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The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XXXI

TRANSPAREN-F Mass. Legislature website receives failing grade, page 3.

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Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

SPRING REPAIR

Students give up vacation time in order to give back, page 5.

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www.dailyfreepress.com

MOVING ON

WEATHER

M. Basketball loses final game to future opponent, page 8.

Today: Mostly sunny/High 41 Tonight: Partly cloudy/Low 24 Tomorrow: 36/25 Data Courtesy of weather.com

Harvard given approval for section of Allston development Double majoring

KENSHIN OKUBO/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The Boston Redevelopment Authority approved an amendment to the Harvard University Institutional Master Plan, which includes renovations on the Bright Hockey Center at 79 N Harvard St. in Cambridge. By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

Boston Redevelopment Authority approved Harvard University’s request to amend an expansive redevelopment project in Northern Allston Friday. “In order to clear the site, Harvard needed to remove facilities and move them somewhere else,” said Gerald Autler, the senior project manager and planner for the BRA. “They identified another site they

owned, the former Comcast building, and decided that would be a good location for this project.” The Harvard University administration plans to renovate their facilities at 28 Travis St. to house current Harvard facilities at 219 Western Ave., Autler said. The university also plans to lease open land to Samuels and Associates, a local developer, to build more facilities, but this amendment will be sent to the BRA board for approval in April.

“Some people are frustrated by the slow pace of some of Harvard’s other development,” Autler said. “This has become much more politically controversial than we anticipated in terms of all the development. Some members of the neighborhood saw it as not a very desirable proposal by Harvard, which may not have drawn attention if their other things were moving forward at a faster pace.” The project will serve as a temporary home for existing institutional uses, including Harvard University Information Technology, mail and transportation services and the Harvard University Police Department training facility, said Lauren Marshall, senior communications officer for the Harvard University Planning and Community Programs, in an email. “Over the past eight months, we have received clear feedback about the 28 Travis St. relocation plan from the [Harvard-Allston] Task Force, the city, Allston neighbors and elected officials,” Marshall said. “The 28 Travis St. project includes the renovation of an existing single-story warehouse building and the construction of an additional singlestory building.” The improvements will not increase the square footage of the Travis Street location, she said. “This [Institutional Master Plan Notification Form] amendment also includes

After legalizing medical marijuana in November, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health announced March 13 that it will file draft regulations with the Secretary of State and officially open policies to public review. The initiative, which passed with 63 percent of the vote, allows for up to 35 marijuana dispensaries, at least one in each county, to grow and sell marijuana to qualified patients. These dispensaries will be approved and overseen by DPH, and draft regulations must be filed by March 29 and be approved by May 1, according to a statement Wednesday. “The voters gave the department a clear mandate and an aggressive timeline for [creation] of these regulations,” said Cheryl Bartlett, DPH interim deputy commissioner in the statement. “We have actively

solicited input from interested parties in shaping these regulations in an effort to put in place a system that is right for Massachusetts,” The DPH must create regulations within 120 days that set application fees for the dispensaries to fully cover the cost to the Commonwealth, define the quantity of marijuana that constitutes a 60-day supply and create rules for cultivation and storage of marijuana, according to the medical marijuana statute that went into effect Jan. 1. Local governments in Wakefield, Reading and Melrose attempted to ban dispensaries from their towns, but Mass. Attorney General Martha Coakley said in a release Wednesday that total bans on dispensaries were not allowed. Matt Simon, representative of the Marijuana Policy Project, said enforcement of the regulations is up to dispensary owners

By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

to deal with local resistance in order to create an effective program. “The better job [dispensary owners] are able to do of getting local approval and making local officials and governments comfortable with these facilities and where they’re operated will contribute to the success of the program,” Simon said. While Simon said there has been local government opposition in other states, he said the clash is just part of the process of figuring out what works best for the state. “Some towns are resistant and others are more welcoming,” he said. “Trying to find towns that are most comfortable with what’s happening is a good idea for dispensary owners.” Owners of marijuana dispensers may find less disapproval if they open a dispensary on a nonprofit level, he said. “Keeping it nonprofit means that people

While a new study reports students who pursue double-major degrees are more likely to develop integrative thinking skills than students who do not, BU officials said not all students benefit from double majoring. College of Arts and Sciences Associate Dean for Student Academic Life Steven Jarvi said pursuing a double major is only worthwhile if the student is genuinely interested in both subjects he or she chooses to study. “If there are two things that you are passionate about, it makes sense, but it doesn’t make sense if you’re doing it just to look good to an employer,” he said. “It’s a waste of time and money to do something just to look good.” However, Jarvi said employers might see students who pursue double majors as having certain positive character traits. “The double major also could just reflect the student’s motivation and initiative, and that is never a bad thing to demonstrate to an employer,” he said. Vanderbilt University professors Richard Pitt and Steven Tepper surveyed 1,760 students from nine different colleges. Of those students, 19 were double majors, according to the study. About 76 percent of double majors responded that their main reason for double majoring was to prepare themselves for the workforce. Seventy-two percent of double majors said the subjects they chose to study expressed their individual identity, and 70 percent said the subjects they studied complemented each other, according to the study, published Friday by The Curb Center for Art, Enterprise and Public Policy. Taking courses in two different majors might help students develop alternative ways of thinking and problem solving, according to the study. “This, in turn, should result in more opportunities for students to cultivate a capacity for deep, integrative learning,” the study stated. While Jarvi said he does not know which double majors BU students most often choose to pursue, many CAS students study more than one subject. “There are definitely some double majors more popular than others,” he said. “It’s not

Marijuana, see page 2

Dual degree, see page 2

Harvard, see page 2

Dept. of Public Health drafts regulations for medical marijuana By Sarah Platt Daily Free Press Staff

improves thinking, new study suggests

GOP, Democrats propose federal budgets with differing effects for college students By Rachel Riley Daily Free Press Staff

GRAPHIC BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The Democratic and Republican Parties released their budgets for 2014 Monday.

Among a number of other dissimilarities, federal budgets proposed by Democrats and Republicans in Congress offer varying effects for students involving federal financial aid and education funding. Democrats in the House of Representatives’ House Budget Committee announced an alternative budget plan Monday in response to the budget released March 12 by House Budget Committee Republicans, according to a Monday press release from the committee. “Any help that students can get — by committing to funding Pell Grants and just keeping interest rates as low as they have been — is really helpful,” said BU Democrats Communications Director Margarita Diaz. “… It’s important to ensure that everyone can actually afford an education.” The alternative budget proposed by House Democrats continues full funding for students receiving Federal Pell Grants and pre-

vents subsidized student loan interest rates, currently set at 3.4 percent, from doubling in July 2014. “This focus on education is in sharp contrast with the Republican budget,” the Democratic budget summary stated. “Their budget makes it harder for out-of-work Americans to get the education and skills needed to find jobs in a competitive global economy by cutting job training services and by cutting student aid by $168 billion over 10 years.” The Republican budget plan aims to reserve financial aid for those most in need, cap Pell Grants awards at $5,645 annually, streamline federal aid programs and remove barriers in higher education, particularly those relative to non-traditional teaching methods like online college courses. Tim Buckley, communications director of the Massachusetts Republican Party, said in an email that the Republican budget would protect students in the future and ensure the

Budgets, see page 2


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Wednesday, March 20, 2013

BU College Republicans V.P.: Budget issue ‘not black and white’ Budgets: From Page 1

Pell Grant program is sustainable. “This budget plan looks to maintain current Pell Grant levels and reform the system so today’s middle school students can access the same resources currently available — which left alone, would go broke,” he said. He said measures aiming to lower costs of college in the past have generally been ineffective. “It is important to remember that throwing money at efforts to reduce the cost of higher education has not worked, as anyone paying tuition today knows all too well,” Buckley said. “More spending is not translating into results.”  BU College Republicans Vice

President Mara Mellstrom said the budget proposals do not appear as if they will affect a majority of college students, and that most of the provisions for higher education deal with streamlining program funding. “Where [U.S. President Barack] Obama wants to do more Pell Grants and more price control, it looks like [House Budget Committee Chairman] Paul Ryan and the Republicans just want to trim the fat,” Mellstrom, a College of Arts and Sciences junior, said. Mellstrom said the budget proposed by Republicans is fair and appropriate. “The Republicans are well aware that everyone deserves a college education and that everyone should have equal opportunity to

get it,” she said. While it is troublesome that Congress takes so long to come to a consensus on the budget, these dilemmas are more complex than most Americans think, Mellstrom said. “It’s not black and white,” she said. Diaz, a CAS senior, said the current stagnation in Congress is causing further distress for college students trying to fund their education. “We are at a point where students must address the skyrocketing costs of college tuition, but we’re also at a point where, in Congress, everything is completely stalled right now,” she said. “The House Democrats, they’re just trying to make sure with this budget that college

students don’t get caught in the fray of things like inflation or economic conditions in this country.” Kayla McDonald, a CAS senior, said Congress should be quicker to make a decision on the national budget. “It makes sense that it’s taking them [Congress] a long time, but they should definitely be able to come to an agreement faster than this,” she said. McDonald said she receives federal aid, but would still like to see some improvement to federal aid programs. “I think they overestimate the family’s contribution a lot of the time,” she said. School of Law graduate student Kelly Soltis said while she does not

receive federal aid, she would like to see a limit on how much colleges can charge. “It would be helpful for students like me who don’t receive financial aid to have some sort of cap on either the percentage increase on tuition or tuition in general at universities, especially private universities,” she said. CAS freshman Ellen Nevers said it is important to maintain a low interest rate on federal loans. “It’s definitely helpful that some of the federal loans come with a much lower interest rate,” she said. “They’ve offered me a lot of loans that would be easier to pay back than trying to take a loan out myself.”

Allston employee: ‘Allston feels like Cambridge’ CAS junior: Double majoring allows for wider perspectives Harvard: From Page 1

the Bright Arena Project, an interior renovation within the Bright Hockey Center and Gordon Indoor Track facilities within Harvard’s Athletics area,” Marshall said. Rob Ridde, 22, a worker at Orchards Skate Shop in Allston, said in his two-and-a-half years living in Allston, Harvard has greatly increased its presence. He said he does not see why Harvard wants to build more. “Half of Allston already feels like [Boston University] and now the other half now will feel like Harvard,” Ridde said. “You can

only assume with a college taking up more space the area is going to get more gentrified.” Jeremy Given, 24, an employee at Buffalo Exchange in Allston, said the area already resembles Cambridge with the amount of Harvard students and buildings in Allston. “Lower Allston feels like Cambridge anyway because there are a lot of Harvard students there,” Given said. “Harvard’s further influence on Allston may change the feel throughout Allston, though.” He said construction has been going on for a long time already, but it has not affected him directly.

Maryssa Hartsgrove, 20, said the area Harvard is developing is disconnected from areas with higher pedestrian foot traffic. She said the area in which Harvard is building is isolated from where most college students live. “It’s already off to its own part, it doesn’t really have much of an effect on the rest of Allston,” Hartsgrove said. “That area of Allston is not the focal point. Allston is mostly focused in the central area and surrounding areas, and the [Harvard] part is separated from there.” Tori Brigham contributed to the reporting of this article.

Med. Soc. Pres.: Pot may not meet treatment standards Marijuana: From Page 1

are not trying to make a quick buck off of the program,” Simon said. “A lot of people are more comfortable with that idea of dispensaries being nonprofit.” Richard Aghababian, president of the Massachusetts Medical Society, said there are other regulations that are necessary for the change in medical marijuana policy to succeed. “We have a high set of standards for medicine and the ways in which we treat people, but we have not applied [those standards]

to marijuana,” Aghababian said. “This law is calling it a medicine without scientific data.” Aghababian said if studies show marijuana to be at least as effective as other medicine and have minimal side effects, they would support medical marijuana. Aghababian said medical marijuana should be included in the Massachusetts Prescription Monitoring System, which would allow the government to watch for patients who may abuse the drug, and specify regulations of the physician-patient relationship

with conditions under which a patient is eligible for medical marijuana. The law states that eligible patients must be diagnosed with cancer, glaucoma, AIDS, Hepatitis C, Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis or other conditions as determined by a qualifying physician. “We aren’t against marijuana any more than we are against excessive use of alcohol or medicine that change your mood,” Aghababian said. “We have to protect the public interest.”

The Daily Free Press Crossword By Mirroreyes Internet Services Corporation ACROSS 1. Informative graph 6. Port on the Caspian Sea 10. Bric-a-____ 14. _____ and Juliet 15. Oil company 16. A small bread 17. Shad fish 18. Jewels 19. Car 20. Dies 22. Scolded or criticized 24. Remain 25. German emperors 26. Bending of the knees in respect 29. Affectations 30. Region 31. Ornamentation in wood 37. Methods 39. 3rd person possessive (male) 40. Weird 41. Tremblor 44. Long period of time 45. Not yours 46. Units of measure for distance (Russian) 48. The grenadier fish 52. Short skirt 53. Substitute or imitation

54. Shredded cabbage 58. Heavenly light 59. Nil or naught 61. 007 actor Roger _____ 62. Ireland 63. Not odd 64. Yellow translucent resin 65. “____ of the d’Ubervilles” 66. Stitches 67. Perceives (archaic) DOWN 1. Poop 2. Cavity 3. Roman god of love 4. Ability to withstand 5. Drinks in honor of a person or thing 6. One over par (golf) 7. Beers 8. A common Korean family name 9. Disentangle 10. Boasts 11. French for “Red” 12. Change 13. Lumps of clay or earth 21. Converts grass into cattle fodder 23. Passageway 25. Booth 26. Arrived 27. Compound found in urine 28. Backmost

Dual degree: From Page 1

surprising that our larger majors — psychology, international relations and economics — also have the most double majors because they just have more students in general.” Ann Jacob, a CAS junior double majoring in international relations and political science, said she decided to pursue two fields of study because she was passionate about both. “I am a double major because I started out as an international relations major and I just loved studying international relations,” she said. “I added political science to it because I interned in Washington, D.C. last summer and I worked a lot with domestic U.S. poverty policy and I really enjoyed it ... It didn’t really have anything to do with job searches or what employers were looking for.” Jacob said she found the majors complementary and said it made sense to study them simultaneously. “When you put two things together, they might overlap,” she said. “You might see something in a different way when you are studying something else at the same time as something else.” Jacob said often, students sim-

ply have more than one interest and want to learn about different topics. “It’s true of our generation in general that we have a lot of interests, so double majoring is a good way to learn about other things you’re interested in,” she said. Laurens Spethmann, a CAS and School of Management sophomore studying neuroscience and either entrepreneurship or law, said students might choose to study multiple subjects to take advantage of what BU has to offer. “You’re paying nearly $250,000 — that’s what it basically comes down to — and if you have the possibility of doing a dual degree, you’re getting the most out of your time,” he said. “You’re really using that time to the highest level of effectiveness. Spethmann said while he has been discouraged to pursue a double major, it is feasible for a student who is motivated enough to do the required work. “If you want a dual degree, no one is going to baby you through it,” he said. “You really have to do it yourself and you have to actively pursue it yourself. There are going to be people who are critical of it.”

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Sudoku 5 8

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29. Operatic solos 32. Ill-bred person 33. Tedious or tiresome 34. Mineral-bearing rocks 35. Violent disturbance 36. Knows (Scottish) 38. A young pig 42. Series of questions 43. Wicked 47. Bowel cleansings

48. Restart 49. Band leader _____ Shaw 50. Russian emperors 51. Empty weights 52. Natural satellites 54. Staff 55. Subdivision of an organ 56. Metric units of area 57. German for

“Worth” 60. Biblical first woman

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Difficulty: Medium

Solution is on Page 4


Campus & City City Crime Logs

Shop and go By Regine Sarah Capungnan Daily Free Press Staff

The following crime reports were taken frpm the Allston-Brighton D-14 crime logs from March 12 to March 19. At about 12:09 p.m. Friday, Boston Police Department received a call about a suspicious person at 17 Cummings Road. When they arrived at the scene, authorities conducted a search for the suspects and discovered an open door in the back of apartments one and two. A witness said he saw the suspects leave through the rear door of apartment two, each carrying a shopping bag and backpack. The apartment was found in disarray, as objects were thrown around the room and bedroom doors were damaged. The front door of the apartment, which leads to the hallway of the building, was covered in pry marks. The victims reported a gold watch and several electronic devices were stolen from their rooms. ...But here’s a big knife An armed robbery occurred at about 7:00 p.m. Monday near 21 Quint Ave. The victim reported that the two suspects were following him while he was walking to his friend’s house. The two suspects drew closer and threw the victim onto the ground. One of the men, described as a white Hispanic man between the ages of 18 and 22, pulled out a four-inch knife and held it in the direction of the victim’s face. He said, “I don’t want to hurt you, give me everything you have” and told his accomplice to check the pockets of the victim. The victim’s iPhone 5 and wallet were stolen during the incident. Good thing she sleeps in Police responded to a call at about 12:24 p.m. Monday about a breaking-and-entering incident at 137 Chiswick Road. The victim stated that she heard a banging sound from the back living room window while she was sleeping. She walked to the living room and saw a person outside the window attempting to enter the apartment. The suspect fled the scene by foot once seen by the victim. The only characteristic the victim remembered about the suspect was that the suspect was wearing a dark gray sweater. The police observed that both locks to the victim’s living room window had been broken. Say please Saturday at about 2:30 a.m., a man was assaulted with a handgun while talking on the phone at a Dunkin Donuts restaurant, located at 214 North Beacon St. A group of seven to eight unknown suspects approached him and two other witnesses. One of the suspects, who was wearing a red jacket, held a black handgun to his throat and told him to “leave the car.” The victim was also given a cut on the back of his head, a scratch to the neck and a swollen left eye. The group then fled the scene in an unknown direction, and one of the witnesses took the victim to the St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center emergency room. However, nothing was taken from the victim during the incident.

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Mass. Leg. site one of least transparent in nation Patrick submits bill By Jasper Craven Daily Free Press Staff

The Massachusetts Legislature website is one of the least transparent government websites in the U.S., according to a transparency report card released by the Sunlight Foundation last Wednesday. The website, which was given the worst grade of ‘F’ by the government watchdog Sunlight Foundation, was faulted for not posting roll call votes online, having a buggy and broken site much of the time and not retaining records before 2009. “The biggest loser here are the residents of Massachusetts,” said Liz Bartolomeo, the communications manager at the Sunlight Foundation. “When they want to go online and see about a bill they read about and how their local representative voted on it, they can’t do it.” Out of all 50 states and the District of Columbia, only five states, including Massachusetts, received an ‘F’ rating. The methodology for grading focused on the wealth of information provided on a given legislative website, the timeliness posted information, the permanence of content posted and the

on transportation, has public support By Steven Dufour Daily Free Press Staff

universities to admit high-achieving underprivileged people so that they’re actually going to the same school as high-achieving, privileged people,” he said. Writing Program professor Allison Blyler said that although money is a factor, it is also important for people surrounding low-income students to help them understand their potential. “ “Universities offer financial aid, but that’s not the only thing that students need, it’s not just about the money,” she said. “You need to wonder if students aren’t being directed to the universities, or if they’re being intimidated by the universities not reaching out to them.” A number of BU students said money should not be a factor in being able to attend prestigious universities. Katelyn Burns, a College of Communication junior, said money should be offered to needy students who are able to get into more selective schools.

In joint association with the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick filed legislation Wednesday to fund infrastructure improvements over the next 10 years. “These investments will create the jobs and opportunity today that will build a stronger Commonwealth for tomorrow,” Patrick said in a press release Wednesday. “A modern, safe, equitable 21st century transportation system is what our citizens want and our Commonwealth needs to unlock economic growth in every region.”  Patrick’s plan calls for disbursement of $13.7 billion to various transportation-based projects in the Commonwealth, according to The Way Forward: A 21st Century Transportation Plan released Jan. 14. In order to pay for the many infrastructure improvements, sales taxes would increase from 6.25 percent to 7.25 percent and state income taxes would increase from 5.25 percent to about 5.66 percent, according to the plan. While the increase in payments may seem unwanted, they actually come as a middle ground between improving quality of transportation and costing the public money, said Michael Verseckes, spokesman for MassDOT. “’It’s never good to raise taxes’ — you‘ll hear that refrain quite frequently, but also it’s not a good time to get stuck in traffic, stuck on a broken-down train, or even to hit a pothole,” Verseckes said. “We’re really at the point where we need to take a look at the system we have and how we’re financing it, what we’ll wield and move forward with.” The higher taxes also would be put in place to compensate for years of irresponsible money management in terms of transportation, Verseckes said. “We unfortunately have a longstanding practice of borrowing money to pay for the highway system’s operating cost, and that is

See Full Story Online

Taxes, see page 4

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY HEATHER GOLDIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The Massachusetts Legislative website received an ‘F’ grade on its transparency, as determined by Sunlight Foundation.

ease of electronic access, among other factors. “You need to have the most recent version of Java Script to access the Mass. website, that’s a little problematic,” Bartolomeo said. “One thing we are also seeing is if anyone wanted to go to the Mass. legislature website and look for something older than 2009, they are not able to find that information online.” Tom Nash, news editor at trans-

parency watchdog and public records request service MuckRock, said as a journalist he has had trouble accessing legislative records. “I’ve tried looking up bills and it’s hard to find them,” Nash said. ”That’s information that other states have figured out how to do. They’re always pushing to show Massachusetts as an incubator of technology and they should lead by example. Democracy isn’t working

Transparency, see page 4

Colleges not drawing low-income, smart students By Amira Francis Daily Free Press Staff

Despite having appropriate grades to do so, many low-income, high-achieving students do not apply to selective colleges or universities for financial reasons, a recent analysis of every high school student who took the SAT found. Boston University economics professor Andrew Newman said underprivileged students often do not apply because they are unaware of certain selective universities or because they do not believe they can achieve admission. “They seem to be thinking that the reason why disadvantaged high achievers don’t attend prestigious universities as much as their more advantaged counterparts do is because either it doesn’t occur to them or they don’t believe they can do it, or they’re too far away,” he said. The study, reported by The New York Times Saturday, was conducted by two longtime education researchers from Harvard University and Stanford University and

appears as a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper. Only 34 percent of high-achieving high school seniors within the lowest income quarter attend any of the most selective colleges in the U.S., according to the study. Newman said it is important for low-income students to be exposed to others because it advances their careers. “Your exposure to other highachieving people from other backgrounds helps you not only learn and acquire other skills, but also helps you with networking which will help you later on in your career,” he said. Opinions vary on how to encourage universities to draw more low-income students and provide them with more money, although it might be most beneficial to force universities to meet a certain quota of less privileged students, Newman said. “The kind of policy that we want, assuming we want to get more integration, is something more like an affirmative action policy, where you actively force elite

BU to offer summer study abroad programs in Africa, Dakar By Rachel Riley Daily Free Press Staff

Boston University will add to its already-strong African studies program by introducing two new six-week study abroad programs in Africa for summer 2013, officials said. One of the programs will be hosted in Zanzibar, Tanzania from May 27 to July 5 and will explore religion, politics and other issues of the area. The other is set to run from May 19 to June 30 partly in Dakar, Senegal and partly in Paris, and will explore issues of youth and migration, according to a Thursday College of Arts and Sciences press release. “We really have a rich ability to prepare students for going abroad, and also to provide them with opportunities to study further when they come back,” said Timothy Longman, director of the center for African studies and head of the

Zanzibar program. Longman said the Zanzibar program offers a unique setting for students to learn about African culture. “It’s a part of Africa that has a mix of Arab, Indian, Persian or Arabian and African cultures, as well as some Portuguese and British influence,” he said. “It’s fascinating to see how all those different societies come together in one place.” Students in the Zanzibar program will enroll in two four-credit courses: A Swahili course and a course titled “Religion, Politics and Identity in East Africa,” according to the release. “Frankly, it’s going to be a fairly small program, so there will be lots of ways that we can adapt to students’ interests,” Longman said. Longman said if the program is successful, CAS officials might expand it for future summers or de-

Study Abroad, see page 4

ABIGAIL LIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Boston University announced two new study abroad programs, one of which will have students spend two weeks in Dakar, Africa and four weeks in Paris.


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Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Students in Senegal program to learn conversational Wolof Study Abroad: From Page 3

sign a program to run during the academic year. Odile Cazenave, head of the Dakar and Paris program and a professor in the Department of Romance Studies, said the program allows students to learn about two distinct cultures. “The first two weeks will be spent in Dakar in Senegal, and the four remaining weeks in Paris,” she said. “The idea is that both Dakar and Paris are unique sides to understand the complexity and context about the evolution of issues around youth and migration.” Cazenave said the program gives students an opportunity to examine film and literature

of the area and understand what migrants from Senegal might experience during a transition from Africa to Europe. “You have many programs going to Senegal, but usually it’s just an introduction to the culture,” she said. “… This program is more focused on the key issues both of youth and migration, which is one of the key issues in the global economy.” Students in the Dakar and Paris program will enroll in two four-credit courses titled “Youth and Migration in Literature and Film” and “Historical and Social Dynamics of Migration,” according to the release. Students will also learn basic conversational Wolof, a language used by many Senegalese, Cazenave said.

Local host families will house students in both programs, she said. Several students said they perceive unique benefits to the new study abroad programs in Africa. Paula Sokolska, a College of Communication sophomore, said the culture shock a student might face in an African study abroad program would be much greater than that of a student enrolled in a European program. “Somewhere like London or Madrid, it’s still a city, so there are still a lot of familiarities from home,” she said. “... But if you go to a place in Africa, depending on where you go, that’s not something that you would necessarily have been exposed to.” Rachel Franklin, a CAS junior, said she

studied abroad in Grenoble, France, and would have gone to Africa, had there been an appropriate opportunity. “I would have gone somewhere like that if there was a program offering science courses in those places, but there wasn’t at the time,” she said. Alexa Aldrich, a School of Management senior who studied abroad in London as a junior, said she would consider studying abroad in Africa if she had more time at BU, citing the great cultural differences as being of particular intrigue. “Cultures that are so drastically different from ours are just so fascinating and interesting,” she said. “... It could actually change your life a lot.”

needed for www.malegislature.gov. “I think that the rating should have been higher, but not by much,” Eldridge said. “We are making steps to have a more transparent government, but there is still work to do.” Eldridge and others amended the rules of the Senate last week in a move to make roll call votes available online. “The Clerk shall make available on the official website of the General Court the results of all roll call votes not later than 48 hours after such vote is taken, not including quorum calls, in a manner easily identifiable, search-

able and conspicuously located,” according to amended Senate rule 8A. “The Clerk shall include the number of the roll call and the title of the matter voted upon.” This rule will take effect by May, and Eldrige said it would surely increase transparency online. “It’s important to provide the votes we take each week so they can be seen by our constituents,” Eldridge said. Eldrige also said the Senate will soon provide voting information in committees, so constituents can see what is brought to the

floor and who is voting on bringing it there. This rule was proposed as a joint rule for both houses of Congress, but only the Senate adopted it, Eldridge said. Nash said it is inexcusable how hard the legislative website is to navigate. “There is no excuse for it,” Nash said. “At this stage, it is an embarrassment that they would sit and not do anything where they should let people understand what they are doing. They are hiding what they are voting.” Kyle Plantz contributed to the reporting of this article.

Sunlight spokeswoman: RI, NY sought feedback, improved website grades Transparency: From Page 3

if they aren’t going to show information on their site.” Bartolomeo said since the report cards were posted last week, a couple of states, including Rhode Island and New York, reached out to Sunlight and managed to bump up their ratings by tweaking their sites. Bartolomeo said Massachusetts officials have not contacted Sunlight regarding rating. Mass. Sen. Jamie Eldrige said the “F” rating was fairly accurate, and an overhaul is

Transportation plan to give MBTA $3.2 bil. for general improvements Taxes: From Page 3

not a good practice in the business world,” he said. MassINC Polling Group released a study Thursday stating voters are open to the discussion of raising additional revenue for transportation improvements throughout the Commonwealth. About 51 percent of the people polled supported increases in transit fares for revenue to improve general transportation. 61 percent supported an increase in the gas tax to fund improvements for roads and highways, and 56 percent supported an increase to the income and sales tax to improve public transportation, according to the poll. Patrick would allocate the most money to road and bridge projects in all parts of the state. Highway maintenance, new construction, regional rail expansion and public transportation are also included, according to the plan. “Governor Patrick’s transportation funding plan is vital,” said Kelly Smith , deputy press secretary for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, in an email. “This is why Governor Patrick, Secretary [Richard] Davey, General Manager Dr. Beverly Scott and many other leaders have been travelling the state to speak with both elected officials and constituents about the importance of the passage [of] ‘The Way Forward.’” The MBTA would receive $3.2 billion for projects including replacement of trains, improvements of signals and tracks and cre-

ation of new technology for better customer service, according to the plan. “MassDOT and the MBTA know that the passage of Governor Patrick’s transportation funding plan is vital to the sustainability and future growth of the Commonwealth’s transportation system,” Smith said. Some state senators said they are aware of the plan and are prepared to vote to pass it. “I am very much for it [the plan],” said Mass. Sen. William Brownsberger. “It’s very important for my district. The House has got to make the first move…[but] it is encouraging to see that there’s already action for it [in the Senate].” Regardless of what the cost would rise to, it can and should be paid for by the public, said Michael Manove, professor of economics at Boston University. “In general, I think that the American taxpayer, including the Massachusetts taxpayer, has foolishly allowed the infrastructure of our economy to decay,” Manove said. “The result is that roads, bridges, and public-transportation facilities, have fallen into dangerous disrepair.” He said there are plenty of opportunities to upgrade and improve public transport in Boston. “Our country and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts need to invest in the public sector,” Manove said.  “The word ‘commonwealth’ itself means something that we need to pay attention to.” Kyle Plantz contributed to the reporting of this article.

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BU students share their experiences from Alternative Spring Break

F

or some students at Boston University, spring break means going back home, visiting friends, eating home-cooked meals and catching up on sleep. However, a number of students ditch the couch potato act and instead gave back to the community through Alternative Spring Break programs. Fighting HIV in San Juan, Puerto Rico Since San Juan, Puerto Rico has increasingly high rates of HIV transmission and drug use, College of Arts and Sciences senior Alex Valdovinos helped organize an ASB trip on which volunteers worked with a nonprofit organization, Iniciativa Comunitaria, to help spread public health awareness as well as provide materials and medical kits to underserved populations in the area. After participating in the First-Year Student Outreach Program as a freshman, Valdovinos said he was still looking for ways to give back and help those in need. After some encouragement from his friends, he became involved with ASB, where he was able to combine his interest in service work and public health. “Alternative Spring Break is one of the best programs in BU, if not one of the best experiences I’ve encountered,” Valdovinos said. “You get that gratifying feeling by doing something good for the community.” Valdovinos said coordinating an ASB trip took more preparation than FYSOP, for which staff had five days of training. ASB coordinators train from October to March. He said as an ASB coordinator he had to contact coordinators at the volunteer site to ensure that students will be welcomed and have the best experience they can get. “They want to learn the issue, they want to have a new experience and I’m there to give it to them,” Valdovinos said. “I’m Hispanic, so I want to give them that Latin flavor of Puerto Rico while they’re experiencing the different areas of public health and the different issues in Puerto Rico.” Valdovinos said the most inspirational part of the trip was when he met with the Executive Director of Iniciativa Comuni-

Deborah Wong Features Staff taria, Dr. Jose Vargas. On the first day of ASB, Vargas told volunteers that he created Iniciativa Comunitaria because he was appalled by the way the patients were treated, Valdovinos said. Of all the things he learned during his time in Puerto Rico, Valdovinos said he was most impressed by how caring the volunteers were. “I’ve never seen so much commitment and hard work in my life,” he said. “[The volunteers] don’t do it for the money, but because of love and compassion.” Rescuing refugees in Atlanta College of Communication sophomore Jun Tsuboike said he wanted a new experience and realized he wanted to assist communities, which is why he sat in front of his computer at 7:59 a.m. on December 1, fervently refreshing the ASB registration page until he landed a spot on the Atlanta ASB trip. While pursuing a dual degree in international relations and journalism, he said participating in ASB would bolster his awareness about people in need. “What’s important to me is helping people, that’s what my passion is about,” Tsuboike said. “Journalism is great because I want to inform people and I think that’s very important. But for international relations, it’s for understanding people. The environment I’m going to be in is going to be very different.” In Atlanta, Tsuboike worked with the International Rescue Committee, a program that helps refugees settle into the U.S. The volunteers helped by filling out paperwork, writing portfolios for the refugees and teaching them English. Although Tsuboike said he has not done community service to this scale before, and even foresaw some difficulty with the language barrier between him and the immigrants, these factors did not deter him from getting involved. He said he helped the immigrants with Teachers of English to Speakers for Other Languages programs and did charades to explain the meaning of the words.

PHOTO COURTESY OF SHANNON STOCKS

CAS freshman Katelyn Flowers (Right), COM freshman Jillian Richardson and CGS freshman Shannon Stocks (Left) work with a Food and Friends manager in Washington, D.C.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ALEX VALDOVINOS

Coordinators, CAS senior Alex Valdovinos and SED sophomore Chloe Walker volunteered in San Juan, Puerto Rico to help spread public health awareness.

“I see myself being a cosmopolitan citizen,” Tsuboike said. “I want to be part of the world, not just a bubble. I have to understand those people in completely different environments that I’ve never been in.”

Helping the homeless in Washington, D.C. Growing up as a girl scout, College of General Studies freshman Shannon Stocks devoted a large amount of time to volunteering. She said she was initially focused on achieving awards and recording numbers of service hours but as she grew up, she realized that those badges aren’t important. “It wasn’t to get the awards, it wasn’t to get the hours, it was because I really liked the project,” said Stocks. “When I came here I did FYSOP and joined a community service sorority, so ASB was the next level.” When signing up for ASB, Stocks thought the Washington, D.C. trip suited her the most. “I like to do more hands on activities and one-on-one activities with people,” Stocks said. “It’s more interactive and you get to see how you’re helping.” Stocks said the volunteers worked with Capital Area Food Bank and Food & Friends to help the homeless in the area and educate the public on health and nutrition. They packaged food and non-food products that were donated from schools and homes to patients who have diabetes, cancer, HIV and other diseases. She said there was an executive chef and a nutritionist on site when they were packaging to help accommodate those patients with specific dietary needs. Initially, Stocks said she thought the main issue was hunger, but the trip taught her even more about public health, cancer and diabetes. She said she would love to participate in this trip again, but would like to travel to a different destination. “I became more interested in public health after this trip, so Puerto Rico would be great,” said Stocks. “Even the environment sounds interesting.”

Stocks put ASB on her long list of community service accomplishments and said she hopes to become a co-coordinator next year. Helping a fuzzy friend in New Orleans, La. Participating in one of the few ASB trips involving animals, Justin Pennisi, a Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences senior, traveled to New Orleans to assist cats and dogs that were abandoned or separated from their owners. “I never had a pet growing up, so I said, ‘Why not?’” Pennisi said. The volunteers assisted the Louisianan Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, a nonprofit organization, with tasks such as cleaning shelters, assisting vets and handing out flyers. He said it was heart-warming to see great families adopt the animals. Besides being able to interact with the animals, Pennisi said he enjoyed conversing with the New Orleans locals, learning about the culture and listening to their stories, especially about Hurricane Katrina. “I’ve never been anywhere near New Orleans and I’ve heard really great things about the culture and the people,” Pennisi said. “When we had our dinner [with the locals], we learned a lot of great stories and experiences, especially Katrina … I think that was a lot of people’s favorite part.” During the 2012 ASB, Pennisi not only helped disabled children when he went to Texas, he said he also formed strong friendships on the trip, which he said “changed his college experience around.” Even though the ASB groups only met twice before departure, Pennisi said he was confident that with the 28-hour car ride, the volunteers would end up as best friends once they arrive down south. By the end of the trip, he said all the volunteers had become close and learned a lot about each other. “Just that one week being next to 11 or 12 other people,” he said, “you really get to know and appreciate each other’s differences and … see other people’s perspective.”


6W

ednesday,

March 20, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

FAT BOY IN A SKINNY WORLD

To date a Fat Guy

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 85 F Issue 31

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan, Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager

SANDOR MARK

Shakti Rovner, Office Manager

The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Sugary drinks can lead to your death

CNN and WCVB News reported Monday that sugary drinks are linked to over 180,000 obesity-related deaths across the world every year, according to research presented this week at an American Heart Association conference. This means that one in one hundred deaths are purportedly caused by over-consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. The U.S. ranked third on the worldwide study of death rates from sugar-filled drinks. Still, the fact that sugary beverages can ultimately lead to death should be read as a warning sign that our country needs to slow down on its consumption of soda, sugary juices, energy drinks, etc. Granted, the government and its food administrations can never fully regulate our national consumption of sugary drinks (or can they? New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg recently attempted a soda ban), as that would infringe on our freedom and right to drink as much sugar as we please and suffer the health consequences accordingly. Government also cannot regulate the manufacturing of sugary beverages. According to The Boston Globe, Coke is the world’s biggest beverage manufacturer, one that provides hundreds of thousands of jobs and generates millions of dollars across the globe. What it can potentially regulate, however, is the way in which sugary drinks are marketed to the public, and especially to younger gen-

erations. It can debate the safety of marketing soda to children. It can, if it wants, label soda the way it labels cigarettes now that soda has been cited as a cause of death. People should know to avoid soda both regular and diet. It’s likely that they already do, but unlikely that they know it helps lead to death. The government’s main effort should be to continue and further its obesity-education efforts, especially because public money is often put into funding the health care of those who do not make socially responsible choices about the beverages they repeatedly consume. In January, The Huffington Post reported on Coca-Cola’s recent “Coming Together” advertisement, which highlighted how the company has worked with school systems to offer bottled water and juices to children, while also making an effort to create 180 low-calorie drink options and offer smaller-sized full-calorie sodas to help control portion size. These company efforts are good, but they do not solve the problem. Neither does a simple ban on soda, as people should limit their sugar consumption in any form. Still, according to WCVB, scientists have found that more people died from diabetes, heart disease and cancer in parts of the world where consumption of sugary drinks is high. Ultimately the way to encourage a sugar limit is to use government money to continually educate people about sugar’s negative affects on health.

CVS requires employee health information

A new CVS policy requires workers who use company health insurance to report their weight, body fat and glucose levels to the insurer or pay a $600-a-year penalty, according to The Boston Herald. The Herald also reported that privacy groups are calling the requirement “coercive” and “invasive,” a breach in employee privacy. CVS has said this is not the aim of the new requirement. According to the Herald, the company has dubbed the request “a health screening and wellness review so that colleagues know their key health metrics in order to take action to improve their numbers, if necessary.” Still, workers must sign a form claiming that the screening of their health is voluntary and that the insurer can provide their test results to WebMD Health Services Group. This, indeed, is a breach in privacy. The privacy groups enraged by the policy claim that the $600 fine prevents the procedure from ever being voluntary, according to the Herald. “There is an important line here between a

valid method of incentivizing wellness versus discriminating against sick workers, but I’m not sure where that line is,” said one privacy activist to the Herald. On the one hand, doesn’t a company providing health insurance to its employees have a right to know about the general health of its employees in the first place? It’s possible that the disclosure of such information is a good thing, so that CVS can be prepared to provide employees with the best healthcare coverage necessary. However, it does seem as if CVS is planning to discriminate against those employees who are less healthy than others — and a person’s weight and glucose levels should not affect whether they get and stay employed, or are eligible for company health benefits. It is unlikely that CVS can legally discriminate against employees who are unhealthy and thus costly to the company. It must make sure that its new requirement is for health-encouragement purposes only.

When it comes to courtship, the traditional “date” has all but vanished, and I find the alternatives to be a little depressing. Let me clarify: If you’ve been in a relationship with someone for three months and then take them out one night, that’s not a “date.” Dinner with someone you’d like to be in a relationship with is a date. And I’m saying that this kind of social interaction has almost vanished for our generation — along with the sex lives of people who use the words “social interaction.” Our generation has a radically different structure of socialization, and for fat guys, it’s made the possibility for romantic relationships a rarity. These days there are only about two places for people between the ages of 21 and 25 to meet — bar or club. Where else are we supposed to meet new people? Parties? All the people I’d ever want to go to a party with I met before I was 20. Classes? I generally alienate people in my classes because of my condescending tone. I hear that some people take cooking classes to meet new people. But I already know how to cook — it’s one of the main reasons I’m fat. As for the gym, I’ve been perfectly clear about how I feel about gyms. My point is that if you want to meet someone special, it appears your only choice is White Horse or T’s. What’s interesting is how this has affected relationships, and more specifically, the way in which relationships start. In the past, the process was pretty tame, a fact I learned from my dad. In his day, you’d take a girl to a movie a couple times, then you get some food once or twice — and before you knew it, you were married with two kids, a house in Scarsdale and a monthly ticket on the Metro North. There’s something so predictable and safe about this. It’s ritualistic and cookiecutter, and also seemingly bland — which is why some people might consider it boring. But the way in which our generation has tried to fix the dating game is just so bizarre. Random hook-ups are exciting, but as for starting a relationship, they’re the social equivalent to spilling your drink and refusing to get paper towels. I know people who consider themselves in “serious relationships” because they hooked up in StuVi more than six times. We’ve turned into a culture in which relationships can be manufactured with two shots and a Rihanna song. My own roommate and his girlfriend are one such example — they’ve been together for two years. And I’d like to say that the two of them are soulmates and that it was destiny that brought them together. Soulmates? Maybe. Destiny? Only if that’s another word for vodka. Their relationship started with a random hook-up in someone’s living room sophomore year. That’s the story

they’ll end up telling their kids. The random hook-up poses a serious threat to the romantic lives of fat guys everywhere. Why? Random hook-ups are based purely on physical appearance. And fat guys are playing a desperate game of catch-up in that department — you won’t find too many fat guys hooking with sorority girls under the dim lighting of Tavern in the Square. Still, what we lack in physical appeal we make up for in other areas, which is why the demise of the traditional date is such a tragedy for fatties. There are two things you need to understand. The first is that entering a relationship is like making an investment. When you’re first getting into the relationship you’re trying to convince the other person that you are worth their affection. The second is that physical appearance is not synonymous with physical attractiveness. You could be born looking like Mick Jagger but if you have something that makes you interesting, you could be the most attractive person in the room. How do you think Kevin Smith snagged Jennifer Swalbach? The traditional date was the place that fat guys could make themselves attractive to a nice young lady — it gave them a chance to state their case. The bland, ritualistic date was the forum where fat guys could show another person how charming, funny, interesting and sexy they could be. But with the decline of traditional dates, we are forced to try and play a game we will always lose. Fortunately, it doesn’t have to be that way. I know tons of girls who would love it if a guy were to ask them on a date. I may not know much, but I know that girls like gestures that let them know they aren’t just another notch on the belt. So there’s only one explanation as to why the random hook-up has been allowed to take over. Real Gentlemen are either too scared or too ignorant to ask girls out. For fat guys, it’s the latter reason. We are both scared of rejection and scared to break with the cultural norm. We’ve learned that this is what people our age do, but only because we haven’t given the fairer sex another option. For once, fat guys have the chance to lead the charge — instead of wheezing and gasping for breath at the back of the pack. All it takes is a little more courage to show the ladies there’s more to romance than making out on a dirty couch in someone’s apartment. Chivalry isn’t dead. It’s just shy. Trust me, act like a gentleman and you’ll snag a lady. Sandor Mark is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a weekly columnist for the Daily Free Press. He can be reached at smark@bu.edu.

letters@dailyfreepress.com

Terrier Talk Reflections

Boston University is teaming up with the City of Boston to launch a new bike safety initiative. The FreeP wanted to hear students weigh in on their experiences with the dangers of biking in the city. Here’s what some of them said. INTERVIEWS AND PHOTOS BY GRACE WILSON

SEAN MYCROFT

“It’s dangerous, because cars don’t really pay attention to [bikes]. I crashed in Brookline last year. I don’t have my bike here anymore.” - CGS sophomore

AAISIM ALI

TATIANA GREEN

“I have friends who bike, they’ve been in accidents. I hear a lot of complaints. I would never bike in the city of Boston.” - CAS junior

“Bike traffic lights could be a possible idea for the safety initiative. I got hit by someone on a bike. I still have the scars.” - CAS sophomore

ROSS TANG HIM

“I have friends who bike and they’re scared that someone is going to hit them or hit them with their car door. I guess have better thought-out lanes.” - CAS junior


Wednesday, March 20, 2013

7

King: Motivation necessary for athletes to reach fullest potential King: From Page 8

Brock gave me the confidence and guidance I needed to be successful in both softball and life, and for that he will always be one of my role models. One thing is for certain. Without Brock, I wouldn’t be sporting a BU

softball jersey. That’s why I don’t step in the box thinking about statistics or hitting for myself. All my motivation comes from the greatest coach anyone could ask for. The fact that I recovered from my injury and can continue to make

Brock proud playing at the Division I level drives me every pitch. When a ball is coming at me, all that crosses my mind is “this one is for Brock.” For some people, they would find this absurd — the fact that I feel I owe a single coach that much. But hey, it

motivates me and seems to work. Everyone has something that drives them. For some it’s family, for others it’s proving critics wrong, and then there are those who are motivated by their own stats. What motivates you isn’t important; the only thing that matters is

there is something that gives you an overwhelming desire to succeed. Everyone needs his or her own Coach Radaker. Without it, you won’t be hitting walk-off homers to win the nail-biters any time soon. Instead, you’ll find yourself falling short in clutch situations.

Terriers preparing for unfamiliar foe in SHU W. basketball: From Page 8

ran, in her final season with the Terriers, played strong at the point guard position. Moran led BU with 5.9 assists per game, which eventually placed her ninth on the all-time BU assists list. To go along with her impressive assist totals, Moran also scored 10.4 points per game with 4.1 rebounds. “They are tremendous players for this program,” Greenberg said. “They’re the ultimate team players. They’re so humble. I’ve been extremely fortunate.” Although Moran and Alford have led the Terriers all season long, other players have been essential to the team’s success as well Junior forward Rashidat Agboola has been a force on both the offensive and defensive side of the ball. Agboola is second on the team in scoring, averaging 11.8 points. She also leads the team in rebounds, grabbing 8.9 boards per game. Agboola’s partner in the paint, junior forward Whitney Turner, has

been a huge factor on the defensive side of the ball for the Terriers. She is second on the team in rebounding, catching 6.4 off the glass per game. Guarding the inside shot is her specialty — she is tied with Agboola for the team lead in blocks, swatting away 1.6 per contest. Off the bench, the Terriers have had a spark plug in the form of junior guard Danielle Callahan. Coming off a season where she sat out due to injury, Callahan has been impressive for the Terriers. She averages 7.9 points per game and has also shot the third-highest 3-point percentage on the squad, hitting 37 percent of her shots from behind the arc. BU’s opponent in the opening round of the WNIT is a tough one, and one that is completely unfamiliar. BU has never faced Sacred Heart (22-10) in the history of its women’s basketball program. The Pioneers are led by their strong offense, scoring 63 points per contest and posting a 38.3 shooting percentage from the field. Guard Gabrielle Washington leads

the team in offense, averaging 16.8 points per game with a field goal percentage of 37.1. Washington also nailed 92.5 percent of her free throws. To couple with the impressive numbers of Washington, forward Morgan Merriman is second on the team in scoring average, dropping 11.2 per game with a shooting percentage of 45.7. To go along with her great shooting numbers, Merriman also grabbed 5.5 rebounds per effort. Despite never having played Sacred Heart, Greenberg said the team can still come up with a game plan for Thursday. “We see them quite a bit on tape,” Greenberg said. “We can get tape on almost anyone now-adays.” Greenberg also said the team is excited to be playing and hosting a WNIT game. “We get to host a playoff game, unlike last year,” Greenberg said. “We like our seed and we’re really excited, especially after having some time off.”

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terrier senior guard Mo Moran has averaged 5.9 assists per game in a season during which she played a large role in getting BU to the NIT.

BU committee exploring all options in search for Parker’s replacement Men’s hockey: From Page 8

decision-making process sets a bad precedent.” Lynch was also adamant about leaving no stone unturned in finding the person best suited for the job. There are the guys on “the list probably in everybody’s head,” he said, but also some not-so-obvious contenders — including non-BU alumni — he did not name. He also did not rule out current Hockey East coaches. “We’re looking at everybody,” Lynch said. The names most often tossed around as potential replacements include Colorado Avalanche assistant coach David Quinn, New York Rangers assistant coach Mike Sullivan and Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Penguins (AHL) head coach John Hynes. Only one name is confirmed, however: BU associate head coach Mike Bavis. Bavis said March 11 after Parker’s press conference he is very quali-

fied for the job. “Over the years I’ve had to handle the team on Coach’s behalf [while Parker was out for medical reasons],” Bavis said. “I feel pretty confident the players have responded to me. In some ways I think I’m a little more uniquely positioned to deal with this. As the last couple of years have shown, this is more than just a hockey job.” Lynch said with Bavis, as will likely be with every person up for the job, there are pros and cons. Bavis has been with the program for the last decade and a half, first as an assistant coach and for the last four seasons as Parker’s associate head coach. He knows the program “inside and out,” as Lynch put it, including both current athletes and those committed to arrive in the coming years. But Bavis’ familiarity with BU men’s hockey could also be his pitfall: By being involved with the team for so long, some link him to the “culture of sexual entitlement” with-

in the program Brown’s task force found last year. Lynch was noncommittal in terms of how heavily last season’s off-ice troubles will be weighed. “Clearly there were some things that occurred over the last couple years that have shown negatively on the team,” Lynch said. “We do have to take those things into consideration. “I also think that there’s broad enough perspective here around the table [on the committee] with the people that are going to be involved in the decision making that that’s going to be taken into account.” Besides the obvious — that Parker’s replacement has to be a good hockey coach that can win, and win a lot — Lynch pegged a number of other qualifications he’d like to see. He said he wants someone “who understands our community and someone who understands how important it is for our hockey team to be visible and to be active in our community,” as well as someone who un-

derstands the “challenges” of the last few years. Lynch also said he prefers someone with head coaching experience — something Bavis does not possess but the three previously mentioned potential candidates do — and someone who has worked with young men, be it in college or elsewhere. Bavis fits the bill for that. Quinn is a former BU associate head coach and spent some time as a head coach in the AHL. Sullivan has never joined the college ranks, but is a former bench boss of the Providence and Boston Bruins. Hynes was the head coach of the U.S. National Development Program and spent a combined three seasons with the University of Massachusetts-Lowell and the University of Wisconsin. No matter who it is, Lynch wants to find his guy relatively quickly. He would not divulge a target date to end the coaching search, but he called mid-April “a marker on the road.” The Frozen Four is April 11 and 13 in Pittsburgh.

“That’s certainly out there in my mind,” Lynch said, laughing. Lynch is not looking to rush the process, however. Picking the program’s first new head coach in four decades, replacing the all-time single-school wins leader and finding the right person to usher BU hockey into a new era is a pivotal moment not just for BU athletics, but also for the university as a whole. “It’s a much bigger job than just being a hockey coach,” Lynch said. “Especially here at a place like BU, where the program is so visible, where we’re coming out of a tough year off the ice, where we’re at a place that really values the academic experience of the student-athlete. Those are all things that will challenge the next head coach in different ways. “The person we choose is somebody that can drive the program forward in the best possible way for BU … We’re also really working hard now to find the next great guy.”

Terriers gain experience in loss BU looking for strong 60-minute effort to defeat BC Men’s basketball: From Page 8

for most of the game, but returned to form when his team needed him and was ultimately the difference, as he finished the game with 16 points. “He is a very good player,” Jones said of Cormier. “My hat goes off to him because he didn’t score in the first half and he came out in the second half and scored 16. He basically put the team on his back.” The Terriers made the game look easy for a majority of the contest, but in the end they could not finish. As a young team, Jones expressed how important of an experience this was and how it will benefit the team in the long run. “We needed to go through this,” Jones said. “We needed to know what this felt like. Now we need to

learn. Overall it’s going to really benefit us. To have a chance to experience something like this, it’ll be great for us.” With their 2012-13 campaign over, the Terriers will focus on their future in the Patriot League. Loyola, like BU, will be leaving its current conference to play for the Patriot League in 2013-14, and tonight was the first matchup of the future conference rivals. “They wanted to play us, we wanted to play them,” Jones said. “We learned a lot about ourselves tonight, as well as a lot about them, and I have to think we will be competing for the top of the league in the future. “There are some very good teams in the league too, but Loyola and BU will hopefully be two of the better teams.”

Lacrosse: From Page 8

team and are lead by a couple of really good sophomores,” Robertshaw said. “I think they are finding their way and they’re similar to us in a lot of aspects. “They had a great game against [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University] that we had the chance to see, and we know we need to slow them down, because they can be a very high-scoring offense.” The Terriers are fresh off of a big victory last Saturday, in which they defeated No. 15 Ohio State University 16-11. Senior attack Danielle Etrasco was unstoppable, scoring eight goals and chipping in four assists to finish the game with a school record of 12 points in a single

contest. For her performance, Etrasco was named America East Player of the Week. Senior midfielder Kristen Mogavero recorded six goals in the matchup. Etrasco and Mogavero are the leading goal scorers this season for the Terriers, with 17 and 12 goals, respectively. The last time the Terriers and Eagles faced off was April 11, when BC defeated BU 18-9. Robertshaw said her team fell short last year because it was too wrapped up and excited about playing a rival such as BC. “We were too hyped up,” Robertshaw said. “We were really emotional. We kind of stretched ourselves too thin on defense … Attack-wise, we got a little nervous with some of our shots and

we weren’t finishing, and that’s something that we want to take out of the equation this year.” Despite dropping its last three contests against the Eagles, BU still leads the all-time series against BC with an 11-7-1 record. For Robertshaw, the biggest key to a Terrier victory Wednesday lies in putting together a complete-game effort. “For us to win tomorrow, we have to play together for 60 minutes,” she said. “If we can go out and play the style of defense that we want to play, take the chances and find the success that we’re looking for on attack and be really aggressive in the midfield — those three things combined for 60 minutes — I think can get us a win, but it’s going to be tough.”


Quotable

We like our seed and we’re really excited.

- BU coach Kelly Greenberg on the upcoming NIT

Page 8

The Inner Edge You motivated?

Haley King

Extra innings, trailing by one, runner on second base. You can feel your heart beating, the blood rushing through the veins spidered throughout your body. You hear the subtle roar of rival fans booing you as you glance at the pitcher tossing spins in the circle, the bright stadium lights engulfing you. You kick away the loose dirt from the box and plant your back foot, stepping in, resting your bat on your shoulder. Without drive and the desire to compete, you can expect a strikeout or a half-hearted hack right at the shortstop, not a walk-off hit. You have to want it. Better yet, you have to wholeheartedly believe you can destroy the ball and knock it out of the park. Baseball is a mental game, which is why motivation is of the utmost importance. It’s exhausting to maintain such a high level of motivation when not being successful at the plate. Everyone needs to find his or her own form of motivation to power him or her past his or her failures. Stepping into the box with any doubt in your mind, you will fail every time. When I step into the batter’s box, I don’t think about the fact that I whiffed at the change-up during my last at-bat. I think of my old travel coach, Brock Radaker. Brock’s love for the game was contagious. He inspired me to give my 100 percent effort in everything I did. He made me want to succeed just to make him proud. I remember the feeling of remorse that coursed through my body whenever our team lost, feeling like we let Brock down after he put so much time and energy into making all of us better ball players. So after we lost, we would work harder and harder and tried everything we could to prevent that feeling of disappointment. But more importantly, Brock helped me to recover emotionally after I broke my back during the heart of recruiting season my junior year of high school. The night Brock called me after finding out my back was fractured, I discovered the difference between a good coach and a great coach, and how much he truly cares about each and every one of his players.

King, see page 7

Sports

W. Lacrosse @ Boston College, 4 p.m.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

stone unturned

BU Athletic Director Mike Lynch and his committee are considering any and all options in their search for the next heach coach of BU men’s hockey. P.8.

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Men’s basketball suffers CIT defeat Search is on

for next BU hockey coach

By Michael Bagarella Daily Free Press Staff

The Boston University men’s basketball team ended its season with a 70-63 loss to Loyola UniversityMaryland in the opening round of the Collegeinsider.com Tournament, Tuesday night in Baltimore. “We were up 11 in the second half — it’s just a tough way to lose,” said BU coach Joe Jones. “I told the guys we had a very good year. We really battled and persevered all season. We played well in some big stretches tonight, but we just weren’t able to pull it out. It’s always tough to lose your last one.” The Terriers (17-12, 11-5 America East) came out with a high energy level and, taking advantage of the noticeably sluggish early effort from Loyola (21-11), controlled both sides of the ball with strong ball movement, crisp passing and stiff defense. BU got out to a quick 8-1 lead only 3:15 into the game and spent most of the first half building on that lead. It seemed like it would be a long night for Loyola when BU found itself up 21-8 with 11:25 to play in the first half, but the Greyhounds refused to die easily on their homecourt. Guard Robert Olson silenced his early shooting troubles by draining three shots from beyond the arc to give Loyola a spark in the last seven minutes of the opening frame. Coupled with a small scoring drought for BU, Loyola crawled back into the game and, despite never leading in the first half, was within reach going into the locker room, 33-27. Junior forward Dom Morris led the Terriers with 11 first-half points, while BU as a team had 23 points in the paint with easy layups. Loyola committed 12 turnovers in the first half and BU took advantage with 12 points off those turnovers. Similar to the beginning of the opening frame, the Greyhounds staggered out of the gate in the second

By Tim Healey Daily Free Press Staff

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terrier sophomore forward Malik Thomas put up 16 points and gathered 6 boards in BU’s 70-63 loss to Loyola University-Maryland in the CIT.

half. BU quickly rebuilt its doubledigit lead, 45-30, only three minutes into the half. Midway through the frame, Loyola began fighting back with an Olson 3-pointer and guard Dylon Cormier’s first points of the game. Each time Loyola came close, BU prevented a lead change, but this changed with six minutes left in the game. “We got out of the gate really well in the second half and then we just struggled to score,” Jones said. “We had a hard time putting together our press and they did a good job of figuring out how to attack us.” Pouring the pressure on defen-

sively, Cormier and forward Anthony Winbush each nailed 3-pointers and gave Loyola its first lead of the night, 58-55, with 5:09 to go in the game. “[The Greyhounds] started making some shots,” Jones said. “They average four threes a game and they got 10 tonight. They just made some big shots, but we need to know how to handle those situations better.” Refusing to give up the lead, Loyola took command of the game when it mattered most. The Greyhounds ramped up the intensity and finished off the Terriers 70-63. Cormier, the Greyhounds’ leading scorer for the season, struggled

Men’s basketball, see page 7

With Jack Parker’s announcement Monday that the 2012-13 season will be his 40th and final as the Boston University men’s hockey head coach, the search for his replacement has already begun. BU Athletic Director Mike Lynch said he started contacting candidates last week, shortly after Parker made it official, but picking the coach’s successor is far from an easy task. “You’re replacing a legend, so I think we have to do our due diligence,” Lynch said in his office Friday morning. “We have to at least review and try and get to our best possible candidate, no matter where that person is across the country. And that’s what we’re in the process of doing now.” The process is no simple one, either. According to Lynch, a committee including himself, BU President Robert Brown, BU Provost Jean Morrison and a number of senior athletic department staffers will interview and ultimately select the next coach. Parker will not be on the committee, but will be consulted during the process. “We wanted to develop a process that is as fair as possible to the incoming coach, and to have the former coach involved in actually picking his successor is probably not something that would be a great idea,” Lynch said. “We would be crazy not to utilize his knowledge of hockey and his understanding of Boston University during the process. But to have him directly involved in the

Men’s hockey, see page 7

Moran, Alford lead BU to WNIT Lacrosse ready for rivalry game By Andrew Battifarano Daily Free Press Staff

Prior to the start of the 201213 season, the Boston University women’s basketball team knew the road to a postseason berth was going to be difficult after being barred from competing in the America East Conference postseason tournament. Although the Terriers (23-5, 13-2 America East) did not qualify for the NCAA Tournament, they did post good enough numbers to be selected to compete in the Women’s National Invitational Tournament for the fourth time in five seasons. “We were just on the edge of getting in,” said BU coach Kelly Greenberg of the NCAA Tournament. “We were, I think, 67. I’m very proud of our players. They did everything they could.” Thursday night, the Terriers are set to face off against Sacred Heart University. Playing in their last season to-

The Bottom Line

Wednesday, March 20

No

The Daily Free Press

Thursday, March 21 W. Basketball v. Sacred Heart, 7 p.m.

gether, senior guards Chantell Alford and Mo Moran were a dynamic duo and major factors in the team’s success. Alford, who came into the season with two consecutive America East Player of the Year awards, did not disappoint in her final season at BU. After opening the campaign up with 17 points against rival Boston College, she followed with a career-high 30 points in a close battle against West Virginia University, in which the Terriers fell 67-64. Alford has been consistent all year and has led the Terriers in points per game, averaging an impressive 16.6 points, along with a team-best 42.2 percent from behind the 3-point arc. Her play earned her a spot on the Mid-Major AllAmerica Third Team along with her fourth All-Conference award in the America East. The other half of the backcourt duo did not disappoint either. Mo-

W. basketball, see page 7

Friday, March 22

M. Hockey v. Boston College (Hockey East Semifinals), 8 p.m. W. Hockey v. Mercyhurst (NCAA Semifinals), 9 p.m.

By Conor Ryan Daily Free Press Staff

No matter the sport, any matchup between Boston University and longtime rival Boston College is a primetime event. Ever since the Terriers and Eagles first played a hockey game in 1918, both schools’ athletic programs have been intertwined throughout the years, with competitive, hard-fought games expected from every single matchup between the two schools. The latest chapter in the BU/BC rivalry will take place Wednesday, as the BU women’s lacrosse team is set to take on the Eagles in Chestnut Hill at 4 p.m. The Terriers (2-3) and Eagles (3-4) may not play in the same conference, but BU coach Liz Robertshaw still expects a heated and competitive game between the two teams. “It’s been a renewed rivalry over the past five or six years,” Robertshaw said. “It’s something

Saturday, March 23 Softball v. Albany, 1 p.m./3 p.m. W. Lacrosse v. UMBC, 1 p.m.

that we have a lot of fun playing in. I think that it will be a tight game, I think it will be a hard fought game, and there’s a lot on the line.” Boston College has struggled out of the gate, dropping four out of its last five games. However, three of its losses this season came against top-15-ranked teams. In their last game, the Eagles fell to No. 1 University of Maryland, 13-5. The Eagles have been led this year by sophomore Covie Stanwick, who has recorded 32 points in seven games this season. Sophomore Emily Mata has appeared in every game in goal for BC, owning a 11.57 goals against average and a .302 save percentage. With a potent offense and a batch of young talent, Robertshaw said she believes the Eagles will be a big challenge for the Terriers. “BC is a young and aggressive

Lacrosse, see page 7

Sunday, March 24 Softball v. Albany, 12 p.m.

March 20th Daily Free Press  

March 20th Daily Free Press

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