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TENNIS TROUBLE

SELF-SUCCESSOR

The women’s tennis team was swept in all three games the team played over the weekend, continuing its losing streak. PAGE 8

Senior Haleigh Knapp broke her own record in the high jump for the second time this season at the Illinois Classic, with a new record of 6-feet-.50. PAGE 7

THE

D aily E astern N ews

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

“TELL THE TRUTH AND DON’T BE AFRAID ”

CE L E B RATI NG A CE NTUR Y OF COV E RA GE

E S T . 1 915

VOL. 102 | NO. 92

W W W . D A I L Y E A S TE R N N E W S . C O M

Diversity workshop to discuss safe spaces Presentation is part of this year’s EIUnity Diversity Conference By Brooke Schwartz Administration Reporter | @brookesch_wartz Two graduate students in history, Monica Burney and Myrtle Castro, will be hosting a workshop during Friday’s EIUnity Diversity C o n f e r e n c e c a l l e d “ W h a t I W i s h My Professor Knew.” This workshop is structured to be a safe space for students to discuss incidents they

C AMPUS AND CIT Y BRIEFS

Super bowl party set to raise money for local Charleston food pantry

“Let’s just break this ignorance and educate for future enrichment .” -Myrtle Castro, one of two graduate students hosting the “What I Wish My Professor Knew ” workshop

may have faced throughout their academic careers involving professors and teachers, such as teachers saying something insensitive, Castro said. English professor Jeannie Ludlow, the

coordinator of the women’s, gender and sexuality studies program, said this workshop is important because it will allow students to find others who have had similar experiences to their own. “I think a lot of times we sit in a class and something happens and we think ‘huh,’ and then we think we’re the only person who thinks that,” Ludlow said. “But if you get in a room and everybody starts talking and everybody had the same ‘huh’ moment, then it becomes a thing and you can talk about it.” Castro said in her undergraduate studies at Elmhurst College, she experienced the ‘huh’ moments that Ludlow mentioned. “It’s important to give students a safe space to talk about these issues, because I

feel like, not that I’ve really experienced this at Eastern, but definitely in undergrad there were moments where something a professor said, either they consciously did it or unconsciously did it, would throw me offguard,” Castro said. “(And) as an undergrad, you are hesitant to tell somebody.” Burney and Castro decided to set up the workshop as an open discussion, with students sitting around in a circle and sharing their experiences. Castro double-majored in history and intercultural studies while at Elmhurst College. She said this interest in diversity grew out of her own experiences.

Safe Space, page 5

Let’s bounce

Staff Report | @DEN_News A Super Bowl party with the intent of raising money for a local food pantry is set for 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday at Roc’s Blackfront Restaurant and Lounge. Because Roc’s kitchen is closed on Sundays, the fundraiser will be downstairs. All musicians “tips” will be given to the Charleston Food Pantry at 990 West State Street. No food will be served, but a full bar service is available. Public domain music will be played, including dear old Illinois tunes, Irish music (if musicians are available) and old ballads. The NFL Super Bowl kick off is scheduled for 5:30 p.m. The News desk can be reached at 581-2812 or dennewsdesk@gmail.com.

Career Services offers students chance to network with alumni Staff Report | @DEN_News Students can learn about potential job opportunities and meet new people at Speed Networking, hosted by Career Services. Speed Networking is set for 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday in the 7th Street Underground of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. Participants will talk with alumni to introduce themselves and learn career-related information during brief, round robin sessions. Each session will give the student a limited amount of time with each new person. After the networking portion of the event, there will be other chances to mingle. Business casual attire is encouraged. Space is limited. Those interested in speed networking can register to reserve a spot at http://www.eiu.edu/careers/speednetwork. php. The News desk can be reached at 581-2812 or dennewsdesk@gmail.com.

JORDAN BOYER | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Tom Lasky, a freshman marketing major, plays table tennis with Michael Roggenkamp, a senior sociology major, Monday night in the Student Recreation Center. Roggenkamp said they had a table tennis tournament later that night, and they were trying to win it.

Annual Diversity Conference set for Friday By Brooke Schwartz Administration Reporter | @brookesch_wartz This year’s EIUnity Diversity Conference will tackle topics such as race, sexuality and bystander awareness from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday. Workshops in the conference will take place at various places in the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. All Eastern faculty, staff and students, as well as community members, are able to participate in the conference. EIUnity will include safe zone training sessions. One workshop includes an introduction of Making Excellence Inclusive’s new Passport

"One of the things I love about it a lot, as a professor, is that I get to sit in the room and be a learner alongside my students and my colleagues." Jeannie Ludlow, English professor to Diversity initiative. This new addition would be a way to offer an official recognition of diversity, as seen through a student’s coursework, essays and attended conferences and workshops. The principal of Charleston Middle School will be presenting a workshop on how a stu-

dent’s socio-economic status affects their ability and desire to learn. Other workshops include topics on race, immigration, the language of inclusion and the integration of individuals with disabilities.

Conference, page 5


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THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS | AP BRIEFS

Local weather TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

Sunny

Mostly Cloudy

High: 35° Low: 27°

High: 48° Low: 34°

T h e D a i ly Eastern News “Tell the truth and don’t be afraid.”

The Daily Eastern News 1802 Buzzard Hall Eastern Illinois University Charleston, IL 61920 217-581-2812 217-581-2923 (fax) News Staff

Faculty Advisers

Editor-in-Chief Cassie Buchman DENeic@gmail.com

Editorial Adviser Lola Burnham

Managing Editor Analicia Haynes DENmanaging@ gmail.com Photo Editor Jordan Boyer Sports Editor Sean Hastings Assistant Sports Editor JJ Bullock Administration Reporter Brooke Schwartz Campus Reporter Andrew Paisley

Photo Adviser Brian Poulter DENNews.com Adviser Brian Poulter Publisher Lola Burnham Business Manager Betsy Jewell Press Supervisor Tom Roberts Night Staff for this issue Night Chief Analicia Haynes Copy Editors Kristen Ed Emily Oldham Sports Designer JJ Bullock

Get social with The Daily Eastern News The Daily Eastern News dailyeasternnews @DEN_News

Visit our website: dailyeasternnews.com About The Daily Eastern News is produced by the students of Eastern Illinois University. It is published daily Monday through Friday, in Charleston, Ill., during fall and spring semesters and online during the summer term except during university vacations or examinations. One copy per day is free to students and faculty. Additional copies can be obtained for 50 cents each in the Student Publications Office in Buzzard Hall. Advertising To place an advertisement or classified ad in The Daily Eastern News, call the ads office at 581-2812 or fax 581-2923. Visit our online advertisements at dailyeasternnews.com/classifieds. Comments / Tips Contact any of the above staff members if you believe your information is relevant. Corrections The Daily Eastern News is committed to accuracy in its coverage of the news. Any factual error the staff finds or is made aware of by its readers will be corrected as promptly as possible. Please report any factual error you find to Editor-in-Chief Cassie Buchman at 581-2812. Employment If you would like to work for The Daily Eastern News as a reporter, photographer, columnist, cartoonist, copy editor, designer or videographer, please visit at the newsroom at 1811 Buzzard Hall. Printed by Eastern Illinois University on soy ink and recycled paper. Attention postmaster: Send address changes to: The Daily Eastern News 1802 Buzzard Hall Eastern Illinois University Charleston, IL 61920

TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2018

STATE AND NATION THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

In State of Union, Trump to make his case on economy WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to move past the shadow of the Russia investigation, President Donald Trump intends to use his first State of the Union address to cite economic progress under his watch while pushing for bipartisanship with Democrats on issues such as rebuilding roads and bridges. The White House said Sunday that the president would point to a robust economy and low unemployment during his first year and the benefits of a tax overhaul during Tuesday's address to Congress and the nation. Aides have said Trump, who stayed at the White House over the weekend as he prepared, is expected to set aside his more combative tone for one of compromise and bipartisanship. White House officials have said the theme of the annual address will be "building a safe, strong and proud America" and that Trump was looking to showcase the accomplishments of his first year while setting the tone for the second. As Trump looks ahead, special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into possible obstruction of justice and Trump campaign ties to Russian meddling in the 2016 election grinds on. It often has distracted from the pres-

ident's message. For example, Trump's address to financial and global leaders in Davos, Switzerland, last week followed reports that he ordered a top White House lawyer to fire Mueller last June but backed off when the lawyer threatened to resign. Trump called the report "fake news." On the policy front, immigration is an immediate flashpoint for Trump and Congress. In the prime-time speech Tuesday, the president plans to promote his proposal for $25 billion for a wall along the Mexican border and for a path to citizenship for nearly 2 million young people brought to the U.S. illegally as children. Trump's plan includes billions for border security and significant changes to legal immigration long sought by hard-liners within the Republican Party. But some conservatives have warned that the deal would amount to "amnesty" for the young immigrants known as Dreamers, and many Democrats and immigration activists have outright rejected it. Part of Trump's goal in the speech is to set the course of the debate as Republicans look to retain their majority in Congress. He is expected to say the tax overhaul will unleash economic growth and he will point to companies

that have provided their employees with $1,000 bonuses and other benefits. Trump plans to outline a nearly $2 trillion plan that his administration contends will trigger $1 trillion or more in public and private spending on roads, bridges and other public works projects. On trade, Trump will note his preference for one-on-one deals instead of multilateral agreements, building on his speech at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland. And he will offer an update on the fight against terrorism and his view of international threats, including North Korea. A senior administration official providing a preview of the speech said Trump probably would avoid the taunts of "Little Rocket Man" for Kim Jong Un and "fire and fury" that he used before. The official wasn't authorized to speak publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity. The address comes at a critical point for the president. He is battling poor approval ratings and is trying to move past the government shutdown that coincided with the anniversary of his inauguration. He's also preparing for a grueling midterm election season that has tripped up other first-term presidents.

Trump for 'transparency' as House mulls memo release WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Monday that President Donald Trump favors "full transparency" as Republicans on the House intelligence committee move toward an unprecedented vote on whether to release classified information to the public. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Trump hasn't made a final decision on whether he would support the release of a memo that addresses a dossier on Trump and questions over whether it was used to obtain surveillance warrants. Many Republicans have pushed to release the classified memo as they have also asserted that some in the Justice Department and FBI have conspired

against the president. Sanders said no one at the White House has seen the memo, so the president was not prepared to make a decision. If the House intelligence panel does vote to release the memo — a vote that could come as soon as Monday evening — then Trump will have five days to decide whether he wants the information released. The panel could release the information five days after the vote if Trump doesn't object. Democrats are livid about the memo, which they say omits crucial facts and should not be selectively released. They have pushed back on Republican criticism of the FBI, saying it is an attempt to discredit spe-

cial counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and whether Trump's campaign was involved. The probe has already resulted in charges against four of Trump's former campaign advisers and has recently moved closer to Trump's inner circle. The top Democrat on the House intelligence committee, California Rep. Adam Schiff, said last week that Democrats on the panel had put together their own memo that they would move to make available to all House members. It's unclear if the panel will also vote on that Monday evening.

Rauner: 'No private business' discussed at meeting SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Gov. Bruce Rauner says "no private business was conducted on public property" when he met with a former business partner at the Executive Mansion in May 2015. But the Republican didn't answer directly Monday. The Chicago Tribune editorial board asked whether discussion with Harreld "Kip" Kirkpatrick included disbursing $67 million from a 2011 investment with Rauner. That's key because the multimillionaire promised when elected in 2014 that he would have no day-to-day dealings with investment decisions. And the mansion is maintained by a private nonprofit organization. His spokeswoman has sought to characterize two 2015 meetings with Kirkpatrick as discussions about a "contract dispute" from a deal before he was governor, rather than about an investment. The meetings came to light last week in Kirkpatrick's lawsuit, which a judge dismissed Friday.

Rauner, Ives square off before March GOP governor primary SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Gov. Bruce Rauner squared off with his opponent in the March 20 Republican primary. But the first-term governor made it sound like he's running against Democratic House Speaker Michael Madigan when he appeared before the Chicago Tribune editorial board Monday. Rauner opponent Rep. Jeanne Ives of Wheaton repeatedly criticized Rauner for failing to tackle issues in his first three years in office. Rauner says he's been blocked by Madigan — speaker for more than three decades. He says he's the only Republican who can beat front-runner Democratic nominee J.B. Pritzker and "take the power away from Madigan." Ives says there are ways to work around Madigan to accomplish goals. She says Republicans don't trust Rauner because he signed a law providing for publicly funded abortions and one friendly to immigrants.

TODAY ON ON CAMPUS: TODAY CAMPUS


TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2018

THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS | NEWS

3

African-American Heritage Month African-American History Month, which takes place during the month of February, will be celebrated at Eastern with events throughout the month. This year’s theme is “Black is … The Power of Nommo.”

Friday, Feb. 2, 2018 EIUnity Diversity Conference 3rd floor of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union, 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Monday, Feb. 5, 2018 Black is … Empowerment (Freestyle/open mic) 7th Street Underground, 7 p.m.

Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018 How NOT to be Young, Dumb and Broke: Keys to Financial Success! Phipps Lecture Hall of the Physical Science Building, 6 p.m.

Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018 AAHM Celebration Kick-Off with Keven Stonewall Lumpkin Hall Auditorium, 6 p.m.

Sunday, Feb. 4, 2018 Black is … Food for the Soul (Soul food dinner) Cultural Center, 3:22 p.m.

Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018 Black is … Knowledge (Black Jeopardy) Coleman Hall, 6 p.m.

*These are the first six events scheduled for the month. We will update the calendar as the month progresses.

FOR RENT ndlord Are you a lam s still t n e t r a p a with fall? e h t r o f e l b a l avai Let students know by advertising in our Classifieds section!

Nice 1-7 Bedroom Homes Conveniently Located Close to Campus Clean, Comfortable, and Affordable! Get them move-in ready! To advertise, call ...

581-2812

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Pick up tomorrow’s edition of the Daily Eastern News to read all the latest in news, sports and features!


4 OPINIONS

T h e D ai l y Eastern News W W W. DA I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

Tuesday, 01.30.18

Welcome back, winter

COURTNEY SHEPHERD | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

STAFF EDITORIAL

Every story deserves to be heard Analicia Haynes

There are reasons to being cold Watching students my age hunched over, their arms hugging their torsos while speed walking to class may prompt a quick chuckle from any passerby regardless of age. Seeing someone shiver in their thin sweaters and even thinner pants immediately leads us to assume that the “dumb kid” did not check the weather this morning and therefore any ounce of sympathy is reserved for a later date and for someone who is worth the care. So, we brush that student off, not realizing that maybe that student did check the weather in the morning. Maybe that student realized that the only clothes they have are the same ones they have been wearing since last fall and continue to wash them so no one will notice that they do not have the latest fashion trends hanging in their closet. Maybe that student, who prayed for warmer weather and embraced not having to shiver on their way to class, realized that once again they have to brace the harsh winter without proper clothing because they cannot afford something as simple as a winter coat. It is easy to assume that someone was not prepared when we see that person shivering in the cold, because it is hard to accept that students who are trying to better their lives cannot afford winter clothes, something many of us take for granted. The next time you judge someone remember that not everyone is as lucky as you so try to be a little understanding and sympathetic. And if you are that student who is too embarrassed to admit you need help, there is nothing wrong with asking for a little help here and there. A true friend, actually a decent human being will lend you a coat or toss you a hand-medown and if someone mistreats you or laughs just remember, there is a special place for them. Analicia Haynes is a junior journalism major. She can be reached at 581-2812 or achaynes@ eiu.edu.

Ever since the #metoo movement started, a welcome change has been happening across the nation. People are finally starting to realize that sexual assault, harassment and abuse is an issue. Something that was once swept under the rug, that was once ignored and denied, now has a spotlight on it. Things still are not perfect, though. Commenters online still accuse survivors who are speaking out of making up their stories for fame or attention, not realizing how hard it is for them to talk about these subjects and tell their stories. There is no monetar y amount in the world that can make up for the emotional pain and trauma it takes to relive a moment like that, and the negative attention is just as plentiful as the positive attention for those speaking out. That is why we want to commend those survivors who are telling their story. It takes so much bravery to do that, and by doing

so, they are ensuring that it does not happen to someone else. Whether it be the brave women who gave victim impact statements at the hearing of serial abuser Larry Nassar or all of the survivors telling their story with a hashtag, they are all making a difference. This is not just something that happens in Hollywood, or in sports arenas. It happens all over, in every profession, at every level. Every story deserves to be listened to. As hard as it is to come to the realization that sexual harassment and assault are more widespread than one may have thought, we need to open our eyes and realize it is a problem. These conversations are long overdue and need to be had. Even though it star ted last year, the #metoo movement still has the momentum and strength it did back then. Hopefully this continues. Hopefully those who have power over another person

continue to realize that they will be caught if they take advantage of them. As many have already expressed, hopefully one day, we will not have to say #metoo. Even one person having been sexually harassed or assaulted is one too many. Social media gets a lot of flack, but the #metoo movement has been extraordinarily important in getting people’s voices heard. Those who did not know they had power before now know that there is at least a chance they will be listened to, and that they have more supporters than they know. At The Daily Eastern News, our motto is “Tell the Truth and Don’t be Afraid.” This is exactly what these brave survivors are doing by speaking up. And the truth will come out.

The daily editorial is the majority opinion of the editorial board of The Daily Eastern News.

You can overcome your depression Depression is an illness that hits people really hard sometimes. Some people are more affected than others, and it can be very serious. I have suffered from clinical depression since I was 13 years old. At first, I had no idea what it was, but I went to my doctor, got diagnosed and got prescribed medicine. Five years later, it hit me worse than it had ever done before. I had just graduated from high school, I came out of my shell, became more social and went on vacation with my family in Cabo. This was supposed to be one of the highest points of my life, but I felt so down and so lost. We were staying at a fancy, all-inclusive resort, and all I wanted to do was sit in my hotel room. I got back from vacation and things got even worse. At first, I kept it to myself for about two weeks before I decided to see my doctor again. My doctor told me my body was pretty much becoming immune to the anti-depressant I had been taking for the last five years. He wanted me to try another medicine, so I did. From July 2013 to January 2014, I was in the worst position possible. I would wake up every day and pray to God that that day would be the day that I got better.

Andrew Paisley I just wanted to lay around all day and do absolutely nothing except sleep. I could not understand why I had to be affected by this debilitation when I had done absolutely nothing to cause it and had nothing to be depressed about. It was not until January 2014 when I finally broke down and contemplated doing the inevitable: I considered suicide. I had no idea where to go or who to turn to. Everyone knew I was suffering, but they did not know what else could be done. I was so sick of waking up every day, getting my hopes up and then feeling just as bad as I had the previous day. I finally got into my local mental health clinic and started going to counseling. By this time, I had started my second semester of community college, the first one

not being so good because of my depression. I had a wonderful counselor who met with me once every two weeks, and I found that it truly helped. One day, I finally figured out the answer to my problems. I realized that I was hit with this for a reason. God was testing me because he knew I could be stronger, but the only person who could really help me get better was me. I started taking the necessary steps. I started exercising, journaling, hanging out with friends and family as much as I could and trying to get on the best sleep schedule possible. It took a while, but eventually I found myself slowly getting better. This time of year is the worst time for depression. We often feel down with the dark, gloomy weather we have during this season and it makes us more depressed than usual. I strongly urge every one of you who are going through this to get help. Do not sit inside all day. I know that is the first thing we want to do, but in the end it does not help at all. Surround yourself with people who are willing to comfort you and listen to you. Depression is a very serious illness, and we all need to take precaution as well as the necessary steps to beat it. Andrew Paisley is a junior journalism major. He can be reached at 581-2812 or at abpaisley@eiu.edu.

Editorial Board Editor- in-Chief Cassie Buchman

Managing Editor Analicia Haynes

Opinions Editor Carole Hodorowicz

Sports Editor Sean Hastings

Photo Editor Jordan Boyer

Online Producer Olivia Swenson-Hultz


TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2018

THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS | NEWS

5

Studying with a friend

PHOTOS BY MARY ELLEN GREENBURG | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Vanessa Boatemaa, a freshman health administration major, was studying with Isaiah Janota (pictured to the right) Wednesday night in Lumpkin Hall. “This is the first time I’ve come here, I decided to work here after tutoring,” Boatemaa said.

Isaiah Janota, a freshman finance major, was studying with Boatemaa (pictured to the left) in Lumpkin Hall Monday night. “We just came from tutoring and now we are working on homework,” Janota said.

»

Safe Space

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “What drew me to my first … major in (intercultural studies) was (that) I’m AsianAmerican, both my parents were born and raised in the Philippines, and growing up I always faced issues (with) being the model minority, so people … assumed just because I’m Asian … that oh, I’m good at math or oh, I’m going to be in the medical field, which is not what I am,” Castro said. Students will be asked not to mention names of any specific professors. Burney and Castro will hand out notecards for students to write their experiences if they do not want to share them out loud. Castro said the ideas discussed by students at

»

Conference

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

FILE PHOTO | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Professor Don Holly answers a question about racial categorization Feb. 4, 2016 during the “Everything you wanted to know about race but were afraid to ask” workshop for the Diversity Conference in the Charleston Mattoon room of Martin Luther King Jr. University Union.

A full outline of the days’ events can be found on the Office of Minority Affairs’ website: http://www. eiu.edu/minoraff/EIUnity%20Diversity%20Conference.php. English professor Jeannie Ludlow, a member of Making Excellence Inclusive who will present at the

the workshop will be documented and shared with Eastern faculty in hopes of further benefiting Eastern’s campus and the learning experience for everyone. “I feel like having students have this safe space to have this discussion, and then have the capability to present this to faculty members will just further enrich (students’) college experiences,” Castro said. The workshop will take place during the EIUnity Diversity Conference in the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union at 11 a.m. on Friday, with registration for the conference having ended on Jan. 29. “Let’s just break this ignorance and educate for future enrichment,” Castro said. Brooke Schwartz can be reached at 581-2812 or at bsschwartz@eiu.edu.

conference, said EIUnity started out as a way to share an education on diversity, as well as ways to stay socially respectable. “One of the things I love about it a lot, as a professor, is that I get to sit in the room and be a learner alongside my students and my colleagues,” Ludlow said. “We don’t do enough of that.” Brooke Schwartz can be reached at 581-2812 or at bsschwartz@eiu.edu.


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THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS | FEATURE PHOTO

TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2018

Monday Workday

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 MARY ELLEN GREENBURG | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS Formiddle Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 Katie Gray, a sophomore elementary and education major, works as a desk assistant in Andrews Hall and sits behind the front desk Monday afternoon. “It’s a good opportuFor Release Tuesday, January 30, 2018 nity to meet people and I get work done at the same time,” Gray said regarding the job.

Crossword “A couple of years ago I was the answer to number 1-Down in the New York Times crossword puzzle,” says best-selling author 1-Across. “At first I was like ‘This is the greatest day of my life.’ But then my brother-in-law pointed out that it was a Saturday puzzle,” which is the hardest of the week. “The clues are so obscure, no one is supposed to know them. He basically told me that until I’m in the Monday or Tuesday puzzle, I’m [24-, 38- and 52-Across].” ACROSS 1 See blurb 9 Sore spot 16 Convenient to carry 17 Region around San Francisco 18 Strike a chord 19 Check for flaws 20 On the ___ (fleeing) 21 Zilch 23 Ja Rule hit that includes the lyric “Wash away your tears” 24 See blurb 29 Falls behind 30 Santa ___ winds 31 Playbill listing 32 ___-friendly

33 Perform in a play 35 Go bad 38 See blurb 44 Bridal path 45 ___ Enterprise 46 “The Catcher in the ___” 47 “Later, old chap” 49 Apple apps use it 51 One of the Three Bears 52 See blurb 57 The “A” of U.A.E. 58 Effortlessness 59 Fútbol cheer 60 Threatening person 62 Military vehicle used for reconnaissance

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE P R I M J A D E S H O T R C A L O O S U R I C H K A Y O V E C S A R U N I M P I S M E L C I L I O T T E

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67 Mark never seen in an online crossword 68 Main city in Chile 69 Snow White’s sister 70 No-show DOWN 1 First full month of spring: Abbr. 2 Coffee, slangily 3 Third-year students: Abbr. 4 Islands surrounding lagoons 5 Venice thoroughfare 6 Appointer of Sotomayor and Kagan to the Supreme Court 7 Sandwich that’s often stuck with toothpicks 8 Welcomed at the door 9 Tolerate 10 Hackneyed 11 Method: Abbr. 12 Chemical symbol for tungsten 13 Puts up 14 Like some handshakes and formulas 15 Lecherous deity 22 “Halt!,” to a sailor 24 Killed, as a dragon 25 Chalupa alternative

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Announcements

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41 Neighbor of Afghanistan 42 Write using a keyboard 43 Get wind of 47 Bullfighter 48 Yoga positions 50 Ukrainian city on the Black Sea 51 Baking container for a cobbler 52 Debussy work whose title is French for “The Sea” 53 Big name in tractors

54 Dog-___ (like some well-read books)

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US ON

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55 Middays 56 Butt muscle 61 Mean dog 63 Hailed vehicle 64 Burmese or Persian

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65 Birthday card number 66 ___ v. Wade

Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 7,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Read about and comment on each puzzle: nytimes.com/wordplay.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 30, 2018

THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS | SPORTS

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WOMEN'S BASKETBAL | CONFERENCE NOTEBOOK

Belmont tightens grip, Eastern tumbles in OVC By JJ Bullock Assistant Sports Editor | @DEN_Sports Chalk up two more ugly second halves and two more conference losses for the Eastern women’s basketball team, after a weekend where it lost to Belmont and Tennessee State thanks to two second half collapses which saw them shoot a combined 25.7 percent in the second half of those games. Eastern has been prone to second half meltdowns this season, in the 10 conference games the Panthers have played this season, they are shooting 34.3 percent in the second half, and things are not trending in the right direction. In Eastern’s last four games, all losses, it shot a mere 25.1 percent from the field after halftime versus 37.5 percent in the 1st half of those games. The pair of road losses for the Panthers drops their conference record to 1-9 and puts them in a tie for last place in the OVC with Tennessee State. Meanwhile, on the other end of the OVC, first-place Belmont disposed of its best challenger for the conference throne, Southern Illinois Ed-

wardsville, 86-64 in Nashville, to keep its record a perfect 10-0 on the season. The win for Belmont is not only its 35th consecutive conference win, but also a statement win that says the Bruins are still the juggernaut of the OVC, having handed Southern Illinois Edwardsville both of its conference losses this season in commanding fashion. At near full health again, Belmont will be perched comfortably in first place, watching from the top of the standings as the rest of the conference jostles for the other seven tournament spots. Morehead State and Jacksonville State won this weekend, moving their conference records to 7-3 on the season. Murray State and Eastern Kentucky squared off in what might have been the most important match of the weekend outside of Belmont and Southern Illinois Edwardsville. The Racers topped Eastern Kentucky 75-68 at home, but what really counted for Murray State was the win moved them to 4-6 in the OVC, and ahead of Eastern Kentucky, also 4-6, in a tiebreaker for the final tournament spot.

Tennessee State’s Tia Wooten strengthened her case for a potential conference player of the year award this weekend when she scored 18 points and grabbed nine rebounds in the Tigers’ win over Eastern on Saturday and went off for 29 points and 11 rebounds against Edwardsville on Thursday. Eastern freshmen Karle Pace struck Tennessee State with a career-high 31-point performance in the loss on Saturday. Coming up this week in the OVC, the top four teams in the conference will face each other on Saturday when Belmont travels to Morehead State and Jacksonville State will head to Edwardsville, on a day that guarantees to have movement at the top of the standings. Eastern continues play with games against Jacksonville State on Thursday and Tennessee Tech on Saturday, both game will be at Lantz Arena. JJ Bullock can be reached at 581-2812 or jpbullock@eiu.edu.

Women’s basketball standings 1. Belmont (20-3, 10-0 OVC) 2. SIUE (11-10, 8-2 OVC) 3. Morehead State (16-7, 7-3) 4. Jacksonville State (13-8, 7-3 OVC) 5. Tennessee-Martin (10-12, 6-4 OVC) 6. Austin Peay (12-9, 5-5 OVC) 7. SEMO (10-12, 5-5 OVC) 8. Murray State (8-13, 4-6) 9. Eastern Kentucky (7-12, 4-6 OVC) 10.Tennessee State (4-15, 2-8 OVC) 11.Tennessee Tech (4-17, 1-9 OVC) 12. Eastern (2-19 , 1-9 OVC)

Knapp breaks own Eastern high jump record again By Alex Hartman Track Reporter | @DEN_Sports Eastern senior Haleigh Knapp broke her own record for the second time this season Saturday at the Illinois Classic. She earned her fourth first place finish in a row with her jump of 6-feet-.50. She broke her own record for the first time at Illinois Jan. 13. Her jump at 6-feet kept her atop Eastern’s women’s high jump record. It was the second time that Eastern Illinois has visited U of I to compete, this time the men earned

third in the meet and the women earned fourth. She ranks first in the OVC for high jump as well. She has high hopes as the season goes on. “Every centimeter counts when you are trying for indoor nationals,” said Knapp. “I’m hoping this height cements me a spot for indoor nationals.” After winning the EIU John Craft Invite Jan. 20, the Panthers’ meet at the Illinois Classic was the opening meet of their string of two-straight road meets before returning home one week before the OVC Indoor Championships, which is also hosted by Eastern. The Panthers have a two-day meet at the Notre

Dame Meyo Invite, before the Grand Valley State Big Meet Feb. 9. Eastern’s Friday Night Special wraps up the indoor regular season. Both sides for the Eastern track team had a good display at a highly contested meet that featured the teams of Illinois and Louisville. Eastern finished with nine top three finishes and four first-place finishes overall. Senior Brion Portis earned her first place in triple jump with a distance of 38-11.75. Some other first-place finishes included senior Chrisford Stevens with his triple jump of 48-feet02.75. This placed him second in the OVC in the

men’s triple jump. Junior sprinter Shirley Jones also earned first with a time of 55.98 in the 400-meter dash, which placed her third overall in the OVC for the event. Eastern had second-place finishers as well with graduate student thrower Ryan Pearce in the shotput and senior sprinter Darneisha Spann in the 60-meter hurdles. Eastern track returns to action Friday and Saturday at Notre Dame for the Meyo Invite. Alex Hartman can be reached at 581-2812 or aihartman@eiu.edu.


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Sports Editor Sean Hastings 217 • 581 • 2812 DENSportsdesk@gmail.com

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

T U E S DAY, J A N UA RY 30, 2018 N O. 102, V O LU M E 92

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DEN_Sports

FILE PHOTO| THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Sophomore Stella Cliffe hits a forehand at the women’s tennis practice Sept. 21 at the Darling Courts. Cliffe and senior Grace Summers won their doubles match over the weekend.

Women’s tennis team swept over weekend By Dillan Schorfheide Women’s Tennis Reporter | @DEN_Sports Eastern’s women’s tennis team continued its losing streak that started the season on Saturday and Sunday, losing all three matches the team played. Saturday, the Panthers traveled to South Bend to take on the Notre Dame Fighting Irish, which ended in a 7-0 shutout victory for the Irish. Then on Sunday, the Panthers took on Ball State in a doubleheader. The shutout to Notre Dame

marks the second one so far in the young spring season, the first one coming against Illinois on Sunday, Jan. 21. For the second straight match, the duo of senior Grace Summers and sophomore Stella Cliffe defeated their doubles opponents in the match. Against Illinois, Summers and Cliffe defeated their doubles opponents, who were ranked No. 45 nationally, 6-3. On Saturday, Summers and Cliffe defeated Notre Dame’s Brooke Broda and Allison Miller by a similar score, 6-4. After taking the doubles point,

the Fighting Irish dominated the singles competition. Cliffe and junior Srishti Slaria were the Panthers who finished with the closest scores to their opponents, both losing in straight sets 6-3, 6-3. The two teams also played two singles matches that did not count toward the overall team score, and at the No. 8 singles spot, freshman Claire Martin defeated her Notre Dame opponent Evie Shannon 6-3. Sunday brought better results for the Panthers against the Cardinals of Ball State. In the first match of the doubleheader, the Panthers lost by a score

of 3-4. Cliffe had a good doubleheader for herself, winning both of her singles matches against Ball State’s Sarah Swiderski. In the first match, Cliffe won in straight sets 6-3, 6-0. In the second match Cliffe won 6-3, 6-3. Also picking up singles wins for Eastern in the first match, was Summers, winning 7-6, 6-4, and freshman Rachel Papavasilopoulos, winning 7-6, 6-3. Papavasilopoulos’ singles match in the second team match went unfinished, and the Panthers lost the second match 4-2.

Picking up the other point for Eastern, along with Cliffe’s win, was sophomore Emily Pugachevsky, winning 6-4, 6-2 in straight sets. After the matches over the weekend, Eastern now has a 0-5 record on the season. Ball State is now 3-1, and Notre Dame is 2-0. Eastern will next host Western Illinois at the Danville Tennis Center in Danville, Ill, on Saturday at 2 p.m., and on Sunday, the Panthers will head to St. Louis to face the Saint Louis Billikens at 6 p.m. Dillan Schorfheide can be reached at 581-2812 or dtschorfheide@eiu.edu.

Men’s tennis team travels to Chicago State By Vince Lovergine Men’s Tennis Reporter | @DEN_Sports Tuesday marks the fourth of 11 straight matches on the road for the men’s tennis team, who have not been so lucky to star t the spring schedule. Eastern is 0-3 to start the spring season, with losses coming from Indiana, Ball State and IndianaPurdue. In last year’s meeting against Chicago State, Eastern lost 4-3, which snapped a seven-game winning streak that was held since 2001. This match could come at the right time for senior Jared Woodson. Woodson currently has not won a match in the spring schedule, but did earn a win against Chicago State last season in three sets. Currently coming into this season, sophomore Freddie O’Brien continues to impress over the two matches. He earned a win against Ball State, and earned another win in singles play against IndianaPurdue University Indianapolis

FILE PHOTO| THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Sophomore Freddie O’Brien hits a forehand in the men’s tennis practice Oct. 25 in the Lantz Fieldhouse. The Panthers play at Chicago State Tuesday.

and earned a win in doubles play. O’Brien is now 2-1 at the No.

1 position and is 1-2 with partner Grant Reiman in doubles play,

earning all three wins the Panthers have earned this season.

While the Panthers try to salvage their 0-3 record on the road this season, the Panthers are 1-18 on the road since the start of last season. Chicago State also has not fared well on the young season, starting out 1-2. The Cougars won its first match against St. Francis, but lost two to Green Bay and Cardinal Stritch. Despite losing two in a row, Chicago State is 1-1 at home. Rohan Wattley has been the Cougars’ best player so far this year, compiling an 8-4 record in singles play, while Christian Gonzalez is second on the team with an 8-6 record. In doubles play it’s more of the same for Gonzalez, he teams up with Felix Savard, and have a 7-4 record together, while being undefeated at the No. 1 position at 3-0. Tuesday’s match starts a one at the Homewood-Flossmoor Racquet and Fitness Club. Vince Lovergine can be reached at 581-2812 or vplovergine@eiu.edu.

2018.01.30  
2018.01.30  
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