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The Daily Free Press

Year xliii. Volume lxxxiv. Issue XIII

JUST TALK SG aims to increase dialogue with Social Justice Week, page 3.

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Thursday, February 7, 2013 The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University

SIMPLE FOLK

Mumford & Sons rock a sold out TD Garden, page 5.

]

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MAINE SQUEEZE

Men’s basketball defeats Maine in 100th matchup, page 8.

WEATHER

Today: Partly cloudy/High 26 Tonight: Mostly cloudy/Low 21 Tomorrow: 36/23 Data Courtesy of weather.com

Legislation seeks to lure Broadway shows to Hub Mass. legislators support stricter gun control laws By Kristen Gloss Daily Free Press Contributor

The pre-Broadway business could be headed to Boston thanks to a bill recently introduced to the Massachusetts Legislature. The bill is set to establish a tax credit program for pre-Broadway shows. Unlike when touring productions visit cities, which last between two and three weeks, pre-Broadway shows need to be in a theater for 10 weeks before moving to Broadway in New York for the duration of their run. Live theater companies that do business with a Massachusetts-based theater venue could be eligible to receive a tax credit to support the expansion of pre-Broadway and Broadway tour launches in the Commonwealth, according to the text of the bill, filed Jan. 17. Up to $3 million could be granted to productions showing in Massachusetts before opening in New York. “My hope is to set a foundation to help stimulate the once-thriving business here at the Commonwealth and once the foundation is set, the tax credit can be removed and we can sustain these pre-Broadway opportunities for decades to come,” said Mass. Rep. Paul McMurtry, one of the bill’s co-sponsors. Shows have been going to neighboring states such as Connecticut, which has a tax credit, McMurtry said. “Moving Boston back to its former status as a Broadway tryout town might bring some excitement back to the theater district, jobs

By Katherine Lynn Daily Free Press Staff

here than in other areas of the city,” said Noah Druckenbroad, 31, of Allston, “and part of that, maybe, is linked to the heavier drinking. But … it still at the same time seems pretty safe.” McCall also said police would be welcome since there have been a number of attacks in the area, including a stabbing on New Year’s Day. But other residents said parties in Allston are to be expected and do not require increased police presence in the area. “If you move into Allston you’re signing up for a bit of that [weekend party atmosphere],” said Nick Holden, 23. Holden said he does not live in the GAP, but even west of Allston Village bars and the GAP it can still get loud on weekends. “It’s still reasonable,” he said. “I don’t have any issues with getting to work or sleeping or anything like that.”

Amid the national debate on gun control, Massachusetts’s representatives in Washington D.C. have come out in support of U.S. President Barack Obama’s proposed gun control package. The laws include mandatory background checks for all gun owners, a stronger ban on assault weapons and an improvement in mental health care, among other provisions, according to the White House website. The bills have yet to be voted on by the House or the Senate. Mass. Rep. Ed Markey, one of the Democrats vying for John Kerry’s vacated senate seat in a special election set for July, said he fully supports the new laws introduced by the president last month. “In terms of the President’s current proposals, Ed Markey supports them whole-heartedly,” said Markey’s spokesman, Eben BurnhamSnyder. “[He] has been calling on Republicans in Congress to hold the vote on the entire package, so that the people who represent Americans who want guns off the street can vote one way or the other on the President’s package.” Earlier this week, Markey met with the group Stop Handgun Violence to promote his position on stronger gun laws, Burnham-Snyder said. “He has been working with groups in Massachusetts as well, to try and push for Congress to pass these laws,” Burnham-Snyder said. “Even though Massachusetts has robust gun control laws, you have the flood of out-of-state weapons coming in and resulting in violent crimes here in Massachusetts.” Markey believes Obama’s plan is needed to federally ensure dangerous weapons don’t cross borders, Burnham-Snyder said. Markey has been working at the federal level since 1994 to promote gun safety. In 1994, Markey supported the first assault weapon ban that was passed by President Bill Clinton, Burnham-Snyder said. “Obviously this is something he has worked on for years,” Burnham-Snyder said. “The impact of gun violence in communities in Massachusetts and communities nation wide hasn’t gone away, it’s only gotten worse, especially over the years since the assault weapons ban has expired.”

BPD, see page4

Guns, see page 2

KENSHIN OKUBO/DAILY FREE PRESS

A bill being introduced in the State Legislature could bring Broadway-bound shows to Boston’s Theatre District.

for industry professionals and increased revenue for the City of Boston,” said Judy Braha, a theater professor at Boston University. There are no vocal opponents to the bill in legislation at this time, but when it undergoes a day of hearings in the House and Senate, the public can voice concerns to government officials. The tax credit will undergo voting in the next 20 months, McMurtry said.

Officials at Boston University familiar with Boston’s theater economy panned the proposal. “If there are 20 shows that would come anyway, and only one extra show you get because of the tax, you’re giving a credit to 21 shows to only get one extra,” said Barton Lipman, department chair of economics at

Broadway, see page 2

Increased BPD weekend patrols go unnoticed by locals By Emily Overholt Daily Free Press Staff

Despite a recent initiative to crack down on underage drinking and large parties in the lower Allston area, residents said they have not noticed a difference in police presence or the party culture of the collegeheavy neighborhood. Cheryl Findaca, a Boston Police Department spokeswoman, said the initiative is gaining momentum with nine arrests related to underage drinking in the past two weeks and five summonses for disorderly houses. “Areas in or around campuses, especially areas known for loud parties, are patrolled by the Boston Police Department as well as college officials,” said BPD Officer James Kenneally. However, Patrick McCall, 25, said he hasn’t seen an increase in weekend patrols, but he does think, if anything, parties have

increased in recent months. “It’s gotten bigger I guess,” McCall said. “I’ve only lived in this neighborhood for a little bit — I’ve lived in Allston for two years. So I don’t know about [the change over] years, but definitely over the past few months.” BPD has dedicated several officers to patrol areas where students party on weekends, with the sole job of keeping the drinking scene in check, as previously reported by The Daily Free Press. Kenneally said the number of officers in the area fluctuates depending on the number and frequency of noise disruptions. And while few residents saw a change in the party scene of Allston and the presence of police — particularly in the area of Gardner, Ashford and Pratt Streets often called the GAP — locals disagreed with the notion that Allston needs a change. “There are more sketchy people out

Updated water bottle bill close to passage after months of gridlock By Bram Peterson Daily Free Press Contributor

After receiving the highest number of cosponsors in its history, the Bottle Bill update — which would expand recycling opportunities throughout the state — seems close to passage. Initially introduced in 2011, the bill had 66 cosponsors in the House. But, when the official cosponsor period ended Friday at midnight, the bill had a total of 95 cosponsors: 75 in the House and 20 in the Senate, according to a press release from the Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group Monday. “The fact that we have 10 percent more cosponsors in the House and a majority of freshmen [legislators] signals that this bill has more momentum than ever before,” said Mass. Rep. Jon Hecht, the chief sponsor of the bill in the House, in the release. The Senate passed the bill in May, leaving the House as the only obstacle before its passage. The updated Bottle Bill would enact a five-cent deposit on non-carbonated beverages, such as water, juice, vitamin and sports drinks,

according to the release. “People see this [update] as a natural extension, [bottles] are a product that can be recycled and reused,” said Rick Sullivan, secretary of the Massachusetts Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs. “It makes sense financially and environmentally.” The original Bottle Bill was implemented in 1983, which instituted the five-cent deposit on bottles and cans, but was only applied to carbonated beverages such as soda and beer. “More than 200 cities and towns have passed resolutions supporting the Bottle Bill update,” Sullivan said. Janet Domenitz, executive director of Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group, said the recycling rate would see a significant rise. “Containers that have a five-cent deposit are redeemed or recycled 80 percent of the time, and containers without a deposit are obviously not getting redeemed, and are only recycled 23 percent of the time,” she said. Allowing customers to redeem all of their

Water Bottles, see page 2

GRAPHIC BY MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS FILE

Legislators are looking to update the Bottle Bill to include five-cent deposits on non-carbonated drinks.


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Thursday, February 7, 2013

Theater prof.: ‘Art begets art’ Warren for stronger background checks Broadway: From Page 1

BU. “There’s a real issue about whether there is sufficient audience for a pre-Broadway sufficiently long run. It seems more valuable to create more work than to subsidize new material,” said Sidney Friedman, a BU the-

ater professor. However, Braha said adding pre-Broadway runs would add to Boston’s cultural atmosphere. “Art begets art,” she said. “The more going on in the cultural sphere, the better it is for the people of Boston.”

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Guns: From Page 1

Rep. Michael Capuano, who represents the seventh district of Massachusetts, is also in full support of Obama’s proposed gun control package, according to a statement from the congressman. “We cannot prevent every act of gun violence, but there are certainly many steps that can be taken to improve safety,” Capuano said in an email statement. “Congress should extend the assault weapons ban, close gun show loopholes, ban the sale of large-capacity magazines and restrict sales at gun shows.” Mass. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who began serving the Commonwealth in Washington this January, has also pledged to support the gun control legislation that has been proposed. “Senator Warren has co-sponsored legis-

Rep. Beaton against Bottle Bill update Water Bottles: From Page 1

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recyclable containers would not only increase recycling and help them see returns on their purchases, but would also enrich redemption centers in Massachusetts, said Shanker Sahai, founder of Greenbean Recycling. “[Greenbean] would love the five-cent deposit on water bottles because we’re not making any revenue on them right now,” Sahai said. Sahai said extending the five-cent deposit would allow recycling centers such as his to continue to operate profitably.

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The Daily Free Press Crossword By Mirroreyes Internet Services Corporation ACROSS 1. Italian for “Ladder” or “Scale” 6. Maori for “Influence” or “Authority” 10. Armed struggles 14. The Mamas and the _____ 15. Style 16. Used in skin lotion 17. Concerning 18. Struck a bell 19. Seaweed 20. Hold back 22. “Vowel mutation” 24. Have (archaic) 25. Splashes 26. Assuages 29. Immediately (medical) 30. Complete destruction 31. German for “Numerical” 37. Existentialist French novelist Albert _____ 39. Protecting shelter 40. One who submits a tax return 41. Items offered 44. Close 45. Unit of pressure 46. Jargons 48. City in Florida 52. Entreaty 53. Lovers

54. More tired 58. Gangster’s girlfriend 59. Small island 61. Truck (British) 62. Historical periods 63. German-American biologist Jacques ____ 64. Delete 65. A Persian goddess 66. Froth 67. Car “dings” or depressions DOWN 1. Box or fight 2. Walking stick 3. Mimicks 4. Soft metallic element 5. Off the right path 6. Conduct deserving reward 7. MASH star ____ Alda 8. River in western Thailand 9. Sharp-cornered 10. Nobel Prize winning Dutch physicist Johannes van der _____ 11. Muslim name for God 12. Scoundrel 13. Chairs 21. Association (abbrev.) 23. Central theme 25. Metal 26. Segments of circles

lation to ban assault weapons, to prohibit the sale or possession of high-capacity ammunition magazines, and to support mental health treatment programs,” said Matt Cournoyer, Warren’s press assistant in an email statement. “She will also support legislation to strengthen background checks.” After Obama announced his package of gun control laws in January, newly elected Rep. Joe Kennedy III also released a statement in support of the President. “Over the past decade there have been too many lives lost, families broken and communities shattered by our inability to reasonably restrict access to dangerous weapons,” Kennedy said in the statement from Jan. 16. “I applaud our President and [Mass. Gov. Deval] Patrick for proposing plans to reduce gun violence that are painfully overdue in this country.”

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Rep. Matthew Beaton said he is not a sponsor of the bill because unredeemed deposits would go into the Massachusetts general fund and essentially be a tax on the bottling companies. “The governor is treating [the update] as a revenue bill, not as an environmental bill,” he said. But Domenitz said the update is a smart decision in terms of sustainability for the state. “The bottle deposit system is the most effective recycling tool we have,” she said.

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The American Identity Colin Smith

The unendingly slippery and alltoo-often misemployed idea we have come to call “The American Identity” is something that’s become increasingly hard to track down these days. Gone is the era when we could, by adjusting the rabbit ears on our black and white television sets, find our country’s common code of ethics and problems played out literally and singularly in a show like The Brady Bunch or Leave it to Beaver. The fact is, whether we like it or not, there is no longer a singular set of American values to appeal to. Recently, The Boy Scouts of America made headlines when it announced it would consider ending their long-standing ban on gay members. For me, the announcement was met with monotony, not gratitude. Perhaps five years ago I would have been suitably impressed by the humanistic and progressive nature of such a declaration. However living in the post-2008 world that I do, I guess I have just come to expect more. In this case I won’t be impressed until a ban on gay members is lifted officially. Apparently I was justified, because yesterday the organization announced that it would delay a vote on permitting gay members until May. The truth is, I wouldn’t have been impressed even if the group had done the right thing and lifted its archaic and dishonorable ban. It’s just too little too late. My anger is quelled a bit when I see the direction in which our country is headed. Someday in the very near future, announcements like the Boy Scouts’ “considering” giving full rights to gay members will be viewed, and should be viewed, as shameful inadequacy, met with a sense of entitlement and not adulation, treated as obvious and not extraordinary. The announcement was a baseball on a tee. And the Boy Scouts still swung and missed. I cannot know for sure why the feeble, short-short-clad merit-badgeladen old men which presumably comprise the upper echelon of Boy Scouts of America have chosen to delay their vote. I cannot even know for sure what the ultimate outcome of this vote will be. However, I do see the pursuit of equal rights for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people of this nation as the last great Civil Rights struggle of our time. Nothing less. And like those weak, often scared people who tried to deny African Americans their full rights in the 1960s, I can surmise that the hesitation of these people probably lies within words and like Tradition, or Patriotism or “The American Identity.” I am not one to trash “The American Identity.” I firmly believe that we are the greatest nation on Earth. But for such a powerful nation, we have a remarkable and terrible capacity for hesitation, for fear. And when terms like the “The American Identity” are used to deny certain portions of our society their full rights under the law, I feel a cold desire to lash out, to say that this “American Identity” is dead. But that is wrong, and I am wrong. The American Identity is not dead, but evolving. It is becoming less sure of itself just as all of us are becoming more sure of ourselves, of who we want to be outside of society’s expectations or the heavy context of tradition. But this “American Identity” is no less American, is no less strong, is no less beautiful for that. Colin Smith is a freshman in the College of Arts and Sciences. He can be reached at colin1@bu.edu.

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Students convene for Social Justice Week Boston named ideal place for men on prowl

By Rachel Riley Daily Free Press Staff

Boston University Student Government officials said Social Justice Week’s numerous gatherings were designed to encourage activism and on-campus discourse on a variety of issues. “Our goal is to bring these issues up in our community at BU and get the discussion going so that people are actually aware of what’s going on and feel like they can make a difference — because really they can,” said SG spokesman and Director of Advocacy Saurabh Mahajan, a College of Arts and Sciences freshman. On Monday, about 20 people gathered in the South Campus study lounge to kick off Social Justice Week by participating in a studentorganized dialogue. SG President Aditya Rudra, a School of Management junior, and KC Mackey, a CAS senior, led the discussion. Luke Rebecchi, a CAS junior, and Katie Cole, School of Theology and School of Social Work 2012 graduate also helped organize the dialogue. “Tonight, we’re having a conversation on social justice — it’s completely student-led, all student participants — really just to have a dialogue about social justice issues,” said SG Director of Social Affairs Rebekah Leopold, a CAS freshman, Monday night. Participants touched on a variety of issues, including poverty, racism, sexism and the role of large corpora-

By Zoe Roos Daily Free Press Staff

HEATHER GOLDIN/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF College of Arts and Sciences juniors Christopher Addis and Luke Rebecchi debate the meaning of social justice during the Conversation on Social Justice in the South Campus Study Lounge Monday evening.

tions in students’ lives. “Forums like this are a way to bring personal experience, diverse background and diverse classroom learning to a conversation in the here and now,” Cole, who is director of children and youth ministries at the Fourth Presbyterian Church of South Boston, said. “It’s a little more personal and a little less philosophical.” Cole said college is a good environment to take up new causes. “One of the great things about going to school in an urban setting is that you have 1,000 opportunities to be involved in all different kinds of social justice initiatives,” she said. “Now is the time to do it.” Charlie Walker, a College of Communication senior who attended Monday’s discussion, said he learned more about the nature of social jus-

tice and how to go about effecting change. “We just heard a lot of different perceptions of injustice, a lot of different injustices,” he said. “Today has showed that a lot of reaching social justice is open-mindedness and willingness to listen and look out for other issues and look out for other people.” SG joined the Sigma Kappa sorority and the Sigma Alpha Mu fraternity Wednesday in hosting a talk by BU professor of neurology Andrew Budson, associate director for research of BU’s Alzheimer’s Disease Center. He spoke about the biological and pathological background of Alzheimer’s, as well as what is known about treating the disease.

Justice, see page4

Students pleased by new Terrier Card website By Brian Latimer Daily Free Press Staff

After the Terrier Card Office announced its new website via email Wednesday, Boston University students said the new Terrier Card Center and Laundry Web site is a more efficient alternative to the Student Link. “It is nice that the website is new and streamlined because a lot of things on the Student Link have not been updated in a while,” said Jeremy Weprich, a College of Arts and Sciences sophomore. “A new website that is fully functional is more convenient.” Students received an email Wednesday from the TCO announcing the new Terrier Card website, which consolidates tools for updates on laundry, meal plans, dining points and other bal-

ance information. “I would remember to go to [the new] website if I have needs related to the Terrier Card,” Weprich said. BU spokesman Colin Riley said the site has been functioning for some time, but TCO decided to make a formal announcement Wednesday. New features include allowing students to view their payment history on Dining and Convenience Points and the ability to report a Terrier Card lost or stolen, Riley said. “You can see your spending history and where you’re using your plans,” he said. “You can also change your settings for notifications, for instance, to notify you if there has been a charge on your card services.”

Riley said the new Terrier Card website also provides a tool that checks the status of laundry machines and driers in BU dormitories. “That [tool] is really important, especially on days that are busy,” said Rei Hawkins, a CAS freshman, about the laundry tracker. “You have to go downstairs and check, then go back upstairs, get your clothes, and then go back down again — it saves you a couple of trips and time.” Demi DeSalvo, a Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences sophomore, said the site makes it easier to view options regarding points, meals plans and payment histories from a smart phone. “I have been going on Student

Terrier card, see page4

It’s not you, it’s the city. Or so says the recent study declaring Boston to be the best city in the country for single men. Certain urban environments are more likely to foster new relationships than others according to the study conducted by Nerdwallet, a personal finance and credit card comparison website. The site found Boston’s offering of affordable dates, multiple places to meet people and a higher percentage of single women the ideal situation for the single man. The Hub came in first ahead of Baltimore, Washington D.C., Philadelphia, Denver, Fort Worth, Texas, and Seattle. The study did not name the worst cities for single men. The study was conducted by looking at the number of unmarried men per 100 unmarried women, the number of bars and gyms per 1,000 residents, unemployment and the cost of a date. The number of unmarried men per 100 unmarried women was weighted twice as much as the other measures. Boston’s first-place ranking resulted from unmarried women outranking unmarried men, a variety of date options and a 7.1 precent unemployment rate, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Some men said they were not surprised by the study’s findings, attesting to dating successes in Beantown. Jacob Liman, 34, a resident of Somerville, said he has lived in the Boston area for more than ten years and met his current girlfriend here. “I met my girlfriend here and when we first started dating, we had a lot of fun going out to different places in the city,” he said Harry Klien, 29, a resident of Brighton said that he was happy with his dating life here in the city. “I’ve dated a couple girls since I’ve lived here,” he said. “And yeah, I guess it was pretty easy to meet people. The bar scene really helps with that.” Sixty-two-year-old Jeff Bullock, a resident of Boston, said he was was amused by the study. “I have been divorced for several years so I’m not really sure how much this applies to me,” he said. “But hey, you know maybe that means there is still hope for me!”

BU graduate publishes novel fighting Calif. Proposition 8 By Paola Salazar Daily Free Press Staff

Boston University alumnus Chris Delyani said he hopes his new novel exploring relationships, marriage and society in San Francisco’s gay community will help normalize gay marriage and work against Proposition 8. Delyani, a 1990 College of Communication graduate, said his experiences in San Francisco as a gay man shaped his novel, titled You Are Here, and its message. “What really inspired me was that it’s true that San Francisco is great, but it’s a city, so there’s good here and there’s bad here,” he said. “It’s a bit of a dark story but there’s possible happiness of finding a friend, finding a partner in this beautiful place, but at the same time, there’s a lot of danger.” Delyani said he originally wrote You Are Here in the 1990s, but ex-

perienced difficulty when trying get it published. “I wrote a first draft of You Are Here and actually managed to shop it around to publishers, all of which shot it down, and while it was being passed around, that’s when I started The Love Thing,” he said. Delyani wrote The Love Thing, a more upbeat novel than You Are Here, and, while advertising the new novel to publishers, honed his original book using his newfound perspective on life. “I added a lot of layers to it,” he said. “I was a kid when I started it, and then a lot older when I finished it, and it brought a lot of depth to characters that were older.” Proposition 8, passed in 2008, repealed California’s original decision to legalize gay marriage. In 2005, California had become the second state in the U.S. to allow gay marriage.

Delyani said his personal experiences provided him with new respect for those who do fight for marriage equality. While at BU in 1988, Delyani attended an LGBTQ gathering to write an article for The Daily Free Press — of which he was a member in 1986 — but felt too uncomfortable to stay for the whole meeting, he said. Some time after that occurrence he became involved with the Boston Alliance of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth, Delyani said. Delyani graduated BU in 1990 with a dual degree in journalism and political science. Two years later, he worked for the Boston Phoenix until he realized he wanted to pursue creative writing. His lack of confidence during his college years is what he believes defined his later change from journalism to creative writing, Delyani said.

Delyani, see page4

PHOTO COURTESY OF CHRIS DELYANI

College of Communication alumni from the class of 1990, Chris Delyani, published a book about Prop 8 called “You Are Here” in August 2012.


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Thursday, February 7, 2013

SG hosts Million Hours Project Thurs. SAR soph.: Website saves time on phone Justice: From Page 3

“I would love for students to begin understanding what’s going on, get involved, and try to help out,” he said. SG will also host the Million Hours Project Community Service Expo from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at 100 Bay State Road. “It’s basically just a showcase of a lot of BU’s service organizations so that people know how they can get involved to help with hunger, or education, or some of those issues that this week is focusing on,” Leopold said.

To close out the week, students will have the chance to speak about social justice with Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore on Friday between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. The conversation will take place on the fifth floor of the George Sherman Union in the Faculty and Staff Dining Room. Leopold said her goal for Social Justice Week is to increase campus dialogue on social justice issues, both specific and general, pertaining to the BU community and the world. “Hopefully, through greater discussion comes greater knowledge,” Leopold said. “Greater knowledge will translate to more action for social justice issues.”

Delyani hopes works will change perspectives Delyani: From Page 3

After moving to San Francisco in 1995, Delyani and his husband Dan began dating, he said. Delyani said he came out to his parents when he and Dan’s relationship grew serious. “I don’t think it came as a tremendous surprise to anyone,” he said. “They didn’t really criticize me for it — they mostly just had the worries of any parent. They just wanted to know I was okay.” He married Dan in 2008, just over a month before Proposition 8 banned gay marriage in California. He campaigned and stood with the gay community in outrage at the proposition. “As I was holding my sign up I kept thinking how ridiculous it was that I actually had to

campaign for a right that straight people don’t even have to worry about,” he said. “It felt really personal. It’s all about bigotry and discrimination.” Delyani said he no longer campaigns for the right to a homosexual marriage, but hopes his works help normalize the perspective of the gay community and marriage within it. COM professor Robert Zelnick said the public’s view on gay marriage might drive a shift in legislation. “It isn’t what’s considered extreme in society anymore,” Zelnick said. “There’s already a normalization of homosexual unions and marriages because it’s too big a part of the culture now to outlaw it. It doesn’t make sense to outlaw something that doesn’t even raise eyebrows anymore.”

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Singles: From Page 3

Link, and it’s really hard to get onto on your phone — and even your computer — just to check meals and points,” she said. “It takes so much longer to go through all those tags, and you have to reenter your information multiple times.” DeSalvo said the new website saves time because information from multiple places on the Student Link is now compiled

on one page. Laura Wong, a CAS sophomore, said she is pleased she no longer needs to cycle through multiple tabs on the Student Link now that her Terrier Card information is all on one page. “I always find myself wondering the number of dining points and meals I have,” Wong said. “If you can view everything on your phone, it makes it a lot more convenient and efficient.”

Allston resident: Parties expected in Allston BPD: From Page 1

Kyle Dinges, 23, who lives next to Tavern in the Square, a centrally located and popular bar, said while he rarely sees police other than by parking meters, he does not think there needs to be more. “There’s a good amount of partying, but I don’t know that there needs to be more cops,” he said. “I haven’t seen too much crazy stuff since I moved here.” On Jan. 19 BPD broke up a party at 34 Ashford St., at which between 90 and 100

students were found drinking in the basement — the sort of party the initiative is trying to shut down, according to Boston. com. And while most residents are split on whether the police need to intervene in the culture of Allston, Trevor Rizzolo, 24, succinctly summed up the nightlife since the initiative was announced. “It’s about as crazy as ever,” he said. Sarah Regine Capungan contributed to the reporting of this story.

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Muse Editor - Meg DeMouth

Music Editor - Lucien Flores

Film/TV Editor - Michela Smith

Lifestyle Editor - Justin Soto

Food Editor - Brooke Jackson-Glidden

Mumford & Sons, Ben Howard sell out TD Garden Sydney Moyer MUSE Staff

PHOTO COURTSY OF GLASSNOTE RECORDS

T

Mumford & Sons brought their “sweet ‘n sensitive brand of folk’ to Boston on Tuesday.

he manifestation of the folk renaissance of the past several years came out in droves Tuesday night to see Mumford & Sons, Ben Howard and The Felice Brothers sing to a sold-out TD Garden.

British singer-songwriter Howard opened the night with sincerity and soulsteeped folk ballads inviting many a Nick Drake comparison from his debut album, Every Kingdom (Island, 2012). As Marcus Mumford himself put it later that evening,

“In England he’s like the new Princess Diana,” but as of yet, Howard has yet to gain as much attention in the States. Judging from the way his quiet croon stilled the rustling of the crowd that generally accompanies an opening act, however, Howard’s relatively unknown status in America may soon change. Rollicking Americana act The Felice Brothers followed Howard, riling the crowd up with the phenomenal use of a washboard and fiddle. By the time Marcus Mumford and company strolled onstage, I was having so much fun that I had almost completely forgotten about some lingering negative feelings I’ve had about Mumford & Sons. Any mention of Mumford & Sons in the past has elicited a slight groan from me and a snarky comment somewhere along the lines of “Ugh, bored.” Before Tuesday night, I would have told you that Mumford & Sons, to me, seemed one of the most undeserving folk revival acts to sell out TD Garden. But my cynicism was momentarily stifled as the London natives filled the arena with swelling anthems like “Little Lion Man” and “Roll Away Your Stone.” My

battery-powered heart was touched as every last bro, hipster and family in the audience practically punctured a collective lung shouting along to the group’s latest single, “I Will Wait.” While perhaps Mumford’s LPs leave something to be desired in terms of originality, their sound translates perfectly to an arena setting, backed by stellar horn and string sections. Still, despite the impressive light show and the sheer energy of the TD Garden show, I wished I had been able to see Mumford’s sweet ‘n sensitive brand of folk at some dingy pub in England, or at least a place like The ICC Church in Allston, which Mumford named as their first-ever North American gig. While it’s great that folk acts like Mumford can pervade the mainstream as they have, I wished for my own selfish reasons that I could have experienced the band within the context their music conjures: down-home, dirty, dive-y Americana. But I suppose I can still hope for a Ben Howard headlining tour in the near future that can fulfill that dream — fingers crossed.

REVIEW: Pusha T – Wrath of Caine Mixtape

B

y 2013, everyone should know that “gangsta rap” is an umbrella term for ultra-violent, hyper-masculine hip-hop that mixes Godfather-esque lavishness with street tales as compelling as those seen on The Wire. This is nothing new. It has been in the genre for decades. But it somehow sounds different when listening to artists like Pusha T. Formerly one half of the Virginia-based duo Clipse, Pusha T went solo, signed with Kanye West, and began to release his own tracks back, starting with the 2011 mixtape Fear of God and its sequel, the Fear of God II EP. Now he is ready for his solo debut studio album My Name is My Name, but not before releasing the “prelude,” Wrath of Caine. Pros Sonically, Caine is a mixture of dark melodies, booming bass and energetic sampling alongside upbeat synths and horns. Young Chop (“Blocka”), Kanye West (“Millions”), B!nk (“Take My Life”), and the Neptunes (“Revolution”) are some of the big name producers on this 11-track mixtape that add their signature sounds to Pusha T’s gritty, sharp wordplay and deliv-

Brandon Kesselly MUSE Staff ery. Lyrically, he delivers on nearly every single track, whether it’s storytelling or just punch lines. In the “Intro” he compares less-than-quotable rappers to “internet porn”, while on “Take My Life” he raps: “It ain’t enough that I struggle through my career/Less appreciated when I was part of a pair.” One of the best tracks on the mixtape, “Revolution,” details Pusha’s career from the Clipse breakout single “Grindin’” until now. Even the seemingly cookie-cutter “Millions” (Featuring Rick Ross) has its moments where both performers showcase their talents as artists. However, while he is gifted at playing the tough drug dealer, Pusha shines most when he’s being reflective, so tracks like “Revolution”, “Take My Life” and “I Am Forgiven” showcase some of his deeper moments. Cons Two words: French Montana. The Moroccan-born rapper’s voice on “Doesn’t Matter” makes the song hard to get into, and the use of Auto-Tune makes it skipworthy, in spite of Pusha T’s performance. Kevin Gates on “Trust You” also becomes

a bit annoying after extended listening. In general, most of Caine’s features – while they do work within the songs’ contexts – are difficult to listen to due to the distortion of the performers’ voices. However, aside from “Doesn’t Matter” and “Trust You,” the mixtape is so short that there is little else to complain of. The Verdict With the exception of “Doesn’t Matter”, Wrath of Caine is definitely worth multiple spins. Pusha T paints a gritty drug dealer soundtrack that allows the listener to live out Scarface fantasies. While the mixtape is simply something to hold over his fans until My Name is My Name’s release, Caine seemingly shows that Pusha is determined to prove “this is the end to all [his] unrecognized greatness.” • • • • •

Standout Tracks: “Blocka” “Revolution” “Only You Can Tell It” (Featuring Wale) “Take My Life” (Featuring Andrea Martin) “I Am Forgiven”

F o l l o w u s o n Tw i t t e r : @DFP_MUSE

PHOTO COURTESY OF ISLAND DEF JAM RECORDS

Pusha T’s mixtape, Wrath of Caine, is “worth multiple spins.”


6T

hursday,

February 7, 2013

Opinion

The Daily Free Press

The Independent Student Newspaper at Boston University 43rd year F Volume 84 F Issue 12

Emily Overholt, Editor-in-Chief T. G. Lay, Managing Editor Melissa Adan, Online Editor

Chris Lisinski, Campus Editor

Jasper Craven, City Editor

Gregory Davis, Sports Editor

Anne Whiting, Opinion Page Editor

Kaylee Hill, Features Editor

Michelle Jay, Photo Editor

Cheryl Seah, Advertising Manager Clinton Nguyen, Layout Editor Shakti Rovner, Office Manager The Daily Free Press (ISSN 1094-7337) is published Monday through Thursday during the academic year except during vacation and exam periods by Back Bay Publishing Co.,Inc., a nonprofit corporation operated by Boston University students. No content can be reproduced without the permission of Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. Copyright © 2010 Back Bay Publishing Co., Inc. All rights reserved.

U.S. Postal Service halting Saturday delivery service

The debt-ridden U.S. Postal Service announced Wednesday that it will stop delivering mail on Saturdays but continue to deliver packages six days a week, according to the Washington Post. The halt will commence in August. Post Office hours on Saturdays will also be reduced. This means that magazines, some newspapers, catalogs, general mail and Netflix movies will not reach customers’ homes on the weekends. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe cited a “changing market demand” brought about by the drastic decline in mail volume caused by the rise of the Internet as the reason for the change in delivery service, according to the Post. The change, though not exactly greeted warmly, is necessary. With the cultural switch from snail mail to email has come enormous financial struggle for the Postal Service. Huge portions of USPS employees have been laid off. As Americans continue to switch to communicating and paying bills online, it does not make sense for the Postal Service to over-burden itself with debt when the demand for mail continues to decrease. Cutting back Saturday deliveries addresses budget issues while still keeping the country’s mail delivery system intact. Postal officials have been seeking approval from Congress to eliminate Satur-

day delivery for a while now, but they have been met with resistance from lawmakers in rural districts and labor unions, according to the Post. Rural lawmakers claim that the change would be felt most in rural areas, where remote communities rely heavily on mail delivery. This is likely because in rural areas, access to Internet is less readily available. However, Donahoe is correct in his assertion that the postal service is less needed than it was even a number of years ago. We prefer to receive bills, tickets, even movies via the computer. We correspond on social media, not via letters. But cutting Saturday delivery does not mean it is the beginning of the end for the USPS. It remains important to the American public and its government officials — as seen through the past resistance of Congress — that the Postal Service finds a way to thrive in the face of the digital age. It is an emblem of tradition in America, and the formal way in which we communicate with our communities and our countries. Imagine electronic wedding invitations — support the Post Office in their need to manage their budget. It is necessary that if we plan to embrace the digital age, we allow for some alterations in the more traditional organizations that are trying to compete.

Hasbro, maker of the game Monopoly, has announced that it plans to nix the iron player token in favor of a cat. We here at the Ol’ Free Press wondered what the schools of BU would be if they were a Monopoly piece... • COM : The Twitter bird. • SMG : They don’t play for fake money. • CGS : The cat because they can’t think of anything else. • CFA : The McDonald’s Arches. It’s ironic. • ENG : A girl because they don’t talk to many. • BU Athletics : Not invited because they’ve had enough devestating losses for one week. • Dean Elmore : A toupée. • The FreeP : A paycheck.

letters@daily freepress .c om!!!

“EXITMENT”

That’s my middle name DAVID FONTANA

They call me David Hilarious Fontana. Hilarious — that’s my middle name. Isn’t that such a weird phrase: “That’s my middle name.” We say it with big grins and a sort of humorous pride plastered on our faces. I think it’s supposed to make your skin kind of crawl, too. No, it’s definitely supposed to make your skin crawl. The phrase flashes nightmares of cheesy salesmen and politicians — if there’s even a difference — with the plastic faces, who say stuff like, “Honesty is my middle name!” Cue: eye-roll, fake-vomit and a door slamming in their faces. Why all the fuss over a middle name? It’s not really good enough to be first, it wasn’t historic enough to be last, it’s just kind of thrown into the mix with a “better luck next year, kid.” Sometimes, I actually feel kind of bad for the middle name. Being the middle name is like growing up and thinking you’re ‘The Man’ only to one day realize that all of those medals on your wall are actually just “Participation Trophies,” and it suddenly dawns on you that you couldn’t even catch a baseball to save your life, let alone save the lives of 300 orphans. That’s sort of what middle names are — orphans. They’re the middle children of the name world. And yes, while middle children like to argue that they’re the best (because we are, cough cough... ), let’s face it, we’re not. “But you just said ... ,” yes, I know what I said! But I was overcompensating for my small pencil. As the middle child I only ever got small pencils. We are the forgotten children. Speaking of which, what is my middle name anyway? Confession time: my middle name is not, in fact, Hilarious. No dear readers that, unfortunately, was completely and totally a lie. I know you’re shocked. And I know that you’re thinking it must be “Sexy,” or “High-n-Mighty,” or even “Godly,” but no. Those names, while indeed all-fitting, are incorrect as well. My middle name is — lights up, sound the trumpets, drum-roll please — Bartholomew! No, it’s really not. It’s Andrew. Anti-climactic, I know. At best, my middle name gets to show up on my diploma. Usually it’s just a single letter with a period after it — A. — filed away for all of eternity in the back of some large dusty drawer with a tarantula laying eggs in one corner, and what was once a piece of chewing gum but what has now turned into a huge, pale-green, pulsing organism in the other. Needless to say, as far as middle names go, their futures seem bleak. This guy named Shakespeare (some old dude from history or something who liked dressing men up as girls) once posed this

thought: “That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Well duh, dude! Where have you been? If I called a rose “nincompoop,” of course it’s still going to smell the same! Sometimes I don’t know what they taught you people back in the olden days. The earth is flat? That gods control the weather? Unicorns don’t exist? Inconceivable! But maybe there’s something behind this “Ye Olde Curiosity Shoppe” question of Shakey’s. Maybe my boy Speare has a point. If I had a different middle name, would I be any different? Maybe not on the outside, but perhaps having a name like David Daring Fontana, or David Ostrich Fontana, well, it might make me think and act in an entirely different way. Destiny’s Child didn’t give Super Bowl XLVII a blackout by singing, “Say my middle name, say my middle name,” but maybe they should have. Maybe Beyoncé should be renamed “Beyoncé Diva Blackout Giselle Knowles Carter.” Or maybe not. What role does destiny play in naming its poor, unsuspecting child? Do our names find us from the great beyond? Are our futures predetermined in simple initials like D.A.F. or is the name rather a self-fulfilling prophecy? In the 1996 cult classic “The Crucible,” Daniel Day Lewis appears in a rather moving scene — perhaps “scene-in-whichhe-only-yells” is more appropriate — in which he gives into the claims of his alleged witchery, Goody Lewis, if you will. But before he is hanged, he refuses to sign his confession for the court. He proclaims, “Because it is my name! Because I cannot have another in my life!” Or can he? I mean people change their names, even legally, all the time. Britney becomes Belva, Nick becomes Frasier, David becomes Dave (but don’t ever call me Dave). In a lot of cases, however, people are just deferring to their middle names. So maybe this funky middle fluff really does serve some purpose. Maybe it’s there as a backup plan, in case something really bad happens to your first name. So, if in the future some friend or acquaintance says, “Hey, I heard your kid Jessica may have gotten into some trouble with the police. Is it true?” You can politely let them know that “she goes by Barbara now.” As for me, you can just call me, Fontana, David Fontana. But don’t forgot about the Andrew, if you’d be so kind. David Fontana is a senior in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a weekly columnist for the Daily Free Press. He can be reached at fontad5@bu.edu.

The Daily Free Press wishes the Boston University community a very happy weekend. If you’ve got something to say, submit a Letter to the Editor at letters@dailyfreepress.com


Thursday, February 7, 2013

7

Depth not a dilemma for Terriers down the final stretch of year Notebook: From Page 8

their ice time my first half of my career. My second half of my career has always been a little bit of that. “The reason for that is guys who have expectations of playing pro hockey ... If they can’t make it here, maybe they’re not going to play pro hockey, you know?” Parker not concerned about depth After two midseason departures, BU has just one spare forward, senior Jake Moscatel, who did not play a game before Jan. 4 of this year. It does have seven defensemen who have been used regularly this year, plus junior Matt Ronan, who has played two career games. In the two games since Myron’s departure, Ruikka has played right wing on the fourth line and BU’s other six regular defensemen have dressed. “We still have seven defensemen any way you look at it,” Parker said. “We have plenty of goaltending any way you look at it. We have Jake [Moscatel], who’s proved he can play. And if you have to, you can play 11 forwards. If you have to, you can play five defensemen — five defensemen if you play Ruikka up front, anyway. I’m not concerned about that right now.

“We don’t want to lose anybody else to injury or anything like that. But in general, we have enough players. It’s been whittled down, but we have the players we want. It’s not like we lost somebody that we wish was still here. Those guys left because they weren’t contributing and they thought they’d move someplace else.” The final 10 With 10 games left in the season, the Terriers are not quite where they had hoped to be after a 10–5–0 first semester. They are hovering just above .500 with a 13–11–1 overall record, one point below Merrimack College and one above Providence College for fourth place in Hockey East. BU is now as far removed from its Dec. 29 loss to the University of Denver as from the end of the season. Beginning with that 6–0 loss, the Terriers are 3–6–1. Just three of those games were against currently ranked teams (Merrimack, Denver and the University of Massachusetts-Lowell). Without the context of the last month or so, BU’s last 10 games could look like a breeze: two games each against the University of Maine, University of Vermont and Northeastern University, the eighth, ninth and tenth-place teams in Hockey East. But Northeastern (8–13–3, 4–11–3

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Despite a weak freshman year, Cason Hohmann is flourishing in his sophomore compaign.

Hockey East) beat BU twice in the last month, with a combined nine goals in those two games. And while the Terriers beat Maine (8–14–5, 4–9–5 Hockey East) in their only meeting so far this season, the

Black Bears swept No. 4/5 Boston College last weekend, putting to rest any notion that any Hockey East game can be taken for granted.

Terriers capture win against Maine despite poor play late in matchup Men’s basketball: From Page 8

jumper, Papale connected from downtown once again and Watson Jr. buried a triple of his own during the stretch, which provided BU with a 32–22 advantage at the 13:12 mark. Pollard’s jumper trimmed Maine’s deficit back down to double digits, but that eight-point margin lasted a mere 17 seconds. The Terriers only padded their lead from then on, exploiting the 2-3 zone that Woodward continued to roll out. During the scoring binge, Papale sunk another 3-pointer,

Watson Jr. recorded a steal and an uncontested layup, Irving converted two free throws and a jumper and junior forward Travis Robinson stuck back-to-back threes. By the time Woodward looked up at the scoreboard, BU was up by 21 with 2:42 remaining before halftime, courtesy of that 15–2 run. “We missed a couple shots, they got a couple of turnovers, they got in transition and they hit threes,” Woodward said. “It seemed like Papale had quite a few baskets. I thought we did a good job in the beginning of slowing them down in the zone, but

they got a little bit of rhythm against it.” In the second half, the Terriers’ lead reached 22 points on a Morris two-point field goal at 2:51. But the Black Bears refused to go away easily and chipped away at the lead. What once was a 22-point cushion turned into a seven-point victory for the Terriers, as they were outscored 40–31 in the final frame. Finishing games strong has been the Achilles’ heel for BU this season, something that Morris attributes to a young squad still learning to play a full 40 minutes.

“Next year we’ll get the mentality where you got a team down and you step on their neck,” Morris said. “Right now, we’re just learning, just trying to have fun, but we also need to get that mentality.” As far as the 100th meeting between these America East rivals was concerned, Morris was glad that his team was the one that came away with the win. “It means a lot,” Morris said. “Now we’re just trying to win every game, so it was just the next game on our schedule. Since it’s a rivalry, it’s always good to beat Maine, either at Maine or here.

Women’s basketball shows two-way skill W. basketball: From Page 8

Follow us on Twitter: @DFPSports

are just really tough and are not going to let people break us down. We were finishing with some good defensive rebounding at that point, which is always the key to good defense.” Once again, the Seawolves responded, going on a 16–3 run to bring the deficit down to 14 with fewer than nine minutes to go. BU’s defense once again stepped up in the final minutes of the game, preventing Stony Brook from hitting a field goal for over five minutes while continuing to pad its lead. Stony Brook only made one more basket in the final five minutes of play and

the Terriers earned the 64–45 victory. Alford led all scorers with 20 points. It was the seventh time this season she recorded at least 20 points in a game. Agboola finished with 17 points while senior guard Mo Moran chipped in with 12 points. Junior forward Whitney Turner led BU with a career-high six assists. BU finished the game with a 48.1 field goal percentage (25-of-52), while Stony Brook hit 33.3 percent (17-of-51) of its shots. BU was also perfect from the freethrow line in the game, hitting all seven of its shots from the charity stripe. BU will look to continue its winning play against Binghamton University. Tipoff is set for 2:30 p.m.

BU fails to maintain focus late in game Strong offesnse: From Page 8

@ BOShockeyblog

@BUbballBlog

They then lost, 81–79, to Rutgers University shortly before Thanksgiving, and yet another in Virginia against George Mason University, 48– 45. Just a few weeks later, BU suffered another one-point loss, this time to Harvard University, 65–64. Against Maine to start off conference play, BU was tied with three minutes remaining and failed to close out the game, eventually falling 63–58. It seemed as if Tuesday had potential to be another instance of BU failing to close out a game. The second half began just as the first did, with back-and-forth play. After a while, Maine was able to cut down what once was a 20-point BU lead to 11 points, with 3:42 remaining. The Terriers lost focus, according to BU coach Joe Jones, allowing Maine to get back in the game and make the score much closer than what it could have been. “We played a great first half, and then the

first seven or eight minutes of the second half I was really pleased with our guys,” Jones said. “I thought we really could’ve extended our lead. It was really poor on our part in terms of our offense down the stretch.” With about nine minutes remaining in the second half, when the Terriers had a comfortable 20-point lead, junior forward Dom Morris picked up a steal, but immediately turned the ball over. Luckily for BU, Maine was playing sloppily at the point and returned the ball to the Terriers one last time. On the ensuing possession, freshman forward Nathan Dieudonne turned the ball over on a simple outlet pass and from there, Maine attempted to mount its comeback. “We just lost our concentration and focus,” Morris said. “I don’t want to keep saying this, but we are a young team.” Fortunately for BU, it had a large enough lead that it managed to come away with the victory, 79–72. But learning to close out games is a priority in practice for this BU squad in the upcoming weeks.


Quotable

Now we’re just trying to win every game, so it was just the next game on our schedule.

-BU junior forward Dom Morris on the team’s approach to the rest of the season.

Page 8

Sports

Good Riddance

The Daily Free Press

Freshman forward Wes Myron became the third BU player in 14 months to depart from the men’s hockey team. P.8.

[ www.dailyfreepress.com ]

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Terriers defeat University of Maine 79–72 at Case Gymnasium Morris adjusts to Black Bears in win

3-point offense on fire against Maine

By René Reyes Daily Free Press Staff

By Chris Dela Rosa Daily Free Press Staff

Junior forward Dom Morris returned to form for the Boston University men’s basketball team to help BU (12–11, 6–4 America East) defeat the University of Maine, 79–72, Tuesday night. The Newark, Del., native tallied a career-high 20 points on 9-of-13 shooting after a forgettable outing at the University of Hartford five days ago, a game in which he missed five shots and registered four points. “We play teams twice, so they know your tendencies,” Morris said of his bounce-back performance. “The first time I played Maine, I didn’t play well, but the first time I played Hartford, I played well. It just happened differently. “They know what you like to do and what you are going to do. They just played me differently. I got off this game versus Hartford.” Freshman guard John Papale contributed 16 points and knocked down four treys, freshman guard Maurice Watson Jr. added 14 points and a season-high eight assists and junior guard D.J. Irving corralled a career-high 10 rebounds for the Terriers, who have won four straight at Case Gymnasium. The Terriers improved to 7–2 on their home floor. “I think BU’s an awfully talented team,” said Maine (8–15, 3–7 America East) coach Ted Woodward. “We knew it’d be a heck of a challenge coming in here tonight. They shoot the ball very well and they’re very well balanced. I know they’ve been playing very good basketball.”

MICHELLE JAY/DAILY FREE PRESS STAFF

Terrier junior forward Dom Morris had a career game with 20 points on 9-of-13 shooting in a great winning effort against the University of Maine at Case Gym.

Guard Xavier Pollard scored 20 points, guard Justin Edwards chipped in 16 of his own and forward Alasdair Fraser had 16 points and eight boards for the Black Bears, who dropped their fourth game in a row. Maine jumped out to a quick 4–0 lead after the tip-off on an Edwards layup and a Fraser banker off the glass. BU did not take long to respond, aided by a 5–0 spurt by Morris and Watson Jr. to pull ahead for the first time all evening.

After Edwards made two free throws to give the Black Bears a 22–19 edge midway through the first half, the Terrier offense began lighting up Woodward’s 2-3 zone defense. Papale swished a 3-pointer from the right wing to even the score, jumpstarting the 10­–0 burst that ensued. Morris drove in for a lefty layup and swished a 15-foot

Men’s basketball, see page 7

With strong 3-point shooting for much of the first half and trouble closing out the game with a lead late in the second half, it was a typical performance by the Boston University men’s basketball team against the University of Maine Tuesday night. Ten minutes into the first half, BU (12–11, 6–4 America East) suddenly took off after playing a back-and-forth game for the first 10 minutes. Down by three with 9:39 left in the first half, freshman guard John Papale hit a 3-pointer that set the tone for the rest of the half. From there, BU went on a 19–8 run that gave it an impressive 48–32 lead going into the locker room at halftime. “I thought they got off to a great start in the first half,” said Maine (8–15, 3–7 America East) coach Ted Woodward. “We matched them pretty well and then they got a spurt with a couple of threes, and unfortunately we couldn’t match them in that sequence.” In the first half, BU made 8-of-14 3-point attempts, while shooting 58.1 percent (18-for31) from the field. Meanwhile, the Black Bears only shot 42.3 percent (11-for-26) and made none of their five 3-point attempts. When the Terriers trotted back onto the court after halftime, they appeared to be ready to leave Case Gym, despite another 20 minutes of basketball yet to be played. For some time, the Terriers have had plenty of trouble closing out games. The first of such instances came in their first game of the season against Northeastern University Nov. 9 when they lost on a last-second 3-pointer, falling 65–64.

Strong offense, see page 7

Wes Myron most recent player to leave Multiple double-digit scorers help BU men’s hockey team for better opportunity grab win over Stony Brook University By Annie Maroon Daily Free Press Staff

Last week, Wes Myron became the third Boston University men’s hockey player in 14 months to leave the team midseason in search of better playing opportunities. BU (13–11–1, 10–7–1 Hockey East) coach Jack Parker said Myron was unhappy with his playing time and role on the team. On Sunday, Parker spoke highly of those players who might have been frustrated with their minutes early in their time here, but stuck around and saw their work pay off — including the Terriers’ captain and their top scorer. “[Senior captain Wade] Megan had his struggles his first two years before he blossomed into a great player,” Parker said. “Some of that might have been that we didn’t play him enough. Some of it had to do with him getting faster and stronger. “[Sophomore forward Cason] Hohmann was miserable last year, but he didn’t leave. It wouldn’t have surprised me if somebody else other than Cason was in that situation and left. Because, ‘hey, I was supposed to be on the power play when I got here and now I’m not.’” Megan was in the lineup nearly every game in his first two years at BU, but had just five goals his freshman year and eight

his sophomore year. As a junior, when injuries and departures gave him a chance at top-line minutes, he went off for 20 goals. As an 18-year-old freshman last year, Hohmann played 35 games, mostly on the third line, and finished with two goals and six assists for eight points. Despite a recent cold stretch, he has already almost tripled that with 23 points this year. Senior assistant captain Ryan Ruikka, of course, took sticking around a step further, playing a fifth season for BU as a graduate student because he missed his first two potential seasons with injuries. “Ruikka is a terrific example,” Parker said. “He missed his first two years and he has been a regular, but a regular not-the-No. 1 defenseman for this team. He has played a role. He has accepted that role and he has gotten a great education, and that is what he came for. He has been a fabulous teammate.” Parker said players leaving midseason were rare decades ago, but are a part of the job now. “I guess we should be a little more concerned about trying to ... make sure we get kids who are more dedicated to their decision,” Parker said. “I don’t remember too many guys quitting because they didn’t like Notebook, see page 7

The Bottom Line

Thursday, Feb. 7

No Events Scheduled Ravens RB Ray Rice fell off the parade float during the Ravens’ recent Super Bowl victory parade...

Friday, Feb. 8 M. Hockey v. Merrimack, 7:30 p.m. Track Valentine Invite @ TTC, 1 p.m.

By Conor Ryan Daily Free Press Staff

Thanks to an efficient and balanced offense, which featured three players scoring in double figures, the Boston University women’s basketball team soundly defeated Stony Brook University, 64–45, at Case Gym Wednesday. “It was a really good game,” BU (19–4, 9–1 America East) coach Kelly Greenberg said. “We did some nice things. One of our goals was to shut down their posts on the inside and I don’t think we gave them many baskets or anything, so ... we really achieved that tonight.” The Terriers, who held the lead for the entire game, started off strong thanks to scoring from four out of their five starters. They built a 20–7 lead with fewer than 12 minutes to go in the first half. The Seawolves (12–11, 4–6 America East) answered back, outscoring the Terriers 14–8 over the next nine minutes to cut the deficit down to seven, 28–21, with 3:11 remaining. However, BU scored the final seven points of the first half, punctuated by one of senior guard Chantell Alford’s four 3-pointers of the night, giving the Terriers a 35–21 halftime lead. The Terriers’ offense had a great first half, hitting 55.6 percent (15-of-27) of its

Saturday, Feb. 9

Track Valentine Invite @ TTC, 9 a.m. W. Basketball @ Binghamton, 2:30 p.m. W. Hockey v. UNH, 3 p.m. M. Basketball @ Binghamton, 7 p.m.

shot attempts, while the Seawolves ended the half with a 37.5 (9-of-24) field goal percentage. By the end of the opening frame, two BU players had already scored in double figures, as Alford led the team with 14 points while junior forward Rashidat Agboola scored 10. A 14-point lead was good news for the Terriers, as they are 14–0 this season when leading at halftime. “I thought we came out on all cylinders, and it wasn’t like we were really slow and being patient, which is a good thing,” Greenberg said. “We balanced it out. We were aggressive, yet patient when we needed to be. I thought Chantell and the two forwards running our ‘one-look’ really got us some great looks.” While the Terriers’ offense was the big story in the first half, it was the team’s defense that dominated the second half of the game. The Terriers held the Seawolves to only one made field goal during the first six minutes of the half, as the lead swelled to 50–23 with 13 minutes to play in the game. “The first six minutes were great,” Greenberg said. “We started playing more with our feet and not assuming what they were going to do. All five of our players W. basketball, see page 7

Sunday, Feb. 10 No Events Scheduled ...Rumor has it he was pushed by his teammate, Ray Lewis.

Monday, Feb. 11 M. Hockey Beanpot v. Harvard, 4:30 p.m.


February 7th Daily Free Press