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Dai ly Eastern News

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Friday, Oct. 18, 2013

VOL. 98 | ISSUE 44

“TELL THE TRUTH AND DON’T BE AFRAID”

athletics

INSIDE HOMECOMING WEEKEND

Unusual athlete shines page 3

Linebacker loves literature page 8

erge V OCT. 18, 2013

Dominic Baima | The Daily Eastern Ne ws

Members of the EIU Cheer Team perform during a football game against Illinois State on Sept. 14 on O’Brien Field.

Cheerleaders keep spirit alive By Ashley Holstrom Staff Reporter @alholstrom

The Daily Eastern News' weekly arts and entertainment section

H omecoming

2013 Your guide to an awesome Homecoming Weekend! Your

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They’re at every home football and men’s and women’s basketball game, on the sidelines with their crisp blue uniforms and shiny pom-poms. They’re even branching out and cheering for other teams, like soccer and cross country, as per the requests of those teams. They don’t get scholarships. They don’t get much funding. They do it for the love of the sport. Eastern’s cheerleaders on the EIU Cheer Team were even willing to pay their own way to go to the football games at Southern IllinoisCarbondale and Northern Illinois this season. But the athletic department told them they couldn’t go, coach Brian Allen said. He said he gets an operating budget each year, most of which usually goes toward travel for postseason tournament games. This year, he used it to buy the team new uniforms. Next year, he said he wants to buy new mats. The

current ones are 18 years old. Outside of the operating budget, the cheerleaders have to buy their own gear: practice clothes, warmup outfits, shoes. They also have fundraisers like cheer clinics to teach elementary, junior high and high school students to cheer. Those fundraisers will come in handy for Allen’s big goal this year: the National Cheerleaders Association competition in Daytona Beach, Fla., in April. The team’s last competition was almost 10 years ago and it took eighth out of 16 teams in the nation. Allen wants to go back. “If you want the quality cheerleaders to represent your school, then you have to compete,” Allen said. “You have to. That’s the way cheerleading is moving now.” Chaney Ruffin, a freshman, and the lone man on the team, said he is confident the team could compete and be just as well known as the football team: as a champion team. “There’s a lot of raw talent and

if we harvest it, this team could be amazing,” Ruffin said. “I believe this team could go to any small coed competition and take first.” Competing isn’t all that matters for this team, though. “For me, it’s always been a part of who I am,” said senior captain Allie Moran. She’s cheered since she was in fifth grade and said she plans on staying in the cheerleading world, hoping to coach high school in the future. Having been a captain since her sophomore year, a leadership role like that would come naturally to her. Her captain duties vary from leading routines at practice, to calling cheers at games, to being the line of communication between the athletic department and the team. She’s not the only one who calls cheers at games, though; everyone on the team knows when a cheer is needed to pep up the crowd. If they don’t, she urges her teammates to learn the game. CHEER, page 5

REMEMBERING KAELYNN

t the first home football game, members of the A cheerleading team wore gray T-

shirts with “Fly high, Kae” written in curly white font. They were in honor of Kaelynn Fay, a freshman cheerleader who died in a car crash over the summer. Her family and high school team were at the Sept. 14 game, since it would have been her first game cheering at Eastern. “Fly high, Kae” was the saying that was “booming on social media” when she died, Moran said. Fay was a flyer. “Kaelynn is still a part of our squad and we think of Kaelynn all the time,” senior captain Allie Moran said. “We think of Kaelynn at practice, we think of Kaelynn at games, we always think of Kaelynn.” The team members presented Fay’s framed uniform to her family at the game.

C AMPUS

Homecoming ‘chuck’ full of activities, events By Juwaan Wright Staff Reporter @DEN_News From the Homecoming Pep Rally to Billy’s Backyard Tailgate, Eastern has numerous of events planned for students, alumnus and commu-

nity members to attend this year. This year, Eastern’s Homecoming theme is “Paint the Town Blue,” celebrating the Panther nation. With this year’s football team having a successful start of a season, students like Brooke Dykema are looking forward to the game

against Southeast Missouri State at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at O’Brien Field. Dykema, a senior management major, said she is looking forward to showing her school spirit. “I’m excited for the football game, and the fact that this is my

last year at EIU, I’m planning to make the most fun out of these events,” Dykema said. Dykema added she enjoyed the “Deck the Halls” event, where several offices around campus decorated their doors and interiors to reflect the school spirit.

More events are planned that do not center just on football for Homecoming. The Homecoming Parade will be at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, beginning at Old Main.

ACTIVITIES, page 5


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Local weather Today

Saturday

FRIDAY, OCT. 18, 2013

homecoming

Newlyweds plan honeymoon at Eastern By Katie Cook Staff Reporter @DEN_News

Rain High: 61° Low: 45° For more weather visit castle.eiu.edu/weather.

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After being immersed in Eastern’s culture and making thousands of memories, Emily Merritt will be adding one more to her collection Saturday – her honeymoon. Newlyweds Emily and Jay Merritt are having their honeymoon at Eastern’s Homecoming on Saturday, and could not think of a better place to spend their first day as a married couple. Since graduating in 2009, Emily Merritt always talks about her great experience at Eastern, and even her family has great memories at Eastern from Family Weekends. So her new husband, Jay Merritt, had an idea of how great Eastern is. “He wanted to see where all the stories took place and tie it all together,” Emily Merritt said. The couple met in a bar called Famous Freddy’s in Fox Lake, when they both recently turned 21. Since it is a small town there are not a lot of places to go to at night, she said. “It’s the only dancing bar in town and not just a hole in the wall,” Emily Merritt said. Both of them went to the bar with their friends, bumped into each oth-

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“We’re definitely going to the football game. We already bought our tickets,” the bride said. “Jay absolutely loves everything about football; it doesn’t matter what team is playing he’ll watch it.” The couple wants to go to the Lincoln Log Cabin and all of the other places Emily Merritt made memories. She also wants to visit Will Rogers

Theatre because her and her sorority sisters used to always go there. “I really want to go to my favorite place, Jackson Avenue Coffee. I really hope it’s still there,” Emily Merritt said. Katie Cook can be reached at 581-2812 or kpcook2@eiu.edu.

Residence Hall Association

Thomas to get feedback on quiet floors By Jarad Jarmon Student Governance Editor @JJarmonReporter In order to evaluate student responses toward adding a quiet lifestyle floor in Thomas, representatives of the residence hall announced Thursday they will be handling the assessment through a survey. The announcement came during the Residence Hall Association meeting Thursday. The survey will be sent out electronically to Thomas Hall residents’ emails before Thanksgiving break.

Lisa Walker, the area director of Thomas and Andrews Hall, said the Thomas Hall Council is still looking into the need for a female quiet lifestyle floor. There is currently only one male quiet lifestyle floor in Thomas and five across campus. Walker said the hall council must make a decision whether or not to add a female quiet lifestyle floor by the time they send out the housing contracts during Spring Semester. “There is a want but we are trying to decide if there is a need, like how many residents would choose that floor,” Walker said.

Mark Hudson, the director of Housing and Dining, mentioned the Big Blue Conga Line, which will start at noon Friday by the Doudna Steps. The Homecoming Committee set up this gathering as an impromptu flash mob. He also announced the Bond Revenue Committee will be expected to meet for the first time on Oct. 25. The committee is made up of three senate members and three RHA members who will be in charge of the housing and dining rates for the next school year. Miguel Williams chose his picks for Bond Revenue Committee, but Hud-

son will have the final say into whether they will be a part of the committee Hudson said he hopes the scheduling conflicts will work out with the members. RHA members also announced the sign ups to walk with RHA in the Homecoming Parade on Saturday will be at 8:30 a.m. in the Java Beanery & Bakery in the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. The next RHA meeting will take place at 5:00 p.m. Thursday in McKinney Hall. Jarad Jarmon can be reached at 581-2812 or jsjarmon@eiu.edu.

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Emily Merritt, an Eastern alumna, and Jay Merritt will be having their honeymoon at Eastern’s Homecoming. The newlyweds will travel four hours from Ingleside to Charleston on Saturday. Emily Merritt said they plan to go to the football game and visit the Lincoln Log Cabin and Will Rogers Theatre.

the

Rain High: 61° Low: 41°

er, and four years later they are getting married. The newlyweds are getting married in Ingleside Friday where 150 close friends and family will join. “It may seem like a lot, but we both come from big families,” Emily Merritt said. The beautiful ceremony is going to take place outside, under a tent and near a lake. The reception will then take place inside where everyone can celebrate the couple’s marriage. The couple tossed around other places to spend their honeymoon but Charleston seemed like the right place to go. “We knew we were going to take a little honeymoon, nothing fancy like the Bahamas or anything crazy,” she said. Following the wedding, the couple is driving four hours the next day to Charleston. Emily Merritt attended Eastern and graduated in December 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in Biology. Since Emily Merritt graduated, she attended Worsham College of Mortuary Science for the one-year requirement. Then she did a yearlong apprentice for funeral directing and is now a licensed mortician. The couple are excited to get started on their honeymoon adventure, and will get going right away.

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FRIDAY OCT. 18, 2013

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Baton twirler joins band, adds different element

By Samantha McDaniel Associate News Editor @SamMcDaniel20 Starting her time at Eastern, the featured baton twirler of the Panther Marching Band placed in a number of AAU Junior Olympic Games in Detroit at the end of July and beginning of August. It is at this competition that Nicci Colucy, a freshman kinesiology and sports studies major, said she had the best performance of her baton twirling career so far in an event called “Down the Field.” At the competition, Colucy was awarded five silver medals and a third place at the competition. “I felt like I put myself out there and represented Eastern in a good way,” she said. Colucy had her start in baton twirling when Mary Ramsey in her preschool class brought batons for showand-tell. When her mom came to pick her up that day, Mary Ramsey’s mom, Dee

Gina Volk | The Daily Eastern Ne ws

Nicci Colucy, a freshman kinesiology and sports studies major, is the featured baton twirler in the Panther Marching Band. Colucy was also received five silver medals and was placed tired in the AAU Junior Olympic Games 2013 in Detroit.

Ann Hull Ramsey, approached her and asked if Colucy had done baton before. Since then she has been on several teams and was also the featured twirler for the Marching Raiders at Boling-

brook High School. Colucy said the art of baton twirling is uncommon in the Midwest, but bigger in the southern states. “When I say that I am a baton twirler people don’t understand what

it is because it’s not like I’m a soccer player or I’m a softball player,” Colucy said. “I like that it’s unique and I feel like I’m unique as well.” Colucy said Eastern was not her first choice but decided to stay closer to home. After approaching Northern Illinois University and being told by the band director that they did not want twirlers, Colucy looked at Eastern. She said she sent out a promo pack that contained her résumé and a video of one of her performances. When she came to Eastern for an open house and visited the information table for the Panther Marching Band, the director, J. Corey Francis recognized her. “My favorite quote by him so far, ‘I know you. You’re the twirler,’” Colucy said. Since then Colucy started with the band and said she has gained a new family. “We help each other out and support each other,” Colucy said. Because Colucy is the only twirler in the band, she often has a lot of free

rein for coordinating her own routines. Francis said he likes having Colucy in the band because she adds that extra visual element to the performance. Colucy said she thinks when she performs she adds a new level to the performance. “It adds height. Yes, color guard members toss, but they don’t toss above their heads,” Colucy said. She said she also like having the audience stay to watch her performance because it keeps people there to watch the band. She said because twirlers are not as common, people often watch her more. “When I do things, then people look at me, so then they are looking at the band,” Colucy said. “While my intention is to have people look at me, it is for the band.” Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu. For the in-depth version of this article go to:

dailyeasternnews.com

Campus

Alumni art show “Skelpcher Werkz” ends with sale By Seth Schroeder Editor-in-chief @DEN_news The art alumni sculpture show “Skulpcher Werkz” wraps up this weekend with events including an art auction, lecture and a reception bringing together alumni from up to 25 years ago. The lecture will feature Jim Johnson, art professor emeritus and former dean of the art department, at 7 p.m. Friday in the Tarble Arts Center. The art sale will feature alumni artwork being auctioned off throughout the day Saturday in both the Tarble Arts

Center and the student gallery in the Doudna Fine Arts Center. “Skulpcher Werkz” will official end after the reception 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Tarble Arts Center. Jeff Boshart, art professor and coordinator of “Skulpcher Werkz,” said he has received abundant positive support for the show, which will be his last big project before retiring from Eastern. “I have had so many comments saying that the diversity of the show was overwhelming,” Boshart said. He said his main goal for the show was to end his time at Eastern with a bang and to revisit the work of his previous students.

“We don’t often get a chance to see our students after they get out of here,” he said. “I would refer to it as a hoot.” Boshart said seeing the work of both recent alumni and of students from more than 20 years ago is an excellent educational opportunity. “That’s what we hope our students see and learn,” he said. “In order to get good you have to keep sticking with it.” Boshart said Johnson’s lecture will focus on the role Eastern has played in public art in Illinois. Johsnon said he will discuss some of his own sculptural work as well as several pieces displayed prominently on

Eastern’s campus. “I think Eastern’s been a real advocate for new and emerging artists,” he said. Boshart said the art sale Saturday will be a silent auction. He said most of the pieces in the student gallery will be artwork done by his previous students. “It’s mostly for alumni coming back because it’s stuff they’ve left me,” Boshart said. “Maybe the alumni will come back and buy their own artwork.” Some pieces of the “Skulpcher Werkz” show will be for sale as well with minimum bids set by the artist.

He said money raised through the art sale will go to support the student gallery in Doudna. Boshart said he will wrap up part of “Skulpcher Werkz” by saying a few words around 2 p.m. during the reception Sunday. He said he hopes to see more alumni at the show and has enjoyed the chance to see so many of his previous students. “That in itself has been overwhelming,” Boshart said. “I cry easily.” Seth Schroeder can be reached at 581-2812 or deneic@gmail.com.

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4 OPINIONS STAFF EDITORIAL

Don’t miss out, get involved This week, as you know, is Homecoming. One of the highlights of the Homecoming weekend is Saturday’s game against Southeast Missouri. If you don’t know about the Eastern football team, it’s time to crawl out from under your rock and get in tune with the “new era” (that was last year) and get to the game to see something special. Since the arrival of second-year head coach Dino Babers, the Panthers have transformed from a bottom of the bucket Ohio Valley Conference team to a team that has many thinking they could go all the way. This weekend, the athletic department is trying to set an O’Brien Field attendance record and this is something the students and returning alumni should definitely support. It won’t cost you a thing. Your Panther Card is all you need, so you can’t use that excuse for not going. Babers said the team’s already set records on the field, why not in the stands? “The football team has been setting all kinds of records on the field, and people have been enjoying watching it,” he said. “I thought it would be great to reward these seniors, this football team, this university with a record.” For seniors who are graduating and will be celebrating their last Homecoming, this is an Eastern team this is worth seeing. The team is fast-paced and scores early and often. The team is coming off a 63-7 beat down of Austin Peay and now will face Southeast Missouri, another team struggling in conference play. For freshmen, now is the chance to start a new tradition of packing the house each Saturday to cheer Eastern to victory. When Babers had his open interview before he was hired two years ago, he said that watching the team would be the thing to do on Saturdays. Babers hasn’t disappointed since he’s arrived and he’s definitely turned the team into something worth tuning into. Whether you’re starting your Homecoming fun this weekend or if you got a head start last weekend, just remember the obvious stuff. Be safe. Don’t drink too much, if that’s what you choose to do. Don’t get arrested. Don’t do anything that you’ll regret later. If you’re going to start drinking early in the day at your tailgate, remember to pace yourself, eat something, and know your limits. But most of all, enjoy yourself. Nobody wants to spend Homecoming in the emergency room. The semester is almost over, believe it or not. Reconnect with some old friends who graduated, maybe meet a few

W

Letters to the editor can be submitted at any time on any topic to the Opinions Editor to be published in The Daily Eastern News. The DEN’s policy is to run all letters that are not libelous or potentially harmful. Letters to the editor can be brought in with identification to The DEN or sent to DENopinions@gmail.com.

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Today’s quote: "Either you run the day, or the day runs you."

- Jim Rohn

W W W. DA I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M FRIDAY | 10.18.13

NO. 44, Volume 98

Homecoming: a chance to see the future Homecoming is like a weekend of time travel. The mixture of returning alumni and current students are a total blend of Eastern’s past, present and future. For returning alumni, I imagine the nostalgia of Eastern traditions and reliving memories good times past is like a trip to the past. I hope their visits are like vacations for them, because, though they may not realize it, they provide a valuable service by coming back to Eastern. By returning, and visiting with students, they provide living examples of where their future might lead after graduation. For a few days they walk like living premonitions among the student body. Of course they don’t hold all of the answers and their experiences won’t be exactly the same as what we as individuals will go through. But they can tell us so much if we only take the time to ask them. What did they do with their degree? What benefits did it bring them? What challenges? What career paths have they taken? What success have they achieved? What regrets still keep them up at night? How can

Seth Schroeder we be like them? Or, how can we be unlike them? The journalism department hosts a “Chili Bash” every Homecoming for both current students and returning alumni. For me it means free food, drink and the chance to ask some of these questions. The department has a wide range of experiences to draw on. Some alumni chose a different path and did not stay in journalism. Others have built truly staggering careers with the same foundation I’m currently building. Between the recently graduated and the alumni of years gone by there’s plenty for us to talk about. I’m constantly reminded I

have plenty to learn both inside and outside the classroom. I start to see different choices laid in front of me. They are a few of my potential futures. I have no idea what they see when they see me. Maybe I resemble some part of their past or maybe I’m just bothering them with questions (though this should really be expected at a journalist party). Pop culture is filled with examples of how time travel is tricky. Homecoming is no different. It’s not the actual past or future you’re dealing with, but instead it’s a place where memory, expectation and reality collide in unpredictable ways. It’s going to be a weird time, but it will be full of opportunity. If you’re a student, take advantage of these days. Make some memories, but also glimpse into what the future might hold for you. If you’re a returning alumnus, thank you. Know that we are learning from you. Seth Schroeder is a senior journalism major. He can be reached at 281-5812 or deneic@gmail.com.

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Armor of technology is not to hide behind

In a world where everybody hides behind technology – Facebook posts, Twitter handles and Instagram photos – sometimes it can feel as if technology is a shield against the rest of humanity. Enter Iron Man, a pop culture icon that exploded into the world of comic books 50 years ago as a representation of everything the youth were supposed to rebel against. Premiering at the height of the Cold War as an industrialist weapons manufacturer, the man inside the suit, Tony Stark literally used technology as a protection from the world. Although he has been updated, redone and modified throughout his half-century of existence, certain aspects of Stark resonate well with today’s techno-heavy society. Stark is a man with a broken heart. Quite literally, as in his initial appearance – and subsequent appearances – he suffers from shrapnel digging its way to his heart, stopped only by a sophisticated electro-magnet in his chest. Using his chest piece to power his suit, Iron Man became a symbol for everything the youth wanted to rally for.

Bob Galuski A figure who stood for patriotism, stopping world threats of terrorism, Iron Man was someone everybody who picked up a comic book wanted to be. And while the character has changed, his theme of using technology as a shield has not. Still suffering from his heart condition, Stark uses the Iron Man armor to protect himself in the same way people use social media, blogs and other facets of the Internet to hide their face. Things like cyber-bullying have become a real thing because people believe they are safe behind technology. Much like Iron Man, the computer and other aspects have become “free-passes” to some to say or do whatever they please. And yes, while there is freedom of speech, to

believe that you are completely safe masked by computers is foolish. The world is a dangerous enough place without having to resort to using something that can be as wonderful as technology as a weapon, while believing it is a shield. While Iron Man can represent an amazing use of technology, there is, as always, a dark side to the moon. That dark side is Tony Stark. If ever there was a time to step out from the dark side and embrace people, not discriminate, bully or harass through technology, the time is now. We are on the brink of a technology revolution, one not seen in countless decades, and if this is the way it is going to go, maybe it is better not to have technology. Don’t be the guy under the suit, damaged and hiding. Remember there is a choice, hide under a weapon or embrace the shield of technology. Bob Galuski is a English and journalism major. He can be reached at 581-2812 or DENopinions@gmail.com.

Editorial Board Editor in Chief Seth Schroeder

Managing Editor Dominic Renzetti

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Associate News Editor Samantha McDaniel

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FRIDAY, OCT. 18, 2013

The Daily Eastern News | CAMPUS

5

SCHOOL SPIRIT

Panther Nation rebooted for Homecoming game By Kendra Cwikla Staff Reporter @DEN_News Student Senate members are revamping the student-led cheer group, Panther Nation, which is currently being run by the student affairs committee chairman Reggie Thedford who is starting the program back up. The senate will have a Panther Nation student section for the Homecoming football game at 1:30 p.m. Saturday at O’Brien Field. The new group would be similar to a previous program also called Panther Nation. Students would be

ball team doing so well, currently number three in the nation, there is no better time than now to overhaul Panther Nation and regain the popularity it once had, like the 2009 Panther Nation attendance of 450 students. Chris Martin, a junior economics major, does not think Eastern lacks school spirit at games, but said it does not compare to other schools. The athletics department now sponsors Panther Nation, and has an app which keeps students up to date with games and other school events, and students can “check-in” to events and gain rewards for points they receive while checking in.

“If you don’t know, get with your brother, dad, whoever it is, and learn the basics of the sport so you know when to call an offensive cheer, a defensive cheer, or when the best times to get the crowd pumped up are,” Moran said. Most of the current cheers are traditional Eastern cheers that have been around for years. In fact, one of them — “We are (clap, clap) EIU (clap, clap)” — had disappeared somewhere along the line and came back into existence during Moran’s sophomore year. At Homecoming that year, about 40 cheerleading alumni came back and cheered with the team at the football game, sharing old cheers, and that was one of them. After that, the cheer was resurrected. The story behind it makes that one

Believing the current student section was lacking enthusiasm, Thedford said he was inspired by the app and previous cheer group to recreate the student section, and would like to collaborate with the athletics department to utilize the app as a way to organize the group. Thedford said he hopes to one day to have the student cheer section be as popular as it was in the past, continuing to progress past his graduation. Surveys were given to students Tuesday and Wednesday to gage the interest surrounding the program. The previous a student cheer section in the 2010-2011 school year ended because they lacked a leader.

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CHEER

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

of the team’s favorites. Moran said at games, she usually focuses more on chants than cheers, which allow for more crowd involvement. “You want the crowd yelling with you and cheering for the team, instead of just watching,” Moran said. That’s when Ruffin’s main duty comes into play: keeping tempo. At practices, he stands in the back and claps loud enough that the women in the front can’t hear the person counting right in front of them. At games, he’s the one in charge of the white megaphone. He doesn’t dance or cheer with the rest of the team, which he said is the main difference from his high school cheering days. Being the only man on the team isn’t

anything new for Ruffin. He was the only male on his high school team, so it doesn’t bother him, he said. “The stigma of male cheerleading is really stupid,” he said. “I want to show that male cheerleading is not something that’s gay or girly. I want to try to beat the stigma at this school and get as many guys on the team.” Open tryouts for the team are coming up, from 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday in McAffee Gym. “We do it because we love it,” Moran said. “That’s why we’re out there. All of us have cheered for numerous years. All of us do it because we love the sport.” Ashley Holstrom can be reached at 581-2812 or alholstrom@eiu.edu.

• Kids Menu • Pasta • Steaks • Stir Fry • Seafood •

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GOOD LUCK, PANTHERS!

217-345-5070

703 W. Lincoln Ave., Charleston, IL Open 5am-10pm Daily www.lincolngarden.net

Just before the Homecoming Parade, the Homecoming 2.5K Race will be starting at 9 a.m. Saturday, and participants begin at the corner of Seventh Street and Lincoln Avenue. An entry fee of $10 will be collected from participants. The “Yell Like Hell” pep rally will be at 7 p.m. Friday in the McAfee Gymnasium. T h e Na t i o n a l Pa n He l l e n ic Council will be hosting a Step Show at 6:30 p.m. Saturday in the McAfee Gymnasium, and following will be an after-party at 10 p.m. Although Dykema might be excited for the Homecoming events, students like Sarah Smith feel there

should be more events hosted compatible to students’ interest level, and events that will not conflict with class schedules. Smith, a senior health studies major, said she feels the events are not interesting enough, although she will be participating in the “Yell Like Hell” Homecoming pep rally. “Last year, I didn’t enjoy the after-party, nor was the money that was spent worth it,” Smith said. “The university needs to try something new, but that’s only what I think.” Juwaan Wright can be reached at 581-2812 or dennewsdesk@gmail.com.

Lunch Special

Skillets • Eggs • Soups • Salads • Sandwiches • Chicken

WELCOME FAMILIES AND ALUMNI! BILL & LINDA PERRY OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT

Kendra Cwikla can be reached at 581-2812 or kcwikla@eiu.edu.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Sandwiches • Chicken • Pasta • Manhattans • Steaks

BRE A ANY KFAST TIM E

Panther Nation was a program where students who were involved had to pay dues, which would go toward shirts and other accessories for football and basketball games as well as busses for away games. Panther Nation used to host yell training sessions as well as participate in tailgating and pep rallies. The large number of students would go to games and yell cheers showing their school spirit, hoping their support would bring the team’s confidence up to lead to a win.

ACTIVITIES

Lincoln Garden Family Restaurant • Stir Fry • Seafood • Kids Menu • Omelets •

»

free to go to games and sit in the student section, but people in this section would be expected to go above and beyond the normal fan. Thedford, a junior political science major, said this section would be full of enthusiastic students leading cheers covered head-to-toe in Eastern’s signature blue attire. The section would yell typical war chants and cheers such as “The Wave” and “The Rollercoaster” in unison. Thedford said he is planning to have a balloon popping competition where students in teams of two would try to pop balloons with their bodies. He said he thinks with the foot-

nch customers Bring in those lu ials with the ec and run lunch sp DEN

1x2 $60 per Week; 1x3 ads for $75 , Include Logo Special Location Tickets: Admission: $13; GROUP RATES AVAILABLE BY RESERVATION ONLY! (Free or reduced-price tickets are available for those financially unable to pay) available at: 217.345.2287, or at the door Charleston Alley Theatre, 718 Monroe, 217.345.2287, One Hour Before Curtain Off the Square and Down the Alley charlestonalleytheatre.com Bat Boy, the Musical, is presented through special arrangement wih dramatists Play Service

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6

The Daily Eastern News | SPORTS

FRIDAY, OCT. 18, 2013

football

baseball

Eastern, SEMO set for OVC showdown By Aldo Soto Assistant Sports Editor @AldoSoto21 Southeast Missouri quarterback Scott Lathrop spent the first five games of this season splitting time with Kyle Snyder as the starter, but after leading the Redhawks to a tripleovertime win against Murray State Saturday, Lathrop has distinguished himself as the unquestioned starter. Eastern (5-1, 2-0) will host Lathrop and the rest of the Redhawks (15, 1-2) at O’Brien Field at 1:30 p.m. Saturday in the Panthers’ 96th Homecoming game. Eastern coach Dino Babers said he knows how much of a threat Lathrop can create running the Redhawks’ option offense. Lathrop, who had thrown two touchdown passes prior to his start against the Racers in five games, threw four and also ran in for another as Southeast Missouri snapped an eightgame losing streak in a 37-34 win against Murray State. “It’s scary enough playing option teams, but the last thing you want to do is play an option team with the ability to throw the football,” Babers said. “When you can do both it’s a very challenging task on the defensive side.” In the Redhawks’ victoryb Lathrop ran the ball a team-high 24 times. He gained 94 yards and on the season has 62 carries and 227 yards rushing: both are team highs. Last season as a freshman, Lathrop started against the Panthers and rushed for 102 yards on 27 attempts, scoring a touchdown on the ground, but only attempted 12 passes, completing half for 39 yards. Eastern linebacker Antonio Taylor said Lathrop gives the Redhawk offense a major advantage with his arm this season. “Their offense has always been option oriented so throwing has not been a crucial part of their offense,” Taylor said. “Now, that Lathrop’s back in the rotation he can make plays on foot and with his arm.” With the Eastern defense game planning against the dual-threat quarterback, Southeast Missouri coach Tony Samuel has to find a way to contain the country’s most potent offense. Led by quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo the Eastern offense enters Saturday’s game averaging 584 yards per game: No. 1 in the FCS. Garoppolo leads all FCS quarterbacks in passing yards, (2,359) passing touchdowns (28) and averages a nation-best 394.5 yards per game. The senior quarterback is also 190 yards away from breaking Eastern’s

Eastern vs. SEMO WHEN - 1:30 p.m., Saturday WHERE - O’Brien Stadium

all-time passing record, which is held by Sean Payton. Garoppolo has fellow senior Erik Lora as his No. 1 target, as the Miami native is tied for the most receiving touchdowns in the country with 12 and is second in the FCS in receiving yards with 797. And after a 63-7 win over Austin Peay, Eastern is ranked as the best scoring team in the FCS, averaging 46.8 points per game. “Our kids need to understand that everybody is beatable and they understand that EIU is a very good team, they understand that, but you can’t put them on a pedestal, you have to play them,” Samuel said. Despite the gaudy numbers Eastern has put up on offense, Samuel said the biggest difference he has seen under Babers’ second year as coach has been the improvement of the defense. “From the beginning, I thought the defense was better the minute they showed up,” Samuel said. “Their defense is a lot more physical, a lot more aggressive. They play extremely hard.” The Panthers have allowed seven points in their last two victories, which have both been against Ohio Valley Conference opponents, but Samuel said it has been the Eastern offense that has made it possible for the defense to succeed. “When you have that kind of highscoring offense, boy, you can really pin your ears back, when you get those leads that they are getting you can be very aggressive,” Samuel said. In Eastern’s last three wins, starting with a 57-24 victory against Illinois State, the Panthers have entered halftime with 44-10, 35-0 and 42-0 leads. Babers said the success of Eastern’s defense is predicated by turnovers. “When we get an opportunity to catch an interception, we do -- when we get an opportunity to rip a ball out and put it on the ground, we do,” Babers said. The Panthers have 11 interceptions and have recovered a conference-high eight fumbles this season. Eastern is third in interceptions behind Tennessee State and Murray State in the OVC, which have each played one more game than the Panthers.

Amanda Wilkinson | The Daily Eastern Ne ws

Kyle Arnett, a sophomore pitcher, looks onto Coaches Stadium where he is a walk-on pitcher for the Eastern baseball team. Arnett is not eligible to play in the Spring of 2014.

Walk-on makes baseball team By Aldo Soto Assistant Sports Editor @AldoSoto21

Twitter made its way to the Internet in 2006, bringing the public thoughts about everything from almost everyone. For sophomore Kyle Arnett, Twitter gave him an opportunity to play on a Division I baseball team. For the first time since 2010, the Eastern baseball team had open tryouts for anyone interested in playing. Arnett transferred from Benedictine University located in Lisle, where he pitched for the Eagles as a freshman. Mick Hick’s, who is a member of Eastern’s club baseball team and friend of Arnett, informed Arnett about the tryouts though Twitter. Arnett, who did not come to Eastern interested in playing baseball, said he simply gave it a shot. “I filled out all the paperwork, knocked out the physical and said ‘if I luck out, I luck out,’” Arnett said. When Eastern coach Jim Schmitz first announced the tryouts he said there would be no guarantees on players sticking around on the team because the main purpose to have the tryout was to bring in pitchers that would fill in during the team’s fall practice schedule. Arnet went to Coaches Stadium on Sept. 5, where he along with four other students tried to impress Schmitz and pitching coach Jason Anderson. But even before Arnett could get Aldo Soto can be reached at 581-2812 on the mound to show his ability, he or asoto2@eiu.edu. found out he would not be eligible to

play during the 2014 season for Eastern. Because Arnett transferred from a four-year school he would have to sit out a year before being allowed to play based on NCAA rules. “I kind of figured I wouldn’t be eligible to play because I didn’t know all the gray areas between Division III and Division I, but I thought if you went up then you would be fine,” Arnett said. Arnett could have decided not to show up for the tryout, but Anderson gave him an ultimatum. “Coach (Anderson) told me that if I made it they would keep me around in the fall and be a part of the team and worst case scenario I could possibly play for the club team,” Arnett said. “Honestly I was just blessed I had the opportunity to make it and playing-wise I would worry about that down the road.” Arnett proceeded to tryout, but the process itself ended almost as soon as it began. After a short period of playing catch to warm up, Arnett and a fellow pitcher followed Anderson to the pitching mound. “(Anderson) asked who wanted to go first and I said ‘I’ll give it a shot,’” Arnett said. “He said I had about 30 pitches and I pretty much threw everything I had for those 30 pitches.” Then, it ended. Arnett picked up his belongings and left after spending 20-25 minutes on the field. Four hours later he received a phone call. “He threw strikes and showed some good stuff,” Anderson said. “He had experience, playing last year with Benedictine, so we thought he would

be a good fit for us.” Arnett was on the team, at least for the fall. Anderson said injuries to a couple of Eastern pitchers did factor into the decision to take Arnett onto the team, but that he would use the time in the fall to evaluate Arnett and see if he could officially be on the team following this season. “Coach Anderson said I would do everything else the team does during the fall and by next year they would know who I was and what I have to offer,” Arnett said. Arnett said despite not being on the team in an official capacity his teammates have made him feel as much a part of the team as everyone else. His first practice consisted primarily on trying to remember names, but as the weeks have progressed he feels like a true member of the team. “Even as a walk-on it was like I had come in with a scholarship and I was with everyone else trying to fight for a position,” Arnett said. “‘Welcome to the squad’ was one of the main phrases I heard all throughout the first week from everyone on the team.” Arnett plans on playing for the club team to get in as much playing time as he can, but for the meantime he continues to practice with the rest of the Panthers, pitching in intrasquad games, waiting for his time when he can finally play when it matters. “I’m pretty much the Rudy of the squad,” Arnett said with a laugh. Aldo Soto can be reached at 581-2812 or asoto2@eiu.edu.

swimming

Swim teams to compete in St. Louis By Dan Hildebrandt Staff Reporter @DEN_Sports Both the men’s and women’s swim teams started their 2013-2014 season on Saturday with the women defeating Butler 154-108. The men had an intersquad meet where the white team defeated the blue team 107-94. Coach Elliot McGill has high expectations of the teams this year. He expects the teams to put in a lot of

work and to progress as the season goes along. “Our expectations are to work hard, get better as a team and then surpass those expectations,” he said. “Really, that’s all we can control.” McGill said he is ready for the season to get into full swing. After the women’s victory against Butler, he liked the outcome, but still wants to see progress made in the future. “The women had an excellent first meet in beating Butler out of the Big

East,” he said. “We swam fast but still have some improvements to make.” McGill noted that the men and women were pretty anxious to get back in the water. The women were a little more nervous than the men, however. “We had the usual first meet nerves last weekend,” he said. “The guys were pretty relaxed, as it was an intersquad for them.” Both teams will get a chance to compete on Friday as the Panthers travel to Saint Louis for a meet at the Si-

mon Rec Center scheduled to start at 5:30 p.m.. Coach McGill has different expectations for the men and for the women at Saint Louis. “I think our women can go in and compete pretty well,” McGill said. “I think we have a chance to keep it a very close meet, even with diving.” The men’s team, McGill said, is working to improve its skills and abilities. “For the men, we are really looking

at their times and technique. Those are our first meet benchmarks to set up the rest of the year.” After St. Louis, the Panthers will face IUPUI on Oct. 25 at Padovan Pool. The next day, Eastern will host the Panther Double-Dual meet with visiting teams IUPUI and Illinois-Chicago. Dan Hildebrandt can be reached at 581-2812 or djhildebrandt@eiu.edu.


FRIDAY, OCT. 18, 2013

The Daily Eastern News | SPORTS

7

men’s soccer

fraternizing with the enemy

By Ashley Holstrom Staff Reporter @alholstrom

Heckling and fraternities: they go together like peas and carrots. But at Eastern, it’s not heckling for the sake of heckling; it’s to encourage “brothers” on the men’s soccer team. Colin Rook, a red-shirt junior defender and member of Sigma Chi fraternity, asked fellow members to come to his games, and this is the first year they’ve gone as a group. “The fans can really bring the energy to us from the sidelines,” Rook said. “We love seeing people in our stands. And the more they heckle, the better on us.” That’s no problem for the men of Sigma Chi. They perch themselves on the bleachers next to the goal, targeting the opposing team’s goalie with their best means of distraction. Joey McElligott, a junior member of Sigma Chi, said he and 20 to 30 Sigma Chis find out the goalie’s name and call it out at pivotal moments. “We try to get in his head, try to get him to mess up,” McElligott said, adding that they usually scream when he reaches out to catch a ball. The goalie is the most important position, he said, so he just wants to distract him and give Eastern the advantage. Alexis Nattee, a senior member of Sigma Chi, said they usually try to keep it clean, but some use “dirty tactics” to get inside players’ heads. “Some guys try to do homework on the opposition and see if there’s anything that we can make fun of them for,” Nattee said. He said they look up the players’

girlfriends and other things about their personal lives online. “Hopefully they’ll get pissed off and do something they normally wouldn’t do,” Nattee said. Players don’t usually react to their jeers, Nattee said. At most, they get the same thing thrown back at them — just what the Sigma Chis like. It means they’ve been successful. Meanwhile, the men of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity crowd together in the middle of the stands equipped with cheers and joking insults. They come to cheer on one of their members, Will Butler, a junior midfielder/forward, chanting “We’ve got your back, Will,” every time he runs close to the stands. The SAEs also do their homework before coming to games, passing around copies of the other team’s roster and looking up the players online. “Sometimes Facebook pages are involved,” said TJ Bogar, a senior member of SAE. “So you can get to know them a little better. There’s not enough information on the roster, but it’s a starting point.” That’s where they get most of their ammo, shouting “Hey, cute profile pic, dude!” and “You work at Dunkin Donuts? How’s that going?” at players. At the game against Loyola on Sept. 13, Bogar and fellow SAE senior Alex Lais lined the front row of the stands with white 5-gallon buckets and drumsticks. “It’s something we did in high school for our soccer team,” Bogar said. “It’s another flavor for the game, an easy way to make a lot of noise. Cheap and effective.” Butler said he likes having mem-

Sigma Chi, SAE heckle to support men’s soccer team

Jason Howell | The Daily Eastern Ne ws

Members of the Sigma Chi fraternity heckle the goalie for the Loyola Ramblers at a men’s soccer game on Sept. 13. The men attend games to support fellow members who are on the team.

bers of his fraternity at the games to root him on because it provides the team with a good support system. Coach Adam Howarth agreed. “I want an atmosphere,” Howarth said. “Any time we can get more people in our stands, it’s a good thing.” Howarth said his players have been in various fraternities, including Sigma Pi and Sigma Phi Epsilon, over the years, and they came to games for the same reason. “I think Sigma Chi seems to be the flavor of the day right now,” Howarth said. He said most of the comments he

women’s soccer

hears from the stands is “pretty lame stuff,” but as long as it’s done in good taste, he has no problem with it. He said this sort of thing is common for all professional soccer games: lots of chanting, cheering, and singing from the stands. The only punishment for heckling would be getting removed from the stands, Howarth said. But it’s never come to that. Athletic Director Barbara Burke said in the five years she’s been at Eastern, she hasn’t had any reports of inappropriate behavior at games. “I’ll knock on wood,” Burke said. “But we just haven’t had it. Our stu-

dents are very respectful of our guests when they come in here. Part of that is our student athletes are really good sports and respectful of their opponents.” Howarth said it’s all just part of the game. “There’s no derogatory remarks, there’s no bad feelings,” Howarth said. “That’s the most important thing. I think it’s all done in good nature and it’s done to enhance the atmosphere and certainly get the home team, which is us, a win.” Ashley Holstrom can be reached at 581-2812 or alholstrom@eiu.edu.

volleyball

First place Panthers host OVC rivals to clash last place Austin Peay Staff Report

By Dominic Renzetti Managing Editor @domrenzetti The Eastern women’s soccer team, currently the top team in the Ohio Valley Conference, will host Jacksonville State, currently at the bottom of the conference, at 3 p.m. Friday at Lakeside Field. The Panthers are coming off a weekend in which they suffered a road loss against Austin Peay, but rebounded with a road win against Murray State. At 5-1 in the OVC, the Panthers are hoping to gain more ground in the conference standings. Eastern, which has seen all of its wins come in conference play, will host Jacksonville State, which has seen none of its wins come against OVC opponents. The Gamecocks enter at 4-9-2 overall, 0-5-1 in conference. Jacksonville State’s four non-conference wins came over McNeese State, Alabama A&M, Troy and Alabama State. The team’s last win over Alabama State came on Sept. 20. The Gamecocks haven’t had much success when it comes to OVC play, with their last conference win dating back to Sept. 30, 2012, over Southern Illinois-Edwardsville. The Gamecocks opened the 2012

OVC schedule with three straight wins over Tennessee Tech, Eastern and Edwardsville, but went on to finish 3-6-1. Jacksonville State’s match against Tennessee Tech last Sunday ended in a 0-0 draw. The Gamecocks took 25 total shots against Tennessee Tech, but were unable to put any past Golden Eagles goalkeeper Jordan Brown, who gave up four goals against Eastern on Sept. 29. Junior Jackie Rush, who has scored five goals so far this season, leads the Gamecocks. Rush had two goals in the team’s Sept. 6 win over Alabama State, but has not scored since the Sept. 29 win over Morehead State. Rush had four shots on goal in last Sunday’s match against Tennessee Tech. Sophomore goalkeeper Taylor Hammond, who has appeared in 14 matches so far this season, did not play against Tennessee Tech after she was sidelined because of an illness. Freshman goalkeeper Cate Eden played 110 minutes against the Golden Eagles in her first career start, recording the shutout. Eden is likely the starter for Friday’s match. Eastern goalkeeper Cortney Jerzy has started all of the team’s OVC

Eastern vs. Austin Peay WHEN - 3:00 p.m., Friday WHERE - Lakeside Field

matches this season following a hand injury to red-shirt freshman Kylie Morgan. The two-time OVC Goalkeeper of the Week has recorded three shutouts this season. Eastern is led by junior Meagan Radloff, who has scored give goals and has one assist this season. Radloff has three game-winning goals so far this season. Radloff has been instrumental in sealing victories for the Panthers in each of the team’s last three wins. The team’s five conference win total is the most the team has had since the 2005 season — the Panthers still have four matches to play. Friday’s match will be the Panthers’ only match of the weekend, making it only the second time this season the team has just one match. The team will return to action Friday Oct. 25 when it travels to Tennessee-Martin for a 7 p.m. match. Dominic Renzetti can be reached at 581-2812 or dcrenzetti@eiu.edu.

Two of the Ohio Valley Conference’s best offensive teams will come into Lantz Arena this weekend to take on the Eastern volleyball team. Eastern, 9-10 overall and 3-3 in the OVC, will host Austin Peay and Murray State for Homecoming weekend. Austin Peay possesses the best record in the west division of the OVC at 5-1, having won five straight matches in conference play. Its lone loss came in the conference opener to Jacksonville State in five sets. The Colonels are averaging 14.25 kills per set in conference matches — second only to Eastern’s 14.42. Also, the Colonels rank third in the OVC in hit percentage with a .221 attack in conference play, just behind the Panthers, whose .222 attack ranks

second. The Racers have hit .240 in nonconference play this season. But since entering the OVC, they are hitting just .151. Murray State has a conference record of 2-4, but its two wins have come against the two worst teams in the conference in Tennessee Tech and Tennessee-Martin. The Racers have lost three of their last four games. The Panthers are currently on a two-game losing streak to conference foes Morehead State, the OVC leader, and Eastern Kentucky, after having their three-game win streak snapped last weekend. Eastern will host Austin Peay at 7 p.m. Friday in Lantz Arena. It will then host Murray State at 6 p.m. Saturday.

Saturday Specials:

Friday Specials:

$1 Airhead Shots $2 Coors Light Bottles $3 Jose CuERVO Friday Hours: 6pm-1am

$1 Domestic Drafts $1 Panthermint Twist Shots $2 Bloody Marys $2 Mimosas $2 Bookah Bomb SATURDAY HOURS: 9AM-1AM

509 Van Buren 217-508-2656


@DEN_Sports tweet of the day: The #EIU football team will host #SEMO in #OVC action Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at O’Brien Stadium.

S ports

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T H E DA I LY E aste r n News

D a i ly e a s t e r n NE W S . C O M

f r iday, o c t. 18, 2013 N o. 4 4 , V O L U M E 9 8

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football

K atie smith | the daily eastern ne ws

Red-shirt senior linebacker Antonio Taylor has played in 39 games in four seasons for the Eastern football team. Taylor, from Maywood, has 159 career tackles and one interception.

POETRY SLAM Linebacker brings creativity to field By Aldo Soto Assistant Sports Editor @AldoSoto21 Antonio Taylor stands at 6-feet2-inches, weighing 215 pounds and spends almost every Saturday from the end of August until November punishing opposing players on a football field. Watching him play in an Eastern football game, one would not imagine that the same man that rams his opponents to the ground spends his free time creating poetry. The red-shirt senior linebacker began his fascination with poetry in fifth grade, when he first thought about what he wanted to be when he grew up. “Instead of being an athlete, I wanted to be a rapper, so it kind of goes hand-in-hand,” Taylor said. Taylor, who graduated from Immaculate Conception High School in Elmhurst, was red-shirted in 2009 at Eastern. The following two years, he played in all 11 games the Panthers had, including being a starting linebacker in 2011, when he was second on the team with 92 tackles.

In 2012, Eastern had a new football coach — Dino Babers — and a brand new coaching staff. It was during fall camp prior to the start of the 2012 season, when Taylor first found out he would no longer be a starter. Coming from Baylor, Babers brought LeQuince McCall with him to Eastern. McCall had played two seasons at Baylor, a Big 12 program. McCall took over as the starter at strong side linebacker, where Taylor had made all 11 starts in 2011. Taylor was then moved to the weak side linebacker position, splitting time with the starter Adam Gristick. Taylor said although he is no longer a starter, he is fortunate enough to have the opportunity to play. “It doesn’t bother me from an ego standpoint, not starting,” he said. “Every time I strap on the pads, I take that as a blessing. Every time I’m out here, I’m going to give 100 percent. Whenever I put on my helmet, I’m going to give it my all.” The coaching change not only meant a new scheme to learn for Taylor it also signified an end of an era for Roc Bellatoni, who is currently

the defensive line coach and special teams coordinator at Villanova. Bellatoni had served as Eastern’s defensive coordinator from 2002-2011. Taylor said it was tough to see some old members of the previous staff leave, including Bellatoni and Justin Lustig, who recruited him. “I still have a great relationship with Roc Bellatoni,” Taylor said. “Me and him probably were the closest from that old staff and I still keep in touch with him.” Coming out of high school, Taylor played a vital role on the Immaculate Conception 2008 Class 2A football state championship team. He played linebacker, making six tackles in the title game and also caught two passes for 58 yards in the 36-17 win against Casey-Westfield High School. Taylor was an All-Suburban Catholic League selection three times and was honored with more area awards in high school. He has been studying football for several years so the new scheme that was brought in was not as difficult to adjust to as the coaching style was. “I’ve been studying football for a while now, so the scheme didn’t come as hard as adjusting to the coach-

es and how they coach,” Taylor said. “That was kind of difficult at first, but I’ve grown to gain great relations with my position coach (Tom) Kaufman, coach (Kim) McCloud and coach Babers.” Taylor not only gained skills on the football field while attending Immaculate Conception, but it is also where he gained an appreciation for his one hidden passion: poetry. Cindy Thomas and retired English teacher Joe Shram, served as Taylor’s guide to poetry. “They got me into poetry and literature and Shakespeare, things like that,” Taylor said. “And after graduating from there I took off and took some poetry classes at Eastern.” Taylor is humble and said his poems are OK, still needing to hone his craft. “I don’t think I’m super creative, but with the help of Dr. Olga (Abella) I was able to get a B in the poetry class, but I’m still working on it,” he said. In football, an analyst will sometimes refer to a quarterback as being cerebral, one who thinks things thoroughly, but rarely is that used as an adjective for a defensive player, who

makes his name by tackling people as hard as he can. Taylor said one of the major things he has transferred from his poetry writing to the playing field is patience. “What I learned through poetry is that I am a very patient writer and I wouldn’t say I’m a perfectionist, but it takes me a while to get exactly what I want to say on paper,” Taylor said. The Maywood native said he takes that patience with him to every game. “I don’t feel comfortable if I don’t know exactly what I’m supposed to do on that exact play and it shows on Saturday’s if I’m prepared from Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday practices, or if I’m not,” Taylor said. For now, Taylor continues to focus on his communication studies major, concentrating in public relations, and also working hard on the field, where Eastern has become one of the country’s best program’s, sporting a 5-1 record heading into homecoming and a No. 3 ranking in national FCS polls. Aldo Soto can be reached at 581-2812 or asoto2@eiu.edu.


erge V OCT. 18, 2013

The Daily Eastern News' weekly arts and entertainment section

H omecoming

2013 Your guide to an awesome Homecoming Weekend! Y our

path to a great

Homecoming - P age 4

K ing

and queen reflect on win

- P age 5 B attle

of the

B ands

winners discuss music

- P age 8


erge V

2B

R eview

10.18.2013

HOMECOMING 2013 Parade Route Map

IMAGE FROM iTUNES.com

Panic! explores love, techno on recent CD Love is a fragile and complicated thing. It takes up a lot of your life and leaves you in heartbreak most of the time. However, it is still something good to look forward to, and life would be nothing without all the good and bad. This is the concept Panic! At the Disco explores with its third album “Too Weird To Live, Too Rare to Die!” The songs on this album have more of a techno feel, but Panic!’s sound has not completely changed. The lyrics are in the same style as the band has written them in the past; it is the execution of the songs that has changed. The electronic elements make the songs more upbeat and easy to listen to in comparison to their other albums, specifically their debut album “A Fever You Can’t Sweat Out.” You can tell that the band's original voice is there, with Brendon Uri’s subtle edginess still a factor, so the band does not sound completely different. While these elements are strong, the electronics and vocals do not over power one another; they balance each other out. The original members that have stayed with Panic! include Uri and drummer Spencer Smith. In 2009, Dallon Weekens joined the band as the bass player. Despite losing some of the original members, the change does not show in their music because nothing seems to be lacking instrumentally. The album centers on heartbreak and how it pretty much sucks to go through. One song, called “Nicotine,” explains that love with a certain someone feels like it is as addictive as nicotine. Two of the songs on the album,

Stephanie White Verge Reviewer

“Miss Jackson” and “This Is Gospel,” were released early as singles along with music videos. “This Is Gospel” explains that two people have broken up, but the person who was broken up with is still clinging onto the other person. The lyrics are telling the clingy partner that if they truly love the other person, they need to let them go because holding on feels like they are drowning and dying together. In the chorus of the song, there is a lyric that says, “If you love me let me go.” Because Uri repeats the phrase throughout the song, he emphasizes the importance of how you are supposed to let go of your past in order to have a better future. In its own way, Panic! explains heartbreak in an up-beat manner and conveys that in order to really live, you need to go through the pain so you know what true love actually feels like. Overall, Panic!’s new album is worth listening to. Not only is it another way to look at a well-known subject, it is also something the Panic! fans will enjoy because it has a new twist along with the distinctive voice fans have become familiar with.

Stephanie White can be reached at 581-2812 or sewhite2@eiu.edu.

graphic by Alex villa


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10.18.2013

Ensemble to present historic music By Jordan Thiede Verge Reporter

The Cathedrals, Castles and Colonies concert will present an eclectic mix of music to the Eastern community. The concert, which will take place at 4 p.m. Sunday in the Dvorak Concert Hall of the Doudna Fine Arts Center, will feature both the Concert Choir and the University Mixed Chorus. Richard Rossi, director of orchestral and choral activities, said more than 75 students from the two choral ensembles will be performing in this particular concert. April Lee, assistant choral director who also conducts the University Mixed Chorus, said different performances would include pieces ranging from spiritual folk music to a patriotic piece. Lee said audiences would be able to experience excellent vocal music by two different choirs if they attend the concert, and part of the show would feature men and women performing separate pieces. Lee said having a good turnout is helpful for the students in the chorus. “It encourages the students,” she said. “It’s good for the choral program.” Rossi said the Concert Choir and the University Mixed Chorus usually perform together about two times a semester, including the holiday concert later this year. He said a good amount of planning goes into these concerts. Rossi said the two ensembles have been preparing for this concert with three to four rehearsals per week almost since the beginning of the semester. He said the choirs have performed the Cathedrals, Castles and Colonies concert numerous times before.

Katie Smith | The Daily Eastern News

Students in the University Mixed Chorus and the Concert Choir practice for the Cathedrals, Castles and Colonies Concert in the Doudna Fine Arts Center on Oct. 7. Rossi said the theme of the concert, complete with its catchy title, was created in an attempt to come up with something that would be eclectic enough to not box the musicians in. Rossi said he thinks students can benefit from performances such as this and the arts in general, especially when it comes to their education. “I think it’s important that the students are well-rounded in their education,” he said.

Logan Andrews, a junior music education major and a tenor in the Concert Choir, agreed that this music is important to make people more familiar with the arts. “The arts are really important in education,” he said. “It helps to build on the education you receive in other classes.” Andrews said the concert usually has a good turnout, complete with community members, students, fam-

ily members of those performing and others who are interested in the music. Andrews said the concert would feature both old and modern material. He said this concert, along with the artistic value, would have historical value since famous composers from many different eras wrote some of the selections. Andrews said this concert usually incorporates music that has “sacred” text in it.

Rossi said one of the most noteworthy pieces being performed will be an arrangement of “Over the Rainbow” by Paul Johnston, an associate professor of jazz studies and jazz piano. Tickets will be $12 for the general public, $10 for Eastern employees and seniors and $5 for students. Jordan Thiede can be reached at 581-2812 or jethiede@eiu.edu.

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5B

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10.18.2013

Queen and King talk Homecoming By Stephanie Markham Verge Editor

With lights beaming down and hundreds of eyes anxiously scanning the stage for the placement of the two most important Homecoming crowns, the winning king and queen say they felt nothing if not nervous. Shavon Francis, a junior accounting major representing the African Student Association, was crowned this year’s Homecoming Queen, while David Groves, a senior business management major representing the Black Student Union, was crowned king. “I for real was like, ‘I’m going to pass out,’” Francis said. “I’m kind of dramatic, but I was honestly nervous.” When the runner-up for king was announced, Groves felt slightly relieved, but the nerves did not go away just yet, he said. “I’m like, ‘OK well David, that clears up a lot of air, but don’t just think confident; you never know what can happen,’” Groves said. Francis said when her name was announced for queen, she felt happy and relieved. “I was scared I was going to fall down those steps on the platform, but I was happy,” she said. Groves said words could not describe how he felt when he heard his name called. “You can think of everything to say, but that moment is just a once-ina-lifetime opportunity,” he said. “It’s a real good feeling.” Francis said the whole experience was very emotional. “It was nerve-racking,” she said. “It was fun, but it was just like a lot of emotions. One minute I was happy; one minute I was nervous. I was anxious. My heart was beating; it was just a lot of emotion.” Groves said the whole week leading up to the coronation was hectic and nerve-racking. “I didn’t sleep probably Sunday night,” he said. “I wanted to go to sleep, but I stayed up until probably 4 a.m.” Now that the two have won their crowns, they are expected to attend Homecoming events and be a model of school spirit for the rest of campus. Groves said they also have to act as good representations of Eastern whether they are on campus, at home or at other schools. “It’s sort of like, I wouldn’t say like

a presidency, but at the same time anything you campaign for you have to make sure you are the person that they voted for,” he said. Campaigning for votes, both winners agree, took a lot of effort. Both the king and queen said they took advantage of social media outlets like Facebook and Instagram. Francis said her campaigning involved constantly reminding people on social media to vote. “I’m pretty sure we got on people’s nerves,” she said. “We were on Instagram like everyday, and we had this little slogan, which I’m pretty sure people got tired of hearing too.” She said her slogan was “Let’s be frank, vote Francis.” Francis said she and her running mate, Darius Francis, a junior public relations major who won the title of prince, both enjoy talking to people, which worked to their advantage in campaigning as well. “We like talking to people, and I have no problem going up to random people, so that’s what we did,” she said. “We were like, ‘OK, we’re going to go out, seek out people, show our face and reach out.’” Groves said he used social media in addition to passing out candy and asking for votes because he knew competition would be tough this year. Though Groves was automatically entered to run for Homecoming King last November when he won the Essence of Man Scholarship Pageant, he said he embraced the opportunity. He said the experience reminded him of being on the court for Homecoming and Prom King in high school. “My best friend won Homecoming King; one of my other good friends won Prom King,” he said. “So it’s always something that’s been with me. When they gave me the opportunity, I ran with it.” Francis said she wanted to run so she could be fully engaged in the Homecoming experience. “I feel like in the past years I just went to maybe one or two things, if that,” she said. Regardless of winning or losing, Francis was looking forward to dressing up for the competition, she said. “I said, ‘Even if I don’t win, I’m going to go look cute in a really nice dress, shoes, hair,’” she said. “So that was really, really fun.” Although Francis was exited for the competition, she said she was not

Amanda Wilkinson | The Daily Eastern Ne ws

Shavon Francis, a junior accounting major, and David Groves, a senior business management major, were crowned Homecoming Queen and King at Monday's coronation ceremony.

so sure about her chances of winning. “I’m going to be honest; I didn’t think I was going to win,” she said. “I was like, ‘No, there’s no way because BSU always wins, since I’ve been here at least.” Groves said he thought he would win, but he was conscious of his competition the whole time. He said every time he thought about being king, he would find mo-

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tivation by thinking of the Beyoncé song “I Was Here.” Francis said her goal as queen is to be welcoming, warming and a friendly face on campus. “Maybe you’re having a bad day; you don’t really know me, but you get a ‘hey’ and a smile,” she said. Groves said winning the crown was just one of the many things he would like to accomplish.

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“I graduate in May, and although this door may close soon, even though I may not come back for grad school, still I want to accomplish all that I can before then and help everybody get to the step that they need to be before I leave.” Stephanie Markham can be reached at 581-2812 or samarkham@eiu.edu.


6

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Announcements

Game Club: Mahjong, Backgammon, Poker, Chess, Go, Settlers of Catan, Risk & more. New Hours! 7-10 p.m. Fridays. Charleston County Market's Mezzanine. Contact: 348-8869, jjh_1967@yahoo.com ___________________________ 10/18 10,000+ COSTUMES FOR RENT! Plus hats, wigs, makeup, beads, birthday, and bachelorette stuff. GRAND BALL COSTUMES, 609 Sixth Street, Charleston. Mon. - Fri.: Noon to 6, Sat.: Noon to 3. ___________________________ 10/31

Help wanted Submitted photo

The Down-fi is Craig Willis Bell, bass; Sam Murphy, guitar; and Blane Slaven; drums. The band will play at 9 p.m. Friday at The Top of the Roc.

Band to bring punk to Roc's

Mattoon Academy of Gymnastics and Dance is looking for a gymnastics or tumbling instructor. Call 235-1080. _______________________ 10/16 Mattoon Academy of Gymnastics and Dance is looking for a dance instructor. Call 235-1080. _______________________ 10/16

For rent Attention! We have several very nice houses for 4-7 people all within 1/2 block of campus.

By Stephanie Markham Verge Editor

Having contributed to the spawning of the punk genre as a member of Rocket From the Tombs, Craig Willis Bell has since formed many bands, including his most current, The Down-fi. The Down-fi, based out of Indianapolis, will perform at 9 p.m. Friday at The Top of the Roc. Willis Bell, the bassist and lyricist for The Down-fi, describes the band as a “power-pop, punk-rock garage band.” “That sort of covers the pigeon holes that we seem to fall into all the time,” he said. “We’re pretty much just a three-piece: guitar, bass, drums. We can get loud; we can get soft, and we sing about girls, cars and the absurdity of life.” The band also consists of Sam Murphy on guitar and Blane Slaven on drums, with all members contributing to the vocals. Willis Bell said he moved to Indianapolis in 1989 after playing in bands in Cleveland for about 20 years, and in the early 2000s, Rocket From the Tombs reunited to produce its first recording. “We really never had a release, yet we had been bootlegged for 20, 25 years, and we’re cited as an influence with so many people in the early punk scene,” he said. Though he has toured with Rocket From the Tombs for the past decade, Willis Bell said he formed The Down-fi in 2008 to get back into doing his own thing. He said The Down-fi is similar musically to his other bands, with influences from rock ‘n’ roll, early punk and The Velvet Underground. “I can’t say that my stuff has changed all that much,” he said. “It’s not maybe as heavy as Rocket From the Tombs is, but we still can rock out.” The name of the band originates from a misheard line in the Velvet Underground song “Sister Ray,” Willis Bell said. When listening to a bootleg version of the Velvet Underground playing at a university in the 1960s, Willis Bell said he heard “the down fi…” instead of “the down five” and thought it would make an interesting band name. He said he first heard the Velvet Underground in the ‘60s when

he was in junior high school, and he admired the group because they were from New York and because of their unique sound. “They had this something about the band that was a darkness in the era of the 1960s when it was all the summer of love, all the San Francisco sound,” he said. He said although he liked those kinds of music, the Velvet Underground presented something different that he also liked. “They were making music at the same time, but they were making it from a totally different angle,” he said. He compared the Velvet Underground’s appeal to hearing something coming from the basement versus hearing something from the main room of a house. “And that’s when the Velvet Underground were down in the basement making all these dark stories when transvestites and heroine addicts and masochists were all in the streets of New York at night,” Willis Bell said. He said he also took influence from contrasting music, like reggae, at the same time. “On one hand I’m thinking of these colic ideas; on the other hand there’s this monster—this darkness that is right there next to it— and I’ve always tried to break in that genre with the light and the dark pushed together, because that’s what we live. We live in between the light and the dark.” The other members of Rocket From the Tombs have created bands as well, including Pere Ubu and The Dead Boys, which Willis Bell said were influential to emerging punk bands as well. He said he still has fans approach him in random places that express admiration and gratitude for his music. “When you have people come up to you and say ‘Your songs really meant something to me, really spoke to me,’ I can’t even describe what that feeling is,” he said. “Because it’s like you’ve just walked inside of my body; you’ve just been able to stand next to my soul and know exactly what I’m trying to say.” Stephanie Markham can be reached at 581-2812 or samarkham@eiu.edu.

Very reasonably priced. Call for appointment & prices 512-1444. ___________________________ 10/17 1545 3rd St. 6 BR house for 4-6, 1/2 block to Rec Center. Off street partking. This is a very nice, reasonably priced house, in a perfect location. Call 345-5048 for appointments. We have other houses available also. ___________________________ 10/17 CAN'T PASS THIS UP! GREAT APARTMENT FOR PROFESSORS, STUDENTS OR ADULTS WITH CHILDREN. WE HAVE SUPER SAFE BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED TWO BEDROOM, 2 FULL BATHS, LUXURY APARTMENT FOR LEASE! AMENITIES INCLUDE FREE TANNING, FREE LAUNDRY, FREE PARKING AND FREE GYM. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED EXCEPT FOR ELECTRIC AND CABLE, MINUTES FROM EIU, NO NEED FOR A CAR, ALL OF THIS FOR $360, PER BEDROOM, PER MONTH. YES BELIEVE IT! U CAN MOVE IN IMMEDIATELY. 2409 8TH ST. APT. 23. U HAVE TO SEE IT TO BELIEVE IT! YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED. CONTACT SUE AT 815-979-4512 ___________________________ 10/18 6, 5, 4 & 3 bedroom houses close to campus. For more information, call or text Cathy at 217-2541311 or email dcburge@gmail.com. Sign a lease before homecoming and get ***$100 OFF*** last month's rent. ___________________________ 10/18 CLOSE!!! Apts. for 1-3. Grads and Undergrads. www.woodrentals.com. Wood Rentals, Jim Wood Realtor, 345-4489 ___________________________ 10/18 Newly remodeled houses. 3, 4, 5 BR. 217-962-0790 ___________________________ 10/18 Short term lease apartments available starting Jan. 2014 (spring semester) Trash/water included, very clean, Great for student teachers 815600-3129 leave message ___________________________ 10/18 1910 12th St. 3 BR 3 bath. W/D, Dishwasher. $900/month. Available August 2014. 217-5491922 ___________________________ 10/22 Bowers Rentals - Spacious 1 Bedroom Apartment available for Spring, 2014. Newly remodeled! $400/month 345-4001 - eiuliving.com ___________________________ 10/22 Bowers Rentals- Nice 2, 3, & 4 Bedroom Homes available for Fall, 2014. 345-4001 or

10.18.2013

For rent

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EIUStudentRentals.com, 217-345-9595

4 BR, 2 BA Duplex 1 blk. from EIU, 1520 9th St.

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tonILApts.com

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___________________________ 10/31

Fall 2014 Group of 4 or 5 persons needed for

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NEW 2 BEDROOM APTS DIRECTLY ACROSS

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___________________________ 10/23

2014 Spring Semester. Furnished 2 BR Apt. Close to

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house. Washer, Dryer, Dishwasher. Rent and

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__________________________________ 12/9

___________________________ 10/23

2014 Spring Semester. Furnished, Large 1 BR Apt.

Mattoon Academy of Gymnastics and Dance is

Close to Campus. Pet Friendly. All Inclusive Avail-

looking for a dance instructor. 235-1080

able. Call or text 273-2048 or 273-6820.

___________________________ 10/23

____________________________ 12/9


6

erge V

Announcements

Game Club: Mahjong, Backgammon, Poker, Chess, Go, Settlers of Catan, Risk & more. New Hours! 7-10 p.m. Fridays. Charleston County Market's Mezzanine. Contact: 348-8869, jjh_1967@yahoo.com ___________________________ 10/18 10,000+ COSTUMES FOR RENT! Plus hats, wigs, makeup, beads, birthday, and bachelorette stuff. GRAND BALL COSTUMES, 609 Sixth Street, Charleston. Mon. - Fri.: Noon to 6, Sat.: Noon to 3. ___________________________ 10/31

Help wanted Submitted photo

The Down-fi is Craig Willis Bell, bass; Sam Murphy, guitar; and Blane Slaven; drums. The band will play at 9 p.m. Friday at The Top of the Roc.

Band to bring punk to Roc's

Mattoon Academy of Gymnastics and Dance is looking for a gymnastics or tumbling instructor. Call 235-1080. _______________________ 10/16 Mattoon Academy of Gymnastics and Dance is looking for a dance instructor. Call 235-1080. _______________________ 10/16

For rent Attention! We have several very nice houses for 4-7 people all within 1/2 block of campus.

By Stephanie Markham Verge Editor

Having contributed to the spawning of the punk genre as a member of Rocket From the Tombs, Craig Willis Bell has since formed many bands, including his most current, The Down-fi. The Down-fi, based out of Indianapolis, will perform at 9 p.m. Friday at The Top of the Roc. Willis Bell, the bassist and lyricist for The Down-fi, describes the band as a “power-pop, punk-rock garage band.” “That sort of covers the pigeon holes that we seem to fall into all the time,” he said. “We’re pretty much just a three-piece: guitar, bass, drums. We can get loud; we can get soft, and we sing about girls, cars and the absurdity of life.” The band also consists of Sam Murphy on guitar and Blane Slaven on drums, with all members contributing to the vocals. Willis Bell said he moved to Indianapolis in 1989 after playing in bands in Cleveland for about 20 years, and in the early 2000s, Rocket From the Tombs reunited to produce its first recording. “We really never had a release, yet we had been bootlegged for 20, 25 years, and we’re cited as an influence with so many people in the early punk scene,” he said. Though he has toured with Rocket From the Tombs for the past decade, Willis Bell said he formed The Down-fi in 2008 to get back into doing his own thing. He said The Down-fi is similar musically to his other bands, with influences from rock ‘n’ roll, early punk and The Velvet Underground. “I can’t say that my stuff has changed all that much,” he said. “It’s not maybe as heavy as Rocket From the Tombs is, but we still can rock out.” The name of the band originates from a misheard line in the Velvet Underground song “Sister Ray,” Willis Bell said. When listening to a bootleg version of the Velvet Underground playing at a university in the 1960s, Willis Bell said he heard “the down fi…” instead of “the down five” and thought it would make an interesting band name. He said he first heard the Velvet Underground in the ‘60s when

he was in junior high school, and he admired the group because they were from New York and because of their unique sound. “They had this something about the band that was a darkness in the era of the 1960s when it was all the summer of love, all the San Francisco sound,” he said. He said although he liked those kinds of music, the Velvet Underground presented something different that he also liked. “They were making music at the same time, but they were making it from a totally different angle,” he said. He compared the Velvet Underground’s appeal to hearing something coming from the basement versus hearing something from the main room of a house. “And that’s when the Velvet Underground were down in the basement making all these dark stories when transvestites and heroine addicts and masochists were all in the streets of New York at night,” Willis Bell said. He said he also took influence from contrasting music, like reggae, at the same time. “On one hand I’m thinking of these colic ideas; on the other hand there’s this monster—this darkness that is right there next to it— and I’ve always tried to break in that genre with the light and the dark pushed together, because that’s what we live. We live in between the light and the dark.” The other members of Rocket From the Tombs have created bands as well, including Pere Ubu and The Dead Boys, which Willis Bell said were influential to emerging punk bands as well. He said he still has fans approach him in random places that express admiration and gratitude for his music. “When you have people come up to you and say ‘Your songs really meant something to me, really spoke to me,’ I can’t even describe what that feeling is,” he said. “Because it’s like you’ve just walked inside of my body; you’ve just been able to stand next to my soul and know exactly what I’m trying to say.” Stephanie Markham can be reached at 581-2812 or samarkham@eiu.edu.

Very reasonably priced. Call for appointment & prices 512-1444. ___________________________ 10/17 1545 3rd St. 6 BR house for 4-6, 1/2 block to Rec Center. Off street partking. This is a very nice, reasonably priced house, in a perfect location. Call 345-5048 for appointments. We have other houses available also. ___________________________ 10/17 CAN'T PASS THIS UP! GREAT APARTMENT FOR PROFESSORS, STUDENTS OR ADULTS WITH CHILDREN. WE HAVE SUPER SAFE BEAUTIFULLY FURNISHED TWO BEDROOM, 2 FULL BATHS, LUXURY APARTMENT FOR LEASE! AMENITIES INCLUDE FREE TANNING, FREE LAUNDRY, FREE PARKING AND FREE GYM. ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED EXCEPT FOR ELECTRIC AND CABLE, MINUTES FROM EIU, NO NEED FOR A CAR, ALL OF THIS FOR $360, PER BEDROOM, PER MONTH. YES BELIEVE IT! U CAN MOVE IN IMMEDIATELY. 2409 8TH ST. APT. 23. U HAVE TO SEE IT TO BELIEVE IT! YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED. CONTACT SUE AT 815-979-4512 ___________________________ 10/18 6, 5, 4 & 3 bedroom houses close to campus. For more information, call or text Cathy at 217-2541311 or email dcburge@gmail.com. Sign a lease before homecoming and get ***$100 OFF*** last month's rent. ___________________________ 10/18 CLOSE!!! Apts. for 1-3. Grads and Undergrads. www.woodrentals.com. Wood Rentals, Jim Wood Realtor, 345-4489 ___________________________ 10/18 Newly remodeled houses. 3, 4, 5 BR. 217-962-0790 ___________________________ 10/18 Short term lease apartments available starting Jan. 2014 (spring semester) Trash/water included, very clean, Great for student teachers 815600-3129 leave message ___________________________ 10/18 1910 12th St. 3 BR 3 bath. W/D, Dishwasher. $900/month. Available August 2014. 217-5491922 ___________________________ 10/22 Bowers Rentals - Spacious 1 Bedroom Apartment available for Spring, 2014. Newly remodeled! $400/month 345-4001 - eiuliving.com ___________________________ 10/22 Bowers Rentals- Nice 2, 3, & 4 Bedroom Homes available for Fall, 2014. 345-4001 or

10.18.2013

For rent

For rent

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2 half-baths. Close to campus. Rent reduced.

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3 & 4 BD, 2 BATH FURNISHED OR UNFUR-

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TAINED! WASHER/DRYER, AND ALL APPLIANC-

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ES INCLUDED! RENT AS LOW AS $300.00! 1140

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EDGAR DR. WWW.JBAPARTMENTS.COM

5-7 bedroom homes. Trash and yard services

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www.chucktownrentals.com

1 & 2 bedroom apts. for Fall. Good locations, all

___________________________ 10/31

electric, A/C, trash pick-up & parking included.

Great location! Rent starting at $300/month.

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Find your studio, 1, 2, 3 bedroom apartment at

345-7286 www.jwilliamsrentals.com

Lincolnwood-Pinetree.

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217-345-6000

Upscale living for next fall!

___________________________ 10/31

EIUStudentRentals.com, 217-345-9595

4 BR, 2 BA Duplex 1 blk. from EIU, 1520 9th St.

___________________________ 11/20

Stove, fridge, microwave, dishwasher, washer/

4, 5, and 6 BR houses for Fall.

dryer. Trash pd. 217-348-7746, www.Charles-

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tonILApts.com

___________________________ 11/20

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Fall 2014 Group of 4 or 5 persons needed for

FOR 2014-2015 NEWLY RENOVATED 2 & 3

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PUS! 217-493-7559, MYEIUHOME.COM

FALL 2014: 3 BR 3 BA duplex east of campus. All

___________________________ 10/31

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NEW 2 BEDROOM APTS DIRECTLY ACROSS

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er, dishwasher, microwave, major appliances,

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____________________________ 12/6

tonILApts.com

STUDIO & ONE BEDROOM APTS located in

___________________________ 10/31

"The Fields" , 3 blocks from campus, avail-

Immediate and spring leases available. Call for

able August 2014. Washer, dryer, dishwasher,

quote. 217-348-1479.

microwave, major appliances, central heat and

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___________________________ 10/31

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3 BEDROOM FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR

____________________________ 12/6

2014-15 SCHOOL YEAR, $185 PER STUDENT FOR

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A 10 MONTH LEASE, NO PETS. CALL 345-3664

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__________________________________10/31

Brooklyn-

____________________________ 12/9 2 BR Apt. Close to Campus. For Rent Fall 2014. Fur-

www.eiuliving.com

nished. Pet Friendly. All Inclusive. Call or text 273-

___________________________ 10/22

2048 or 273-6820.

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__________________________________ 12/9

of all sizes. Rent and lease negotiable. Washers,

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Inclusive. Call or text 273-2048 or 273-6820.

549-6967

__________________________________ 12/9

___________________________ 10/23

2014 Spring Semester. Furnished 2 BR Apt. Close to

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house. Washer, Dryer, Dishwasher. Rent and

text 273-2048 or 273-6820.

Lease negotiable. 549-6967

__________________________________ 12/9

___________________________ 10/23

2014 Spring Semester. Furnished, Large 1 BR Apt.

Mattoon Academy of Gymnastics and Dance is

Close to Campus. Pet Friendly. All Inclusive Avail-

looking for a dance instructor. 235-1080

able. Call or text 273-2048 or 273-6820.

___________________________ 10/23

____________________________ 12/9


7B

erge V

10.18.2013

Students show excitement, apathy about Homecoming By Derrick Johnson Verge Reporter

Amanda Wilkinson | The Daily Eastern News

Members of the Panther Marching Band practice in formation on Monday behind the Tarble Arts Center. The band will be playing at the Yell Like Hell pep rally on Friday, at the Homecoming parade and at the football game on Saturday.

Marchers prepare for Homecoming Week By Josh Jones Verge Reporter

Homecoming is here, and the Panther Marching Band has been preparing to bring plenty of school sprit through the half-time show and pep rally. However, preparation is not easy, as the marching panthers face many challenges before they perform. J. Corey Francis, assistant director of bands, said much preparation goes into any event that marching panthers are performing in, whether it is band-focused or not. “It takes a lot of time a lot of coordination and a lot of effort to put a full show and stuff going on in the stands, and put that all together,” Francis said. The marching panthers started to prepare for homecoming after the last football home game. This leaves only three weeks to learn the music and coordination. Practice occurs three days a week at Tarble field. Jaymee Findlay, a senior music education major who plays the mellophone, said he finds Homecoming a very exciting time for the band and student body.

“We kind of see ourselves as the spirit of the campus,” he said. “Wherever you go you're probably seeing marching band people without realizing it, and we like to think of ourselves as the football team’s biggest fans.” Findlay had recently changed from the clarinet to the mellophone, a trumpet-like instrument. Alexander Braun, a sophomore music performance major who plays the flute, said he finds Homecoming to be a great time to march. “It is one of my favorite times because that is when you see the school at its most spirited,” Braun said. The average practice starts off with each section separating and working in a smaller group setting to make sure all the music is right, and the remaining hour is dedicated to the group coming together and making sure it flows well. Braun said he enjoys the atmosphere when performing with his fellow band mates. “It is a family atmosphere pretty much everyone there is your friend,” Braun said. The music that the marching panthers will be performing is part of what they are learning for the marching band festival that will be

a week after Homecoming. This music includes “Bird Land,” “Dindi” and “Big Noise.” Francis said he has his own reasons for choosing each piece of music. He said “Bird Land” is a tune that is popular among marching bands, and he felt “Dindi” was a song that otherwise most would not get to hear unless the band performed it. He said “Big Noise” is a fun jazz song that the crowd will really enjoy. Braun said what made Homecoming different from other events was the need for everything to be bigger. “We’re just try to make it a little bit more of a bigger deal because it is Homecoming,” he said. “It is important with the school. We have President Perry coming by for a rehearsal, and he is gong to help us out a bit,” Braun said. Francis said the marching band has proven to be dedicated. “The students work really hard and they enjoy their work for the most part they especially enjoy the payoff of a great performance,” he said. Josh Jones can be reached at 581-2812 or jljones8@eiu.edu.

If there is a single word students are using to describe this year’s Homecoming, it is “excited.” Paxson Menard, freshman sociology major, said he could not wait to experience Homecoming Week at Eastern. “I know everyone is getting pumped up for it,” Menard said. “I’m excited to just see what it’s all about.” Menard said he does not know what events he will be attending for sure, but he is looking forward to testing as many out as he can. “Any organizations I come across, I’ll try to participate in them,” Menard said. Daniel Trevor, a senior communication studies major, is not quite as thrilled about Homecoming. “It just never has seemed like a huge deal to me,” Trevor said. “I barely even realize it’s Homecoming here.” To Trevor, the entire weekend is overblown. He has never voted for the king and queen, and he said he does not even know how. “They don’t even really jazz up the campus,” he said. He said he knows there are events, but he does not know what they are. “I think a lot of them are Greekrelated, and it’s really cool if you’re involved in that, but I’m not,” Trevor said. “A lot of the other events I don’t even know about until after the fact.” Although Homecoming may not be much different than any other week for Trevor, he acknowledged that there is always something fun to do. “You find out something the day of and you go to it,” he said. To some, like sophomore prenursing major Dani Burden, the Greek-related activities are what make Homecoming exciting.

Burden is a member of the Alpha Sigma Tau sorority and the leader of the sorority’s Yell Like Hell team. “I participated last year, but this year I got to step up into a leadership role,” Burden said. “I can’t wait to show everybody at Yell Like Hell what my team has been working on.” Though their perspectives of Homecoming are different, these students are all looking forward to one thing over everything else: Eastern’s Homecoming football game against Southeast Missouri on Saturday afternoon. “I think now that the football team is starting to succeed a lot more there’s a little more school spirit,” Trevor said. He said he is looking forward to attending the game with his friends. Burden said she also notices the school spirit surrounding the Homecoming game. “The energy at the football game is always really exciting,” she said. “More students come out than normal, and it’s just a good environment with good spirit.” Menard said his excitement for Homecoming peaks with the football game. “I know what I’m really excited for is the Homecoming game,” he said. “I feel like it’s going to be really exciting.” During Homecoming, students and alumni come together for events like the “Blue Bash” family fun night on Tuesday or BLUEfest Thursday evening. Some students might not find anything to do over the weekend, but Menard will have enough fun to make up for it. “I’m excited to be a part of this Homecoming throughout my college years,” he said. “I am excited!” Derrick Johnson can be reached at 581-2812 or dmjohnson3@eiu.edu.

Religious group to share views at parade By Stephanie Markham Verge Editor

Among the cheerful crowd that gathers each year to show school spirit at the Eastern Homecoming Parade, one group marches to make a statement of its religious and political views. For more than 10 years, the Coles County Lutherans for Life anti-abortion organization has been participating in the parade to share its beliefs. Corinne Thomley, a former state president for the organization, said the group would participate again this year with students and teachers from St. John’s Lutheran School

and other members riding a float and handing out pamphlets. She said some seventh and eighth-grade girls had planned to march, but because of prior engagements the group had to look for more people. “Unfortunately the people who were supposed to walk with the float had to go to a volleyball tournament, so right now they’re scrapping to try to find other people to walk with the float,” she said. “This seems to happen about every year.” She said the marchers also hand out coloring pictures and crayons to children along the route. “The handouts and things take a lot of time, and we had students

doing that this year,” she said. Although some participants in the Lutherans for Life parade group are children, Thomley said they still have an understanding of abortion issues. “The children understand the issue that walk in the parade,” she said. “Their parents understand the issue, and the children at the Lutheran school understand the issue. They know that babies are being killed before they’re born, and they oppose that idea.” In the past, the organization has driven floats with images of Jesus and had people walking and pushing babies in strollers, Thomley said.

She said this year’s float, which takes about a day or two to put together, would be about the group’s belief in “the sanctity of human life.” “(We believe) in the importance of human life, why it is important to protect it and to further it,” she said. Thomley said the group has been taking part in the parade for about 10 years, and although crowd reactions were negative in the beginning, reactions for the past seven or eight years have been positive. “I have seen a big change in attitude among people,” she said. She said the group encourages people to vote for political candi-

dates who have anti-abortion views, supports a yearly advertisement in the JG-TC protesting Roe v. Wade and participates in college health fairs. Thomley said she feels the organization’s efforts have made an impact in the community. “Because of our activities and because of the pro-life feelings of the community, we have never had a Planned Parenthood in the area or had an abortion clinic in our area, and that we are very thankful for,” she said. Stephanie Markham can be reached at 581-2812 or samarkham@eiu.edu.


erge V

8B

10.18.2013

B and Profile

Katie smith | the Daily Eastern News

BreakAway is Spencer Sharp, drums; Hunter Laughhunn, lead guitar; Will Sharp, lead vocals and rhythm guitar; and Jacob Murphy, bassist. The Battle of the Bands winners will play for the Homecoming tailgate.

BreakAway to rock classics at tailgate By Stephanie Markham Verge Editor Thinking back to winter assemblies in grade school, one might recall the awkwardness of dancing with a random, sweaty classmate while the red light from dad’s camcorder flashes from the back of the auditorium. For three teenagers from Mattoon, however, their school’s winter assembly proved to be their moment of truth. After hearing the other students cheer for their rendition of a classic holiday tune, Hunter Laughhunn and brothers Spencer and Will Sharp decided to form a rock band, recruiting their friend Jacob Murphy to join as well. This is how BreakAway, the winning group from the Charleston Parks and Recreations Department Battle of the Bands, got its start roughly two years ago. “We played like ‘Jingle Bell Rock’ or something,” Hunter said. “So we decided we should probably try to put a band together, and that’s when we decided to get a bass player.” The classic-rock inspired band features Hunter on lead guitar, Spencer on drums, Will on lead vocals and rhythm guitar, and Jacob on bass. Now, Spencer, Hunter and Jacob are in high school together, with Will set to join them next year after graduating eighth grade. “When people ask how old we are, they are surprised normally,” Will said.

BreakAway will play during the Homecoming tailgate, which begins at 10:30 a.m. Saturday outside O’Brien Field. Hunter said the band members treated the competition like any other show, especially considering they did not know who their judges or their competition were. This was not the band’s first victory, though. BreakAway also took the first-place title at the Champaign Park District Battle of the Bands earlier this year. “We did one in Champaign and we won that one, and going off that we were kind of stoked to get to another one to see how it would work out,” Spencer said. The Champaign competition, which featured about 10 local teenbands, was a bit more nerve-racking for the group. “We walked in there thinking, ‘If we win third place, wonderful; I’m going to be happy if we get third place,’” Will said. Hunter said once the band members heard the winners from last year play, they were sure they did not stand a chance. “There was one other band that we thought, ‘They smoked us,’” he said. Spencer said the band members thought they did not place until the band they thought would be first won second. “It was funny to hear my dad’s reaction because the third-place band he didn’t think was going to be in the top three,” Spencer said.

BreakAway currently performs cover songs, has written one song and is working toward writing more. The band’s first experience in writing music came when they composed a song for Sarah Bush Lincoln Health Center’s TV commercial. Will said composing the instrumentals was easy while writing the lyrics was not so easy. “We started it like it was going to be a slow song, but when we found out it needed to be like a commercial jingle, we speeded it up actually a lot, and then we added some drums and then bass,” he said.

bands to emulate, BreakAway tries to steer clear of modern influences. “We just try to take the old, classic music and put our own twist to it and try to reintroduce it to the people that are our age that don’t know about this music,” Jacob said. Will said the newest song the band has covered was a Keith Urban song, considering the members are not fans of much of the music from today. “It takes somebody that knows how to run a computer for pop and then somebody that’s a producer that knows how to use auto-tune, and that isn’t music,” Will said.

"We're not just playing the music that's known right now. We're trying to break away from the crowd." Jacob Murphy, bass player Because the band spends much of its time playing shows or practicing, finding the time to write is difficult, Hunter said. “We’ve been playing like pretty much every weekend,” he said. “We have very little time to actually sit down and write because we’re practicing music that we need to know for the performances.” The group plans to work on writing and perfecting songs more during the winter season when shows are sparse, Will said. When chosing songs to play or

Jacob said bands that produce music live onstage with their instruments are more impressive, his favorite concert having been a Lynard Skynard and ZZ Top show in Champaign. “It’s just not as impressive when you give someone a little device with a bunch of buttons and they just sit there and press it,” he said. “Then (there is) someone who actually spends years learning the instrument so they can play it well.” Will said his exposure to music had mostly been the country and Christian music his mom listened to—until one

night when he heard a different sound coming from downstairs. “My dad was blaring ‘You Shook Me All Night Long;’ I could hear it up in my room it was so loud,” he said. “I came down and I said, ‘What are you doing?’ and I was instantly hooked on that.” Spencer said he mostly listens to the XM ‘80s rock stations his dad plays in the car. Jacob said his dad was influential to his appreciation of classic rock as well. “My dad used to make CDs with a whole bunch of ‘70s and ‘80s music on it, and I’d listen to those every night before I went to bed,” he said. “And I just grew to love the style of music and I’ve always listened to it.” Hunter said he listened to mostly country until he started playing in BreakAway, and once he started learning the music, he loved it. As for the future of the band, Will said he wants to "make it big" and have people know his name. "I want to go on tour," he said. "I want to go around the world, and I want to play music." Meanwhile, the name "BreakAway" represents how the band works and trues to present itself, Jacob said. "We’re not just playing the music that’s known right now," he said. "We’re trying to break away from the crowd and be our own people and try to do what we enjoy." Stephanie Markham can be reached at 581-2812 or samarkham@eiu.edu.

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