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ART GALLERY The Tarble Arts Center will be adding new art exhibits before the end of the semester. Four exhibits opened on Friday, Nov. 18. PAGE 8 PAGE 3

The Eastern men’s basketball team won three straight games, giving the Panthers a perfect 4-0 record at home.

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Eastern receives $5.6M from state

Giving thanks for being back

CHICAGO (AP) — The Illinois Board of Higher Education has approved $17 million in emergency funding to help three financially-strapped state universities through the end of the year. The Chicago Tribune reports the board voted unanimously on Wednesday. Under the agreement Western Illinois University gets $8.4 million, Eastern Illinois University receives about $5.6 million and Chicago State University gets around $3 million. The funding can only be used to pay down costs incurred this year. The board received $20 million from the state to distribute to schools in financial crisis. It’s part of a temporary spending plan as the impasse over a full state budget stretches into a second year. About $3 million is left. It’ll go to the Illinois Community College Board in December.

(Top): Hannah Heinz, a freshman biological sciences major, hangs clothes up as she unpacks after Thanksgiving break in Lincoln Hall Sunday night. As she unpacked, her friends joked around with her, guessing how long her room would stay clean. Heinz said she is excited to be back at Eastern but not looking forward to finals.

PHOTO BY C ASSIE BUCHMAN | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

(Left): Matt Hartung (foreground), a freshman physics major, prepares to haul a lamp and a load of laundry to his room at Lawson Hall Sunday. George Hartung (background), Matt’s father, jokingly said in regards to his son’s frequent moving, “(Matt’s) picture is up at the post office, too.”

PHOTO BY JASON HARDIMON | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Glassman proposal calls for control over international students’ tuition By Samuel Nusbaum Administration Reporter | @DEN_News The Board of Trustees heard a proposal from Eastern President David Glassman asking the board to give him control over international students’ tuition and a report about the progress of the vitalization project at its meeting Friday, Nov. 18. Glassman said the proposition would give him control over tuition prices for international students. As of now he has no control over the prices, but he wants to be able to set them based

on the rates for the international student’s university. He said he wants to have more flexibility with tuition and fee models. The Board will vote on Glassman’s proposition at their next meeting. The vitalization project consists of nine workgroups, which focus on different parts of the university, such as intercollegiate athletics, marketing and academic programs. Glassman said preliminary reports for the project have been completed and turned in to the administration. The preliminary reports have recommenda-

tions for the various departments across campus. The chairs of those departments were able to see these recommendations. Workgroups no. 8 and no. 9, which each focus on the marketing and organization of colleges in the university, do not have any reports to turn in but will be talking to the president and keeping him informed. The Board’s finance committee said the university finished its quality assessment report, which was submitted to the state for review. The university also finished reviewing the preliminary budget for FY2017. BOT, page 5

University named Institution of the Year by IRHA Staff Report | @DEN_News Eastern was named the 2016 Institution of the Year by the Illinois Residence Hall Association. According to a press release, “this award is the highest honor an IRHA member school can attain.” To get the award, universities submitted a bid or written report. Eastern’s was written and submitted by geography major Kiyla DeVoss. Called “Once Upon a Time: A Tale of Leadership,” DeVoss’ bid had a fairy tale theme. Mark Hudson, director of Housing and Dining, said the award reflects the work of student leaders on campus. “Our student leaders distinguish themselves year after year by delivering high-quality programs, services and activities,” he said. “Developing and nurturing student leadership is one of EIU’s core values.” Hudson said the awards showed the departments’ efforts are effective. “Our time and energy are being well invested,” he said. Eastern will host the IRHA conference in February 2017. The News staff can be reached at 581-2812 or dennewsdesk@gmail.com.


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Editor-in-Chief Kalyn Hayslett DENeic@gmail.com Managing Editor Analicia Haynes DENmanaging@ gmail.com News Editor Cassie Buchman DENnewsdesk@ gmail.com Associate News Editor Abbey Whittington Opinions Editor Shelby Niehaus opinions.DEN@ gmail.com Online Editor Jordan Hale DENnews.com@ gmail.com Photo Editor Molly Dotson DENphotodesk@ gmail.com Assistant Photo Editor Olivia Swenson-Hultz Sports Editor Sean Hastings Assistant Sports Editor Mark Shanahan Administration Reporter Samuel Nusbaum

Entertainment Reporter Angelica Cataldo Campus Reporter Chrissy Miller Pop Culture Reporter Marisa Foglia Verge Editor T'Nerra Butler Verge Designer Thaija Evans Faculty Advisers Editorial Adviser Lola Burnham Photo Adviser Brian Poulter DENNews.com Adviser Brian Poulter Publisher Lola Burnham Business Manager Betsy Jewell Press Supervisor Tom Roberts Night Staff for this issue Night Chief Analicia Haynes Copy Editors/ Designers Leon Mire Sports Designer Lauren McQueen

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SPRINGFIELD (AP) — A mammoth plan to save nuclear power plants in Illinois, derided as a corporate bailout by consumer advocates but hailed as a leap forward in energyefficiency by environmentalists, faces an uphill climb this week in the final days of the General Assembly’s fall session. Here are some questions and answers about the proposed legislation: Q: What is Exelon’s rationale?

A: The company says despite producing no harmful greenhouse gases, nuclear-generated electricity doesn’t benefit from financial incentives like solar- or windpowered generators do. Also, it says,

Comments / Tips Contact any of the above staff members if you believe your information is relevant. Corrections The Daily Eastern News is committed to accuracy in its coverage of the news. Any factual error the staff finds or is made aware of by its readers will be corrected as promptly as possible. Please report any factual error you find to Editor-in-Chief Kalyn Hayslett at 581-2812. Employment If you would like to work for The Daily Eastern News as a reporter, photographer, columnist, cartoonist, copy editor, designer or videographer, please visit at the newsroom at 1802 Buzzard Hall.

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A: Consumer groups, led by the nonprofit BEST Coalition, argue the plants aren’t needed and keeping them open will cost ratepayers more anyway. BEST director Dave Lundy says Illinois plants produce 41 percent more power than consumers can use, meaning the excess electricity is exported and higher rates for Illinois consumers will subsidize out-of-state users. the way a person handles their assault,” Quanada Prevention Educator JJ Magliocco said. “We are teaching them that they can make a difference. They don’t have to keep their mouth shut.”

QUINCY (AP) — Illinois has a new law requiring all hairstylists in the state to be trained in domestic violence support and response. The law will take effect Jan. 1, the Herald-Whig reported. Pin-Up Hair Studio stylist Jamie Feramisco said hairdressers sometimes learn about incidents of domestic violence through chatting with clients. She said she often hears accounts of domestic violence in her salon and that she tries to support women facing such circumstances. “The salon is a safe place to go. People tell their stylists things they don’t even tell their family or friends,” PBA Director of Charitable Programs Rachel Molepske said. “We have gotten testimonials from people that said this program saved them.” Feramisco said she plans to host a training session at the salon once the state has established a curriculum. “The whole idea is to help hairdressers deal with disclosures. There is a right way and a wrong way to talk to someone. It can make or break

Imagining Cuba’s human rights situation after Fidel Castro

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Q: And the opposition says?

Illinois stylists to be trained in domestic violence support

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About The Daily Eastern News is produced by the students of Eastern Illinois University. It is published daily Monday through Friday, in Charleston, Ill., during fall and spring semesters and online during the summer term. One copy per day is free to students and faculty. Additional copies can be obtained for 50 cents each in the Student Publications Office in Buzzard Hall.

the Quad Cities Generating Station in Cordova and the plant in Clinton are unprofitable and both must be closed by summer 2018. Exelon says that would result in 4,200 lost jobs and higher power bills for ratepayers.

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He ove r t h re w a s t ro n g m a n , brought his country free health care and education, and enlisted Cubans in what he called fights for freedom from Central America to South Africa. Fidel Castro also maintained a steel grip at home, jailing dissidents and gays, controlling freedom of travel and expression and declaring virtually any activity outside his control to be illegitimate. In the wake of the revolutionary’s death Friday night, human rights groups said they hoped that his brother and successor, Raul Castro, would move faster toward allowing Cubans more freedom of speech, assembly and other basic rights. Under Raul Castro, Cuba has moved away from jailing political prisoners for extended sentences, in-

Q: How much will the Exelon subsidies and related programs cost?

A: BEST Coalition tabbed it at $24 billion over the next two dozen years, calling it “the largest rate hike in U.S. history.” Last week, add-on incentives to lure support from coal-power generators were dropped, and with other tweaks last week, a consultant study for BEST now puts the price at $16.4 billion. Exelon did not immediately estimate the cost, although the carbonfree emissions credit would be worth $285 million a year. Q: What is Gov. Bruce Rauner’s position?

A: The Republican warmed to the stead making thousands of short-term arrests each year that Cuban dissidents say are designed to harass them and disrupt any attempt at political organizations. Cubans today feel freer to criticize their government in public, but any attempt at protest or demonstration is swiftly quashed. Independent journalists operate inside the country but find it nearly impossible to distribute printed material and they report repeated harassment from authorities.

Corps won’t forcibly remove protesters from federal land BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it has “no plans for forcible removal” of protesters who have been camping in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access oil pipeline. The Corps says in a statement Sunday that it “is seeking a peaceful and orderly transition to a safer location.” The Corps notified tribal leaders Friday that all federal lands north of the Cannonball River will be closed to public access Dec. 5 for “safety concerns.” The agency says those

proposal after a contentious peak-demand pricing plan was dropped. It would have reduced a fixed rate but based electric bills on the monthly average of the 30-minute period each weekday a consumer uses the most power instead of overall monthly consumption. The company had argued seven in 10 customers would have saved money, but critics said it would create unpredictable price spikes. “We can’t have our energy costs go through the roof or we’ll lose more jobs,” Rauner said in Chicago last week. “If we raise the energy costs for entrepreneurs that need to consume a lot of energy, they have to lay people off. Saving some jobs at a plant won’t matter. So we need a balance.” who choose to stay do so at their own risk. They say anyone on the property north of the Cannonball River after that date will be trespassing and subject to prosecution. The land to be closed includes the main protest camp, about 50 miles south of Bismarck.

Trump calls recount a ‘scam’ but effort moves forward WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — For months Donald Trump called the presidential election “rigged.” The president-elect has a different word — “scam” — for the recount effort aimed at revisiting the vote in three pivotal battleground states. “The people have spoken and the election is over,” Trump declared Saturday in his first comments about the growing effort to force recounts in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. He added, “We must accept this result and then look to the future.” Green Party nominee Jill Stein’s fight for a recount got a major boost Friday when Wisconsin officials announced they were moving forward with the first presidential recount in state history.


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2016

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Tarble opens new exhibits before end of semester By Angelica Cataldo Entertainment Reporter | @DEN_News As the fall semester concludes, new art exhibits are beginning at The Tarble Arts Center for the upcoming spring semester. Friday, Nov. 18 marked the opening of several new exhibits: “P.S.” by Eli Craven; “Vessels of Genealogies” by Firelei Báez; the Blackbox Series “Phantasmagoria” with the hybrid films of Ranu Mukherjee; and “Reaching Into Infinity” featuring Chul Hyun Ahn. Rehema Barber, the director and chief curator for the Tarble Arts Center, said new exhibits are not usually on full display before the end of a semester. However, this year Barber opened the exhibits earlier to give faculty and staff members the chance to see the exhibits without having to work around their normally busy schedule. Barber said the exhibits all relate to the theme of nature, both human and natural. This theme is a secular idea that Tarble is trying to connect each artist’s work to. On Thursday Nov. 17, Báez and Ortiz were part of a public lecture hosted at Tarble to talk about Báez’s work and kick off the new exhibit. Báez’s work reflects on individuals and their journey through racial, political and cultural boundaries, focusing on individuals from the Dominican Republic, where she was born. “These pieces are about redefining resistance and renegotiating what’s good and what’s bad,” Báez said. “These are things that are part of who we are.” Some of her pieces serve as artistic commentary on Dominican and Haitian relations throughout history. Her work contains collages and large pieces made with ink, paint, books and pictures. In some of her work, she takes images of

ANGELIC A C ATALDO | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Firelei Báez presents her work to a small group of faculty and staff on Nov. 17. The work consists of images from history from which she had made collages and paintings.

prominent figures in history and combines them with elaborate drawings or collages. “(My work) is like surrogate bodies for these figures in history,” Báez said. “I like to work with figures, like they are all pawns in a larger, broader context.” This exhibit is co-curated by María Elena Ortiz, assistant curator for the Perez Art Museum Miami. Ortiz is also the curator of Báez’s nationwide traveling exhibition, “Bloodlines.” Craven’s exhibit is part of this year’s Artist in Education Residency and features several photographs and images he has found in thrift stores, estate sales and books, along with photographs he has taken himself. “(I worked with) shifting or removing and subtracting from the images,” Craven said.

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“Removing the identity of the image or person brings a new plane for the viewer.” He combines the images to make abstract pieces reflecting on his personal views on life and the lives of others. Some of his work contains pictures he pulled from a book he found of German social figures from World War II. “I worked with investigating the rules of the image and socially what becomes normal,” Craven said. “I had the book and I liked the idea of the (pictures) serving a different purpose.” Craven said the recent presidential election drove his fascination with this project. For one of his pieces, Craven found a wallet with three pictures of strangers in it and decided to expand the photos into a tri-fold,

three-dimensional piece. “These are people who may or may not be alive,” Craven said. “They passed on and no one claimed the value of these pictures and I started placing value on them.” Mukherjee is a contemporary American artist from San Francisco. She creates digital collages and works with layer animation, drawings, photography, images and painting. Mukherjee’s exhibit in the Blackbox consists of hybrid films projected onto the walls. Barber said Mukherjee’s work is about breaking down barriers and hierarchies. Her work uses color, shapes and other elements to create abstract images that she continually builds on with animation and other images to create her hybrid films. Ahn is from Busan, South  Korea and moved to the U.S. in 1997 to study at Eastern Michigan University. Then, in 2002, he received a Master of Fine Arts from the Mount Royal School at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore. Ahn’s exhibit “Reaching Into Infinity” uses LED lights and mirrors to create sculptures with illusions of infinite geometric shapes and images. “(His) work is very minimalistic, but he plays with this idea of timelessness but also captures space and is very contemplative,” Barber said. “There’s so much to see and process.” These exhibits will be on display from November 2016 through February 2017. T h ro u g h o u t t h o s e m o n t h s , t h e Ta r b l e Arts Center will host public lectures with Mukherjee and Craven at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 12 and Thursday, Jan. 19, respectively. There will also be an A.L.L. Gallery Talk featuring Ahn at 11 a.m. on Thursday, Feb. 9. Angelica Cataldo can be reached at 581-2812 or amcataldo@eiu.edu.


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T h e Daily Eastern News

W W W. DA I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

Monday, 11.28.16

Billy’s Reminder

Gretchen Neal

DAP a threat to lives, rights, heatlh in Sioux reservation While we were off enjoying (or rather, studying through) a week off of school, the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and like-minded protesters were gathered around Sacred Stone Camp, the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The pipeline, which is expected to run for 1,200 miles, stretches from North Dakota to Illinois. The project plans to run miles of pipes containing crude oil under the Missouri River and through sacred sites and burial grounds of the local Standing Rock Sioux. Though it may seem like an over-reaction to protest ground wherein only the dead inhabit, or where occasional religious rituals take place, consider two things: one, these misgivings does not speak well of your character, and two, the DAP plans to run within a half a mile of the tribe’s reservation, and very close to their water supply. Their drinking water supply. And as the victims of both the BP spill and the Flint water crisis can tell you, a leak in the line is definitely a possibility, especially if it leaks somewhere near the Missouri River. Further, let me remind the reader of the government’s minimal response to the Flint crisis. Even without the threat of an oil leak, the pipeline still encroaches on native burial grounds, which is very close to violating federal rights for the indigenous people. However, every lawsuit so far filed has only put off the project, and the protesters are being asked to leave by Dec. 5th. Over Thanksgiving weekend, the local police warned residents around the pipeline that protesters would be violent and looking to upset the community. Both the police and the protesters claim that the other side is inciting violence, but there are at least 26 injured protesters who were sent to a hospital and (hey, this is weird) zero reports of injury on the side of law enforcement. There are also videos of trails of smoke (allegedly from smoke grenades) and an interview with Morton County Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier in which he admitted to lying about protesters using pipe bombs (what he was seeing was ceremonial smoking pipes). So far the only evidence of violence on the protesters’ side has been a report of a protester kindly returning a smoke grenade. It is almost as if American law enforcement officers are not very contained when it comes to violent outbursts. (I am referring, of course, to every black person killed by law enforcement with little to no cause – of which there are many.) Those aside, when it comes to unwarranted violence, I would still take the side of the people who are not legally given a firearm to wear every day. The protest of the DAP may seem like a lost cause, with protesters being ordered out soon, but you can still support the cause by spreading information about it and donating to the legal fund of the Standing Rock Sioux, their gofundme or the Sacred Stone supply fund. If you are so inclined, you can voice your (professionally-worded) concerns to North Dakota governor Jack Dalrymple or the contributors to the pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners. Gretchen Neal is a senior English major. She can be reached at 581-2812 or gdneal@eiu.edu.

DAN PRER ADOVIĆ | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Staff Editorial

Flipping the switch: learn work-life balance The staff of The News showed up to the newsroom Sunday ready to work. Sure, some of us brought in Thanksgiving leftovers to share, and a few of us took time out to catch up with coworkers, but when we entered the newsroom, we were prepared to work. First day back from break or no, there was news to print. One of the editorial staffers learned a term that applies well to our first day back at work after a break. She describes getting back into work as “flipping the switch.” This was described to her as the ability to switch between work and play immediately, as if your work/play settings were mapped on a light switch. It might seem obvious to the reader that being able to go back to work after a break is a valuable skill in a healthy work-life balance, but we think that the immediacy aspect is often overlooked. Immediacy is efficient and necessary on both ends of that balance because flipping the switch works both ways. For this particular moment, students should be

able to flip the switch to maximize their time and productivity in the last three weeks of the semester. One off day at this point might be anywhere from a regrettable waste to a disastrous one. Flipping the switch and knowing exactly when and how to buckle down and get to work will make the last push to winter break more manageable and more productive. However, we also think that flipping the switch the other direction will be useful for students on the next break. Sometimes, mid-semester breaks can still be stressful; even if you have a break from your work, you might not be able to get the most out of it if you are still trying to catch up or if you are still feeling stressed about what you have left to do. Thanksgiving break might not have been the catharsis that we needed, in this case. So the staff of The News suggests that you master flipping the switch for the upcoming winter break. When you learn to immediately go back to work mode, you learn, by association, how to

go back to play mode, and this resting state is not only a happy addition to our lives but an essential part of our functionality. Rest is important. It helps us synthesize what we learn and do, and it prepares us for what is ahead. Knowing how to maximize rest time, then, is an integral part of resting well. Understanding how to flip the switch into a thorough and fulfilling rest period is the key to great recovery. But resting well comes later. For now, students should be focusing on making a quick switch out of Thanksgiving rest time and into the final push to the end of the semester (and, for some of us, the end of our college careers). There is still important work to be done, and The News wants to see all students achieve their goals for the semester instead of watching our friends and classmates struggle to get back into the swing of work. The daily editorial is the majority opinion of the editorial board of The Daily Eastern News.

Workgroup transparency has been a myth Editor’s note: Jack Cruikshank represents students on Vitalization Workgroup #6 (Marketing and University Branding) and speaks for graduate students on the Council on University Planning and Budget. When President David Glassman introduced his Vitalization Project two months ago, I was excited for the new ideas that could be pioneered for increasing enrollment and diversifying our program offerings. I saw this semester as a chance to ask the faculty, staff and students for new ways to lead us out of the slump that Eastern has recently found itself entrenched in. Now, however, I see the entire project a colossal waste of everyone’s time. At the group’s first meeting on Sept. 29th, President Glassman spoke highly of the need for both transparency and collaboration, which were the ideals that had prompted me to commit my time this semester to attempting to improve Eastern. Through many hours in meetings and email communications, my fellow workgroup members and I have compiled a list of recommendations for the university’s marketing. One such suggestion simply involves hiring more people. For staffing, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville employs 23 marketing professionals (including a graduate assistant) who work to sell the SIU-E brand; Eastern has four.

(As an aside, Eastern has a considerable pot of money for marketing that could easily be deployed to hire additional staff. The guise of fiscal prudence should not convince anyone that hiring these new employees would be remiss.) I hope these recommendations take hold, but there is no mechanism to hold the administration accountable to implementing (or, at the least, strongly considering) these recommendations if there is not transparency in the group reports. When seven of the workgroups released their reports in early November, I asked Ryan Hendrickson, Task Force Committee Chair, where the group would be posting the reports (e.g., online, physical copies, etc.). He told me they would not be released, as they were “preliminary recommendations.” I give the administration credit because, in the state of Illinois, if something is a “preliminary recommendation,” it is exempt from the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA); that was deceptively clever on the administration’s part. As a workaround to the Open Meetings Act, which requires public bodies to conduct meetings accessible to the public and the press, multiple workgroups conducted business over email. Email communication in and of itself is not bad, but recently, under the FOIA, I requested the emails of one of the workgroups, only to receive heavily redacted emails. Viewing the black

bars across the emails would lead one to believe they are classified state secrets; however, they are simply emails about how best to structure our university going forward. Anything that was deemed an “opinion” was redacted because, once again, the FOIA precludes “recommendations and opinions used in the formulation of policies or actions.” Again, I commend the administration on their ability to use the laws as written to limit transparency and group discussion. I had erroneously thought the administration would keep their promise about remaining transparent in these financially difficult times. I call on the administration to release the workgroup reports of their own volition; no law prevents such a release. On the contrary, the FOIA was designed to allow the public access to the everyday business of public officials who are paid by the taxpayer. For my part, I would be happy to share my group’s preliminary recommendations with anyone who wishes to see them. Furthermore, I would love to discuss how Eastern can market itself better going forward; I very much seek and value the opinions of every member of the Eastern community. Jack Cruikshank is a political science graduate student. He can be reached at 581-2812 or jdcruikshank@eiu.edu.

Editorial Board Editor- in-Chief Kalyn Hayslett

Managing Editor Analicia Haynes

News Editor Cassie Buchman

Associate News Editor Abbey Whittington

Photo Editor Molly Dotson

Online Editor Jordan Hale

Opinions Editor Shelby Niehaus


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2016

NACWC to share women’s stories of police brutality

THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS | NEWS

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Falling for the holidays

By Kalyn Hayslett Editor-in-Chief | @DEN_news The National Association of Colored Women’s Club will speak on the female perspective of police brutality during a “Hear my Voice, Unmasking the Truth” presentation 6 p.m. in the Grand Ballroom of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. NACWC President Kayla Slusher said the members of the NACWC, being an all-women organization, sympathize with the victims and hope that by sharing the women’s stories they open the eyes of the people on campus. “We hope people understand that this is affecting not only men in our community but our women as well,” she said. “We understand and we hear their cry.” From 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. the ballroom will be transformed into an art gallery where students, faculty and staff can look at photos of female victims of police brutality. Next to each photo viewers can read a short description of who the women are and how they were murdered, beaten or harmed. Three solo acts ranging from singing to spoken word and a demonstration from the African Student Association will be performed from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Slusher said the performers have freedom to use their feelings, interpretations and creativity when structuring the performances. In between the acts members of the NACWC will expand on the descriptions of the women who are displayed in the art gallery and share biographies from other victims. The showcase is free and all students, faculty and staff can attend.

PHOTOS BY MOLLY DOTSON | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Jocelyn Carrera, a five-year-old from Clinton, Indiana, leads Sylvia Lorenzen, a four-year-old from Chrisman, around the iceless skating rink during the “Christmas in Paris” celebration Saturday. Carrera and Lorenzen had just met that day, according to their parents, but Carrera’s mother said they planned on exchanging numbers before leaving the festivities.

Kalyn Hayslett can be reached at 581-2812 or kehayslett@eiu.edu.

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 However, it is not possible to do more than approve the budget because of uncertainty in Springfield resulting from the budget impasse. The Board also discussed Springfield, higher education funding and how the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign gave legislators their own proposal for funding. Samuel Nusbaum can be reached at 581-2812 or at scnusbaum@eiu.

Alex Christianson, a seven-year-old from Paris, tries to regain balance on the iceless skating rink during the “Christmas in Paris” celebration Saturday. Many of the skaters, including Christianson, said the experience was nothing like real ice skating. Despite this, Christianson said he “had a lot of fun falling down a bunch of times.”

Lily Reedy, a seven-year-old from Paris, cries for help after falling on the iceless skating rink, which was part of the “Christmas in Paris” festivities, Saturday. The rink was made of PVC panels, rather than real ice, and greased to simulate the slickness of traditional ice for ice skating.


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THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS | NEWS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2016

Thanksgiving weekend Black Friday Madness shoppers spent less due to discounts NEW YORK (AP) — Thanksgiving tions to grab shoppers. “People are much more deliberate weekend shoppers picked up hot toys, TVs and new Apple products, buying about the purchases they make,” NRF both online and in stores, but spent less CEO Matthew Shay said Sunday. “In a per person because of rampant discount- perfect world, everyone would sell at full price, but as consumers and as buyers all ing that they’ve come to demand. Once all the receipts are in, customers of us would like to get a deal on things we look to have spent an average of $289.19 buy. The era of promotional sales is with over the four-day weekend, down nearly us to stay.” Even though shoppers are spending 3.5 percent from a year ago, based on a less per person, more shoppers could still survey by the National Retail Federation. The pressure on prices was especially translate into more spending. MasterCard Advisors SpendingPulse, strong on products like TVs. More than 154 million customers which tracks spending on all kinds of paysaid they had shopped or planned to this ments, estimated that spending over the Thanksgiving weekend, up from 151 mil- four-day weekend will be up 3.8 percent, lion a year ago, according to the survey with online sales up by double-digit perconducted Friday and Saturday by the Na- centages and in-store sales up in the sintional Retail Federation and Prosper In- gle digits. MOLLY DOTSON | THE DAILY EATERN NE WS But MasterCard Advisors’ Sarah Quinsights & Analytics. And more were doJermaine Jones, a Charleston resident, loads a 50-inch TV into the back seat of his Chevy Cavalier during a Black Friday sale at the Charleston Walmart. Jones said he put another one of the 50-inch TVs on laying it online, as about 99.1 million went lan also cited a slight decline in the average away, and he plans to give it to his children as a Christmas gift. to the stores and 108.5 million shopped sale because of promotions. According to a survey conducted by the National Retail Federation, shoppers spent an average of Stores trying to snag customers first online. $289.19 over the four-day Thanksgiving weekend which is down 3.5 percent compared to last year. The drop in spending underscores how and compete with Amazon are shifting even with an improving economy, many to a steady stream of online discounts and shoppers are still focused on habit devel- alerts instead of focusing on doorbuster sales on a few products. oped during the Great Recession. That meant that online shopping stole They’re fixated on deals and more readily using technology to find them whenev- thunder away from sales at stores. And er they want to buy. More than a third of while areas like electronics and toys recustomers surveyed by the NRF said that mained strong for the weekend, clothall of their purchases were on sale, up 11 ing, particularly basic sweaters, were still a tough sell. percent from a year ago. Shoppers are visiting fewer stores and The Thanksgiving weekend kicks off the holiday shopping season but stores the rate at which browsers converted into A webcam run by the local tourist STOCKHOLM (AP) — Swe- after it was inaugurated on Sunday. have increasingly started their sales earlier. buyers was slightly lower than last year, den's Christmas Goat — a giant decArsonists just cannot stay away office showed the frame of the goat said York William Taubman, chief operating of- Corporation Stores had been wary about beingThe left New orative goat made of straw and wood from the giant decoration, which was still standing but all the straw Times Syndication Sales ficer at Taubman Centers, which operates with a lot of inventory they would The have New didn't last long on its 50th anni- seldom survives the season without was gone. York Times Syndication Sales Corporation 620 Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y.— 10018 24For malls around the country. to discount to get off the shelves, and so 620 There was no immediate word on someone trying to burn it down. Eighth Avenue, New1-800-972-3550 York, N.Y. versary. 10018 Information Call: Still, after a contentious presidential started the season with less on hand. possible suspects. The local newspaper Gefle DagThe straw goat, an annual Yuletide For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Release Saturday, November 19, 2016 election, he believes people are ready to That will help preserve profit margins, For Release Monday, November 28,tradition 2016 in the city of Gavle since blad said it was set on fire late Sunbut they’ve still planned aggressive promo- buy. 1966, went up in flames just hours day.

Swedish Christmas goat burns on 50th anniversary

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2016

THE DAILY EASTERN NEWS | SPORTS

7

Swim teams place at House of Champions By Tyler McCluskey Swim Reporter | @DEN_Sports The men’s and women’s swim teams both finished in 11th place out of 12 teams at the House of Champions Nov 18-20 at IUPUI. After the first two days, the women’s team was in last before making the jump up in the final day, while the men were in 10th the first two days before dropped down in the final day. After day one, the Panthers had a total of 11 top 25 finishes. Sophomore Lauren Oostman, freshman Rachel Manderscheid, sophomore Martee Grainger and junior Dani DiMatteo took the 12th in the 400-medley relay with a time of 3:58.92 and were the Panthers’ top finish on the day. Finishing 23rd in the same event was the team of sophomore Caro Lamarque, junior Niki Beringer, freshman Karleen Gernady and senior Carolyn Belford with a time of 4:12.94. Freshman Gloria Gonzales, Gernandy, freshman Jaelyn Williams and freshman Kailey Adcock finished the 200 free relay with a time of 1:47.80, good enough for a 23rd finish. The team of DiMatteo, Oostman, freshman Julia Martin and senior Fallyn Schwake earned themselves a 19thplace finish with a time of 1:43.02. Oostman also earned herself a topfive spot on Eastern’s all-time list in the 200 individual medley with a time of 2:10.38 which was 25th best at the House of Champions. DiMatteo fin-

ished 18th for the highest individual finish for the Panthers in the 100 fly in a time of 57.78, that moves her into second place on the all-time list for the Panthers. For the men on day one, the team of junior Matt Jacobs, junior Patrick Wood, junior Jennings Soccorso-McCoy and senior Brogan O’Doherty finished the 400 medley relay in 14th with a time of 3:32.53. In the 200 free relay, O’Doherty, Soccorso-McCoy, junior Bryan McPherson and junior Brandon Robbins took home the 14th place, finishing with 1:27.35. On day two of the House of Champions, Jacobs broke his own record in the 100 breast in the preliminary round with a time of 56.65. He ended up in eighth place in the event with a time of 56.81. O’Doherty earned a 13th-place finish in the 100 back with a time of 51.95. O’Doherty, Jacobs, Robbins and Soccorso-McCoy took 13th in the 200 medley relay in 1:36.33. In the 800 free relay, the team of McPherson, sophomore Gerald Stingle, Robbins and sophomore Nick Harkins finished strong with a 7:13.58, which was good enough for a 16th place finish. Oostman finished 13th in the 100 backstroke with a 58.05 time. In the preliminary round, Oostman had a time of 57.53, which was a personal best and good enough for her to get third on the all-time list. On the final day of the House of

SEAN HASTINGS | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Senior Fallyn Schwake competes in the 1,000-yard freestyle against Evansville Friday, Nov. 11, in Padovan Pool.

Champions, the Panthers saw some new names added to the all-time list. Jacobs is now second on the alltime list in the 200 breast with a time of 2:05.19, which was good enough to finish tenth. Gernady finished 23rd in the 200

fly with a time of 2:13.18, which is now tenth all-time. Manderscheid moved into sixth on the Panthers’ list with a time of 2:27.13 in the 200 breast, which earned her a 10th-place finish. The Panthers’ next swim meet will

be Dec. 3 as they take on Saint Louis, Wabash College and Maryville at 1 p.m. at the Padovan Pool in Lantz Arena. Tyler McCluskey can be reached at 581-2812 or trmccluskey@eiu.edu.

5 Panthers earn All-Ohio Valley Conference honors By Maher Kawash Football Reporter | @DEN_Sports The Eastern football team may not have made the postseason, but five Panthers have given the team plenty to cheer about by earning All-OVC honors. Redshirt senior Devin Church and senior Seth McDonald led the way, as they did all season long, by being named to the All-OVC First Team. Redshirt senior Evan Kanz and redshirt junior David Johnson also earned honors on the All-OVC second team, while Johnson and redshirt junior Mitch Kimble were named to the OVC All-Newcomer team. Church led the OVC with 1,066

McDonald Church rushing yards to become the 12th player in school history with a 1,000yard rushing season. His accomplishments went beyond just the conference though, as Church was 13th in the NCAA in rushing following the regular season. His 13 total touchdowns tied for the conference lead as he finished with seven rushing

touchdowns and six touchdown receptions. Church was also the Panthers’ top receiver, finishing with 41 catches for 386 yards. McDonald led Kanz the Panthers with 99 tackles to rank fourth in the OVC while adding 2.5 tackles for loss and one sack. McDonald just missed becoming the first player since Nick Ricks to record back-to-back 100-tackle campaigns. Kanz’s All-OVC second team honor comes after leading a Panther offensive line that ranked third in the OVC

Johnson

in total offense by averaging 404.8 yards per game. Jo h n s o n w a s able to help the Panthers at the beginning of conference play this season as a transfer from South

Carolina. He did so by finishing fifth on the team, with 51 tackles as well as tying the team lead with 12.5 tackles for loss. Kimble dealt with injuries all season long, and that led to many thinking what could have been for Eastern, but he still earned conference honors because of his performance in those lim-

ited games. Kimble finished with 1,414 passing yards and 15 total touchdowns in just seven games on the year, and he also ranked seventh in the conference in Kimble passing yards as well as fifth in touchdown passes. As those Panthers earned honors to cap their seasons, the team finished at 6-5 overall for the program’s secondstraight winning season and fourth in the last five years.

it’s more than paper dailyeasternnews.com

Maher Kawash can be reached at 581-2812 or mwkawash@eiu.edu.


S ports

Sports Editor Sean Hastings 217 • 581 • 2812 DENSportsdesk@gmail.com

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

M O N DAY, N O V E M B E R 28, 2016 N O. 65, V O LU M E 101

8

Win streak on the line against Indiana State By Mark Shanahan Assistant Sports Editor | @DEN_Sports The Eastern women’s basketball team eclipsed its win total from last season with a 74-60 win over IllinoisSpringfield on Saturday afternoon to improve to 4-2. Junior guard Grace Lennox led the Panthers to their second-straight victory with a career high 26 points on Saturday. Lennox was one of four Panthers to finish in double figures against Illinois-Springfield, along with junior Jalisha Smith, freshman Allison Van Dyke and senior Erica Brown. Smith added her second-straight double-double with 15 points and 12 rebounds. Van Dyke continued her impressive freshman season with her first career double-double, scoring 15 points and 12 rebounds. Van Dyke has reached double digits in all of the first six games. Eastern played a big first quarter, outscoring Illinois-Springfield 21-5 behind Lennox, who scored 10 in the first. Illinois-Springfield fought back in the second quarter making the deficit manageable trailing 39-27 at the half. The Panthers would not let up though, as they shot 44 percent from 3-point range in the second half, leading them to another victory. IllinoisSpringfield outrebounded Eastern 4538 in the game, but Eastern was dominant in the paint, outscoring IllinoisSpringfield 30-12. Prior to the Illinois-Springfield game, Eastern traveled to Florida for games against Stetson and Florida A&M. The Panthers were able to split the Florida road trip, as they lost to Stetson 72-55 on Nov. 19, and they defeated Florida A&M 66-50 on Nov. 22. Eastern had Sunday off but is back

SEAN HASTINGS | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Freshman guard Allison Van Dyke attempts to get past two Wright State guards Thursday, Nov. 17, in Lantz Arena. The Panthers lost 71-61.

in Lantz Arena tonight with Indiana State coming to town to wrap up the two-game home stand. Indiana State is 2-3 this season, and they hosted Eastern last season, beating them 60-42. The Sycamores will be playing their fourth game of a five-game road trip that has not been very kind to them. They split the first two games and are now on a two-game losing streak

after blowout losses to Missouri and Nebraska-Omaha. Indiana State has done well on the defensive end, averaging 4.8 blocks per game. McKenzy Telfair leads the team with four blocks this season, followed by teammate Rhagen Smith, who has three. On the offensive side, forward Wendi Bibbins has almost averaged a double-double in each game this season. Bibbins is averaging 8.2 re-

bounds and 8.6 points per game. She has also been efficient with the shots she takes shooting 48.6 percent from the field. The Panthers counter Indiana State with a balanced offense that has four players averaging at least 11 points a game. Van Dyke leads all Eastern scorers with 12.8 points per game, followed by Lennox, who averages 12 per game after her big performance

on Saturday. Smith and Brown are among the Panther top scorers but have been the team’s leading rebounders as well. Brown averages 8 rebounds per game, while Smith averages 7.3. The game is set to tip off at 6 p.m. tonight at Lantz Arena. Mark Shanahan can be reached at 581-2812 or mmshanahan@eiu.edu.

Eastern men’s basketball team wins 3 straight By Sean Hastings Sports Editor | @DEN_Sports School life may have shut down for a majority of campus, but the men’s basketball team was still full go, and it has got the Panthers back to their winning ways. After a blowout win to start the season against St. Francis, the Panthers dropped back-to-back close games with Troy and Saint Louis, but they were able to get revenge on Troy one week later in Lantz Arena. The three wins Eastern earned this past week were all at home, keeping them a perfect 4-0 in Lantz Arena — 5-0 including an exhibition matchup with Eureka College. Eastern’s losses had one thing in common: the Panthers were alive for only one half in each game. Eastern dominated for 20 minutes each game, but the struggles in the other 20 minutes of each game were too much for the Panthers to recover from. The Panthers scored 71, 72 and 73 points in each game, with each half almost identical. Eastern started its win streak with a 73-64 win over Western, which was followed by a 7167 win over Troy and a 72-62 win over South Alabama. It is not like Eastern’s offense exploded in any of the games, but it was able to stay consistent enough to win the game. Guard Demetrius McReynolds is the only senior on the team this year and is one of its leaders. McReynolds

went off against Western, scoring a season-high 21 points and grabbing 7 rebounds. Just one week removed from a close loss to Troy, McReynolds made sure Eastern would not suffer a close loss on its home floor, and he scored 19 points to propel Eastern to its 7167 win. And with the 16-point, 6-assist performance from junior guard Montell Goodwin, the Panthers got back to their winning record. Eastern and Troy were tied at 67 with 1:08 left in the game, but Goodwin hit two clutch free throws with 15 seconds remaining. Troy’s Kevin Baker could not connect on a 3-point attempt, and the Panthers grabbed the rebound. An intentional foul by Devon Walker put junior guard Cornell Johnston at the line. Johnston hit both free throws to seal the victory. South Alabama was 5-0 before taking on the Panthers, and with another strong performance from Goodwin, Eastern handed the Jaguars their first loss. Goodwin scored 14 points and had two assists. The Panthers had a three-point lead at halftime, and a matching 36-point second half and strong defense kept pushing the Jaguars away. Eastern had a five-point lead with just over five minutes left in the game but turned that into a 13-point lead with 3:01 left in the game. A big difference in the game was Eastern shooting 45 percent from be-

SEAN HASTINGS | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Freshman guard Logan Koch puts pressure on a St. Francis opponent during the Panthers' 83-41 win Friday, Nov. 11 in Lantz Arena.

yond the arc. Eastern hit 9 out of 20 3-point tries. Goodwin was 3-5 on 3-pointers. The Panthers’ home stand will continue Tuesday with a match up against Bradley before going on a four-game road trip including trips

to Illinois-Chicago Sunday, Northern Kentucky Dec. 7, Western Dec. 10 and Missouri Dec. 17. Once the Panthers wrap up their road trip, they will face Fontbonne University before taking on Indiana State to finish off non-conference

play. Eastern opens up its Ohio Valley Conference schedule with Jacksonville State in Lantz Arena. Sean Hastings can be reached at 581-2812 or smhastings@eiu.edu.

2016.11.28  
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