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Eastern News

Tuesday

“Tell th e t r u t h a n d d o n ’ t b e a fr a i d . ”

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EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CHARLESTON, ILL. D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M T WIT TER.COM/DENNE WS

Student prepares to teach abroad

Miller wins freshman award

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DOUDNA FINE ARTS THEATER

UNIVERSIT Y AFFAIRS

Eastern’s budget increases By Rachel Rodgers Administration Editor

Editor’s Note: This is the third installment of a series of budget articles.

KIMBERLY FOSTER | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Molly Manhart, a senior theatre arts major, and Vince Dill, a psychology graduate student, perform during dress rehearsal for the play "The Shape of Things" Monday in the Black Box of the Doudna Fine Arts Center. The show will run Thursday through Sunday, with performances at 7:30 Thursday through Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday. KIMBERLY FOSTER | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Molly Manhart, a senior theatre arts major, and Vince Dill, a psychology graduate student, perform during dress rehearsal for the play "The Shape of Things" Monday in the Black Box of the Doudna Fine Arts Center. The show will run Thursday through Sunday, with performances at 7:30 Thursday through Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday.

The Shape of Things Cast explores self-identity in new performance By Samantha McDaniel Activities Editor

A four-member cast will take the audience on a journey as the story of love versus self-identity is discovered this week. “The Shape of Things” will take place Wednesday through Sunday thanks to Eastern’s theatre department.

Jeff Tangeman, an assistant professor of theatre and the director of “The Shape of Things,” said this hour and a half play tells the story of Adam, a shy student, who falls in love with Evelyn, an intense artist. “The play centers around the main character, Adam, and how he explores how far he is willing to change himself for a girl he falls for,” Tangeman said.

Evelyn encourages Adam to bet- Performance dates ter himself, so he has to decide if he wants to take her advice. • Time-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, “We see how the relationship Thursday, Friday and Saturday tests his own will and his own sense and 2 p.m. on Sunday of identity and who he is,” Tange- • Place- Black Box Theatre of the Doudna Fine Arts Center man said. Adam’s relationship with Evelyn • Price- $5 for Eastern students, affects his Adam’s relationship with $12 for general admission and $10 for employees and people his friends Jenny and Phillip. CAST, page 5

62 and older.

Eastern’s budget increased by about $3.18 million, which carried over from Fiscal Year 11 funds because of Eastern’s cash flow management in response to lacking state payments. In June, the state owed Eastern about $21 million of its total appropriated FY 11 funds of about $47.4 million. Since then, the state has reimbursed Eastern with about $12.1 million and still owes about $8 million. William Weber, the vice president for business affairs, said the $3.18 million is a pool of one-time-only funds resulting from the two major ways the university has compensated for funds the state owes. “Typically we do not have significant amounts carry over like this,” Weber said. “It is an anomaly and is the result of how we managed the cash flow situation.” The two major ways the cash flow was managed are cutting back on spending and borrowing internally from local non-restricted funds, which consist of income that is not from tuition or general revenue funds, he said. “We purposely did not spend our full budget authority and have cut back on funding as much as possible while still being able to have classes and keep the university running,” Weber said. “This has helped supplement our expenditures on a temporary basis as we try to move forward with the situation with the state.” The spending cuts significantly affected the university in terms of personnel, he said. “The employee headcount of full and parttime employees is down by more than 100 compared to two years ago,” Weber said. “We have also cut back on travel and equipment expenditures, which now require VP approval.” COUNCIL, page 5

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Council changes insurance policies By Sara Hall City Editor

The City Council voted to renew their health, vision and life insurance policies and switch health insurance companies at a special meeting held Monday at City Hall. T h e C o u n c i l vo t e d t o s w i t c h health insurance policies from PersonalCare to Blue Cross Blue Shield after Blue Cross Blue Shield offered a lower premium. Mayor John Inyart acknowledged the dedication of the insurance committee’s work in deciding this year’s insurance policies. “A lot of work goes into each renewal,” Inyart said. “Changing com-

panies is even more work.” City Manager Scott Smith said the cost of health insurance is shared by each employee and the city, with the city giving each employee an allowance toward the total cost of their health insurance coverage. The employee pays the difference, Smith said. Sm i t h a d d e d t h a t e m p l o y e e s can choose each insurance item to be covered as single employee or through a family plan. The council voted to renew their vision insurance through Vision Service Plan with a 21.9 percent decrease than the current rate. They also voted to approve MetLife for dental insurance with

an increase of 13.1 percent than the current rate. Smith said employees must cover 100 percent of any dental and vision coverage they choose to receive. The council voted to renew the life insurance policy through Delta TruAssure Insurance Company at a 3.6 percent increase. Smith said the city pays for the life insurance policy at no cost to the employee. Active employees are eligible for a $20,000 life insurance policy. Retirees can pay the premium cost and be eligible for a $10,000 policy. Sara Hall can be reached at 581-2812 or smhall3@eiu.edu.

KIMBERLY FOSTER | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

City council member Jim Dunn, right, listens as city manager Scott Smith wraps up Monday's special city council meeting by thanking contributors who helped put together the insurance coverage policies approved by the council last night.


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HOLIDAY PERFORMANCE

EIU weather Music groups join together for concert TODAY

WEDNESDAY

By Samantha McDaniel Activities Editor

Rain/Snow High: 36° Low: 24°

Mostly Sunny High: 37° Low: 23°

For more weather visit castle.eiu.edu/weather.

Eastern News T

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“Tell the t r u t h a n d d o n ’ t b e a f r a i d . ”

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Three choirs and an orchestra will perform holiday music to start the Christmas holiday on Sunday. The Eastern Symphony Orchestra, the Eastern Concert Choir, the University Mixed Chorus and the choir from Charleston High School will perform together in their annual Holiday Concert. Janet McCumber, the director of the University Mixed Chorus, said the concert is a group effort. Richard Rossi, the director of Orchestral and Choral Activities and the Eastern Symphony Orchestra, will lead the orchestra. The orchestra and choirs will each perform their own music, as well as combined pieces. “The Many Moods of Christmas” by Robert Shaw and Robert Russell Bennett and “Christmas Day” by Gustav Holst will be performed by the three choirs and the symphony orchestra. The Eastern Concert Choir and the University Mixed Chorus will perform “Magnificat” by Charles Villiers Stanford and will be accompanied by an organ. The orchestra will be performing “Improvisations on Christmas Carols” by Bryan Kelly. This piece includes: “Allegro (God rest ye merry gentlemen)”; “Andante non troppo (Es ist ein Ros' entsprungen)”; “Slowly (Past three o'clock)”; “Moderato (I saw three ships)”;

FILE PHOTO | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

The Eastern Symphony Orchestra, University Mixed Chorus, Concert Choir and Charleston High School Advanced Chorus perform a rendition of "Gloria" by John Rutter during the Dec. 5, 2010 Holiday Concert in the Doudna Fine Arts Center's Dvorak Concert Hall.

and “Allegro (Ding dong merrily on high / Unto us a boy is born).” The orchestra will also perform other music for the audience. McCumber said she is happy to have about 50 Charleston High School choir students perform during the holiday concert. “It’s a good way for them to get the experience of singing, not only in this performing venue, but they also get to see how choir is at a college level,” McCumber said.

She said the concert is a good way to start off the holiday season and get in the Christmas spirit and she is looking forward to performing them. “With these pieces there is nothing sad, there’s nothing that is depressing,” she said. “It is fun to do holiday music, and I think the audience is always ready to hear it, because it is a real fell good concert.” McCumber said it is a good way

to take a break from work, projects and business and to relax before the Christmas break. “It’s just all happy Christmas music and people can just come and take a break from their shopping and decorating and just enjoy some great music,” McCumber said. Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu.

DOUDNA FINE ARTS CENTER

Band combos set to perform compositions By Samantha McDaniel Activities Editor

Eastern jazz combos Apollo Quartet, Vanguard Quintet, Birdland Quartet and Blue Note Quintet will perform three compositions apiece Thursday. The performance will be at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in the Theatre of the Doudna Fine Arts Center. Paul Johnston, director of the Jazz Lab Band and coordinator of the combo program, said each of the combo bands will play compositions that both the students and the coaches picked. “The students and combo coaches all bring music into rehearsals,” Johnston said. “The combos then select a set to perform for the con-

cert.” The Apollo Quartet includes: Paul Johnston, piano; Tony Piecuch, guitar; Efrem Tutwiler, bass; and Andrew Vicino, drums. The combo is coached by Paul Johnston. The Apollo Quartet will be performing: “Strike Up the Band” by George and Ira Gershwin; “Interplay” by Bill Evans; and “The Chicken” by Jaco Pastorius. The Vanguard Quintet includes: Cassandra Bugbee on trumpet; Marty Román on piano; Matt Dennison on guitar; Nolan Lee on bass; and Kyle Dombroski on drums. This combo is coached by Chad Mathis, a graduate music major. The Vanguard Quintet will play: “Four on Six” by Wes Montgomery; “Perdido” by Juan Tizol; and “Work

Song” by Nat Adderley. Kurt Swan on piano; Eric Fitts on guitar; Jack Helsley on bass; Jake Schlich on drums play in the Birdland Quartet that is coached by Jack Helsley, a Music department personnel. The Birdland Quartet will play “Slow Dancing in a Burning Room” by John Mayer and arranged by Jake Schlich; “Don’t Explain” by Billie Holiday and Arthur Herzog Jr. and arranged by Eric Fitts; and “God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen” arranged by Kurt Swan. The Blue Note Quintet includes: Aaron Eckert, trombone; Dan Hoffmann, piano; Steve Kaiser, guitar; Chad Mathis, bass; and Jamie Mauck, drums. This quintet is coached by Paul Johnston.

“Three to Get Ready” by Dave Brubeck, “Terminal 1” by Dan Phillips, and “Sunny Side of the Street” by Jimmy McHugh and Dorothy Fields will be played by the Blue Note Quintet. Johnston said the combos create performance experience for the students. “Students gain important experience playing in combos,” Johnston said. “They get an inside perspective of how music is constructed.” The combos have been recognized for their performances at the Elmhurst, Notre Dame and North Texas jazz festivals. Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu.


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News Editor Elizabeth Edwards 217 • 581 • 2812 DENnewsdesk@gmail.com

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Student prepares to teach abroad

Wood will travel to Costa Rica as part of consortion By Rachel Rodgers Administration Editor

A m a n d a Wo o d ’s d r e a m o f teaching and experiencing a diff e re n t c u l t u re b e c a m e a re a l ity when she learned that she will be student teaching in Costa Rica during the spring semester. Her new home for the semester will be in Heredia, Costa Rica, which is about 10 kilometers north of San Jose. While she will be student teaching at Pan-American High School, she will be living with a host family that does not speak English. Each year, 10 Eastern students are chosen to student teach abroad by the Consortium for Overseas Student Teaching, and Wood, a senior English major with teacher certification, will be the only student to teach abroad in the spring. She said one reason why the program interested her is because she hopes to go to graduate school for English Language Learners certification, and experiencing another culture would be beneficial. “By experiencing another culture, I can see how the students are taught and I can spread the wealth by bringing that knowledge back here,” Wood said. The program will also be beneficial to her in the future when she encounters students whose first language is not English, she said. “Since I am planning to go into ELL (English Language Learners), I want to be able to relate to students and thought this would be

Z ACHARY WHITE | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Senior English major Amanda Wood plans to student teach abroad in Costa Rica next semeter. Wood will will teach as a part of the Consortium for Overseas Student Teaching, which selects 10 students a year to teach abroad.

a better way to relate to students t h r o u g h re a l - l i f e e x p e r i e n c e ,” Wood said. Wood will be teaching English courses at Pan-American High School, which consists of about 250 students, she said. Another reason she was interested in the program is to learn another language and to have more experience in a different country.

“I have only been outside of the country once when I went to Canada, but that was so long ago when you didn’t even need a passport,” Wood said. “I really wanted to go to a Spanish-speaking country and thought it would be a groovy experience.” Eastern tuition and fees are waived for the program and Wood will be paying for travel and living

expenses, she said. Eligibility for the program includes completing all student teaching requirements, maintaining at least a 3.0 GPA, attending an informational session and going through an interview process. Wood said she was able to list her top four locations she wanted to student teach abroad at and Costa Rica was her first choice

because it was more vegetarianfriendly. Her other locations were Ecuador, Mexico and Hong Kong. Wood is scheduled to leave on Jan. 23, 2012, and return on May 14. Rachel Rodgers can be reached at 581-2812 or rjrodgers@eiu.edu.

RED WEEK 2011

March to bring awareness to HIV/AIDS for Red Week March will end at 7th Street Underground for open mic night By Robyn Dexter Staff Reporter

Students will march in solidarity, as they walk from Taylor Hall to 7th Street Underground to s p re a d a w a re ness of HIV/ AIDS and bring support to those touched by the disease. The march will begin at 7:30 p.m. Cordy Love, assistant director of New Student Programs, said he is excited to see students stand up for a good cause. After the march is over, partic-

ipants will have the chance to listen to proceed to the 7th Street Underground and participate in a Faces of AIDS Open Mic Night. Love said students will also be able to take part in an open mic night. “After the march is the production of the Faces of AIDS Open Mic, which will promote AIDS awareness and give the students the opportunity to perform and do a variety of things,” he said. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over a million people in the United States were living with HIV at the end of 2008. The CDC also estimates that close to 50,000 people are newly infected with HIV per year. The cumulative number of AIDS-related deaths up through 2008 was over 600,000. With this march and support for those living with HIV/AIDS, Eastern is bringing awareness and perhaps helping decrease this shocking number for future years, Love said. Although HIV and AIDS are

currently synonymous with each o t h e r, t h e y a r e t w o d i f f e r e n t things. Human Immunodeficiency Virus is a virus that targets specific blood cells, lowering the body’s immune system to fight off diseases, which left untreated will lead to AIDS according to the CDC. “Every (few) minutes someone is diagnosed with HIV/AIDS so it’s something that I feel they need to be aware of,” Love said. Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, is a progressed stage of HIV. The CDC states that the survival rate for people with AIDS after its progression from HIV was very low until the 1990s, when newer medications enable those infected with HIV to live much longer. “I think it’s important that college students understand that AIDS is a worldwide epidemic,” Love said. “And it’s something that they need to be aware of.” Robyn Dexter can be reached at 581-2812 or redexter@eiu.

DANNY DAMIANI | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Senior communication studies major Essence Allen performs the opening selection during open mic night following the annual candlelight vigil for Red Week Dec. 2, 2010, in 7th Street Underground.


O pinions

Opinions Editor Dave Balson 217 • 581 • 2812 DENopinions@gmail.com

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STAFF EDITORIAL

Gain insight Give thanks for the loyal, hilarious opposition into horrors of Holocaust There are limits to what the mind can comprehend, so we settle for approximations. We cannot wrap our minds around infinity, but we can try to understand light years. We can’t see things through the eyes of others, but we can try to be empathetic. Perhaps we are lucky that we cannot grasp the horrors of the Holocaust. It is probably for the better that we are spared the emotional toll of imagining the systematic murder of 6 million Jews and nearly as many non-Jews. Nevertheless, it is incumbent upon all of us that we never forget what happened in Europe in the 1930s and ‘40s. Throughout the execution of the Final Solution, most people, even the Jews in the ghettos and concentration camps, assured each other that such broad and deep evil wasn’t possible. We now know that the purest evil—and there is no better name for it—can come quickly and in forms we can scarcely imagine. We will always have the evidence to remind us; museums, libraries and the camps themselves are filled with ghosts in the forms of letters, pictures, bones and ashes that testify to that fact. But we will not always have the living testimony of its survivors. Meeting a Holocaust survivor is a truly humanizing experience, and Eastern students have that opportunity today at 6:30 p.m. in the University Ballroom of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. Eva Mozes Kor will discuss her time at Auschwitz, where she and her sister were imprisoned and subjected to the grisly experiments of Josef Mengele, the notorious Angel of Death. We profiled Kor in Tuesday’s article, “Holocaust survivor speaks.” Her story is one of unthinkable cruelty, resilience, trauma and perseverance. Kor and her twin sister, Miriam, were part of Mengele’s main experiments—his goal was to understand the genetics of identical twins so that the Nazis could create a pure Aryan race, all blonde-haired and blue-eyed. His means were sadistic, not scientific. But Kor’s story is also one of forgiveness. She has dedicated her life to educating people about the horrors she witnessed. She founded the CANDLES Holocaust Museum in Terre Haute, Ind., in 1995. She speaks around the world relating her story. But she also speaks to spread a message: Forgiveness is the only personal path to peace. She decided to forgive Mengele and his staff for what they had done, and did so publicly in a 2006 documentary, “Forgiving Dr. Mengele.” This decision angered many of her fellow survivors, along with some contemporary observers. But she is true to herself, she speaks from the heart and she has a lot to offer anyone who will listen. Kor was 10 years old in Auschwitz. She’s 77 today. In 10 years, there may not be many survivors able to tell their stories. In 20 years, there will be far fewer. We urge all members of the community to take this opportunity to meet a bold, defiant survivor speak about the unspeakable evil of the Holocaust. Come listen to Kor, meet her, see the history in her eyes and the strength in her voice.

The DAILY EASTERN NEWS

“Tell the truth and don’t be afraid.”

EDITORIAL BOARD Editor in Chief Alex McNamee

News Editor Elizabeth Edwards

Managing Editor Associate News Editor Shelley Holmgren Samantha Bilharz Online Editor Chris O’Driscoll

Opinions Editor Dave Balson

The daily editorial is the majority opinion of the editorial board of The Daily Eastern News.

As we awaken bleary-eyed with a tryptophan hangover, we must brush the crumbs from our shirts and gear up for these last few grinding weeks before winter break. Despite the mounting stress and pervasive semester-end drag, we at least rest assured that while having an intelligent answer to questions is important for our finals, it matters naught to the rest of the world. At least not if you’re trying to get on the Republican presidential ticket. The current potential candidates are more entertaining than any reality show amalgamation could hope to be, and since no one ever gets voted off the island, we get to watch them perform their foot-to-mouth gymnastics over and over again. Television gold. Almost every member of this motley crew of rag-tag upper-elite misfits has enjoyed his or her month or so in the limelight. All have shriveled like the proverbial ant beneath scrutiny’s cruel, unyielding magnifying glass. But seriously—give them a break, you guys. They totally weren’t prepared to have to, like, think and talk and answer questions that are super hard. And the Liberal Media (with their fancy use of “facts”) are totally making them look bad. Isn’t it enough that they don’t want to raise their friends’ taxes and think zygotes have feelings? Even Michele Bachmann’s crazy-eyed stare has lost its creepy, shark-like shine. After riding a major wave of success after Iowa and the Ames Straw Poll, she

Mia Tapella couldn’t seem to move forward, and sunk. Perry cast in his line, effectively upsetting her tea party reign, and by September Bachmann could barely hang onto her own staff. I expected so much more from a woman who actually considers herself subservient to her husband. Whose sole success in congress is making light bulbs less environmentally sound. And said Hurricane Irene was God punishing us for federal spending. And thinks being gay is satanic child abuse. Rick Perry seemed to have it all: a successful political career in Texas, sturdy Christian values and a presidential-looking coif that rivals both Mitt Romney’s and Rachel Maddow’s. The minute he set foot on primary turf he rocketed to the top of the polls as an ultra-conservative squarejawed superstar. Then he started talking—calling Herman Cain “brother” and trying to teach random children creationism. For more examples of Perry’s fountain of knowledge, or a solid 25 uncut minutes of hilarity, please see Youtube video “Rick Perry

drunk” or any video footage of him talking at all. Conservatives may want a box of Kleenex. That Cirque du Herman Cain ever enjoyed serious consideration by conservative voters is entirely beyond me. Aside from having zero identifiable experience in anything but being the CEO of a pizza you can’t refuse, Cain barely has a working knowledge of current events, much less any practical insight into how to fix our tanking economy. Like all Republicans, he blames the media and their collective “confusion about his positions” for everything that threatens to derail the Cain Train, when the only person clearly confused about his positions is the conductor himself. He didn’t know what President Obama’s policy or actions regarding Libya were, and has since taken to answering every single question with the nonsensical chanting of “9-9-9.” He has completely contradicted himself on every issue from abortion to immigration, and suggested to the American people that reading is not important in the presidency. And apparently he’s hands-y. Now Newt’s been resurrected, and it’s only a matter of time before Republicans remember that he’s evil and accept that Mitt Romney is the only logical choice to lose to Obama in 2012.

Mia Tapella is a senior Engligh and political science major. She can be reached at 581-7942 or DENopinions@gmail.com.

FROM THE EASEL

SE TH SCHROEDER | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

GUEST COLUMN

Several parts of campus not safe for women By Jennifer Hindes President - Women’s Empowerment League

Dear faculty, students and police: “I spend so much time here, and I want to feel safe. I want to be comforted by safety despite the darkness,” said senior Becki Rowe. The Women’s Empowerment League, Eastern’s new feminist organization, recently conducted a safety survey walk. This walk is a response to Joe Biden’s 1 is 2 Many campaign, which notes that violence against women is on the rise for women ages 17-24, especially on college campuses and in high schools. Our walk consisted of seven members from the Women’s Empowerment League, our two faculty advisers, Jeannie Ludlow and Caroline Simpson, Dan Nadler, a member of the University Police Department, and Charleston Police Department. Our route was limited by time and other elements, therefore we recognize that there were more routes and spots that could have used our attention. O’Brien Stadium • The emergency blue pole in the parking lot is hidden by vehicles and would be more efficient if it were more visible. • The corner of the parking lot heading toward LSD is extremely dark due to the trees

and lack of light. We think a light near these trees would be an improvement. • The group noted that safety is not only noted by lights around an area, but also general presence of people—students, security, faculty, or otherwise. Family Housing • The only emergency blue lights in family housing are near the entrance, but not near the living spaces. A simple fix could be to have blue lights in the middle of the housing structures or closer to the units themselves, as danger is not only from strangers, but from those we know as well. • The structures of family housing create dark corners, blind spots and hidden corners. This could be fixed with motion-sensor lighting, to allow students to know when something moves and feel safe despite the structures. University Court to Greek Row • There was a clear difference between the old blue lights and the new ones, we would like to see all the blue lights equipped with the new light bulbs. They were brighter and easier to see from a distance. In fact, one of our members could not see one of the poles until they were only 8 feet away. • Many of the Greek Row buildings looked like they could benefit from motion-sensor

Letters to the editor can be submitted at any time on any topic to the Opinions Editor to be published in The Daily Eastern News. The DEN’s policy is to run all letters that are not libelous or potentially harmful. They must be less than 250 words.

lights. Buzzard Hall • The greenhouse is under lit and shaded at night. • At the corner near Doudna and Buzzard there is no blue light in sight, and the closest one is around the building (near Tarble). • The lights under the Buzzard overhang Ninth Street entrance could be lit. Tenth Street next to campus • Two lights were out on this street and without the porch lights the road would be completely dark. Fourth Street • Sophomore Jenny Martin said, “If Fourth Street weren’t so dark, I would walk it at night. I would at least like the option of walking it at night, but with it being so dark – I don’t feel safe.” • It is extremely dark. • Well traveled in the day, but not at night because of this. Second Street • The street is darker than the ally behind it. For more information about the Women’s Empowerment League, its meeting time, or the safety survey walk, please contact Jennifer Hindes – jmhindes@eiu.edu

Letters to the editor can be brought in with identification to The DEN at 1811 Buzzard Hall. Letters may also be submitted electronically from the author’s EIU e-mail address to DENopinions@gmail.com.


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Red Week

SETH SCHROEDER | DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Darnell Tyms, a sophomore English major, and Shirmond Burroghs, a senior business management major, both work on patches of a quilt for Red Week Monday evening in the Bridge Lounge of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. Tayla Mardis, a senior kinesiology and sports studies major, and Cindy Owusu, a senior health studies major, also work on patches and helped clothes the booth.

BUDGET, from page 1 The state comptroller’s office has promised to pay the rest of the appropriated FY11 funds by the end of December, he said. The state was paying for FY 12 appropriations on time until early November. “We were told that we will not receive any more FY 12 payments until the end of the calendar year in order for the state to catch up with payments,” Weber said. “Currently we have received roughly $10 million from the state for the FY 12 appropriated general revenue.” The total state appropriation for FY 12 is about $46.8 million. The $3.18 million was added to Eastern’s budget for revenue expenditure funds. The university’s FY 12 budget approved by the Board of Trustees on June 20 totaled about $114.74. The Board of Trustees approved the $3.18 million increase on Nov. 18, bringing the total to about $117.92 million. Rachel Rodgers can be reached at 581-2812 or rjrodgers@eiu.edu.

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Breaking down the numbers ...

$46.8 million

Total state appropriation for Fiscal Year ‘12

$10 million

Amount received from the state of Fiscal Year ‘12 appropriations

$3.18 million

Amount increased from Fiscal Year ‘11 appropriations

Why the increase? William Weber, the vice president for business affairs, said the $3.18 million is a pool of onetime-only funds resulting from the two major ways the university has compensated for funds the state owes.

TOTAL

$117 million

$117 million

$46.8 million $10 million $3.18 million

Total Fiscal Year ‘12 budget approved by Eastern’s Board of Trustees on Nov. 18

GRAPHIC BY SHELLEY HOLMGREN | THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS

“ We see in the play how his friendships with them (Jenny and Phillip) get tested because of the relationship he has with this new girl,” Tangeman said. The cast is made up of four members: Vince Dill, a graduate student, as Adam; Molly Manhart, a senior theatre arts major, as Evelyn; Jake Cole, a freshman theatre arts major, as Phillip; and Rachael Sapp, a sophomore history major, as Jenny. Tangeman said he thinks the play does a good job of presenting the message of love and self-identity. “There are great humorous moments in the play and there are good messages,” Tangeman said. Cole said he thinks the characters are an interesting part of the play and make the play connectable. “They can relate to a lot of what goes on in the world,” Cole said Sapp said the characters are easy for the audience to relate to. “There is someone for everybody,” Sapp said. “There is the mean girl, the quiet one, the bro and the geek, there is everybody.” Sapp said the play is also easy to follow and understand. “It’s very conversational, it is exactly how we talk everyday, and it’s easy to pick up on,” Sapp said. “It’s easy to understand your character that way.” Tangeman said he thinks the play is easy to relate to because of the present time period it takes place in. “The audience will be able to enjoy and relate with it,” Tangeman said. “It’s a contemporary piece so there is a lot of accessible information and content.” Admission to the play is $5 for Eastern students, $12 for general admission and $10 for employees and audience members 62 and older. The play will is on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre of the Doudna Fine Arts Center. Tangeman said he could not wait for the audience to see the play. “We have been working so hard and the one component that we haven’t been able to introduce into this whole thing is the audience being able to be a part of this with us,” Tangeman said. Cole said he is also excited for an audience to see the play. “I am looking forward to my maama (grandma) seeing it,” Cole said. “Everyone has worked so hard on this play and we are finally ready to unveil it in the epic moment.” Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu.

State

Quinn: Budget deal prevents closures, layoffs By The Associated Press

S P R I N G F I E L D , Il l . — Gov. Pat Quinn and legislative leaders agreed Monday to cancel plans for closing state facilities and cutting nearly 2,000 jobs by taking money from elsewhere in the state budget, including about $100 million originally earmarked for education. If the agreement is approved by lawmakers, it would save a prison, a center for juvenile offenders and

centers for the mentally ill and developmentally disabled. Quinn's budget director, David Vaught, stressed that the plan will not increase overall state spending. Instead, it moves money around within the budget. "By pushing spending down over here, we're able to use that money over there for different purposes," Vaught told The Associated Press. Aides to House Speaker Michael Madigan and Senate President John

Cullerton, the top Democrats in the Illinois Legislature, confirmed the agreement but said they had few details. The spokeswoman for Senate Minority Leader Christine Radogno, R-Lemont, said Republicans object to the way Democrats have handled the state budget but felt they had to reach some arrangement to avoid closing valuable state facilities. "We were concerned about chaos

from closing the facilities without a thoughtful plan," said spokeswoman Patty Schuh. "In order to avoid that, we were able to put together a reallocation agreement." The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees welcomed the news. "While we have not seen the details of the agreement announced tonight, we believe it is a positive step toward saving jobs and averting harmful cuts to health care,

prisons and more," said Henry Bayer, executive director of AFSCME Council 31. Lawmakers could begin voting on the agreement as soon as Tuesday. Quinn announced months ago that without legislative action he would be forced to close the facilities and cut jobs. The Democrat said lawmakers hadn't given him enough money to keep all of state government running for a full year.


C lassifieds Announcements “UGLY CHRISTMAS SWEATERS!” AT SPENCE’S ON JACKSON. OPEN TUESDAY THRU SATURDAY 1-5PM. 345-1469 __________________________12/1

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Roommates ROOMMATE WANTED for spring semester 2012, furnished room (without bed) 4 bedroom house/ 2 1/2 bath $395 per month plus utilities 1516 1st street, please contact 217-671-2377 _________________________11/30

Sublessors Two rooms available for rent in a furnished house in Charleston, IL (Close to EIU campus) from Jan. to May 2012. $295 per month. Moving home to student teach. Call 217-259-4863 _________________________11/30 Looking for roommate for Spring Semester at the Millennium Place. Spacious, fully furnished. $395/month plus 1/3 utilities. Will pay 1st months rent. 618-562-1252 __________________________12/9 2 bedroom apartment available January. $545/month/person. Brooklyn Heights. Corner of 4th and Polk. Call (217)249-5092 for details. __________________________12/2

For rent NOW LEASING: 2012-2013 several locations to choose from. Call 217-3453754 _________________________11/29 Available June ‘12: 4 BR 2 BA house recently remodeled. Great parking, plenty of space. Great Condition! Call Todd 840-6427. _________________________11/29 I have 3 and 4 bedroom houses available. Freshly remodeled, all appliances included. 11 month lease. Price range $275-$325 per bedroom. Very nice and clean. One block from Old Main. Trash included. Come see what makes our apartments better than the rest! Call Kevin 217-962-0790 pantherproperties.com _________________________11/30 NICE 2 BR APTS 2001 S 12th ST & 1305 18th ST Stove, Frig, microwave Trash pd. Ph 217-348-7746 www.CharlestonILApts.com _________________________11/30 2BR APTS, 955 4th ST Stove, frig, microwave, dishwasher Garage. Water & Trash pd. Ph 217-348-7746 www. CharlestonILApts.com _________________________11/30 DELUXE 1 BR APTS 117 W Polk & A ST 1306 & 1308 Arthur Ave Stove, frig, microwave Dishwasher, washer/dryer Trash pd. Ph 217-348-7746 www. CharlestonILApts.com _________________________11/30 NOW RENTING FOR 2012-2013. ONESIX BEDROOM HOUSES. CLOSE TO CAMPUS. CALL TOM AT 708-772-3711. _________________________11/30

For rent 1,2 and 3 bedroom apartments. 3 blocks from campus. Furnished. One month free rent. Call 620-6989 or 6200298. _________________________11/30 Renting NOW! 1,2,&3 bedrooms, Park Place, Royal Heights, Glenwood, Lynn Ro. Close to campus! www.tricountymg.com. 348-1479 _________________________11/30 Available Spring 2012: Fully furnished one and two bedroom apartments. Lincoln Avenue Location. New Laminate flooring, skylights, full sized beds, PC workstation, living room furniture. Some utilities included. For additional information and to schedule a tour call 254-3903 _________________________11/30 Available immediately. Furnished 2 bedroom townhouse. Water, lawn, and garbage included. Central air, onsite parking lot, free onsite laundry, tanning, and exercise equipment. Pet friendly and close to campus. $750 per month. 2409 8th St. 217-414-3514 _________________________11/30 FOR FALL 2012. VERY NICE 1,2,3,4,6,7,8 BEDROOM HOUSES, TOWNHOUSES AND APARTMENTS. ALL EXCELLENT LOCATIONS. FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL US AT 217-493-7559 OR www.myeiuhome.com. _________________________11/30 August 2012. 1,2,3,4 BR apartment. 1812 9th; 1205/1207 Grant 3 BR Apartments. 348-0673/ 549-4011. www.sammyrentals.com _________________________11/30 FALL 5,4,3,2 BEDROOM HOUSES, 2 BEDROOM, 2 BATH APARTMENTS. $250/MONTH. 549-4074 __________________________12/1 LEASING NOW FOR AUGUST 2012. 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 BEDROOMS. GREAT LOCATIONS, REASONABLE RATES, AWESOME AMENITIES! CALL TODAY FOR YOUR APARTMENT SHOWING. 3455022 CHECK US OUT ON THE WEB www.unique-properties.net __________________________12/1 LEASING NOW FOR AUGUST 2012 SOUTH CAMPUS SUITES, 2 BR / 2 BA APARTMENTS, 2 BR TOWNHOUSES & 1 BEDROOM FLATS. FREE TANNING, FITNESS AND LAUNDRY. AWESOME NEW LOCATION, CLOSE TO CAMPUS WITH RENTAL RATES YOU CAN AFFORD! CALL TODAY FOR YOUR SHOWING 345-5022 OR CHECK US OUT @ www.unique-properties.net __________________________12/1 AVAILABLE AUGUST 2012 4 & 5 BEDROOM HOUSES 1409 7TH ST, 1434 9TH ST. 1705 9TH ST. GREAT LOCATIONS. CALL TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR SHOWING 345-5022 www.uniqueproperties.net __________________________12/1 1 & 2 bedroom apartments across from Buzzard/Doudna. eiuapts.com 217345-2416 __________________________12/2 3 bedroom apartments. One block from campus on 4th Street. Rent starting $260/person. Call Ryan (217)722-4724. __________________________12/2 For Rent Fall 2012. 4 BR, 2 bath house. 2 blocks from campus. W/D, dishwasher. Call or text 217-276-7003 __________________________12/2 Leasing for Fall. rcrrentals.com __________________________12/2 $175 PER STUDENT FOR A 3 BEDROOM FURNISHED APARTMENT. 10 MONTH LEASE, NO PETS. CALL 345-3664 __________________________12/2 3 Bedroom Townhouse nearly new construction/ Must See. 9th & Buchanan. Call 630-505-8374 24 hours. __________________________12/2 Available January 1st 2012. Courthouse Square Apartment. 2 bedroom (1 large, 1 small). Over a fun vintage/ retro shop. $400/month. Water included. 217-508-8795 __________________________12/2

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

Phone: 217 • 581 • 2812 Fax: 217 • 581 • 2923 Online: dailyeasternnews.com/classifieds

D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

T U E S DAY, N O V E M B E R 29, 2011 N o. 159, V O LU M E 96

For rent

For rent Houses and Apartments 2,3,4,5,6, and 7 bedrooms. Call for details and appointments. (217)345-6967 __________________________12/2 Large 3-4 bedroom house for rent for Fall 2012. CA, W/D, $300/mo per person. Trash included. Call 217-549-5402 __________________________12/2 2 BR 1 Bath house for Rent $550/ month. 1409 13th St. Contact Zac 217549-1922 __________________________12/9 Awesome location and affordable rent. 4 bedroom 2 bath fully furnished. Grant View Apartments. (217)345-3353 __________________________12/9 Very nice 2 bedroom house, close to campus. $640 per month 345-3232 __________________________12/9 2 BR on the square. Water/Trash included. No pets! $375/mo. Jeff Hudson, Broker 217-549-5985 _________________________12/12 Available June 2012. Nice 1 bedroom apartment off campus. Quiet area, newly updated, good parking. Pets allowed. 217-840-6427 _________________________12/12 VILLAGE RENTALS 2012-2013. 3 & 4 BR houses w/ washers & dryers. 1 & 2 BR apartments w/ water & trash pu included. Close to campus and pet friendly. Call 217-345-2516 for appt. _________________________12/12 Leasing Fall 2012. 5 & 6 Bedroom. Close to Lantz. Off Street Parking/ Washer/ Dryer Trash included. 217-259-7262. _________________________12/12

For rent

For rent

Female housemates. 1808 9th St. Private rooms. 217-549-3273 _________________________12/12 2 bedroom house, 1609 S. 12th, d/w, w/d, a/c, porch & patio, $345 each, 2012-13. 217-549-3273 _________________________12/12 6 bedroom 2 bath house, 1521 S. 2nd, w/d, a/c, $345 each, 2012-13. 217-5493273 _________________________12/12 5 bedroom, 2 bath, w/d, d/w, patio, 1836 S. 11th $360 each. 217-549-3273 _________________________12/12 Call about our great deals and promotions. Find your home in Charleston at www.lincolnwoodpinetree.com _________________________12/12 Free Iphone with rental. Ask how at 217-345-6000. Great locations for 1,2,3,4 bedrooms _________________________12/12 *PREMIER HOUSING* view your future home at www.eiprops.com _________________________12/12 1 1/2 BLOCKS NORTH OF OLD MAIN ON 6th Street 3 bedroom house available August 2012. 217-348-8249 www.ppwrentals.com _________________________12/12 GREAT LOCATIONS- 1 and 3 bedroom apartments available August 2012. 217-348-8249 www.ppwrentals.com _________________________12/12 NEW 1 BEDROOM APARTMENTS!! Available August 2012. 3 blocks from campus on Garfield Avenue. 217-3488249 www.ppwrentals.com _________________________12/12

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Starting Fall 2012. 3 and 4 bedroom houses. Large bedrooms. Off street parking. Central AC 10 month lease. (217)273-1395. _________________________12/12 7 BD 3 BATH 1023 WOODLAWN ALL INCLUSIVE! private back yard 217-3456210 www.eiprops.com _________________________12/12 Nice 3 bedroom house, 3 blocks from campus. W/D, dishwasher included, large backyard. 217-690-4976 _________________________12/12 6 bedroom house furnished for Fall 2012-2013. Basement plus washer/ dryer. 1508 1st street. $310 each. Call Jan 345-8350 _________________________12/12 6 Bedroom house for Fall 2012. 2 Bath. Close to EIU. Air-conditioned, locally owned and managed. No pets. Call for appointment 345-7286 www.jwilliamsrentals.com _________________________12/12 Available now and for January: 1 and 2 person apartments. Very nice. Locally owned and managed. No pets. Call 345-7286 www.jwilliamsrentals.com _________________________12/12 Spring Semester Openings! Youngstown Apartments 217-3452363. 1 two bedroom townhouse, 1 three bedroom townhouse, 1 three bedroom garden apt. _________________________12/12 Fall 2012 very nice 5 bedroom house, close to campus, 5 sinks, 3 showers, 2 laundry areas. Need a group of 4 or 5 females. 1837 11th St. No pets please. Call 217-728-7426 _________________________12/12

Available Fall 2012. Newly Remodeled 4, 5 bedroom houses on 12t Street. Walk to campus. W/D, D/W, A/C. 217549-9348 _________________________12/12 7 BR, 2 BA House near stadium. Washer/Dryer, dishwasher, includes mowing & trash. Large parking area. 217345-6967. _________________________12/12 4 BR house near campus. Washer/Dryer, dishwasher, large front porch, basement. Includes mowing & trash. 217345-6967. _________________________12/12 7 BR House 1/2 Block from campus. 2 1/2 bath, 2 kitchens. Washer/Dryer. Includes mowing & trash. 217-345-6967. _________________________12/12 FALL ‘12-’13: 1,2, & 3 BR APTS. BUCHANAN STREET APTS. CHECK US OUT AT BUCHANANST.COM OR CALL 3451266. __________________________1/16 Available Jan 1st 1 BR apts. Water & Trash included, off street parking, $410/mo. BuchananSt.com or call 3451266. __________________________1/17 4 bedroom house 1218 Division $260 each next to city park. 3 or 4 bedroom very nice 3 level townhouse Brittany Ridge $300/$260. 2 bedroom furnished Apt at 1111 2nd St $275 each including water/trash. (217)549-1957. __________________________1/31 Now renting Fall 2012 6 bedroom and 4 bedroom within walking distance from campus. Call 345-2467 ___________________________2/1

Edited by Will Shortz ACROSS

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SPORTS

T U E S DAY, N O V E M B E R 29, 2011

N o. 159, V O LU M E 96

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT

Romo to return for athletic Gala

Staff Report

The guest of honor at the fourth Athletic Director’s Gala will be Eastern class of 2002 alumnus and current Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo. The Gala, to take place on Feb. 14, 2012, will be honoring retiring

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

7

BASEBALL

head football coach Bob Spoo for his 25 years of service to the Eastern football program. The Gala will take place at the Thelma Keller Convention Center in Effingham, with tickets going on sale on Dec. 5. Tickets are $150 for a single or $200 for a couple.

MILLER, from page 8 Mo re h e a d St a t e l o s t a c l o s e game to Bucknell 54-50. The Bison went on a critical 14-to-7 run late in the game to close out their victory. Junior Byrson Johnson scored a game-high 20 points, as he knocked down six shots from beyond the three-point line. Morehead was led by senior Ty Proffitt who scored a season-high 14 points. With the loss the Eagles fall to 3-4 and Bucknell improves to 5-2. Tennessee Tech barely snuck past a NAIA team, Wilberforce, winning 84-83. Senior Kevin Murphy scored

a career-high 31 points in the victory. The Golden Eagles led by four with 13 seconds to play; however, Chris Olafioye hit a three-point shot at the buzzer to cut the deficit to one point. The Bulldogs were led by senior Darius Foster who hit six shots from long range on his way to 31 points on the night. The win improves Tennessee Tech’s record to 3-3. Rob Mortell can be reached at 581-7944 or rdmortell@eiu.edu.

NIXON, from page 8 Forward Sydney Mitchell ended last season with 471 points. At her average of 11.8 points per game, she would finish this season totaling 814 points in her career. Guard Kelsey Wyss ended last year with 445 points in her career. With her 10.4 points per game

i Spy

average this season, she would finish the year with 747 points. With one season left after this one, all three other juniors could realistically score more than 1,000 points in their careers. Alex McNamee can be reached at 581-7942 or deneic@gmail.com.

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FILE PHOTO | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Senior pitcher Darin Worman throws during a game against Tennessee Tech April 17 at Coaches Field. The baseball team added seven new players to the 2013 roster during the early signing period.

Panthers sign 7 new players By Dominic Renzetti Sports Editor

Though the season is still a ways away, the Eastern baseball team has already signed seven new players in its early signing period. Coming to the Panthers from Eureka High School is utility player Matt Dunavant. Dunavant had a .319 batting average in his junior season, while also having 19 RBIs and 17 hits. Standing at 6 feet, 3 inches and 230 pounds, Dunavant is the biggest of the seven signees. “(Dunavant) provides us with size and pop that we feel we need to become a better offensive team in the future,” head coach Jim Schmitz said in a press release. Also joining the team will be infielder Mitch Gasbarro. Gasbarro comes to the Panthers as an AllWestern Sun Conference player from Glenbard South High School, despite missing most of his junior season with a hand injury. Jake Johansmeier of St. Charles

North High School is one of two right-handed pitchers signed by the Panthers in the early signing period. Johansmeier is ranked in the top 25 players in Illinois by Prep Baseball Report and was a member of the All-Upstate Eight Conference Honorable Mention Team in his junior season. “Jake was a guy that we had our eyes on for a long time,” Schmitz said in a press release. “He is a guy that we feel can be one of the premier players in our league down the road.” The other right-handed pitcher signed by the Panthers ranks as one of the best players in the state of Missouri. C.J. Martin is ranked No. 4 in Missouri, as well as the No. 316 prospect in the nation. Outfielder Derek Page of Edwardsville will join the Panthers after batting .374 in his junior season. Page hit four home runs in a season which would take Edwardsville to the IHSA Elite Eight. Another outfielder, Trey Russell,

Signed players Matt Dunavant UTL Mitch Gasbarro IF Jake Johansmeier RHP CJ Martin RHP Derek Page OF Trey Russell OF Jason Scholl C/IF

comes to the Panthers as the team’s only junior college transfer. Russell will join the Panthers after having a .364 batting average at Joliet Junior College. In his senior season at Urbana High School, Russell was an All-Big 12 Conference First Team Selection. Ranked in the top 60 prospects in the state of Illinois, catcher/infielder Jason Scholl will join the Panthers following a season where he scored 32 runs for Glenbrook North High School. Dominic Renzetti can be reached at 581-7942 or dcrenzetti@eiu.edu.


@DEN_Sports tweet of the day: Football players Artavious Dowdell, Cory Leman, Von Wise and Eric Zink were named to the All-OVC second team.

S ports

Sports Editor Dominic Renzetti 217 • 581 • 2812 DENSportsdesk@gmail.com

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

T U E S DAY, N O V E M B E R 29, 2011 N o. 1 5 9 , V O L U M E 9 6

MEN’S BASKETBALL

HEAD COACH SEARCH

Miller wins freshman award By Rob Mortell Staff Reporter

Freshman guard Joey Miller was named the Ohio Val l e y C o n f e re n c e f re s h m a n o f the week for his performances against Eureka College and Central Arkansas. Miller, the son of head coach Mike Miller, averaged 15 points in the two games. He showed off his touch from the three-point line making 6-of11 shots, the biggest of which, f o r c e d t h e s e c o n d ov e r t i m e against Central Arkansas. Miller also averaged five assists and two rebounds in the two games. He is the first Eastern player to win the award since red-shirt forward James Hollowell won on Feb. 15, 2010. Around the OVC Tennessee-Martin beat Alabama-Birmingham 59-54. Tennessee-Martin held the lead almost the entire game, as its defense controlled the Blazers offense. The Skyhawks were led by sophomore Mike Liabo who had a career-high 22 points. Eighteen of those 22 points came in the second half as he helped Tennessee-Martin maintain its lead by shooting 6-6 from the free throw line. Tennessee-Martin freshman Myles Taylor also added his second career double-double as he scored 13 points and grabbed 10 rebounds. Alabama-Birmingham was led offensively by Cameron Moore and Jordan Swing. Both players scored 15 points in the loss. The win improves the Skyhawks record to 2-5. MILLER, page 7

8

Second candidates to appear on campus Public interview for potential coaches to take place today Staff Report

DANNY DAMIANI | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Senior guard Jeremy Granger avoids a Loyola-Chicago defender to go for the basket Nov. 13 during a men’s basketball game in Lantz Arena.

Mark Hutson, one of four finalists for the Eastern football head coaching position, will be on campus at 5:45 today in the Lantz Club Room for a public interview. Hutson is currently the interim head coach at Tulane University, replacing Bob Toledo on Oct. 11. Hutson was an offensive line coach for the Green Wave for five seasons prior to taking over as head coach. Hutson, who graduated from Oklahoma in 1960, came to Tulane from Eastern, where he spent four seasons as an offensive line coach. In Eastern’s 2006 season, Hutson took over as head coach in the absence of then head coach Bob Spoo, who retired at the end of this season after 25 years with the team. Spoo missed the 2006 season due to medical reasons. Hutson has also coached at Tulsa as an offensive line coach and student-athlete academic liaison, a graduate assistant at Oklahoma, a tight ends coach and special team’s coordinator at Murray State. The next interview will be Jeff Choate, special teams coordinator at Boise State, at 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 5 in the Lantz Club Room. Rounding out the candidates will Dino Babers, special teams coordinator at Baylor, at 4 p.m. in the Lantz Club Room.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Nixon first of junior class to reach 1,000 points By Alex McNamee Editor-in-chief

At the 8:34 mark in the second half of the Eastern women’s basketball game against San Jose State, junior guard Ta’Kenya Nixon made a free throw to score the 1,000th point of her Eastern career. Nixon began the season with 936 points in her career. She has scored in double figures in all five games this season on her way to the 1,000-point mark. Nixon becomes the first player on the current roster to eclipse 1,000 points in her career. The program’s all time leading scorer is Rachel Galligan, now an Eastern assistant coach. Galligan scored 1,891 points in her career. In her freshman season, Nixon scored 475 total points. In her sophomore season, she added 461. In both seasons, she has scored an average of 468 points. If that trend continues, Nixon is slated to finish this season with 1,404 points. If she scores her average during her senior year, Nixon would finish her career with 1,872 points – the second highest total in program history. However, if Nixon continues her pace of 15.6 points per game this sea-

son, she would score only 453 points this season. Last season, she averaged 15.9 points per game. Nixon has already solidified her place in history after breaking six freshman single-season records two years ago. She set records for games started, free throws made, free throws attempted, rebounds, assists and steals. Nixon also becomes only the 20th player in program history to eclipse 1,000 points. She currently has 1,014 points – good for the 19th best in program history. Nixon passed Sheryl Bonsett, an Eastern player from 1986 to 1989. Bonsett has 1,012 career points to her name. If Nixon continues at her season points average of 453 this season, she would climb the latter to 9th all time with 1,389 points. Everyone in Nixon’s junior class has a chance to scratch the surface of 1,000 points. The next closest is forward Mariah King, who had 598 points at the end of last season. Continuing with her average of 12.6 points per game this season, King would finish this year with 963 points. NIXON, page 7

K AROLINA STR ACK | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Senior forward Chantelle Pressley has the ball stolen by a defender Nov. 11 during a women’s basketball game against Oakland City in Lantz Arena.

Issue 159 Vol. 96  

November 29, 2011

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