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Wednesday

“Tell th e t r u t h a n d d o n ’ t b e a fr a i d . ”

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OC TOBER 17, 2012 V O LU M E 9 7 | N o. 4 1

EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CHARLESTON, ILL. D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M T WIT TER.COM/DEN_NE WS

Perry comments on campus issues

Stat recap from weekend events

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ENROLLMENT

Committee to help Eastern meet needs

UNIVERSIT Y BOARD

By Robyn Dexter In-depth Editor

The Enrollment Worx Group is a committee of various Eastern departments that works to enable Eastern to meet its enrollment needs. Implemented by President Bill Perry in Spring 2012, the group has been working to develop strategies for increasing applications, yield and retention. Mary Herrington-Perry, the chairwoman of the Enrollment Worx group, said the recommendation for the birth of the group came from Noel-Levitz consultants in the spring. “They key is sharing information and making sure everybody is on the same page,” she said. “There are all sorts of opportunities to collaborate.” The committee consists of representatives from many aspects of Eastern including financial aid, integrated marketing, admissions and housing. One of the aspects the group handles is financial aid, and Director Jerry Donna is a member of the group. “They keep us apprised of what we’re doing in terms of allocating scholarship dollars,” she said. “We’re really trying to be strategic with financial aid in terms of offering just the right amount.” Herrington-Perry said in the past, Eastern has over-awarded some students and under-awarded others, so the group is trying to find a middle ground to get students to come to Eastern. “Those financial aid strategies help us to not only increase enrollment, but they also help us shape the entering class because we’re trying to target students who have a higher ACT score,” she said. Herrington-Perry said the group has addressed issues like the Early Alert System, the two new positions in Admissions and the Strategic Enrollment Planning effort. At the group’s last meeting on Oct. 10, Herrington-Perry disclosed the results of the College Choice Survey that Noel-Levitz implemented for Eastern applicants. She said 1,204 students responded to the survey and the group was able to determine that the students were most influenced by their parents on their college choice. “We know right off the bat that we need to do more communications that the parents are seeing,” she said. “One of the new things we’re doing is sending out a postcard so it doesn’t have to be opened by the student and the parents can see the information.” Herrington-Perry said this is just an example of one of the things the group does to help communicate with each other better. The group has six subcommittees: Academic Programs, Campus Visit Strategies, Communication Flow, Customer Service, GIS Map Worx and MyEIU Phase II. “For Academic Programs, we’re looking at exactly what Eastern is offering and what workforce needs really are,” she said. Herrington-Perry said Brenda Major is leading the subcommittee on Campus Visit Strategies, which focuses on open houses and campus tours to make experiences more positive for students. COMMITTEE, page 5

PHOTOS BY MIR ANDA PLOSS | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Randy Stuff, owner of Wea Ink, shows his tattoo of the translation of his Wea Indian Tribe name “Kiihkoneehsa.” He has 52 total tattoos.

Artist shares tattoo, piercing smarts By Amanda Wilkinson Staff Reporter

A local tattoo artist urged students to think before they ink. Randy Stuff, owner and tattoo artist at Wea Ink, has 52 tattoos, but said it is important to take appropriate time before getting a piercing or tattoo. The “A Living Canvas: Tattoos and Piercings” presentation was a part of the University Board’s “Cultural Arts: Teach Me Tuesdays.” Stuff said he is a self-taught tattoo artist and has been tattooing since 1990. Stuff said getting a tattoo should be a thoughtful and planned out decision. “ D o n’t g e t a t a t t o o b y a dumba-- that’s unclean,” Stuff said. He said people who get a tat-

too or piercing should always see the equipment coming out of a brand-new package or else it is probably not clean. People getting tattoos also should always ask if the equipment is sterilized, Stuff said. “When it comes to this, it is art and medical combined,” Stuff said. “You want to look for a license.” Stuff said going to a clean tattoo shop is good but it is not good enough. “Getting a tattoo is half the battle, the rest is on you,” Stuff said. Stuff said the worst reaction to a tattoo that he has seen was in the early ’90s. He e x p l a i n e d t h a t p e o p l e would die from tattoos because they would give them to themselves with a hanger and a file.

However, Stuff also explained that now piercings are more dangerous than tattoos. “There’s an entry and exit hole, it’s an internal wound,” Stuff said. Stuff said people going to get a piercing should always ask for titanium because it is less irritating to the skin and it does not show up on a MRI. Stuff said tattoos are common. The star was the most common tattoo Stuff said he has done lately and explained that it changes with the times. “I’ve learned a thousand different ways to do that star,” Stuff said. At the end of the speech, St u f f ’s b r o t h e r, Te r r y St u f f, judged a “best tattoo contest.” ARTIST, page 5

Randy Stuff, owner of Wea Ink, shows his tattoo of his parents done by his younger brother Terry, Tuesday in the 7th Street Underground of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union.

ELEC TION

Students watch, discuss debate By Amy Wywialowski Assistant Daily Editor

About 150 students filled the Coleman Auditorium Tuesday to watch the second presidential debate and how the issues relate to them. Marita Gronnvoll, a communication studies professor, worked with the communication studies department to organize the event, but said it was not an original idea to hold this type of forum. “We did this type of thing in the 2000s but it was much smaller,” Gronnvoll said. “It is a national thing that many schools do; we didn’t come up with this idea on our own.” At the beginning of the event, Gronnvoll passed out a sheet with six questions for participants to think about as the debate went on. “We are not trying to pick a winner, but familiarize students

with the issues,” she said. “This debate is about a combination of foreign policy and domestic policy, so I hope students pay attention to how the candidates act as opposed to the last debate and how they interact with the audience.” Before the discussion, part i c i p a n t s w a t c h e d t h e p re s i dential debate through CNN’s website. At the halfway point through the debate, the stream of the debate was continuously slow, so Gronnvoll switched to YouTube. “ We c h o s e C N N b e c a u s e they are co-sponsoring the debate and thought they would have more bandwidth,” Gronnvoll said. “Obviously, we were wrong, as more people log on, the slower it gets, and it’s frustrating.” W h i t n e y P l e d g e r, a s o p h omore communication studies major, said she sees herself

Z ACHARY WHITE | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Tommy Zei, a senior political science major, laughs in Coleman Lecture Hall after Mitt Romney told Barack Obama that he was not finished talking yet during the screening of the Presidential Debate Tuesday.

as a liberal, but not as Democrat. “I see flaws in both parties, so I go with what I think about the issues not a particular party,” Pledger said. “I come from a conservative mother and a liberal fa-

ther, so I feel like I have insight from both sides.” Pledger said she attended the event to see what her peers think about the issues, not just the candidates. DEBATE, page 5


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D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

CIT Y COUNCIL

EIU weather Amendment made to vehicle ordinance TODAY

WEDNESDAY

By Samantha McDaniel Daily Editor

Thunderstorm High: 74° Low: 43°

Cloudy High: 58° Low: 44°

For more weather visit castle.eiu.edu/weather.

ONLINE Check out Verge Editor Jaime Lopez’s list of all the fall movies he thinks you should take the time to go see at rockinmovies.wordpress. com.

CORREC TION In the article “Play bring love stories together,” in Tuesday’s edition of The Daily Eastern News, the location of the play was misidentified. It will actually take place in The Theater of the Doudna Fine Arts Center. The News regrets the error.

Eastern News “Tell the t r u t h a n d d o n ’ t b e a f r a i d . ”

Contact If you have corrections or tips, please call:

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The Charleston City Council voted to amend an ordinance banning all low-speed vehicles on Tuesday. Mayor John Inyart said the amendment will allow a certain type of low-speed vehicle that is approved by Illinois and federal government. “In banning all low-speed vehicles, we banned some that are legal on the road,” Inyart said. Inyart said there are vehicles, similar to the ones Eastern uses for the maintenance department, that have all the amendments and qualifications to be driven on the road. He said these vehicles have vehicle identification numbers, are legal by the federal government, proper tires, brakes and roll over protection. “We are not undoing everything we did,” Inyart said. City attorney Brian Bower said these vehicles will still be held to standards similar to a car. Bower said they must have license plates, insurance and subject to traffic violations. He said the drivers must follow any rules like they would have to in a car. Inyart said the vehicles will be allowed on any street with the speed limit of 30 mph or less. He said they can cross roads with higher speed limits, but will not be allowed to drive on them.

217•581•2923 Printed by Eastern Illinois University on soy ink and recycled paper. Attention postmaster: Send address changes to: The Daily Eastern News 1802 Buzzard Hall, Eastern Illinois University Charleston, IL 61920 Editorial Board Editor in Chief...............................................................................Elizabeth Edwards DENeic@gmail.com Managing Editor............................................................................. Ashley Holstrom DENmanaging@gmail.com News Editor......................................................................................... Rachel Rodgers DENnewsdesk@gmail.com Associate News Editor............................................................... Nike Ogunbodede DENnewsdesk@gmail.com Opinions Editor................................................................................. Seth Schroeder DENopinions@gmail.com Online Editor....................................................................................................Sara Hall DENnews.com@gmail.com Photo Editor.......................................................................................... Zachary White DENphotodesk@gmail.com News Staff Daily Editor............................................................................................ Sam McDaniel Assistant Daily Editor.................................................................. Amy Wywialowski Features Editor............................................................................................ Tim Deters In-Depth Editor......................................................................................Robyn Dexter Sports Editor........................................................................................Jordan Pottorff Verge Editor.............................................................................................. Jaime Lopez Assistant Photo Editor........................................................................ Miranda Ploss Assistant Online Editor.................................................................Andrew Crivilare Assistant Sports Editor..............................................................Anthony Catezone Advertising Staff Advertising Manager.....................................................................Breanna Blanton Promotions Manager............................................................................Kate Hannon Faculty Advisers Editorial Adviser................................................................................... Lola Burnham Photo Adviser.......................................................................................... Brian Poulter DENNews.com Adviser........................................................................Bryan Murley Publisher........................................................................................................ John Ryan Business Manager....................................................................................Betsy Jewell Press Supervisor......................................................................................Tom Roberts Production Staff Night Chief........................................................................................ Ashley Holstrom Lead Designer/Online Production...........................................Dominic Renzetti Copy Editors/Designers/Online Production...................... Nike Ogunbodede About The Daily Eastern News is produced by the students of Eastern Illinois University. It is published daily Monday through Friday, in Charleston, Ill., during fall and spring semesters and twice weekly during the summer term except during university vacations or examinations. One copy per day is free to students and faculty. Additional copies can be obtained for 50 cents each in the Student Publications Office in Buzzard Hall. The Daily Eastern News is a member of The Associated Press, which is entitled to exclusive use of all articles appearing in this publication. Comments / Tips Contact any of the above staff members if you believe your information is relevant. Corrections The Daily Eastern News is committed to accuracy in its coverage of the news. Any factual error the staff finds, or is made aware of by its readers, will be corrected as promptly as possible. Please report any factual error you find by e-mail, phone, campus mail or in person.

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He said the road is only about 14 feet wide when people park on both sides, but needs to be about 18 feet. The item is open for public inspection and community members can present comments or concerns to the council. The council will vote on it at the next meeting on Nov. 6. The council also tabled an ordinance that would create a no-parking zone on Kenton Street. Inyart said the area is about 175 feet long and will allow for better visibility around the curve of the road. “There is section that is about two houses long, that when there are cars parked on both sides of the street there is a blind spot coming around that corner,” Inyart said. He said he talked with a few residents on the street about the visibility and the no-parking zone. “I went out and visited the neighbors in the area and I think they understand what we are trying to do and understand the reason for it,” Inyart said. The city council will meet at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 6 in Charleston City Hall. Samantha McDaniel can be reached 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu.

MUSIC

Concert band to change tempo By Samantha McDaniel Daily Editor

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Inyart said an example would be that they can cross Lincoln Ave., but would not be allowed to drive down it. “I’ve driven one, they are zippy,” Inyart said. “They should hold up traffic anywhere on a street that has 30 miles-per-hour speed limit, because they will zip right up to 25-26 mph almost immediately.” A loan agreement for about $122,000 to purchase a street sweeper with a 1.75-percent rate. The loan is schedules to be paid over five years. Inyart said the city traded in an old sweeper and paid about $166,000. The rest will be paid by the loan. The council approved a concept plan for the Sun Elite Athletic Club that will be build on Loxa Road. Inyart said the plan was approved by the Corridor Review Committee and it was recommended that it be approved by the council. The council also tabled an ordinance for a no parking zone around the University Village on the inside of Taurus Loop. Inyart said there should not be any problems with the zone. “The area was designed with more than enough off street parking originally and it’s not being used,” Inyart said. “It’s creating a traffic problem when people park on both sides, which reduces the width of the street beyond what we can go.”

The Eastern Concert Band will be switching paces during its concert on Thursday be changing the variety of tempos in its program. The concert will take place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the Dvorak Concert Hall of the Doudna Fine Arts Center. Alicia Neal, the director of bands and the director of the Eastern Concert Band, said she is excited about the different selections for the program. “Old Home Days,” by Charles Ives has five movements. “It’s got a bunch of different stuff in it, some slow and some fast,” Neal said. “The last movement of it is 'London Bridge is Falling Down.' Everyone will remember that tune from their child-

hood.” Corey Francis, the assistant director of bands, will also be guest conducting a piece by Michael Lauridsen. They will be performing “Contre qui, Rose,” which will slow down the program’s tempo for a moment. They will be finishing up with “Invincible Eagle” by John Phillip Sousa. She said she is excited about the upcoming concert and hopes many parents can come support their students for their first concert. “This is my first concert with this group,” Neal said. “I’m excited to see what kind of crowd we get for this concerts.” Neal said she is looking forward to “Sun Dance” the most because she has never conducted it. Neal said her main goal for the concert is for

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students to showcase their work. “I want the students to have a rewarding experience,” Neal said. “It’s always fun for them to show what they’ve been working on twice a week for seven weeks. I just want them to feel good about their performance and feel like they’ve learned something in the process.” Neal said the wide variety of music will entertain the audiences. “People are going to hear catchy tunes while they are there,” Neal said. Tickets are $5. “It’s an evening of music making, it should be really fun,” Neal said. Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu.


C ampus

News Editor Rachel Rodgers 217 • 581 • 2812 DENnewsdesk@gmail.com

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

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STUDENT GOVERNMENT

FACULT Y SENATE

Student Senate to work toward finalizing funding for IBHE-SAC

Perry comments on Chick-fil-A, enrollment plan

By Amy Wywialowski Assistant Daily Editor

The Student Senate will vote Wednesday on the best way to fund Illinois Board of Higher EducationStudent Advisory Committee meeting at Eastern in November. Student Senate Speaker Mitch Gurick said the November meeting would not only benefit members of the Student Senate, but the university as a whole. “It gives us a chance to show students from other school who we are, it really is an honor,” Gurick said. Gurick said food for the event would cost $304 and would feed 25 delegates. The resolution proposed $200 to come out of the Student Senate budget, and $104.55 to come from Office of Student Affairs.

“(Nadler) strongly believes in this event,” Gurick said. “He said it is a great opportunity that he does not want us to miss.” Gurick said by hosting the IBHESAC meeting at Eastern, as well as the fact that Jarrod Scherle, the student executive vice president, never stays overnight when he attends the meetings; the organization has been able to save enough money to send two Student Senate Members to a conference this upcoming weekend. “We used to send delegates to a conference in Texas but because of budget cuts in the past few years we haven’t been able to,” Gurick said. “Student Senate member Nick Allen did a lot of research and found the American Student Government Association Conference.” Shawn Allen, a junior political science major, and Elise Klaus, a freshman

history major, will attend the conference on Oct. 20 at the University of Illinois at Chicago. “They are both new to Student Senate and are still learning about it so it is very exciting,” Gurick said. “After they come back they will give a presentation to the Student Senate to show us what they learned and how we can apply it at Eastern.” The group will also vote on a consent agenda, which includes the approval of a new Chief Justice to the Student Supreme Court The Student Senate meets at 7 p.m. in the Arcola-Tuscola Room of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. Amy Wywialowski can be reached at 581-2812 or alwywialowski@eiu.edu.

UNIVERSIT Y BOARD

Poetry night to get ‘Xplicit’ By Jordan Thiede Staff Reporter

Students can share their feelings, ideas and opinions about different life experiences Wednesday at the University Board’s Open Mic Night “Poetry After Dark.” The Poetry After Dark event will take place at 7 p.m. Wednesday in the 7th Street Underground. Esraa Odeh, the UB mainstage coordinator, said this event is a good chance for any student poets to not only share their own work, but to also witness an acclaimed artist in the profession. The night will include a slam poetry performance by Brandon Thornton, who is otherwise known as “The Xplicit Poet.” Odeh, a junior art major, said Thornton is not what people usually expect a typical poet to be. She described Thornton as an urban poet who is a “smooth speaker.” She said Thornton is someone who has done other poetry tours in the

past and has made a name for himself. Odeh said Thornton usually covers a wide variety of topics in his performances. Odeh said some of these subjects can include things such as social issues, race, love and other life experiences that many people can relate to. The mic night will also give students the opportunity to share any poetry they have written that otherwise may not have been made public. Odeh said these types of events happen quite often at Eastern; sometimes as much as much as two or three times a month. These open mic nights often include reading poetry, or they can be other opportunities for students to get their work out there. “We want the students to perform,” Odeh said. Odeh said this event is open to, and usually draws, all types of students who have done this type of work in the past. She said it is not just people one

would generally assume would be the “poet” type. “It’s usually not just one type of person,” Odeh said. “It’s just people with different types of talent that like to show their talent.” Odeh also said that she thinks students can be hesitant to share their work at times. She said it is part of her job to help students who may be nervous about performing. Odeh said she is encouraging students to come to the show, whether it is to share their poetry or just to enjoy the performances. “I do wish that there was something I could do to make people feel more comfortable,” Odeh said. “All I can do is welcome everybody and encourage them to do it and put on a good performance for the audience.”

By Stephanie Markham Staff Reporter

President Bill Perry and the four vice presidents spoke to Faculty Senate Tuesday about their concerns with enrollment and the budget, resolutions made about Chick-fil-A, and recent legislation regarding professors’ pensions. Perry said he will present a response to the Faculty Senate about their three resolutions relating to Chick-fil-A by the last week of November. “Overall, I’d say the three resolutions look sensible,” he said. “I just need to put together an analysis to respond adequately.” Perry said the three meetings of debate in Faculty Senate proved the depth and importance of the issue. William Weber, the vice president for business affairs, discussed state funding. He said while funding issues are continuing, there is still noticeable improvement. He said although the state owes Eastern between $11-12 million for this fiscal year, that number was much higher last year at $20-21 million. Members of Faculty Senate expressed their concerns of the effects of current Illinois legislature proposing changes to professor’s pensions. Chairman Andrew Methvan said

current legislation is suggesting a shift in the contribution of pensions from the state to the schools’ budgets. Perry said this change caused many faculty to retire last year because they feared they would loose benefits if they waited. Perry said he feels confident in the recent strategic enrollment plan. He said the number of prospective students attending open houses has increased from 400 to 500, and there are currently 5,000 students using the Eastern portal website versus only 1,500 at this time last year. Dan Nadler, the vice president for student affairs, said students surpassed the goal for combined community service with 110,000 hours, making the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll. He also said student government exceeded its goal by registering more than 2,000 students to vote. Martin also talked about the alumni honored during homecoming weekend, including seven distinguished alums and various service awards. He said it is important to keep alumni constantly active in the university. Stephanie Markham can be reached at 581-2812 or samarkham@eiu.edu.

Jordan Thiede can be reached at 581-2812 or jethiede@eiu.edu.

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O pinions Eastern’s legacy will continue despite lowered enrollment Eastern’s biggest issue currently is its decreasing enrollment. Though, like any large community, Eastern faces a variety of problems, and we at The Daily Eastern News see issues with enrollment as the highest concern because without students, there is no university. Unfortunately, the issue does not seem to have a direct solution, and many actions taken to improve things will not necessarily have an immediate effect. As we reported in our Oct. 9 issue, and in many previous issues, the administration and faculty at Eastern have many strategies to help increase enrollment, like working with the Noel-Levitz consulting firm, developing new recruitment strategies and implementing programs such as the Summer Institute. But we also know there is only so much Eastern officials can do. Much of the enrollment issue stems from a stagnant economy and a state government with numerous financial issues, both of which are largely out of Eastern’s control. We do not mean to imply that working to improve things is pointless, only that the external causes are not necessarily things with which our community can deal. We are grateful for the work Eastern’s administrators are doing to alleviate the situation. As we have said before, students can also help increase enrollment by forming a friendly and accepting environment that new students would want to be a part of. Though the actions we take may not have the profound effects we would like, the situation is not hopeless. As our community works to improve things, it is important to remember that despite the current strain of decreased enrollment and the problems associated with it, Eastern will continue on beyond this. The Homecoming high may have just ended, and the parade, tailgating and celebrations may already be distant memories as we return to the daily grind of class, but our returning alumni reminded us of Eastern’s legacy. Eastern is bigger than what we are doing here and now. It has weathered and solved numerous problems we have never had to face, and it will continue to do so long after we are gone. We should keep this in mind as we continue to deal with the enrollment issue. It may seem like our university is losing more and more students and that our current home may one day be a thing of the past. But this will not be the case. It is impossible to say that Eastern will live forever. But we are confident that this problem, however difficult to deal with, will not be the end of it. This is only one point in our university’s history. It may not be the greatest, but it is not going to be the last.

The DAILY EASTERN NEWS

“Tell the truth and don’t be afraid.”

EDITORIAL BOARD News Editor Rachel Rodgers

Managing Editor Associate News Editor Ashley Holstrom Nike Ogunbodede Online Editor Sara Hall

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

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COLUMN

STAFF EDITORIAL

Editor in Chief Elizabeth Edwards

Opinions Editor Seth Schroeder 217 • 581 • 2812 DENopinions@gmail.com

Opinions Editor Seth Schroeder

The daily editorial is the majority opinion of the editorial board of The Daily Eastern News.

We’re not prepared for face-to-face conversation A friend of mine told me recently about a project she did for her communication class where she stopped using everything that had a screen for 24 hours. No TV, no computer, and her cell phone could only be used to make calls. All of her texts and emails were ignored. She had to read the paper or a book for information. She had to actually talk to people. Every time she walked out of a room, she would grab her cell phone, only to realize that she couldn’t use it. When she had a free moment, she would reach for her computer, then have to set it back down and find something else to do. She could not follow her routine anymore because most of it used a screen of some kind. We do most of our communication through social media or texting, through a screen, and as college students now, we have been doing this our whole lives. According to Twitter’s blog, an average of 140 million Tweets sent in February of 2011, and according to the blog digitalbuzz, the average number of status updates on Facebook in 20 minutes was 1,851,000 in 2011. We are not prepared to talk face-to-face in situations that require it. Situations such as job interviews where conversation skills can mean the difference between getting a job and unemployment. The conversation is different. That conversation is not social media, and many of us are not prepared to face it.

Brandyce Gordon We are not even prepared for something as simple as speaking in class. When a teacher asks a question in most of my classes, all I can hear are crickets. How can we make a good impression as adults if we cannot even answer a question in class? Even as I type this, I am sitting with two of my friends. I am on my computer, and they are both on their phones. I am not sure if we have talked yet, and this is how we spend our time together: distracted. But it isn’t just us. Everyone in the room is doing the same thing. Every time I say something to someone while they are texting, I always get told they are multi-tasking. But the sad news is that humans can’t multi-task. According to a National Public Radio, we do not multi-task, but rather switch our concentration back and forth really fast. As much as this is an evolutionary edge that we have, it still means there is part of what I am saying that is not being heard.

What has communication come to? Are we going to become a world were everything is conducted online? What happened to conversation? Lets say we go to the extremes and become like the movie “WALL-E.” We might not be riding in floating chairs, but we could just be watching screens in front of us, never talking face-to-face. Is everyone OK with that? Of course, I’m just as guilty of this. I cannot tell you the number of times I have walked through campus and only saw the screen of my iPhone as I texted or tweeted my way to class. But I am not alone. If I look up on my way to class, the majority of people I see are bending their head to see a screen. I think giving up screens would be a liberating experience, one that maybe everyone needs to try. Then maybe, for at least 24 hours, we can start learning how to talk to people with words and not our cell phone screens. I plan to do the 24 hours without a screen experiment during Thanksgiving break and see how long I can make it. I hope I last for all 24 hours. Look for a follow-up column after Thanksgiving to see what my experience was like. Brandyce Gordon is a junior journalism major. She can be reached at 581-2812 or denopinions@gmail.com.

FROM THE EASEL

L AMONT J. HAYMOND | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

LET TER TO THE EDITOR

Diversity should be encouraged, not inhibited It’s great to live in a country where tolerance and diversity are practiced. On “Main-Street-America,” it’s possible to have a Jewish synagogue next to an Islamic mosque. Across the street might be Catholic, Protestant, Mormon and Charismatic churches. On the same street, we could have a gay bar; a Bible thumping, right-wing conservative Bible College; a crisis pregnancy center; an abortion clinic and a Republican headquarters next to a Democrat one. The diverse list could go on with each one representing strong personal beliefs. In the middle of the neighborhood, we

could have a community building for respectful dialogue and debate on the differing principles. It would be OK to carry a poster affirming your support of one or the other or a placard speaking your disagreement with another. There would be no harm done, as long as it doesn’t become a violent demonstration, an incitement to riot, ugly name-calling, or expressions of disrespect, dishonor or disgrace. It is possible to disagree without being disagreeable. The staff of The Daily Eastern News is to be commended for their effort to let all the

Letters to the editor can be submitted at any time on any topic to the Opinions Editor to be published in The Daily Eastern News. The DEN’s policy is to run all letters that are not libelous or potentially harmful. They must be less than 250 words.

voices be heard, as long as they speak without hate, bigotry or prejudice. It is also fair that they print letters from the general public who just happen to be paying the taxes that keep Eastern alive and well. You should be left with the choice to enter any of those institutions on “Main Street,” including Chick-fil-A. Those who would take away that choice are the intolerant and anti-diverse. Bob Clapp, Oakland, Illinois

Letters to the editor can be brought in with identification to The DEN at 1811 Buzzard Hall. Letters may also be submitted electronically from the author’s EIU e-mail address to DENopinions@gmail.com.


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LEC TURE

Students to learn about grad school By Samantha McDaniel Daily Editor

Representatives from every Eastern graduate program, including 22 external programs, will congregate in the Grand Ballroom of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. Students pursuing graduate school in the future can learn about the different programs Eastern offers as well as what other programs are available. Bobbi Kingery, an adviser for Career Services, said there will be representatives from every program at Eastern and about 22 external programs present at the Graduate School Information Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday in the Grand Ballroom of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. Kingery said each school will either be bringing the entire office or just representatives from specific fields. “It’s an opportunity for students to drop-in in between classes, dressed casually, and meet people from these

programs and ask specific questions,” Kingery said. Kingery said this gives students the opportunity to learn about programs from something other than a website. “It gives them the opportunity to speak to someone face-to-face,” Kingery said. “Although there is a lot of information available on the webpages, the representatives from these programs are often the people who will read the transcripts as they come in. Students can get a feel for what they are looking for.” Kingery said this is an opportunity to learn what they need to do in order to get accepted to graduate programs. She said students can ask about different aspects of a program “It’s an opportunity to get in-depth answers that you can’t get from a website,” Kingery said. She said students of all classes are invited to attend. “For underclassmen who are thinking about graduate school, or know they need to go, it’s a great opportuni-

“The earlier you find out what they are looking for, the easier that process with be and be able to prepare for it.” Bobbi Kingery, adviser for Career Services

ty to walk through and find out what those programs are looking for, because graduate school is competitive,” Kingery said. “A lot of students think ‘oh, I’ll go to graduate school rather than finding a job,’ but not everyone is going to get in.” Kingery said a full list of programs that will be represented can be found on the Career Services website. She said for students who want to learn about graduate programs before the information day can attend “Grad School-Is it for Me?” at 6 p.m. in the Charleston-Mattoon Room of

the Union. Kingery said there will be two representatives at the panel and they will talk with students about getting into graduate school. She said students need to learn what program want. “The earlier you find out what they are looking for, the easier that process with be and be able to prepare for it,” Kingery said.

“(Tattoos) are another way to decorate myself.” Hannah Ferris, sophomore undecided major

“Early voting has already started but I want to clarify issues and help students understand exactly what the candidates are talking about,” Zei said. Nick Tieman, the president of the EIU College Republicans and a junior accounting major, said politics is something he has always been passionate about and that it is important for student to be informed. “We were invited and wanted to come help educate and share out views,” Tieman said. The next presidential debate will take place Oct. 22. Amy Wywialowski can be reached at 581-2812 or alwywialowski@eiu.edu.

Amanda Wilkinson can be reached at 581-2812 or akwilkinson@eiu.edu.

Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu.

DEBATE, from page 1

The Communication Flow is managed by Pat Early, the assistant vice president for communications. Sue Harvey is leading the subcommittee on Customer Service that makes sure that faculty and staff have the most positive interactions with students as possible. Herrington-Perry said the GIS Map Worx subcommittee—led by John Stimac—is using geographic information sciences to help Eastern understand enrollment more. The tools can plot maps that help the Enrollment Worx group figure out where students come from and use the data to improve enrollment. The final subcommittee, MyEIU Phase II, is chaired by webmaster

“I’ve watched the past few debates by myself, I’m big on being an informed citizen,” Pledger said. “Now that I am in college, I think it is more important than ever, these are the issues that will affect me and my future children someday.” While some participants were not partisan, both the EIU College Democrats and EIU College Republicans had representatives at the event and helped lead the discussion. Tommy Zei, a member of the EIU College Democrats and a senior political science major, said he was interested to see how the debate would go but said his major goal within the event was to educate.

Robyn Dexter can be reached at 581-2812 or redexter@eiu.edu.

ARTIST, from page 1

There were only three participants but Terr y’s decision was slightly more difficult even with less choices. Terry looked at the quality of lines, color, shading and overall quality of the tattoo. Ultimately, Terry picked Hannah Ferris as the winner. Hannah Ferris, a sophomore undecided major, won a $75 gift card with her gumball machine tattoo on her left triceps. Ferris said her tattoos do not have any significance behind them. “They’re just pretty and I like them,” Ferris said. “They are another way to decorate myself.” Ferris’ sister Molly was also in contending for the “best tattoo contest.” Molly Ferris, a junior psychology major, said she thinks she gets tattoos because of the experience. “We both got free tattoos on our toes and it’s just a fun story,” Molly said. Hannah said people should not only take the time to research what tattoo they want, but also be willing to pay an adequate amount of money to get the best result. “A good tattoo is not cheap and a cheap tattoo is not good,” Hannah said.

COMMITTEE, from page 1 Ryan Gibson and helps attract prospective students and allows the group to communicate with students online. The Enrollment Worx group meets twice a month, but can schedule to meet more frequently if necessary. The Enrollment Worx group is in the process of interviews for the new assistant vice president for enrollment management, and are not meeting this week. “I think we’re all sharing a lot of good information and we have such a dedicated team that’s totally supportive of EIU,” Herrington-Perry said.

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T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

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ACROSS

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Z E K E

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PUZZLE BY ROBERT W. HARRIS

DOWN

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE A L E C

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A D I E U

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SPORTS

W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 17, 2012

N o. 41, V O LU M E 97

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

STAT ATTACK

VIE WS

21:35 CROSS COUNTRY

Red-shirt senior Olivia Klaus set the program record in the women’s 6K, completing the race in 21:35 at the Bradley Classic over the weekend. Klaus’ time of 21:35 ear ned her a 10th place finish.

FOOTBALL

515.86

Easter n’s football team is among the nation’s best in terms of off ensive production. Its average of 515.86 total yards of off ense per game ranks second in the nation. Easter n also ranks second in scoring off ense (43.43 points per game) and fifth in passing off ense (390.86 yards per game).

VOLLEYBALL

Red-shirt junior Stephanie Ar nold recorded 11 blocks in Easter n’s four-set road win against Murray State. Her 11-block effort included 10 roofs, placing her seventh all-time in program history for roofs in a game en route to being named the Ohio Valley Conf erence Def ensive Player of the Week.

3

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WOMEN’S SOCCER

Easter n’s women’s soccer team has just three matches remaining in the regular season, and is currently out of contention for the Ohio Valley Conf erence Tour nament as only the top six teams advance to the postseason tour nament. The Panthers will need to win at least two of three games to qualify for the postseason tour nament.

REPORTING BY JORDAN POT TORFF, PHOTOS BY Z ACHARY WHITE, DESIGN BY ASHLEY HOLSTROM | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Alex McNamee

OVC littered with top talent By Alex McNamee Staff Reporter

Jacksonville State running back Washaun Ealey owns Eastern. Ealey, a transfer from Georgia, has played two games against Eastern since he became a Gamecock last year. His stats in those two games: evidence why he was recruited to be a Georgia Bulldog. Saturday, Ealey ran for 149 yards and three touchdowns on 23 attempts. Last year, he ran for 155 yards without scoring a touchdown. Ealey is just one in a long line of Division-I transfers to come to the Ohio Valley Conference level and perform at a high level. Ealey, like some of the top tier players who transfer to OVC schools, has a history of troublemaking. He was granted a release from Georgia in May 2011 after a couple suspensions — one involving a hit-and-run. This season, Ealey was arrested on drug possession charges and suspended for one game, the Gamecocks’ home opener in September. Even so, Ealey has performed well this season and Saturday’s game could be a breakout game for him. He rushed for 149 of his 327 total yards and scored three of his four touchdowns. Ealey is one of the top 10 rushers in the OVC. Also on that list: Eastern Kentucky running back Matt Denham, who transferred from Kentucky. Denham is the second-best rusher in the OVC with 874 yards and eight touchdowns this season. Two of the OVC’s top wide receivers were also transfers to their schools. Tennessee-Martin receiver Quentin Sims transferred from Georgia Tech and is in the top five of the league with 691 receiving yards. He also leads the Skyhawks in that category. Just below him on the list is Tennessee Tech receiver Da’Rick Rogers, who transferred from Tennessee this summer after multiple violations of the school’s substance-abuse policy for athletes. Rogers is best known this year for his huge performance catching the ball early this season when he had 18 receptions for 303 yards and two touchdowns in one game. The transfer train doesn’t stop with these players, though. There are plenty high profile names spread throughout the conference. Murray State has nine players who’ve transferred into their program from higher profile schools like Ohio State, Arkansas, South Carolina and Ole Miss. Eastern Kentucky has six transfers, including two from Virginia Tech. It comes full circle with Jacksonville State, though. The Gamecocks are from Alabama, the closest OVC school to the Southeastern Conference, and have always seemed like an SEC factory for players coming down a level. Former quarterback Ryan Perrilloux is a great example. He transferred from Louisiana State University in 2008 after some trouble and immediately became a force to be reckoned with as a Gamecock. He passed for 236 yards and one touchdown against Eastern on Oct. 24, 2009, and ran for 36 yards and a touchdown. Ealey is the new big name at Jacksonville State, finally gathering the stats that recruiters expected from him a few years ago. But he’s not the only one. No matter how all the high profile players got to where they are today, they’re exciting to watch and can really bolster a program. Alex McNamee can be reached at 581-2812 or admcnamee@eiu.edu.


@DEN_Sports tweet of the day: #EIU men’s golf nabs sixth place finish in its last tournament of the fall season at the Cougar Classic.

S ports

Sports Editor Jordan Pottorff 217 • 581 • 2812 DENSportsdesk@gmail.com

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

W E D N E S DAY, O C TO B E R 17, 2012 N o. 4 1 , V O L U M E 9 7

FOOTBALL

8

GOLF

Men’s golf team wraps up season Team finishes 6th out of 11 teams By Cody Delmendo Staff Reporter

DOMINIC BAIMA | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Head coach Dino Babers yells to the football team during the game against Jacksonville State Saturday at O’Brien Field. Eastern won 31-28. The win puts the Panthers at 3-1 in the Ohio Valley Conference.

Panthers climbing national ranks By Jordan Pottorff Sports Editor

Having won three of its last four games, Eastern’s football team is gaining recognition throughout the FCS football ranks once again following its 31-28 Homecoming win over Jacksonville State on Saturday. FCS Polls The Panthers find themselves as one of several teams in the “other teams receiving votes” category. The Panthers rank No. 40 in the nation in the Sports Network FCS Top 25 poll and rank No. 32 in the FCS Coaches poll. The No. 32 ranking is the highest ranking the Panthers have had this season. In the top 25, both polls saw major shakeups as four of the nation’s top five teams lost over the weekend. Coming off a win over previously unbeaten Montana State, the Eastern Washington Eagles have taken over the No. 1 ranking in both the Sports Network FCS Top 25 poll and the FCS Coaches poll. Eastern Washington received 92 first-place votes in the Sports Network FCS Top 25 poll and 11 firstplace votes in the FCS Coaches poll. In the Sports Network FCS Top 25 poll, James Madison, Georgia Southern, North Dakota State and Montana

State round out the top five. Tennessee State is the highest ranked Ohio Valley Conference team, ranking No. 17 nationally. Eastern Kentucky is also nationally ranked, coming in as the No. 23 ranked team. Tennessee-Martin, Tennessee Tech and Jacksonville State join Eastern as OVC schools to receive national recognition as “other teams receiving votes.” In the FCS Coaches poll, the same five teams hold the top five rankings, but Tennessee State is ranked No. 18, while Eastern Kentucky sits as the No. 24 ranked team in the nation. Weekly Awards Two players combined to share OVC Offensive Player of the Week honors this past week as Tennessee State junior running back Trabis Ward and Tennessee-Martin senior quarterback Derek Carr shared the honors. Ward led all OVC running backs with 267 rushing yards and four touchdowns in the 40-28 win over Southeast Missouri. His 267 rushing yards and four touchdowns both rank second in program history. Carr was nearly perfect in TennesseeMartin’s 66-59 win over Murray State. He completed 42 of his 46 pass attempts and threw for a career-best 560 yards and seven touchdowns. His seven touch-

down passes set the Tennessee-Martin record for touchdown passes in a game, and his 560 passing yards set the OVC record for passing yards in a game. Defensively, two players also combined to share the award as Tennessee State’s sophomore defensive back Steven Godbolt III and Tennessee-Martin’s senior defensive back Thad Williams combined to take home the defensive honors. Godbolt paced the Tennessee State defense as his four tackles and 62-yard interception return helped the Tigers improve to 7-0 on the season. It was Godbolt’s fourth interception of the season. Williams also had an impact defensively as his 42-yard interception returned for a touchdown gave the Skyhawks a 7-0 lead in the opening minutes of the game. Williams also added six tackles, a pass break-up and a tackle-for-loss in the win over Murray State. Eastern junior kicker Cameron Berra was tabbed as the OVC Special Teams Player of the Week for his performance against Jacksonville State. Berra was a perfect 4-of-4 on his point after attempts and he also converted on a 43-yard field goal attempt as time expired in the first half. Berra is now a perfect 6-of-6 on field goal attempts this season. Jordan Pottorff can be reached at 581-2812 or jbpottorff@eiu.edu.

Eastern’s men’s golf team finished up the fall season Tuesday at Harbor Side Golf Course in East Chicago for the Chicago State Fall invitational, as it finished sixth place overall out of 11 teams. The Panthers finished with an overall score of 615 (+39). This was the best finish the team had this fall season so it was great to end on a high note, senior Tommy Ponce said. “I’m very proud of how our team came back today, Ponce said. “We could have been lower than what we ended up, but we showed improvement and that’s what we needed and that’s what we needed to see to give us motivation moving into the spring season.” Eastern was once again led by senior Kevin Flack, who finished with an overall score of 149 (+5). Flack finished tied for eighth place overall with Brandon White from Lewis, Kirby Brown from St. Xavier, Tom Boockmeier from Green Bay and Brad Winters from Valparaiso Gold. Ponce and freshman Austin Sproles finished tied for 30th place individually with an overall score of 155 (+11). Brad Stephens from DePaul, Sam Weber from Green Bay, and Kevin Workman from Indian Hills CC also tied for 30th place, but performed independently. “I feel good,” said Ponce. “I had a lot of positives come out of this tournament. I just didn’t get everything going like I wanted to.” As for his individual future, Ponce said he plans to use the offseason to work towards improving in the spring. “I plan to work hard this offseason to eliminate some minor mistakes that hurt me in the fall

“We showed improvement and that’s what we needed and that’s what we needed to see to give us motivation moving into the spring season.” Tommy Ponce, senior golfer

and be more on top of my game f o r t h e s p r i n g s e a s o n ,” Po n c e said. Junior Zach Holland finished tied for 41st place individual ly with an overall score of 158 (+14). Sean Hickey from Loyola-Chicago and Brad Peterson from DePaul finished tied with Holland individually. James Jansen and Adam Decker from Loyola-Chicago finished tied for 56th place individually with an overall score of 165 (+21). Green Bay finished at the top of the board as a team with an overall score of 590 (+14). Green Bay was led by Chad Ebert, who finished in third place with an overall score of 146 (+2). Oscar Sharpe from Indian Hills nabbed the top spot individually with an overall score of 142 (-2). Sharpe competed independently so his score did not go toward his team. The Panthers are finished with the fall season and will not start back up until the spring season in March. Cody Delmendo can be reached at 581-2812 or cddelmendo@eiu.edu.

Top Cat

with Olivia Klaus, red-shirt senior cross country runner

Klaus distances herself from competition By Holden Fuehne Staff Reporter

Olivia Klaus continued her excellence as a runner in her red-shirt senior season by breaking the Eastern all-time record for best time in the 6k run. Before the race, Klaus, said her goal was to crack the top 20 and the 22 minute mark. Finishing 10th out of 222 at the Bradley Classic with a record-breaking time of 21:35 satisfies those goals, she said. The 21:35 team beats the old record of 21:47 set by teammate Erika Ramos. Klaus said what started out as a normal race turned into a dominant

performance. She hit record pace toward the middle of the race and eventually picked it up down the stretch. “Coach (Erin) Howarth was telling me I was on record pace toward the mid to end of the race, so that was motivational,” the Eureka native said. As good as Klaus is as a runner, she said she cares even more about how her team performs as a whole. “It was a great day all around for our team, everyone was hitting personal bests and having awesome races,” Klaus said. “For me to get the record was awesome and meaningful because it makes me feel like my hard work is all pay-

ing off.” This record seemed to be meant for Klaus since she transferred from Miami (Ohio) four years ago. She already made the second team All-Ohio Valley Conference in her first season as a Panther. Klaus has made the All-OVC first team in each of the last two seasons. She also holds the sixth best time in Eastern history in the 5K. “But I think seeing our team progress and run awesome was so much more important,” Klaus said. “The record was kind of like icing on the cake.” The finish by Klaus and the Panthers comes at the end of the

“For me to get the record was awesome and meaningful because it makes me feel like my hard work is all paying off.” Olivia Klaus, red-shirt senior runner

season, as they are getting hot at the right time, Klaus said, with the OVC Championship on Oct. 27. “I think it’s just what we need going into the championship,” Klaus said. “Confidence in ourselves is what our team will succeed off

of. The best is yet to come in our team.” Holden Fuehne can be reached at 581-2812 or hjfuehne@eiu.edu.


Issue 41 Volume 97