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The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XIV

NEMO FINDS YOU Blizzard gives students difficulties and fun, page 4.

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Monday, February 11, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

BODIEZZZ

Snuggle up to Warm Bodies this Valentines Day, page 5.

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THREE-J

www.dailyfreepress.com WEATHER

D.J. Irving hits seven threes en route to BU win, page 8.

Today: Wintry mix to rain/wind/High 46 Tonight: Showers early/Low 32 Tomorrow: 43/25 Data Courtesy of weather.com

BUPD takes student into custody at ‘Snowbrawl’ SAO changes to increase student resources, funds By Margaret Waterman Daily Free Press Staff

Snowball fights are all fun and games until someone loses an eye, or until someone hits a police officer with a snowball, as one student found out Friday night’s “Snowbrawl.” Boston University Police Department officers took a student into custody Friday night for hitting an officer in the face with a snowball during the massive snowball fight on the Esplanade, said BUPD Captain Robert Molloy. “He will be charged with disorderly conduct, assaulting an officer and resisting arrest,” Molloy said. Molloy, who declined to identify the student, said the officer involved reported the student put up some resistance before eventually complying and was taken into custody and brought back to the station. The officer then collected his information and released him. A large group of students gathered at the intersection of Bay State Road and Silber Way late Friday night and proceeded to walk along Storrow Drive where plow trucks were clearing snow, Molloy said. “They found people were then coming down Storrow Drive from the Esplanade climbing back up and climbing over fences,” he said. Molloy said officers were dispatched to the scene to instruct students to clear the area, when a student intentionally struck an

By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

ing ever since its peak in 2006, according to the statistics. The travel time index is a measure of how much extra time is needed for driving when there is traffic, as opposed to when roads are open, according to the press release. In 2011, Boston’s travel time index was 1.28, which means that trips by car took on average 1.28 times longer in the average amount of traffic. In 2006 at Boston’s peak, the travel time index was 1.42, according to the statistics. Some drivers said they are used to dealing with Boston’s traffic congestion. “Of course [the roads] are more congested, it’s common sense,” said Nick Sabokrooh, a florist in Westwood. Sabokrooh said he commutes to Boston City Florist everyday, and it takes him about 45 minutes to do so. “We always have to deal with rush hour because we open at eight in the morning,” he said.

With its new changes, Boston University’s Student Activities Office will provide greater online connectivity and increased resources for the benefit of student groups, officials said. SAO’s development, an ongoing process through the spring 2013 semester, will provide student groups with more efficient ways to deal with paperwork, said Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore. “Some of the things that they [students] will see are a greater use of technology right away,” Elmore said. “Someone who’s in the leadership position in a club or association will say to himself or herself, ‘wow, there are more opportunities for me to do things such as sell tickets online,’ to be able to do more online and to be able to check people in with their tickets online.” The restructuring began in January when the Director of Student Activities position opened up, Elmore said. Elmore said personnel in SAO were changed slightly to maximize efficiency. “Abby Myette, I promoted her to an associate director’s position there,” he said. “She’s alongside Raul Fernandez, who’s also an associate director, and I’ve got [Assistant Dean of Students] John Battaglino overseeing the whole operation, which included me asking him to move his office over there so he’d be right on the ground and in the space.” Elmore said SAO officials’ goals are to structure advances in the website that will reduce the amount of paperwork student groups must submit to start and maintain a group. “With student activities, we’ve got to look at a new world where clubs and organizations come and go a little faster,” he said. “Clubs and organizations I think of more like startups these days. They’re more initiative-driven, cause-driven, and that may mean that the initiative finishes and you move on to the next thing.” Elmore said the advances will include student groups’ access to SAO funds for on and off-campus activities. “I’ve asked the Allocations Board to give some more thought to how we allocate funds to student organizations,” Elmore said. “I hope what people will see is a bit of loosening up when they want to request funds, a bit more

Traffic, see page 2

SAO, see page 2

TAYLOR HARTZ/DAILY FREE PRESS

Students participate in ‘Snowbrawl Fight part two’ Saturday afternoon on the Esplanade after Winter Storm Nemo dumped two feet of snow Friday night.

officer with a snowball. The student will be summonsed to Roxbury District Court sometime in the near future, Molloy said, where the court will decide if there are enough facts and evidence to have a complaint made against him. A video posted to YouTube, titled “Boston University PD Officer Tasers Student at Snowball Fight,” shows footage of the student being handcuffed by a BUPD officer.

Bystanders gathered around the officer and the student as he was held on the ground and then taken away. Molloy said the allegation that a BUPD officer used a taser gun on a student is false. “We never have carried tasers,” he said. “The officer did not use a taser. He was flashing his flashlight to attract the attention

Snowbrawl, see page 2

Boston ranked fifth most traffic-prone city in nation By Bram Peterson Daily Free Press Contributor

Due to rush-hour traffic and the lack of a distinct grid roadway system, Boston was ranked the fifth most traffic delay-prone city in the nation, according to a recent study. More than 498 populated cities and metro areas across the United States were ranked on various traffic-related and environmental factors, such as the total yearly delay time per driver, travel time index and the total amount of wasted gasoline per driver, according to a Tuesday press release by Texas A&M Transportation Institute. Boston ranked fifth in the yearly delay-percommuter category, with Boston commuters logging an average of 53 delay hours per year, according to the release. “We all understand that trips take longer in rush hour, but for really important appointments, we have to allow increasingly more time to ensure an on-time arrival,” said Bill Eisele,

report co-author, in the release. “As bad as traffic jams are, it’s even more frustrating that you can’t depend on traffic jams being consistent from day-to-day.” Washington D.C. tops the list for longest total delay times followed by Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York, according to the release. The roadway congestion also takes an environmental toll, in the form of wasted fuel. Commuters wasted an average of 26 gallons of fuel a year, totaling over 66 million gallons from all commuters in 2011, according to 101 Urban Areas, a group that collects and provides urban mobility statistics on its website. Boston was ranked 11th nationally in total daily commuters by car, logging approximately 1.9 million auto commuters a day, according to the 101 Urban Areas statistics. Although the number of commuters in Boston has been steadily rising, the travel time index for the Boston metro area has been decreas-

Boston still recovering after Winter Storm Nemo slams Commonwealth By Kyle Plantz Daily Free Press Staff

After one of the worst blizzards in Boston’s history, the city continues to recover in the aftermath of Winter Storm Nemo, which hit the Northeast Friday afternoon. “Our number one priority is getting to the side streets,” Boston Mayor Thomas Menino said in a press release Sunday. “Residents have been very patient as we work to recover from the fifth largest snow storm to ever hit the City of Boston.” Winter Storm Nemo hit the Northeast Friday and continued until Saturday, bringing about 24.9 inches of snow to the Boston area. Boston schools are closed Monday and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority will resume normal services Monday. “We are focused on getting service back to our customers as quickly as is safely possible,” said Kelly Smith, deputy press secretary for the MBTA, in an email.

“We have crews working around the clock to make necessary repairs and tend to clearing, but we’ll only reopen service when it is absolutely safe to do so. Our main goal is restoring service for Monday morning’s commute.” MBTA services closed Friday at about 3:30 p.m. and remained closed until the MBTA announced Sunday there would be limited subway and key bus routes around 2:00 p.m. Sunday, according to the MBTA website. The City of Boston had no power outages, according to the National Grid outage map Sunday. Still, on Sunday, more than 300,000 homes and businesses reported having no power. Michael Verseckes, a Massachusetts Department of Transportation spokesman, said everyone was in full force trying to clear the roads. “We are still clearing out some of the major roadways,” he said. “The post-storm

Blizzard, see page 2

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS

Commonwealth Avenue was still under the process of being cleared at 10:30 a.m. Saturday after Winter Storm Nemo dumped two feet of snow Friday night.


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Monday, February 11, 2013

BUPD Capt.: Arresting officer ‘did not use taser’ Dean of students: Process of requesting funds ‘loosening’ Snowbrawl: From Page 1

of another officer.” The video had almost 5,500 views as of Sunday evening. Peter Campbell, a School of Management junior who witnessed the student being escorted out, said he thought the police’s response was an overreaction to the situation. “He held him face-down in the snow for a good while until the other cop came, and they hand cuffed him and dragged him off,” Campbell said in an email. “It looked like he could barely walk when they took him away — he was really limp when he was laying in the snow under the cop’s knee.” Katie O’Neill, a College of Arts and Sciences junior, said her friends started the event with no intention of several hundred people showing up. “He [my friend] had just meant

to invite people that we knew on Facebook and everyone invited all of their friends and soon there were 6,000 people on Facebook invited,” she said. The snowball fight, referred to as “Snowbrawl” by attendees, drew significant media attention, and videos of the gathering were posted on BostInno and YouTube. Michael Mojahed, a School of Management sophomore, said it was good to see BU students enjoying the snow in Boston. “It really shows unity and it ended up being a really fun experience for everyone,” he said in an email. “The only negative part of the whole event was that the police escorted one person [out] ... The police are doing their job of making sure we are all safe, but at the same time this was  definitely  an example of them overusing their power.” Gabriella Bastidas, a CAS freshman, said she enjoyed the

snowball fight as she hails from southern Spain, where there is rarely snow. “My friend swears there were at least 500 [participants], but the blizzard and continuously having to dodge snowballs didn’t allow me to accurately estimate,” she said in an email. “I had expected something more organized where students would split into two teams and begin the war, but instead several smaller snowball fights broke out in the area.” College of Communication junior Jason Kashdan said the snowball fight was a great exhibition of youthful spirit. “I thought the [snowball fight] was a great idea for students to enjoy the snow in a fun and harmless way,” he said. “It was incredible to see the number of students who showed up to participate in the snowball fight and I think everyone was excited to just have a good time and play in the snow.”

BFD spokesman: 1 death caused by ‘Nemo’ Blizzard: From Page 1

shoveling is still ongoing and it will take a little time. We still have crews out there.” Verseckes said in Massachusetts, they called in 3,500 plows and trucks to clear the snow off roadways and 378 of them were in Boston. Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick issued a road ban Friday asking that all vehicles be off the roads by 4:00 p.m. The ban was lifted Sunday at about 4:00 p.m. Steve MacDonald, Boston Fire Department spokesman, said there were two fires and one death caused by the storm. An electrical fire broke out in West End Friday night, leaving

more than 460 condominiums without power and heat during the height of the storm. Saturday morning in Roxbury, an unattended candle caused $200,000 in damage to a home, MacDonald said. A 12 year-old boy died Saturday due to carbon monoxide poisoning in a vehicle when the exhaust system failed to vent out of a car. The child went into cardiac arrest and neighbors revived him with CPR before Boston Emergency Medical Services took him. He was later pronounced dead at the hospital, MacDonald said. Menino, in a press release Saturday, said public safety is the city’s first priority and people should use caution when cleaning

up after the storm. “The news of this tragic accident is a sad reminder that the danger of this storm is not over,” Menino said in the release. “Please take care and use caution when cleaning up and getting back out on the streets. Our hearts go out to that family and their friends who are learning of this tremendously sad accident.” MacDonald said there is still a lot of work to be done before Boston is back in full working order. “There are still a lot of calls we receive for wires down or tree limbs down,” he said. “We are keeping 80 or so firefighters on to deal with the aftermath. We are doing what we can to keep people safe.”

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The Daily Free Press Crossword By Mirroreyes Internet Services Corporation ACROSS 1. Walked 6. Scattered seeds 10. Genghis ____ 14. French for “Study” 15. Member of the lily family 16. Luminous radiation 17. Rounded structure in a flower 18. Place 19. Almost to overflowing 20. Example or sample 22. Foamy preparation 24. Greek god of war 25. Erred or blamed 26. ______ Island, New York 29. Am not (slang) 30. Singer ____ Braxton 31. “Unsnarling” 37. Cars 39. Long period of time 40. External 41. Keeness and forcefulness of thought or expression 44. A tribe of Israel 45. Employ 46. One who works in the petroleum industry 48. Writes hastily 52. Young Womens

Christian Association 53. Relating to a choir 54. Abstaining from marriage 58. Thorny flower 59. City in New Mexico 61. Polite 62. Range or extent 63. Depression era migrant farm worker 64. Name that means “Night” in Arabic 65. Found in pods 66. Frying utensils 67. City in Germany DOWN 1. Animal companions 2. Above 3. Remedy 4. Teaching and learning 5. Longing 6. Bargains 7. “Wiseguy” star Ken ____ 8. Misfortune 9. Developer of “Game Theory” (math), Johannes von _______ 10. City in Afghanistan 11. Wood or grove 12. Get up 13. Nominated 21. List of choices 23. Expenditures 25. _____ee = woman engaged to be married 26. Immediately

the semester. “It does get difficult and it is a challenge for us since we are not the most organized when working with SAO,” Fisher said. “Changes that make working with SAO easier and faster will help us get organized better.” Amy Stimets, president of the Alpha Phi sorority, said the option to promote events online is helpful, but the sorority will still stick with the George Sherman Union Link as its primary option for advertising events. “Even though online still generates buzz, we get our name out there because the turnout is better at the GSU Link than just selling tickets online,” Stimets, a College of Communication junior, said. “It’s a hassle to bring computers to the GSU Link because people have to do it right there and it’s not as convenient as using cash.” Stimets said her experience communicating with SAO has not been difficult in the past. “The change I’m most familiar with is SAO being more transparent,” said Rachel Atcheson, the BU Vegetarian Society president and CAS junior, said. “Before, dealing with the Allocations Board, you received your individual allotment by itself, but now you can see online how much every other group has been allotted.”

SAO: From Page 1

creativity on the part of our funding board to think about ideas.” The changes were announced in a letter emailed to leaders of student groups. In the letter, Elmore wrote an additional $126,000 was made available for student groups to be distributed by the Student Allocations Board. Elmore included a link to the indevelopment website and said he encourages feedback. BU student group leaders said the new changes to the SAO will positively affect their groups’ outreach, productivity and influence on campus. “For the most part we don’t spend a ton of money, but it is nice to have some funding to put toward certain props and costumes,” said Chris Fisher, Theater for Everyone president. “The big benefit for us is we can put on more elaborate sketches because we would have much more to work with.” Fisher, a College of Arts and Sciences senior, said the new SAO funds will allow TFE to create a more creative and prop-driven show, but the group will still function as before. He also said a reduction in paperwork will help the executive board focus on producing their show for

Hub travel time index 1.28, study says “I go through back roads, I don’t use the highways,” he said. “If I did I’d be stuck in traffic for an hour and a half.” Despite Boston’s extensive public transportation, many commuters have no option but to drive to work. “Mass transit is just not an option,” said McCormick, who said he has no choice but to make the 40-minute trip by car. But for short commutes, the traffic seems to be manageable for some drivers. “It’s pretty easy to get to work,” Sanderson said. “I don’t mind driving. But if I [did] hit traffic I would not be happy.”

Traffic: From Page 1

Other drivers said they do not deal with the traffic or congestion on the roadways. Cassie Sanderson, hostess at Sunset Cantina who drives from Arlington said she drives to work at odd times and does not deal with other drivers. “Usually I don’t hit any traffic, I usually come in at either 10:30 in the morning or at night, but for some reason there’s usually no traffic,” she said. Matt McCormick, a worker at Otto’s Pizza who drives from Saugus, said he tries to avoid the major roadways.

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Sudoku 2 3 6

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4 7 9 (medical) 27. Journey 28. Initial wager 29. Make amends 32. Approaches 33. Puts babies to sleep 34. Article 35. Baltic river 36. Smile 38. Indeterminate vowel 42. Small

summit or pinnacle 43. Wail 47. Hanging mass of ice 48. Refuse 49. Task 50. Latin for “Rosecolored” or “Pinkflowered” 51. Regions 52. Affirmatives

54. Metal money 55. French for “Notice” 56. Thin slab of clay or stone 57. Style 60. Also Known As Solution is on Page 4

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Difficulty: Medium

1 4 Solution is on Page 4


CMampus & City arasco

Ignoring the model

A sea of bodies all cramming in and out of a single door, guarded by an archaic, hunk of junk that doesn’t even accept debit — that’s the B, C, D and E lines of the MBTA. It’s dreadful. It’s inefficient. It’s stupid. Better, more efficient, models exist all over the globe, and have for years, but we’ve ignored them. Why? The problem could easily be solved with turnstyles, on-board ticketers, or any number of more efficient methods. Why aren’t we doing that? If the rest of the industrialized world can do it, why can’t we? Is it ignorance, arrogance or just stupidity? And it’s not just the MBTA that has problems. Why on earth would the bicycle lane be situated between traffic and parked cars? Cars swerve across the bike lane to park. Doors fly open from both sides. It’s shockingly poorly thought-out. Why not flip the bike lane and the parking lane? I’m not breaking any ground here — that model is already widely used. Of course! That makes way more sense. No car ever enters the bike lane. All we’d have to do is re-paint the lanes. That’s it! It could be done tomorrow. The parking meters can stay where they are. Boston is such an intelligent city, which is precisely what makes these issues that much more dizzying. But having seen much of the country and running into similar problems all over, I can’t help but wonder — is it a Boston problem, or an American problem? Are we unable to adopt the more efficient models of others because we suffer from the “America is the greatest because it just is” delusion? The U.S. still uses the size of an ancient king’s foot as an official measurement of distance. The UK, the country that invented that system, doesn’t even use it anymore — they realized how idiotic it was. Living under this delusion that “America is the greatest country in the world because I said so” is toxic. It’s a virus that keeps us from progressing. We’re a big, powerful, important nation, sure. We have a lot of great things to be proud of and thankful for. Yes, of course. But we only speak one language — and we can barely get that right. We have 5 percent of the world’s population, but we have 25 percent of the world’s prisoners. We’re not leading the world in science or math — we aren’t even close. Forty-six percent of Americans don’t “believe” in evolution. That’s staggering. That’s appalling. Not “believing” in a fact is akin to not “believing” in turning on your brain. Does that 46 percent “believe” in gravity? We don’t like to hear this. We don’t like to think that America isn’t “the greatest at everything.” We don’t like to think that we have issues. But we have them — every country does. We have partisanship, debt, and obesity. We’ve rested on our laurels. While other nations are tinkering, troubleshooting, and rolling up their sleeves to find answers to problems, we’ve hung our hats on the past. That’s why we wake up today confused, upset, and in denial that we’re “without a doubt the greatest country in the world.” We live in a mostly wonderful country, but it seems that America’s bloated ego is our number one enemy of progress. Frank Marasco is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences. He can be reached at fcm820@gmail.com.

Monday, February 11, 2013

USPS to stop Saturday mail delivery Fewer students to NE schools, report suggests

By Zoe Roos Daily Free Press Staff

The United States Postal Service announced Wednesday it would be changing its delivery schedule in an attempt to cut costs, causing concern for legislators and Boston residents. The new delivery schedule, which would eliminate Saturday mail delivery, is projected to save the postal service approximately $2 million dollars a year, according to a Wednesday press release from the USPS. The new delivery schedule, which will go into effect the week of Aug. 5, would include package delivery Monday through Saturday but would reduce mail delivery to Monday through Friday. State Rep. Edward Markey of the 5th district of Massachusetts was among those concerned about the reduced hours. “Eliminating Saturday mail delivery will negatively affect many of the hardworking people of the U.S. Postal Service who perform such a vital job for our county,” he said in a statement Wednesday. “It also could harm businesses that depend on Saturday delivery and customers who can’t wait through the weekend to receive the government benefits they rely on.” Markey joined with other legislators to co-sponsor a bill that urges the USPS to take all measures to try and preserve their six-day mail delivery service. “Congress should enact compre-

By Steven Dufour Daily Free Press Contributor

SARAH FISHER/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF Politicians and Boston residents say they are concerned about the announcement that the U.S. Postal Office won’t be delivering on Saturdays.

hensive postal reform that frees the Postal Service from unnecessary requirements that undercut its competitiveness and profitability,” he said. “The Postal Service should also be given more flexibility to innovate with new products.” Patrick R. Donahoe, Postmaster General and CEO of USPS released a statement, outlining details for the new delivery schedule. “The Postal Service is advancing an important new approach to delivery that reflects the strong growth of our package business and responds to the financial realities resulting from America’s changing mailing habits,” Donahoe said in the statement Wednesday. “We developed this approach by working with our customers to understand their delivery needs

and by identifying creative ways to generate significant cost savings.” The Post Office has reported financial challenges over the past several years, and market research conducted by the post office has determined that reduced delivery days is the best way to reinvigorate the post office. “The American public understands the financial challenges of the Postal Service and supports these steps as a responsible and reasonable approach to improving our financial situation,” Donahoe said. “The Postal Service has a responsibility to take the steps necessary to return to long-term financial stability and ensure the continued affordability of the U.S. Mail.”

Postal Service, see page 4

Group to promote French-speaking culture By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

Association Francophone de Boston University Vice President Chérie Gu said her organization plans to unify a spectrum of Bostonian French speakers, from those in firstsemester French to native speakers, to learn the language and the culture of French-speaking countries. “When we learn French in a classroom, we don’t have a lot of time to talk to people in the class because we’re too busy paying attention to the subject matter,” Gu, a College of Arts and Sciences sophomore, said. “We wanted to form a club or some kind of presence outside of class where we could practice French and learn about the culture.” Gu said at present, AFBU has more than 50 members on its email list, and more than 100 students have liked the AFBU Facebook page. A francophone is a person associ-

ated with any and all French-speaking countries, including Senegal, Algeria and even Canada, she said. “It’s really important to know [being a francophone] is not just French [culture] and French people,” Gu said. “I’ve met people from China, Singapore and Puerto Rico all interested in French and speaking it.” Gu said the AFBU will host round-table discussions about relations between French-speaking countries, outings to crêperies in Boston and movie nights. She said not all members are fluent in French, but the only events that will require fluency are discussions. “One of the events coming up is the round-table discussion, in mostly French, about French intervention in Mali,” Gu said. “We’re asking specialists in international relations and French professors to come speak.” Saïful Saleem, AFBU president and CAS junior, said in an email the

goals for the spring 2013 semester are to add members and increase the frequency of group activities. “By next semester, we hope to be able to create a link with other universities in the area and work together to host events that will benefit the francophone community of Boston,” Saleem said. “We have already entered into discussions with similar student groups and professors from neighboring universities, and hopefully something will come into fruition by the next semester, if not before.” Saleem said the club’s membership base is diverse and students from every populated continent have joined the group. While the group has a varied membership, all who participate share an appreciation for the French language, he said.

French, see page 4

While recent studies predict a forthcoming decrease in enrollment in higher education across the country, particularly in the northeast, some Boston University students said they feel BU will experience little change, if any. Jason Lane, director of education studies at the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government at the University at Albany, State University of New York, released a report Wednesday analyzing the future of higher education and possible decreases in enrollment based on two recent studies. “The number of high school graduates will decline in the coming two decades, particularly in the northeast,” Lane said in the report. “Many colleges and universities are going to struggle to maintain their share of high-school graduates. In fact, those institutions that don’t learn to adapt to the new reality will likely close doors by the end of the decade.” Both a January college enrollment forecast by Moody’s Investors Service and a December high school graduation rate prediction by the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education predicted declines in the foreseeable future. Researchers predict a 2-percent drop in public and private high school graduates between the 2008-09 and 2019-20 school years. The Northeast’s rates could drop as much as 7 percent, according to the WICHE report. Lane said in the report the predicted decrease in graduation rates will directly affect colleges nationwide. Despite Lane’s predictions of enrollment, BU received a recordbreaking 52,532 applications for the fall 2013 semester. This marks a 19.3 percent increase from 2012, according to a previous Daily Free Press article. Patricia Rieker, a BU sociology professor, said these predictions could be attributed to rising college costs around the country and to the U.S.’s current financial recession. “Lots of middle class families are struggling,” she said. “It’s a combination of people having lost some of their ability to pay, and at the same

Enrollment see page 4

MBTA ad campaign promotes better rider behavior By Clinton Nguyen Daily Free Press Staff

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority released an animal-themed print advertising campaign Thursday in hopes of fostering more respectful commuter behavior. This ad campaign is the fifth in 12 years geared towards promoting better rider behavior, according to the MBTA. Dubbed the “courtesy critters,” the ads feature various animals engaging in what would be considered rude rider behavior, like “hogging” up all the seats and being a “litterbug.” Beverly Scott, MBTA general manager, said in a statement that she hoped the ads would raise awareness about respectful commuting. “Riding the T every day, I

know how important it is to be respectful and kind to other passengers as well as operators,” she said in a statement Wednesday. “Sometimes we need to be reminded of the basics and hopefully it will make everyone’s commute a more pleasant one.” The six designs were created internally by the MBTA and the ads will be placed in 2,400 trains and buses, according to an MBTA statement. Edward Boches, a Boston University professor of advertising, said the advertisements were acceptable from a marketing standpoint, but not in the actual execution of the message. “It recognizes none of the insights we know about influencing behavior — never lecture, never reprimand,” he said. “Instead try

MBTA, see page 4

HEATHER GOLDIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

The MBTA launched a new ad campaign aimed at curbing inappropriate behavior on the T, including littering.


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Monday, February 11, 2013

LET IT SNOW, LET IT SNOW, LET IT SNOW

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS

School of Management freshman Shaun McGuire (back) and College of Arts and Sciences freshman Matt Ruiz (front) jump into one of the snowbanks created by the plows along Bay State Road Saturday morning.

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS

People walk in the streets through Kenmore Square Saturday morning after Winter Storm Nemo.

HEATHER GOLDIN/DAILY FREE PRESS

A student skis down a ramp made by other students onto Nickerson Field Saturday afternoon

GRACE WILSON/DAILY FREE PRESS

Cars on Bay State Road are covered by snow late Friday night as Winter Storm Nemo moves through.

TAYLOR HARTZ/DAILY FREE PRESS

Students use makeshift sleds to enjoy the snow after Winter Storm Nemo Saturday.

AFBU pres.: group culturally diverse Students: BU employability key to applicants or another activity held at BU that French: From Page 3

“We have people who are native speakers of French and people who are still beginners trying to learn the language,” Saleem said. “Like the Francophone world, AFBU is very culturally diverse.” Miranda Swinnen, AFBU secretary, said she joined Gu and Saleem to create the group. “Upon coming to BU, I was really excited about joining a French cultural group or a francophone-type association,” Swinnen, a CAS freshman, said. “I didn’t see any of these types of groups at Splash, so I was eager to start something like this.” Swinnen said AFBU leaders have been considering organizing festivals

would involve other universities. “It’s a great way to connect people who have this common interest, and we hope to include other universities if they have francophone groups we can connect with,” Swinnen said. Swinnen said she was surprised by the group’s turnout and she is excited to meet others with a common interest in what is such a large part of her life. “I would have to say the enthusiasm draws me to AFBU,” Swinnen said. “I have so much passion for the French language and francophone culture, and it makes me so happy to see other people are so eager to learn and speak French as a community.”

Resident: ‘Sad’ mail is losing to tech. Postal Service: From Page 3

A number of Boston residents at a local post office expressed their concerns about the impending changes. Kevin McGinley, 47, a Boston resident, said he was concerned about how the limited service would effect business operations. “My biggest concern is business documents,” he said. “My personal

mail can wait another day but I need my business documents promptly.” Ann Carter, 68, a Boston resident, was in the post office to mail a package to her granddaughter for her birthday. “I just find it kind of sad,” she said. “I always love getting mail and now it is just another thing all that technology is taking away. I’m afraid one day their won’t be mail at all.”

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Enrollment: From Page 3

time higher education is more expensive.” However, Rieker said while American college students may enroll in fewer numbers in the coming years, international students will not. “BU is a very expensive school,” Rieker said. “But BU takes in a large number of international students. If there’s ever a drop off in American students, it gets made up.” Rieker also said state schools may be increasing efforts to improve the education they offer. Several BU students said BU’s prestige will prevent it from suffering due to lower high school graduation rates. “BU has enough appeal to keep growing,” said Michael Lyons, a College of Arts and Sciences sopho-

more. “It’s rated seventh in the nation for employability [in the 2012 Global Employability Survey], and I think that’s enough for just about anybody that wants to apply to college.” BU graduates were ranked the seventeenth most employable internationally and seventh most employable domestically ahead of schools such as Brown University and New York University, according to a survey published by The New York Times in October. “I think the cost might hurt us at BU, but at the same time, it is a prestigious school,” said Merry Richter, a CAS freshman. “The [university’s rank in the 2012 Global Employability Survey] is definitely a huge, huge draw as well, because that’s what people want to get. They need to get a good job after college.” Richter said students motivated

to go to specific colleges would be more likely to pursue distant options than students who cared less about the prestige and quality of their school. “The kids who just barely graduate [from high school] and don’t really want to go to college…tend to go to [public] state school, because it’s cheaper,” Richter said. “In order to go to a private institution like BU, you have to want to go, so I don’t think BU will see much of a difference.” Se June Han, a College of Communication freshman, said BU’s quality and location will cushion it against lower enrollment rates. “The research is really strong here,” Han said. “It’s also close to other universities, so it’s really easy to get other opportunities for a lot of college students.”

Advertising prof.: MBTA ad campaign lacks ‘creativity’ MBTA: From Page 3

and leverage existing behavior and celebrate and reinforce the behaviors that you want.” Boches said the MBTA’s message lacked creativity. “From a creative perspective, it shows no originality, cleverness or wit,” he said. “All of which are essential to creating messages that people pay attention to and remember. The T does have a captive audience. So people are forced to see the messages.” He said if the ideas were more charming, the ad would reach out

to more people. A number of riders said they felt that the campaign reached out to a wider audience due to its lightheartedness. “Everyone reads the boards in trains, and it will definitely help to educate passengers,” said Luis Alvarenga, a Newtonville bartender and commuter. Though Alvarenga said he hasn’t witnessed rudeness from riders while on his regular commute on the Riverside-bound train, he feels the campaign will help commuters in other parts of the city become more conscious of their actions.

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“When people realize they are behaving more like animals, they’re getting the right message,” he said. Julian Arber, a Somerville resident and sales associate, said that the ads were “definitely a creative way of getting it across.” She said that the “courtesy critters” are a refreshing take on a message the T has been putting out in so many different ways. “Maybe the kids will reach out to their parents and ask, ‘Hey, what’s this picture saying,’” she said. “It might end up being a nice collaborative effort.”


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Muse Editor - Meg DeMouth

Music Editor - Lucien Flores

Film/TV Editor - Michela Smith

Lifestyle Editor - Justin Soto

Food Editor - Brooke Jackson-Glidden

Don’t be too afraid to cozy up to Warm Bodies Joseph Martelli MUSE Staff

W

ith the northeastern weather not so kind this winter, everyone could use a little warming up. What better way to lay the gloves and scarves aside than by cozying up in a theatre and watching zombies eat brains and fall in love? In the post-apocalyptic world of Warm Bodies — directed by Jonathan Levine (50/50, The Wackness), starring Nicholas Hoult, Teresa Palmer, Analeigh Tipton, John Malkovich and many others — zombies, although already dead, have lost all sense of what it was like to have ever beenalive, or in love, in the first place. Until human Julie (Teresa Palmer) is introduced, zombie R (Nicholas Hoult) quite literally mopes around, moaning and groaning until he experiences his first heartbeat in years. The film is wrought with scares, comedy and adorable moments all woven together to form what is probably one of the only cute zombie films out there. The film’s unconventional approach attracted director Jonathon Levine to the project, he said. “For me, it was such a unique take on zombies. I don’t think we’re trying to redefine anything here, I think we’re trying to use zombies to tell a story about what — for me — is just a guy and a girl falling for each other. “Zombies have always traditionally been used to tell stories and to sort of reflect society back to itself and so that’s why I don’t think we’re trying to redefine them,” he said. Seems like a fair enough answer, after all — society can get pretty messed up, huh? But the film has its fair amount of fun.

PHOTO COURTSY OF SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

Analeigh Tipton, Nicholas Hoult and Teresa Palmer, left to right, in Warm Bodies.

Warm Bodies “hits on so many different levels that you really get to indulge in so many different avenues … There’s so many different levels to this film, and it never gets boring,” said actress Analeigh Tipton, a former contestant on America’s Next Top Model (Cycle 11). She plays Nora, a tough female who, like all other non-zombies, is trained to handle weapons and fend off the brain-eaters. For the role, Tipton got to handle machine guns on set, she said, describing the whole process as “playing pretend on a very heightened, wonderful scale.” But don’t let the machine-gun talk scare you away. The film is geared towards zombie lovers and chick-flick fans alike, and doesn’t use an immense amount of gore or cheesy effects. Both Levine and the studio

wanted Warm Bodies to be accessible to all. “We definitely wanted to keep it PG-13. It’s a movie that we wanted young people to see, and we didn’t want them to have to sneak in,” Levine said, adding that the film “has a very positive heart to it, so I didn’t think it was important to push the envelope on the gore.” He did, however, “shoot some really gory stuff which will maybe make it to some director’s cut.” While the film can get pretty actionpacked, there are particular moments where the female cast specifically got to have fun, Tipton said. In one scene, Julie and Nora hold R down and apply makeup to him for fun — ironic, since after sitting through

hours of crazy makeup herself on ANTM, Tipton was finally the one with brush and pallet in hand. “We are playing tough characters. There weren’t a lot of moments to get girly, and this was our moment to really just fully hold him captive … We put so much bad makeup on him and he had to sit there just so patiently,” Tipton said. With such a mix of sweet goofiness and violence, one has to wonder where some of the inspiration came from besides the original novelization by Isaac Marion. “Nick [Hoult] took inspiration from WALL-E, and also Edward Scissorhands just for the tone,” Levine said. “You want this guy who can’t speak to feel sweet, and Nick is so good at doing that.” But fighting zombies, no matter the level of sweetness, is still serious business. Levine’s weapon of choice? “One of those tee-shirt guns, it was actually my assistant’s idea,” he said. “I regret not doing that because that would’ve been really funny.” Tipton opted for a more creative approach, explaining that she’d use “wordplays and puns … to confuse [the zombies] so that they would get really baffled and maybe turn and eat themselves.” Warm Bodies will be hard to stay away from. With Valentine’s Day so close, it’s the perfect film to watch while snuggling up next to your special someone. Or, if you are still waiting for your own brain-eating lover, simply place your jacket and scarf on the seat next to you to comfort yourselfwith the fact that at least it’s not empty, right? No matter who is sitting next to you, Warm Bodies guarantees that the theatres won’t be empty this month.

REVIEW: “Dream House” comes to Gallery 5 Nolan Young

C

MUSE Staff

ollege of Fine Arts senior Molly Rosner brings pop art back to life in a major way in her “Dream House” art exhibition, on display through Friday, Feb. 15 at the CFA’s Gallery 5. Using vibrant colors, thick brushstrokes and a touch of pizzazz to depict vintage images of men and women, her paintings pay homage to many artists before her. She puts a post-modern twist on old styles and themes, culminating in a display that is youthful, fashionable and retrospective. At the heart of Rosner’s work is photography. All of her paintings are derived from stills taken during photo shoots. “I think my strongest works are my photographs, to be honest,” Rosner said. Keeping in line with her pop-art paintings, the photographs have a vintage vibe with a hint of mid-20th century nostalgia. Mostly in the style of pin-up girls, the photographs are both sexy and satirical, acting as a caricature of

the stereotypical 50s housewife. Manipulated with a filter, the images have the foggy film-camera feel that compliments the retro ambiance of the exhibit. Rosner’s paintings differ in style, but follow the same artistic and social influence. They mostly consist of male subjects wearing suits and touting cigarettes. The works seem to represent the male counterparts to the women in the photographs. Visually constructed with solid, deeply contrasting colors, her paintings resemble the iconic works of the father of pop art. “My artistic influence is mainly Andy Warhol,” she said. Her admiration for Warhol does not stop there. She also models her mode of production after his. “He had a whole factory of people working for him and helping him produce the art. That’s how I was able to do all this. I couldn’t have done it alone,” she said.

And like Warhol, Rosner is driven. She, along with School of Hospitality and Administration senior Julie Jackson used the opening night of the exhibition to launch their own “home décor and lifestyle design company” called Dream House. The company, which has 21 employees and two interns, aims at the 20-something demographic with pieces that look tailor-made to line the walls of dorm rooms and apartments. Though Rosner’s home décor design may be vintage inspired yet entirely of this age, her “Dream House” art exhibition is as much a period piece as it is a display of pop art. Its use of gender roles and sexuality is telling. The pieces seem antiquated and presumptuous by modern standards, but that is the point. Molly Rosner creates a space where the old is new again, an unapologetic reflection of a prior generation. It is flashy and hip, but most importantly, it is honest.

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6M

onday,

February 11, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 14

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan, Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Page Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

Increased tuition, increased debt

The nation’s collective student loan balance has reached $1 trillion and it continues to rise, The New York Times reported Saturday in a feature about the increasing amount of students who work their way through school and still graduate with large debts. It is well known that the price of a college education in the U.S., especially at a private university, is often unmanageably high. Many students must work two jobs to pay for it. This is less than ideal, noting how too much work takes away from what college should be about: studying. If students are forced to spend the majority of their time at work, their studies will suffer, and they will ultimately get less out of the education they toil to finance. The problem with high college tuitions (which continue to rise) is that they marginalize middle class students. The majority of families in the United States cannot afford the full price of a private university tuition. At the same time, however, many of the same are too affluent to qualify for financial aid. High tuitions therefore rob middle class students of the opportunity to attend the university of their choice not on the basis of merit but because of a lack of funds. True, there are other options. State and community schools in the country are good. There are a number of scholarships available to students willing to work and apply for them. Still, according to The Times, few students can actually work their way through college in a normal amount of time without debt and financial. Even state schools cost much more than the average student working a low-paying job can afford.

It appears “the college experience” is a myth experienced only by those privileged enough to pay for room and board, cafeteria costs, and leisure. For the rest, college is a financial burden. The problem is the widespread belief that private (and thus more expensive) colleges are inherently better and more desirable, and give students a leg up in the job market. For this reason, students will work to pay for a more prestigious education. Finances create an impediment to collegiate growth and success. They also inhibit creativity. The rising cost of college, and the inability to pay for it, could be the ironic reason for which universities are having to slash their humanities departments as more and more students opt to study business and finance instead of, say, Italian literature. The issue obviously is not pressing enough for colleges to make significant changes to their tuition and financial aid policies. Indeed, there appears to be enough students willing to pay — or work to pay — for their education. But there are a number of things that universities could do to address the problem. First, the FAFSA system, which offers federal student aid, should take into account that while students can legally remain dependents on their parents for things such as taxes and health insurance, they might not receive financial assistance from their parents. Additionally, universities could work to make changes that might help to reduce costs. They could turn off more lights during offhours; they could reduce the salaries of officials who claim to care about the student body but enjoy enormous financial benefits themselves.

Letter to the editor: Protecting the Protection Bureau

Some days ago, the Daily Free Press reported on the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau’s plans to look into the financial products being promoted on BU’s campus. This campaign is one of many that the CFPB is engaged in across the country in efforts to engage, educate and protect consumers. Since its creation in 2011, the CFPB has worked diligently to repair and police the financial system which crashed our economy. In that short time this fledgling agency and its Director, Richard Cordray, have received praise for their even-handed and dedicated efforts, even from the industry they regulate. It’s hard to imagine anyone finding fault with this kind of common-sense action for the public good. Yet, in today’s brutal and bickering partisan climate, where there’s a will, there’s a way. A recent controversial court case has breathed new life into an old fight over the CFPB and Cordray. On Jan. 25, a conservative D.C. Court of Appeals declared a number of President Obama’s 2011 recess appointments, including Richard Cordray, unconstitutional. By throwing out hundreds of years of precedent, this capricious decision has cast doubt on the legitimacy of Director Cordray’s appointment, and thereby the legitimacy of his and his agency’s actions. Opponents of the bureau have seized this shaky legal ground and are threatening to block the confirmation of Director Cordray (again) unless dramatic changes are made, which will undermine the work of the CFPB on the behalf of students like us as well as consumers across the country.

Whether or not you care about reforming the financial system (you should), knowing what kind of product BU is selling you (again, you probably should) or improving the student loan system (you definitely should), you have to care about this case. Blocking the confirmation of Richard Cordray has nothing to do with him or his ability to do his job. He’s already had a year to prove himself, and one-time skeptics are lining up to defend him. What this obstructionism is about is an ideological disagreement that should have nothing to do with the day-today work of our government. Allowing pointless arguments like this to stop public servants from doing their jobs is a horrible way to govern, and we shouldn’t put up with it. As corny as it sounds, if you agree, please let lawmakers know it. Being here in Washington D.C. has taught me that letters are read, concerns are noticed, and outside voices can ring loudly in the halls of the Capitol. Taking the couple minutes to draft an e-mail to your senator will make an impact and help steer this fight away from the stupidity which is dominating it. You can also sign a petition at http:// action.civilrights.org/site/PageNavigator/AFRCordray2013.html Stand up and protect Director Cordray, so he can get back to work protecting the rest of us. Justin Kenney CAS ‘14 jckenney@bu.edu

SNAPSHOTS OF D.C.

Lights, Camera, Action? SOFIYA MAHDI

As I fumbled with one of the office’s iPads while a scholar waited patiently for me to angle the shot, I felt pretty ridiculous. My duties were no longer solely comprised of proofreading and formatting information. I had taken a leap of faith and pitched a project of my own. With U.S. President Barack Obama’s State of the Union speech to air Tuesday, my assignment was to get scholar’s predictions on what to expect. As this is the nation’s political hub, I experienced a new phenomenon, one about which everyone (and I mean literally everyone) had an opinion. From small cafés to other workplaces, to the hundreds of interns cramming their bodies on the Metro to get to work everyday, you cannot escape it. There’s a saying that one should never discuss religion or politics. I soon realized discussing controversial issues that could divide opinion was what kept the cogs going in this small yet larger than life town. This project I had decided to pursue quickly dominated this past week of my life. Emails flew through cyberspace as I scheduled appointments with scholars according to subject area. I conducted interviews in their offices, unsure what personality sat in the room before me, papers askew and views awaiting. I was gaining confidence as I settled into my new role as a hybrid of cameraperson and interviewer. I was no Oprah, but my piece was coming together. One afternoon, I entered a scholar’s office and asked if he could close the blinds behind him so we could adjust the lighting. With great gusto, he climbed onto his wallmounted radiator and began his epic battle to adjust his old blinds, which had probably never been shut before, what with the beautiful view of the city behind his windows. His foot kicked one of the vent tiles off of the radiator and into it. Despite my attempts to help, he rummaged through his desk drawers and brandished his tool of choice: a letter opener. His attempts only aggravated the situation as three more tiles flew to the ground. Was I officially the worst intern ever? After a few more minutes of this struggle, he mumbled as he grabbed a paperclip, unwound it, and essentially began to fish for this elusive tile. Slowly but surely, he pulled the tile out in one elaborate gesture and it landed near his desk. The interview could finally begin. By the end, he was forthcoming about how excited he was for this venture to take form, a reaction I was not in the slightest expecting after the comedy of errors I had just witnessed. I drove myself crazy editing videos. I played them over and over again. Analyses

of entitlement programs, sequestration and foreign policy plagued my mind as I manipulated angles and light. I was settling into a madness of my own making. I needed some inspiration. I needed some air. I needed to step away from the dancing spikes on my screen signifying color contrast and background noise. It seemed serendipitous that we were all scheduled to visit Lincoln’s Cottage that day. President Abraham Lincoln’s retreat is and was on the grounds of a veteran’s home, a site that has endured more than a century. I was stunned when we entered a separate exhibit before our official tour; there lay one of the signed copies of the Emancipation Proclamation. We poured over this momentous relic of history in wonder. I had studied this document in school, I had seen a movie on it, and now it was real, tangible, before my eyes. A disclaimer for anyone expecting plush period furniture in the cottage today: you won’t find any. The walls and rooms are sparse; the patio which once overlooked the Potomac is now shielded by trees and overlooks construction. Times have certainly changed, but the feeling remains. This was not a quiet, secluded spot for the former president. When war ravaged America and slavery was still commonplace, you could still hear the artillery being fired in the surrounding land. From Lincoln’s library, you could see deceased soldiers being buried in the nearby cemetery, a precursor to the burial ground at Arlington. Since then, the battleground has moved from the fields to the halls of Congress. But one thing is the same: there is no retreat and there is no avoidance of what the issues are, even if the execution of solutions is less than perfect. That’s the beauty of this city. It is phenomenally difficult to get anything done — that much is true. It’s a makes-youwant-to-fling-tiles-off-your-radiator kind of frustrating. So, where’s the silver lining? Call me naively optimistic, but I think it’s inherent in the way that people in this city come here because they aren’t complacent or content with how life is now. Doing those interviews, I found people who have views on American life and who are willing to dedicate their careers to its improvement. For what Washington seems to lack in action, it compensates in a spectrum of visions. And that’s an important first step. Sofiya Mahdi is weekly columnist for the Daily Free Press, and a junior in the College of Arts and Sciences studying abroad in Washington, D.C. She can be reached at sofiya218@gmail.com.

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Monday, February 11, 2013

7

Women’s hockey taking simple approach to remaining games Notebook: From Page 8

“And I think if we put those two things together we should be in pretty good order.” Scoring machine The Terriers’ 3.64 goals per game ranks them second in Hockey East in scoring, behind No. 2 Boston College. For the first time in the program’s history, BU has six players with 10 or more goals in the same season. Redshirt senior forward Jenelle Kohanchuk leads the way with 13 goals, while her linemate, junior co-captain Marie-Philip Poulin, leads the team with 23 assists and 35 points. Poulin also ranks just behind Kohanchuk in goals with 12. But instead of reffering to individual star players, Durocher said it is the loose atmosphere surrounding the team and the opportunistic power play that help the Terriers put up so many goals. “I try to keep everybody loose here and not try to over-coach them or tell them what to do out there,” Durocher said. “I let their ability speak for themselves. “And … we’ve had a real solid run on the power play since Christmas. And when you get that one — or maybe some games two — extra goals on the power play, it really does set a tempo and give yourself a chance to get the three, four, maybe five goals a game.” The confidence that comes along with the team’s ability to put pucks in the net can result in advantages and disadvantages.

“Sometimes it can be a great piece to their confidence because they know that they can come back,” Durocher said. “But I hope that it’s not a shortcoming in that we don’t play enough defense.” Keeping it simple With just seven games remaining in the season, BU isn’t thinking about the NCAA tournament just yet. “[If BU has] a chance to play in the championship, or possibly win an NCAA title, that’d be fantastic,” Durocher said. “But that’s not in my thoughts right now.” Despite its No. 3 ranking, the team is taking a much simpler approach, with its eye on other accomplishments before the national championship comes into the picture. “There’s a regular season championship we’re fighting for, there’s an NCAA bid we’re playing for, and obviously we’re playing for the Hockey East postseason championship,” Durocher said. Even with national rankings and seeds for the postseason tournaments hanging in the balance, the Terriers are thinking about nothing but the upcoming contest. The Terriers face off against Harvard University in the Beanpot consolation game Tuesday at 5 p.m. in Matthews Arena, the home of the Northeastern Huskies. “It gets confusing if you put too many things on the kids,” Durocher said. “If you can keep the focus on Harvard, we can create our own energy within the team. “Those are the real things we have to focus on.”

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Terrier junior co-captain Marie-Philip Poulin leads BU’s top-notch offense in points and assists and is just one goal shy of a tie for the team lead in goals.

Effort level, energy must be high for BU Men’s basketball: From Page 8

“We have very good guard play,” Jones said. “No doubt about it.” BU stretched its lead to as many as 23 points during the second half, helped out by contributions from freshman forward Nathan Dieudonne and sophomore guard Zach Chionuma, who each netted seven points off the bench. “Nate and Zach both played very well,” Jones said of his role players. “They’re

working hard in practice. It’s been a carryover from practice.” With a crucial tilt looming at the University of Vermont on Tuesday, Jones is well aware that BU’s compete level must be at an all-time high for his team to pull through. “We have to go compete,” Jones said. “That’s the big thing. Anytime you play a Vermont team, you have to be ready to compete, so we have to go up there and compete and play with great energy.”

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Sports Section On Facebook Terriers’ defense shuts down prolific scorer W. basketball: From Page 8

the ball,” Greenberg said. “We knew that they had two 3-point shooters and [sophomore Sherae] Swinson, who had the big game against us.” Swinson led Binghamton with nine points and pulled down 11 rebounds. In the teams’ previous matchup, Swinson had 18 points and was 8-of-16 from the floor with five boards. Limiting the Bearcats’ star was key in blowing them out in the teams’ last game as conference

opponents. Binghamton came to within 13 points of BU when freshman guard Kandace Newry hit a 3-pointer with 5:17 remaining in the game to make the score 57–44. But the Terriers went on a 12–4 run over the last 3:42 of the game to seal the 73–51 victory. BU looks to expand upon its strong performance against Binghamton University when it goes on the road to take on the University of Vermont in Burlington, Vt., Wednesday night.

Maguire to play first game at TD Garden Men’s hockey: From Page 8

get time playing the point with the man-advantage, while senior forward Ryan Santana will play by the crease. Parker also said he is putting Megan back on the first line, meaning junior Matt Nieto will slide back down onto the second-line left wing. Freshman goaltender Sean Maguire, meanwhile, will start between the pipes. He had been set to start Friday vs. Merrimack College, but with that game rescheduled due to the snow, Parker is sticking with his netminder rotation and giving Maguire a game at TD Garden. It will be Maguire’s first time playing at the Garden, as well as his first time playing the Crimson — a team with one of the worst offenses in the country with an average of two goals per game. But Parker doesn’t want to sleep on the Crimson, the ECAC’s last-place team. He said he has seen about four of their games this sea-

son, including two in person, and Monday’s loss to BC was the best they have looked. “They played with a lot of emotion, they played with a lot of physical play to their game, and they made some nice plays,” Parker said. “They certainly were in the game.” On paper, it looks like a lot of recent BU games — one the Terriers should be able to walk through. But with the operative phrase being “on paper,” it is a matter of BU actually showing up and playing to its capabilities. “It’s a lot more important to [BU] than it is to [Harvard],” said BU coach Jack Parker. “I don’t know if I want [BU to get over the loss to Northeastern last Monday] too quickly. I’d be upset if they were laughing about it the next day, you know? It’s something [to which you respond with] ‘that’s done, what’s next?’ But at the same time you’re a little upset that you didn’t get it done last time, and we’ve got to play more determined next time.”


Quotable

I’m just doing the best I can to make sure that our younger guys realize how big this game [Monday] is.

-BU senior captain Wade Megan on the upcoming Beanpot consolation game

Page 8

Sports

Take

The Daily Free Press

it easy

The No. 3 Boston University women’s hockey team isn’t putting too much pressure on itself just yet. The squad is taking it one game at a time. P.8.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

Monday, February 11, 2013

Terriers defeat Binghamton in one-sided affair Women’s hockey By René Reyes Daily Free Press Staff

Boston University men’s basketball coach Joe Jones picked up on Binghamton University’s strategy in the opening minutes of a Saturday matchup with the Bearcats: Take freshman guard John Papale out of the game and do not let him settle into any offensive rhythm. “It’s just hard to do that,” Jones said of the Bearcats’ game plan. “There are just so many guys who can hurt them.” In front of a crowd of 2,706 at the Events Center, junior guard D.J. Irving did most of the hurting, dropping a career-high 27 points on 10-of-18 shooting and sinking seven treys to propel the Terriers (13–11, 7–4 America East) to a 79–58 thumping of the Bearcats (3–21, 1–10 America East). BU produced two other starters in double figures, as Papale had 12 points off four 3-pointers and junior forward Dom Morris scored 13 points to buoy the Terriers to their fifth win in six games. Guard Jordan Reed posted a doubledouble with 17 points and 11 rebounds and forward Javon Ralling had 10 points to lead Binghamton, the losers of five straight contests — currently the longest winless streak in the conference. The Bearcats’ last victory came on Jan. 19, a 57–56 decision at the University of Maine. “They have some guys who are very good at this level,” Jones said. “They have a combination of youth and just not enough depth. I think that’s there biggest issue right now.” Four days removed from lighting up

Maine’s 2-3 zone for 79 points, BU shot 47.8 percent from the field and 38.7 percent from beyond the 3-point line. In the first half alone, the Terriers knocked down 9-of-18 shots from downtown with Irving and Papale accounting for all nine of those 3-balls. BU’s hot shooting from all spots on the court of late comes as no surprise to Jones. “We lead the league in 3-point shooting,” Jones said. “We lead the league in field goal percentage. We’re one of the leading scoring teams in the league. This isn’t something that just happened. Our offense hasn’t been the issue for us. It’s been more in some other areas. We’re not surprised. “We’ve had guys get hot. John’s gotten hot. [Junior forward] Travis Robinson has gotten hot. D.J. is starting to get hot. Dom has led us in scoring. I’m never surprised … It’s a great weapon for us to have so many guys who can score.” Binghamton scored six of the game’s first 10 points, but BU responded with a 14–0 surge bolstered by six straight Irving field goals, and never trailed again. Irving finished with a career high in points with 27, but it was the six boards that he grabbed that caught his bench boss’s attention. “He’s rebounding the ball very well as of late,” Jones said. “He’s had 24 rebounds in the last three games. I’ve been really impressed by that. That’s absolutely huge. He’s really competing at a high level and obviously [Saturday night] he was lights out. His all-around game was very efficient.”

suffers rare loss in Beanpot matchup By Gregory Davis Daily Free Press Staff

JACKIE ROBERTSON/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terrier junior guard D.J. Irving scored a career-high 27 points in BU’s 79–58 victory.

Freshman guard Maurice Watson Jr. served as the facilitator and dished out 13 assists, including nine in the first session that saw the Terriers jump out to a 42–28 halftime cushion. When asked if his team boasts the most dynamic backcourt in the league, Jones was candid.

When the No. 3 Boston University women’s hockey team fell on Tuesday in the Beanpot semifinals against Northeastern University, it was the team’s first loss in 14 games. BU was held to fewer than three goals just three times over the course of its undefeated streak. However, the Huskies gave up 13 goals in three games to the Terriers earlier in the season, and didn’t let it happen again. BU only netted one puck in its 4–1 loss. “[The Beanpot loss] was obviously very trying and something that the kids had pointed to for a while here,” said BU coach Brian Durocher. “Going into the Beanpot the last four years, we’ve had a team that could have won the event, but it hasn’t happened for different reasons so it definitely left a sour taste in everybody’s mouth.” Durocher said passing and forechecking are the most imperative factors to the team bouncing back and getting a new streak going. “We need to work on a couple of things we didn’t do well the other day,” Durocher said. “I don’t believe we made or caught passes very well … so we’ll focus on that. We’ve got to be a little more determined on our forecheck.

Notebook, see page 7

Men’s basketball, see page 7

Terriers not taking Beanpot matchup BU faces off against Binghamton for against Harvard lightly, looking to win 2nd time in 2012-13, wins handedly By Tim Healey Daily Free Press Staff

When it comes to Beanpot consolation games, you don’t need to remind Sean Escobedo how important they can be. In February 2011, when the senior defenseman and his classmates were sophomores, BU blew a third-period lead to Harvard University to have its heart broken, 5–4, on Valentine’s Day. The loss hammered BU when it came to that season’s PairWise Rankings and was therefore the reason the team missed the NCAA tournament. “Obviously Harvard [in 2011] is at the back of our minds,” Escobedo said Sunday before adding that BU coach Jack Parker addressed the team about the subject earlier in the week. “The guys who have been here have experienced what they did to us … It is always going to be on our minds.” This time around, the No. 11/13 Terriers (13–11–1, 10–7–1 Hockey East) are in a similar situation. They are again in the consolation game of the city’s annual four-team tourney, again facing the Crimson (5–15–2). And, after a rough month-and-a-half stretch, BU again finds itself on the cusp of an NCAA bid. Needless to say, the Terriers aren’t taking this game lightly. “I’m just doing the best I can to make sure that our younger guys realize how big this game [Monday] is,” said BU senior captain Wade Megan. “It is, in my eyes, a must-win game. I’ve done everything I can to make sure that everybody is ready to play tomorrow night.

I think we are. I think we will show up and have a good game.” The last time BU and Harvard faced off, the Crimson fought back from a three-goal deficit in the final frame before stunning the Terriers, 6–5, in overtime Jan. 9. Since then, Harvard has not won. The win vs. BU serves as its only win in its last 16 games. The Crimson most recently lost to No. 4/5 Boston College, 4–1, in the Beanpot semifinals and tied Dartmouth, 1–1, Sunday. The Terriers haven’t played to quite as miserable a record, but they are far from happy as well. They are just 3–6–1 since Christmas and are clinging to fourth place in Hockey East — and home ice in the playoffs. Parker, though, insists his team is trending up. “We played with a lot of emotion and we played with a lot of grit [first semester],” Parker said. “That disappeared for a while and now we’re getting it back. It’s just not producing ‘Ws’ yet. “We’re making strides. We’re getting our enthusiasm back. I think we seem to be coming back together as a team.” Parker said the team worked during practice this week to improve its power play, which has failed to convert in its last 13 chances, including six last week vs. Northeastern University in the Beanpot semifinals, a 3–2 loss. Maintaining possession in the offensive zone and moving the puck quicker were points of emphasis. Sophomore forward Evan Rodrigues will

Men’s hockey, see page 7

The Bottom Line

Monday, Feb. 11

M. hockey vs. Harvard, 4:30 Beanpot consolation game

Tuesday, Feb. 12 M. basketball @ Vermont, 7 p.m. W. hockey vs. Harvard, 5 p.m. Beanpot consolation game

By Matthew Fils-Aime Daily Free Press Staff

Saturday afternoon, the Boston University women’s basketball traveled north to Vestal, N.Y., to take on the Binghamton Bearcats for the second time this season. Just like earlier in the season, the Terriers (20–4, 10–1 America East) came away with a win, but this game had a different story. The Terriers won handedly, 73–51. In one of the Terriers’ strongest games of the season, their offense was clicking and fluid as five different players scored in double digits. From the opening tip, the Terriers controlled the game with a quick 7-0 start and held the lead until the end of the final buzzer. Junior forward Whitney Turner led BU with a career-high 14 points on 7-of-10 shooting and added seven rebounds to her stat line. “Whitney really looked to score [Saturday] because they weren’t doubling her,” said BU coach Kelly Greenberg. The BU frontcourt, made up of Turner and junior forward Rashidat Agboola, was especially stellar, outscoring Binghamton in the paint, 17-4. Agboola came up with 13 points on a 4-of-7 shooting day, along with 10 rebounds. The double-double was her seventh of the season. Senior guard Kristen Sims had 11 points and also tallied five rebounds, while senior guard Chantell Alford chipped in 10 points.

Wednesday, Feb. 13 W. Basketball @ Vermont, 7 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 14

Although she did not score in double digits, senior guard Mo Moran played a major role in the Terriers’ victory, as she was able to account for nine of BU’s 20 assists while also contributing six points and seven boards. The Terriers’ sixth man, Danielle Callahan, had 11 points off the bench, connecting on three of her seven treys. “We like to share the ball and we’re always looking for the open person,” Callahan said. “We like to let whoever is open shoot the ball, so it’s really fun playing with these girls.” Callahan’s performance helped BU gain a 19–18 edge in bench scoring. In their previous matchup, the Terriers only had three players in double digits, with Chantell Alford leading all scorers with 16. BU shot just 30 percent from the floor, but was able to force Binghamton (4–20, 3–8 America East) into 17 turnovers. “[In the previous game] they had a couple new players that we weren’t familiar with,” said Greenberg. “But in this game we were ready for them and really jumped on them defensively.” This time around, the Terriers were defensively stout again and forced the Bearcats into 13 turnovers while holding them to 30 percent shooting. The Terriers put up 17 points off of the turnovers. “We wanted to be really aggressive on

No Events Scheduled Dice-K signed with the Cleveland Indians over the weekend ... Terry Francona’s blood pressure was not consulted.

W. basketball, see page 7

Friday, Feb. 15 M. hockey @ Maine, 7:30 p.m.


February 10th Daily Free Press