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EASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY CHARLESTON, ILL. D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M T WIT TER.COM/DENNE WS

Trailblazing professor remembered by peers

Football humiliated before 9,000 fans

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CONCERT

Chicago rocks family, students By Samantha McDaniel Activities Editor

Changing lights, rock music, cheers and clapping could be seen and heard Saturday in Lantz Arena. The band Chicago entertained an estimated 3,500 to 4,000 audience members for two concerts using drums, guitars, trombones, saxophones, keyboards, trumpets and flutes. Audience members danced, swayed and held lit-up cell phones or lighters. Chicago is made up of nine members including four founding members: Robert Lamm, keyboards; Lee Loughnane, trumpet; James Pankow, trombone; and Walt Parazaider, saxophone and flute. The other members include Jason Scheff, bass guitar; Keith Howland, guitar; Tris Imboden, drums; Drew Hester, percussion; and Lou Pardini, keyboards. Ceci Brinker, the director of Student Life, said she thought the concerts went well. “Chicago delivered as promised— a great, great show as evident by the many Eastern parents and friends singing along and dancing in the aisle,” Brinker said. Brinker said the highlight of the show for her is just having Chicago as the Family Weekend performance. Brinker said she believes the stu-

KIMBERLY FOSTER | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Walt Parazaider, a founding member of the band Chicago, plays saxophone Saturday during the first of two show put on by the band in Lantz Arena as part of Family Weekend. Parazaider also plays flute and woodwinds for the band.

dents and parents enjoyed the opportunity to have fun together. Pam Ellsworth, an Eastern parent, said she thinks Chicago still had good energy and enjoyed the performance. “My favorite part is when I saw

Mr. Perry had his little arm around his wife and was swaying,” Ellsworth said. “It was such a tender moment.” Kim Ozark, an Eastern parent, said the band has changed a little since she saw them when they were young, but

thought they were still fantastic. “This was the best EIU concert I’ve been to and I’ve been to five,” Ozark said. Kaycee Spinner, a senior family and consumer sciences major, said she

RENE WABLE ENERGY CENTER

MAGICIAN

By Elizabeth Edwards News Editor

By Uriah Berryhill Staff Reporter

Eastern is now the only university in the country that can fuel its entire campus off renewable energy. During the grand opening of the Eastern’s new Renewable Energy Center, lines upon lines of interested students, faculty members and community members stood outside of the new building to take a tour Friday. Ryan Segal, the campus energy and sustainability coordinator, who presided over the tours, said the energy center will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent. The center will use 27,000 tons of wood chips a year to fuel the biomass gasification process, he said. The energy center, located at 2100 18th St., will be open 24 hours a day and 365 days a year, Segal said. The new plant has replaced Eastern’s steam plant facility, which was located on Seventh St. Honeywell Building Solutions built the energy center for $55 million, he said. The contract with company guarantees that within 20 years the savings received from the center will pay for the costs, he said. The renewable energy center was built without increasing city taxes or student tuition rates. The projected life span of the facility will be about 30 years, he said. During the grand opening ceremony, Donald Kathan, the area director of the U.S Department of Commerce, Economic Development Administration, said Eastern’s renewable energy center is truly a success story on many different levels. The center is the largest biomass renewable energy project in the country and will significantly reduce Eastern’s annual electricity consumption, Kathan said. “It highlights a successful partnership between an university and a private company,” Kathan said.

Illusions, levitations, voodoo and magic entertained Eastern parents, students and faculty as a event part of Family Weekend. The University Board had Mike Super, winner from the NBC reality show “Phenomenon,” on campus Friday. Some of Super’s tricks included levitating a girl from the audience, making a bowling ball appear from a picture on a piece of paper and controlling a parent from the audience. Super did a premonition trick where he guessed what three audience members would say to three different questions that he had asked. “Doing magic is not amazing to me, but amazing others is what makes me love my job,” Super said. Super said he loves performing on college campuses for Family Weekends because he can relate to the college student and their parents by using comedy that they can relate to. During the performance, Super made snow that floated around the stage. He said that this trick honors his mother because as a child he promised her that he would always try to make snow. Super said his favorite trick is

was surprised by how many songs she knew and she enjoyed the concert. “I got to spend it with my family,” Spinner said. “It was like a blast from the past for them.” Martha Ritter, who met the band through the meet-and-greet, said she saw the band almost 36 years ago and thinks that they still sound the same as they did back then. Deb Gory, an Eastern parent, said she was surprised by the energy the members had. “They exceeded my expectations,” Gory said. “I had no clue they would be that good after so long. I was surprised they are in such great shape.” Another parent, Dick Cole, said this is the second time he saw Chicago perform. The first thime was in 1968 when they were opening for Jimi Hendrix. Brinker said she felt the concert went well and served the purpose of bringing families together. “A Family Weekend concert is just a special time at EIU, and seeing EIU parents and students singing along, dancing and having a good time at a Family Weekend concert event says it all,” Brinker said. “You cannot put a price on that!” Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu.

Parents, students Energy Center running, drawing national attention dazzled by magician

ENERGY, page 5

DANNY DAMIANI | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

A crowd gathers to watch the truck tipper operate after the grand opening of the Renewable Energy Center Friday. The tipper gets the truck to 63 degrees allowing the truck load of biomass fuel to get into the hopper.

making a paper ball levitate and crawl up and down his arm. He said he has sometimes used it in tricks at taverns near the college campuses he visits. He said he has had a trick fail on stage and he prepares for these mistakes by having an alternative trick that the audience is always oblivious to. Super said he loved the audience members and audience members loved him. Rick Laymen, an Eastern parent and audience member, said he thought the show was put together well and was very interesting. Super said he was born and raised in Pittsburgh, and began performing magic when he was 6 years old. He said he gained an interest in magic and illusions when he went to Disney World and watched a magic show for the first time. Super said his all-time famous trick is the Voodoo trick. This trick made him a winner on the NBC show, “Phenomenon.” Michael Mellot, an Eastern parent, participated in Super’s famous Voodoo doll trick. Mellot said he was entertained, surprised and believed the trick would work. MAGICIAN, page 5


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Editorial Board Editor in Chief.....................................................................................Alex McNamee DENeic@gmail.com Managing Editor.......................................................................... Shelley Holmgren DENmanaging@gmail.com News Editor....................................................................................Elizabeth Edwards DENnewsdesk@gmail.com Associate News Editor................................................................. Samantha Bilharz DENnewsdesk@gmail.com Opinions Editor........................................................................................Dave Balson DENopinions@gmail.com Online Editor.......................................................................................Chris O'Driscoll DENnews.com@gmail.com News Staff Activities Editor................................................................................... Sam McDaniel Administration Editor...................................................................... Rachel Rodgers Campus Editor............................................................................. Nike Ogunbodede City Editor..........................................................................................................Sara Hall Photo Editor..................................................................................................Kim Foster Sports Editor....................................................................................Dominic Renzetti Verge Editor........................................................................................ Seth Schroeder Assistant Photo Editor...................................................................... Karolina Strack Assistant Online Editor.......................................................................Marcus Smith Advertising Staff Advertising Manager.............................................................. AnnaMarie Sprague Promotions Manager...........................................................................Allison Twaits Ad Design Manager.........................................................................Shannon Ready Faculty Advisers Editorial Adviser................................................................................... Lola Burnham Photo Adviser.......................................................................................... Brian Poulter DENNews.com Adviser........................................................................Bryan Murley Publisher........................................................................................................ John Ryan Business Manager....................................................................................Betsy Jewell Press Supervisor......................................................................................Tom Roberts Production Staff Night Chief...........................................................................................Alex McNamee Lead Designer/Online Production.............................................Doug T. Graham Copy Editors/Designers/Online Production................................... Sarah Bigler About The Daily Eastern News is produced by the students of Eastern Illinois University. It is published daily Monday through Friday, in Charleston, Ill., during fall and spring semesters and twice weekly during the summer term except during university vacations or examinations. One copy per day is free to students and faculty. Additional copies can be obtained for 50 cents each in the Student Publications Office in Buzzard Hall. The Daily Eastern News is a member of The Associated Press, which is entitled to exclusive use of all articles appearing in this publication. Comments / Tips Contact any of the above staff members if you believe your information is relevant. Corrections The Daily Eastern News is committed to accuracy in its coverage of the news. Any factual error the staff finds, or is made aware of by its readers, will be corrected as promptly as possible. Please report any factual error you find by e-mail, phone, campus mail or in person.

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Abby Jacob and her father Phillip Jacob take part in a game during Billy's Backyard before Eastern's football game against Eastern Kentucky University Saturday.

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Ancient Egyptians' effect on religion to be discussed By Samantha McDaniel Activities Editor

Students can learn about the religion, landscape and documentation of ancient Egypt today. The Lumpkin School of Business, the School of Technology and Booth Library are having three presentations as a part of “A Futuristic Look Through Ancient Lenses: A Symposium on Ancient Egypt” series. Andrew Robinson, a professor of communication studies, and Ryan McDaniel, a professor of communication studies, will be presenting “A Biblical Perspective of the Ancient Egyptian Religions” at 11 a.m. in the conference room of the Booth Library today. John Paul Stimac, the dean of the Honors College, will be pre-

senting the “Physical Landscapes of Ancient Egypt” at 1 p.m. in the conference room of Booth library today. Allen Lanham, the dean of library services for Booth Library, will be presenting “Make No Mistake: Documenting Life Since the Ancient Egyptians” at 2 p.m. in the Conference Room of the Booth Library. The first presentation by Robinson and McDaniel will focus on the religious perspective of ancient Egypt. “It has many centuries of religious development after the romanticized epoch of the Pharaohs,” McDaniel said. “Egypt saw the development of much of what is most beautiful in what came to be the Christian Tradition.” Robinson said the religious de-

velopment of Egypt has affected religion today. “Since over 80 percent of our nation considers themselves of the Christian faith, it would be significant for them to realize how much that Ancient Egyptian culture has influenced and been a part of their faith,” Robinson said. McDaniel said the development in Egypt affected the development of the Christian religion of today. McDaniel said that by understanding the religious developments of ancient Egypt, students can understand Christianity and Western Civilization. While another presentation, “Physical Landscapes of Ancient Egypt,” will be about how the people of early Egypt spread out based on the climate and geology of the time and how it affected the rise

and fall of the pharaohs. The third presentation, “Make No Mistake: Documenting Life Since the Ancient Egyptians,” will highlight the way people have left their mark on history by using words, pictures and technological advancements. McDaniel said students can learn a lot through the presentations. “Most students will not have heard anything about this rich history and tradition in any context,” McDaniel said. Samantha McDaniel can be reached at 581-2812 or slmcdaniel@eiu.edu

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Pride to celebrate important day By Nike Ogunbodede Campus Editor

FILE PHOTO | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Trailblazing professor remembered by peers By Rachel Rodgers Administration Editor

The first African-American female to serve as a spokesperson in the White House, who taught at Eastern for 10 years, died on Sept. 26. Annette Samuels, 76, served as a spokeswoman during President Jimmy Carter’s administration, and she was the first fashion editor for Essence Magazine. She also served as press secretary for Marion Barry, the former mayor of Washington, D.C. Samuels taught at Eastern from 1996 to 2006. Some of the courses she taught included Journalism and Democracy, Public Relations in Society, Minorities and the Media and Women in the Media. James Tidwell, the chair of the journalism department, said Samuels’ students enjoyed having a professor with many practical experiences in politics, public relations, magazines and more. “Students admired her, and when she spoke, they listened because of her real life experience,” Tidwell said. “She knew what she was talking about because she lived it.” Leslie Hyder, a professor of journalism, said he found Samuels to be articulate in expressing her opin-

ions, thoughts and perceptions while also being sensitive to the concerns of others. “Annette was a fountain of knowledge and wisdom from many years of work in the field of journalism and political oppositions,” Hyder said. “Her knowledge of the political process was unequaled, and she continued to follow politics until the end of her life.” Tidwell said it was great to the listen to stories she would tell about the famous people she knew and interacted with. She brought a lot of additional discussion and experience to not only the classroom but to university events such as panel discussions, Tidwell said. “Anytime you wanted to talk politics and have some insight, she was the person to go to,” Tidwell said. “She was able to add a layer of expertise to the discourse on politics and civil rights.” Tidwell said Samuels had unique experiences facing media scrutiny with having to explain certain situations to the world like the Iran Hostage Crisis of 1979 and the Marion Barry’s scandal in 1990 when he was caught on video smoking crack cocaine. Hyder said Samuels was always tolerant and understanding. “Her personality always reflected her

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Rachel Rodgers can be reached at 581-2812 or rjrodgers@eiu.edu.

Homecoming elections now available online Staff Report

Students, faculty and staff have the opportunity to vote for Homecoming Court online today and Tuesday. The online voting is available at www.eiu.edu/homecoming/login.php. The voting categories include Homecoming King, Queen, Prince and Princess. The student body and faculty votes count as 30 percent of a Homecoming candidate’s overall score. If there is a tie, there will be an additional round of voting between the candidates.

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J.A.C. opens doors to all Rockin’ out for a reason A square beyond compare Cafe begins live LocAL bAnds pLAy to rAisE monEy for rELAy for LifE

music event every Saturday evening

By Brad York Verge Editor

Jackson Avenue Coffee (J.A.C.) is a location to go blowoff steam, study for hours on end and socialize as the creamy fragrance of lattes, cappuccinos and hot chocolates stream though the air. J.A.C., located at 708 Jackson Ave., may sound like an unusual place for a concert setting, but Dan Reible believes it is the perfect location for live music that has not been offered to Charleston in some time. “In the Charleston area there is no place to relax and listen to music except for a bar,” Reible said. “I’d like a place where people can come relax, have a cup of coffee, sandwich, bagel and take it easy and listen to some good acoustic music.” Reible and his wife Vicki are currently shuffling through papers in order to become the rightful owners of J.A.C.

Reible moved to Mattoon in 1984 after serving in the Navy and soon became a truck driver, traveling the nation with his wife. Reible has played for various bands in the past and mentioned to his friend, Ryan Dawson and the current owner of J.A.C., he was looking for a place to host weekly concerts on Saturday evenings. Dawson then asked Reible if he ever pictured himself owning a café. Reible expressed an interest, and soon, Dawson offered to sell the business. Dawson said the Reibles’ have been his customers since J.A.C. opened nearly eight years ago. “I planned on going back to school this summer to complete a degree in teacher’s certification,” Dawson said. “We were ready to move on to new things. I figured it is best not to run anything into the ground, so I offered to sell the place.” Dawson has high hopes for

By Colleen Kitka Assistant Verge Editor

BRAD YORk | ON THE VERGE

Dan Reible , owner of the Jacksno Avenue Coffee enjoys sunse viewing the humbling setting from his newly titled “retirement bench” at the J.A.C.

the future of J.A.C. and feels as as though hosting live musicians every Saturday night is only the beginning of the growth J.A.C. will see. The first Saturday night performer will be “Reverend” Robert Reynolds Saturday from 8 to 10 p.m. at J.A.C.

pHOTO COURTESY Of REVROBERT.COM

“Reverend” Robert Reynolds plays his guitar; He will play acoustic at 8 p.m. on Saturday at Jackson Avenue Coffee.

None of the performances will come with a cover cost, but instead a hat will be passed around around for donations, which go entirely to the artist. Robert Reynolds is a musician who plays blues music from the ‘20s, ‘30s and ’40s, and is glad Reible is opening his doors to local musicians. Reynolds said he has known Reible for a while because they have been playing music together through the years. “It is good to play one close to home. This is more intimate than the festivals and blues bars I’ve been playing at lately,” Reynolds said. “I play electric when I’m with my band, but this show will be all acoustic.” The intimate setting offers a place for begging and practiced musicians alike. Reible wants to show people in Charleston music they may not have heard before. He plans to host various artists from various genres each weekend. “I’ve got things booked all the way through the end of June,” Reible said. “It’s mostly people I have heard in the area and a lot of local musicians. We are open

to all different styles. It doesn’t matter if I personally like it or not. It’s whatever I think our customers will like.” Reible said his customers are an eclectic group, and notices that he has a lot of high schoolers come there every evening. He said parents know it is a safe place. Reible said he is open to any style of music and musicians who are interested in performing the Saturday night events should come out to J.A.C. Open Mic Night every Thursday. These open mic sessions are used as auditions of sorts for the diverse music Reible hopes to incorporate with the Saturday night performances. In addition to the open mic night artists, Reible searches the Web and various local music hot spots in order to find performers. “I’m hoping to get a lot of music in here that people haven’t experienced before,” Reible said. “People may have heard blues, but it probably isn’t the old delta blues that (Reverend Robert) will be playing.” Brad York can be reached at 581-7942 or at bayork@eiu.edu.

The 7th Street Underground will turn into a concert venue tonight at 5:30 as the Colleges Against Cancer group hosts its second Rock it for Relay concert. The benefit concert will feature the three local bands Good Morning Midnight, Cured by Fire and Madison’s Avenue, and one solo musician, Jenna Jackley. Tickets are $5 at the door and can be purchased starting at 5 p.m. All proceeds go to the Colleges Against Cancer’s Relay for Life team, and will ultimately be given to the American Cancer Society. Kyle Swalls, guitarist and vocalist for Good Morning Midnight, has witnessed the devastation of cancer first hand. Swalls said his grandma is fighting against cancer. “It’s a constant struggle dealing with it,” Swalls said. “A lot of time the chemo won’t be as effective, and they will try a new method and stuff. And so just knowing the constant struggle makes me want to do something like this and raise money for an individual who is having the same, who is dealing with the same kind of suffering.” This band along with Cured by Fire is playing at Friends & Co. later in the evening. They were willing to book two gigs in one night to show their support. “We feel that playing this gig will allow people to see that rock and roll and the whole style of it isn’t just about being on your own and not really caring about anyone else,” Logan Richardson, Madison’s Av-

Square Fest provides stage for new music, new bands and new surroundings By Brad york Verge Editor

pHOtO COURtESy Of GOOD MORNING MIDNIGHt

Good Morning Midnight band members Elgin Combs (guitarist), Michael “Woody” Woodring (drummer), Kyle Swalls (vocalist and guitarist) and Chad Barton (bass guitarist and vocalist) volunteered to play tonight at the Rock it for Relay event to help raise money for the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life.

enue lead singer, said. “We really do care about the issue of breast cancer and cancer in general,” Richardson continued. “Because some people

pHOtO COURtESy Of JENNA JACKLEy

Jenna Jackley is a Mattoon High School student and will be playing at the 7th Street Underground tonight at 5:30 p.m.

close to us have had it and, luckily, they have recovered from it.” Many of the bands playing are new to Eastern’s campus. Richardson said performing at the concert would be an opportunity to expose students to a different kind of local music. Good Morning Midnight is an indie and alternative rock band. Beginning nearly a year ago and stationed in Marshall, the group is fresh to the Charleston music scene, but has played in the 7th Street Underground before for a canned food drive. Cured by Fire is a Charleston metal band. Megan Givens, the concert coordinator said the group sounds similar to Metallica or Godsmack and does a good job of getting a crowd going. Their influences come from those bands and others like Guns N’ Roses, Motley Crue and Black Sabbath. Jenna Jackley is a Mattoon High School student who plays the guitar and sings. “She is just memorizing to watch,” Megan Givens said. “She is in high school, so she is still very young, but the caliber of voice she has is just amazing.”

Madison’s Avenue is another young alternative rock band from Charleston that has been putting out their own music for eight months. The group has played all over Charleston, in Havana and in Centralia, but tonight will be one of their first times playing on campus. Givens, a junior elementary education major, said all the bands are hard working and were booked because they came recommended by other artists. The Colleges Against Cancer has raised more than $5,000 through their fall breast cancer T-shirt sales and other fundraisers. They have pledged to raise $8,000, and across campus different groups have pledged to raise $70,000 for the American Cancer Society. Last year, the concert drew a small crowd, but Givens is hoping for more public support. “What ever little amount can put towards the American Cancer Society will help in some way,” Givens said. Colleen Kitka can be reached at 581-7942 or crkitka@eiu.edu.

Spring is a season that brings a refreshing smell into the air as the trees begin to bud and the winter chills become dormant. It is a time for new life to see the wonders of Charleston. With new life comes new ambitions. New ambitions mean new music, and for Charleston that means new events. A fresh take on the Charleston festival scene is exactly what Scott Chaplinski has been planning for nearly a year with the event Square Fest. “I started thinking in February that it was about time to get it going with everything going on with Celebration, Woodchuck Music Festival, there’s finals, there’s Easter. I realized it was crunch time to get it going,” Chaplinski said. Square Fest will begin at 2 p.m. Saturday through 1 a.m. Sunday. The event will take place on Charleston’s square at the bars Mother’s, Friends & Co., Mac’s Uptowner and Top of the Roc. The event will cost $12 and allow patrons 21 and over admittance into any of the bars and performances. Chaplinski said getting the bars involved was the first part of organizing the event, and after he explained the potential benefits they jumped on board. “I kind of just threw it out there,” Chaplinski said. “They’ve given me good ideas, and they appreciate the ideas that I have. They’ve been very helpful with everything I’ve been doing.” Chaplinski has been wanting to get the bars involved with a festival event for more than year and said he feels that now was the best time to bring it all together. “We are hoping it brings a lot of business to the square,” Chaplinski said. “We hope it is going to be a nicer day. It’s a good window of a month and a half of good weather to show all these people,

‘Hey there are all these other great bars in town, and not just the ones near Lincoln (Avenue.).” Many of the featured acts will be Charleston based groups such as Mugwump Specific, Andy Van Slyke and Staff Blues Band while others such as DJ Illith, Poundcake and Ryan Arnold stem from locations throughout the state. “I figure this was a great networking opportunity for a lot of bands,” Chaplinski said. “We are pulling in bands from the Kankakee area, and some musicians from Champaign area. It’s bands that I like, and I know that other people (like).” Chaplinski said most of them are younger bands that have only been playing for a year or two and that many times a band that has been playing for four to five years need a guarantee that they are getting paid. “Having never done anything like this before I didn’t want to make promises to a bunch of people that I can’t fulfill.” Chaplinski said. In fact, much of the money for producing the event was saved up by Chaplinski himself. He hopes that the $12 cover is enough to give some of the traveling bands money to cover their gas costs and without being too high to deter college students and community members from coming out. One local musician, Mitch Davis, a senior management information systems major, saod he plans on showing the crowd some new tunes to commemorate the new event. “I mainly like to get people dancing, but I also play some more chill stuff,” Davis said. “I don’t want people to get burnt out, so I’ll make new songs before the shows. New shows get me motivated to make new songs. (Square Fest) is going to be so new. There’s going to be so many different people playing at so many different bars. I don’t really know what to

BRAD yORk | ON tHE VERGE

Mitch Davis, a senior management information systems major, rehearses new songs and freshens up on older material Wednesday evening in his home as he prepares for today’s Square Fest event.

expect. That’s why I am expecting to play in front of a totally new crowd, so I really got to try to pump people up.” With a wide variety of performances including blues, rock, jam band, electronic and rap everyone is beginning to develop expectations for the new event and Chaplinski is no different. “I want to be able to be out on the square, outside the bars and see people

Nike Ogunbodede can be reached at 581-2812 or ovogunbodede@eiu.edu.

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calm nature,” Hyder said. “I never saw her upset or angry, and she just rode with the punches.” Samuels earned her master’s degree in public administration from Harvard University in 1989. “She was also the first to recognize the potential of certain political stars like Barack Obama and Rahm Emanuel,” Hyder said. “In many ways, she was one of the people who influenced them.” Tidwell said Samuels was a pioneer on both a race and a gender standpoint. “She was a trailblazer in many ways being a black woman in the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s,” Tidwell said. “She was such a dynamic person and had so much knowledge and unbelievable experiences.” Samuels spent two years as the executive director of the Commission for Women in Washington, D.C., and was also named a Woman of Achievement by the Women’s Studies Program at Eastern. “She enriched and enhanced the faculty in all ways that we are good,” Hyder said. “It was our great fortune of having her among us, and we miss her.”

Armed with a microphone, two speakers and an emcee, members of EIU Pride will help members of the Eastern community who are keeping secrets about their sexuality, or just secrets in general, on Tuesday. Oct. 11 is recognized as National Coming Out Day in the Lesbian Gay Bisexual and Transgender community. To celebrate, EIU Pride will have a microphone from noon to 3 p.m. in the Library Quad. Pride President Nico Canaday said the day is not just about coming out for the LGBT community, but the group also wants others to be able to share secrets not necessarily pertaining to their sexuality. “It isn’t just for the LGBT community—it’s more about spreading educational awareness across campus,” Canaday said. “We encourage all students to come up and be empowered.” It is usually a pretty light-hearted event to address a pretty serious issue, he said. “We don’t want people to be afraid of who they are,” Canaday said. Coming out is a very important moment in a person’s life and it should be done when the person feels safe, he said. This is the fifth year EIU Pride has done a coming out day, he said.

“People come and go all day and 50 people come and share on average,” Canaday said. While EIU Pride is expecting people to come out and share, it also has respect for those that choose not to do so during the provided time, he said. “We don’t think it is bad for people to not come out but if they do want to come out then we are giving them a pretty cool opportunity,” Canaday said. “That is their choice.” Sexually is not only a personal issue it can also be a political statement as well, Canaday said. Eastern has been particularly helpful to its LGBT members, he said. “Eastern has been very supportive— lots of places might feel uncomfortable giving a whole bunch of gays a microphone,” Canaday said. Canaday said the great thing about college is that organizations are able to do a lot with educating people about homosexuality. “It encourages a more engaged environment—a better place to be gay and talk about LGBT issues,” he said. EIU Pride meets at 8 p.m. every Monday in the Charleston-Mattoon Room of the Martin Luther King Jr. University Union.

having a good time,” Chaplinski said. “I want to hear, sort of over-hear, what they did like and what they didn’t like. I just think there will be a lot of good vibes coming. Perfect conditions for me, is hearing that people had a great time.” Brad York can be reached at 581-7942 or bayork@eiu.edu.

eastern’s arts & entertainment magazine

The candidates are required to participate in an interview, which makes up 60 percent of a candidate’s score. The interview team consists of faculty and staff members. The remaining 10 percent of a candidate’s overall score is received after completing the Homecoming Candidate Application. Students, faculty and staff also have the opportunity to vote for Faculty Homecoming King and Queen. The winners will be announced at 7 p.m. on Oct. 17 at the “Royal Blue” coronation in the McAfee Gymnasium.


O pinions

Opinions Editor Dave Balson 217 • 581 • 2812 DENopinions@gmail.com

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

M O N DAY, O C TO B E R 10, 2011 N O. 129, V O LU M E 96

STAFF EDITORIAL

COLUMN

Student Senate members unanimously approved a resolution in favor of incorporating electronic billboards at their meeting Wednesday, based on results from a Facebook survey. As we reported in an article on Oct. 6, only 121 students responded to the survey. The main purpose of Eastern’s Student Senate is to represent the opinion of the student body. The last time we checked, 121 students are barely 2 percent of the student body population. According to an Oct. 5 article in The Daily Eastern News, a student senate member presented the idea of supporting the installation of electronic billboards to the city council. She reported that 80 percent of the students who responded to the survey were in favor of the electronic billboards. What we are asking is: how is this survey a valid representation of the opinion of Eastern student body? There are 30 student senate members, and each one is meant to represent about 350 students. The number of students surveyed is not even enough to fill the representation of one senator. The survey was available to students via the Facebook statuses of student government members. This means that students would have had to be Facebook friends with student government members to see their statuses on their news feed and be able to click on a link that would take them to the survey. A student senate member said he thought 121 students was not an accurate representation of the student body, but what is troubling is the resolution was unanimously approved. we are glad this concer was raised, but not one student senate member voted against the resolution. Decisions that directly affect the student body as a whole, like installing electronic billboards, should not be made off of the input of a sample that reflects less than 2 percent of total students. According to the student government mission statement, “Student Government members shall maintain a progressive state of mind in order to respect the student body in regards to their positions. Student Government will protect the rights and interests of the students while also enhancing the quality of the EIU experience through the power that is vested in them by Eastern Illinois University.” We think approving this resolution based on the feedback of 121 students is disrespectful to the student body and should not have been voted on until the opinion of more students was gathered. It’s bad enough that Student Senate thinks a Facebook poll of 121 students is as comprehensive a survey as their constituents deserve. Thinking a self-selective poll of 121 Facebook friends is good enough is lazy. But to present that poll to city council as a meaningful measure of student support is manipulative. Be honest to your constituents and be honest about them. Going to city council with a plan that affects students is one of the most important things Student Senate does. To misrepresent student support is a dereliction of duty at best and, frankly, dishonest.

A little background on the race thus far: Elizabeh Warren, despite being a Harvard Law School graduate and professor, has been difficult to pin as the elitist snob that Scott Brown would like to rally against, casting himself as a graduate of “the school of hard knocks” (which is apparently comprised of two top private universities, because Brown went to Tufts and Boston College Law School). Warren, who served in the Obama administration as chair of the Congressional Oversight Panel for the TARP bailouts, is gaining momentum in the political sphere and the polls reflect this, putting Warren within five points of the incumbent Brown without even being officially chosen as the Democratic candidate. She previously designed an agency dedicated to the sole purpose of consumer information and protection, which was promptly quashed by congressional conservatives. In the wake of the Occupy Wall Street protests, it’s not surprising that voters are getting excited about someone with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on her resume. Elizabeth Warren and her smart, populist agenda are looking good to knock Brown out of his senate seat. Brown, named “Wall Street’s favorite sena-

4

Student Senate Senate race illustrates the duping of a nation The Massachusetts senate race illustrates on a It’s not news that politicians take jabs at each scale how those in power can draw attenother during debates, nor that those jabs tend uses bad poll to small tion away from important issues through opto be petty and have to do with their oppopressive tactics, and how instrumental the menent’s past or personal lives. What is newsworjustify position dia has become in this type of suppression. thy is that Brown’s direct insult was intended to

The DAILY EASTERN NEWS

“Tell the truth and don’t be afraid.”

EDITORIAL BOARD Editor in Chief Alex McNamee

News Editor Elizabeth Edwards

Managing Editor Associate News Editor Shelley Holmgren Samantha Bilharz Online Editor Chris O’Driscoll

Opinions Editor Dave Balson

The daily editorial is the majority opinion of the editorial board of The Daily Eastern News.

Mia Tapella tor,” by Forbes magazine, is a perfect example of the duality of the Republican Party. If you’ve been wondering how long the GOP was going to be able to pull off this balancing act of pretending to represent “Joe Six-Pack” while supporting the interests of the very corporations who regularly disband Joe’s hard-won union rights and ship his job overseas, I think we’ve reached the tipping point. Unfortunately, a simple search of “Elizabeth Warren” won’t immediately yield information of her brilliant record, but an abhorrently stupid interaction between her and Brown in which Brown mocks her physical appearance. The conflict arose when the candidates were questioned about how they had paid for college. Brown, as is no secret, was pictured nude in a 1982 publication of Cosmopolitan magazine. Warren, after positing that she had “kept her clothes on” and paid for her college tuition with student loans and a succession of parttime jobs, was met with a keenly intelligent “Thank God” from the senator.

reduce Warren based on a limitation he applied to her gender: that a woman’s value is equated with physical attractiveness. Before you rush to attack Warren’s comment, consider the huge, glaringly obvious fact that no woman, from either party, for any race, in any state would have a shot in hell after posing nude in anything, much less win a senate seat. The Republican Party is famous for taking attention from important issues by shifting focus to less complex social issues. Instead of having an honest debate about the economy, in which their real values and motives would undoubtedly become clear, Republicans frequently opt to stay with topics like “gays are destroying the military,” because they are able to use bias to manipulate a largely uneducated voting base. The problem is obvious: when parties bank elections on misrepresentation and the unbiased media has all but totally disappeared, what chance does an uneducated voter with limited resources have of intelligent, thoughtful participation? Mia Tapella is a senior English and political science major. She can be reached at 581-7942 or DENopinions@gmail.com.

FROM THE EASEL

DAVE BALSON | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

LET TERS TO THE EDITOR

College about learning, not dating and flirting

Basic skills test cannot show teacher’s value

In response to the Oct. 5 staff editorial, “You’re in college; go out and date, the Web can wait,” I can’t believe that my fellow students, who uphold academics, would encourage students to “get out of [the] dorm room and become a part of the college experience.” If college life is to “flirt for fun or date for love,” then I believe that I’ve looked at Eastern the wrong way. I do concede that it is human nature to crave interaction with other people, and I am certainly not against getting involved on campus. However, the major objection I have is the idea that dating is a core part of college life. It is not. Why would we (or, rather, our parents) pay for a degree and then skive off and socialize? To be frank, there are much cheaper ways of doing that. Plus, dating in college does nothing for the first serious job search. Education should be why we students are here at Eastern! Another objection I have to the rhetoric of this editorial is that there is no concession to those people who are love-shy like myself. Love-shy people have trouble even attempting to socialize, especially with the opposite sex. Was there any vote of confidence for those people? No! That part of the readership was marginalized through your hopefully accidental omission. We’re here to graduate with a degree, not to socialize. If you’re going to socialize, go elsewhere and leave us scholars alone. Thank you,

How does a test much like the ACT make a good teacher? There are many wonderful test takers in the world, but that doesn’t mean they can teach. A person can know everything in the universe, but the true question is whether that individual can teach a class of 25 first graders. The basic skills test is an insult to teachers and future teachers. Salary shouldn’t be increased to bribe future teachers, because in the end those educators will fail at teaching. The pay should be increased because true, devoted teachers deserve an increase in this hard economy. Many educators today spend their money in a classroom instead of on themselves. A student isn’t just some little child that needs guidance; instead, teachers make a vow and that child is part of a family. A teacher wears many hats, the best are educators and care givers. Eastern is one of the best schools for becoming a teacher. I know this not because of some statistic, but my family all have attended Eastern and today they are wonderful educators. The basic skills test does get in the way of my dream because it’s not that I can’t succeed, but it’s harder. Before any article is written about education, take a look into classroom and see what they’re learning. Many kindergartners no longer have nap time, but have to write paragraphs and count to not 100 but 1,000. In key, a test doesn’t make the teacher, only that individual can do that because it’s located in his or her heart.

Michael Skasick Freshman - English major

Melissa Kubas Elementary education and special education major

Letters to the editor can be submitted at any time on any topic to the Opinions Editor to be published in The Daily Eastern News. The DEN’s policy is to run all letters that are not libelous or potentially harmful. They must be less than 250 words.

Letters to the editor can be brought in with identification to The DEN at 1811 Buzzard Hall. Letters may also be submitted electronically from the author’s EIU e-mail address to DENopinions@gmail.com.


NEWS

M O N DAY, O C TO B E R 10, 2011

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REACCREDITATION

Journalism department seeks reaccreditation By Nike Ogunbodede Campus Editor

The journalism department is going to be critiqued throughout the week in an effort to receive its sixth national accreditation in April. Starting today, journalism students will have special sessions discussing the strengths and weaknesses of Eastern’s journalism program with four representatives of the Accrediting Council for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. Eastern’s journalism program

ENERGY, from page 1 The president of Honeywell Building Solutions, Paul Orzeske said during the ceremony the renewable energy center is a great story of collaboration on many fronts. Many universities pick glamorous projects to gain attention, but Eastern has been making environment improvements on campus before the construction of the renewable energy center, Orzeske said Another speaker, Lisa Bonnett, interim director of Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, said Eastern’s energy center should be a model for public and private facilities throughout the state and the nation. This project shows further environmental improvements must not be put on hold till the economy improves, she said. Orzeske said Eastern is also taking this technology and using it in the classroom. A scale model of the energy center is in classrooms and labs at Eastern, he said. A program called Center for Clean Energy Research, sponsored by Eastern will integrate student learning with opportunities from the energy center. Frank McCormick, retired English professor and attendee at the grand opening, said the energy center has been a topic of discussion in the community for many years. “It is state of the art,” he said. “I am curious to see how it works.” Jennifer E. Callahan of the office of philanthropy, wanted to see where the money went. She added the project was collaboration between many different entities. The old steam plant was built in 1925 and has been shut down for about a month, Siegal said. Elizabeth Edwards can be reached at 581-2812 or dennewsdesk@gmail.com.

has been nationally accredited four times since its first national accrediting in 1982, which was four years after Daniel Thornburgh founded and chaired the department. Accreditation is a system of voluntary self-assessment and external review of educational institutions and of professional programs offered by those institutions that are looked over every six years to maintain an institutions accredited status, according to the Accrediting Council for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication. The last accreditation was in

2006 and led to different improvements made to the department. The Accrediting Council for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication currently accredits 111 programs in 40 states that have a variation of journalism and mass communication departments. James Tidwell, the chair of the journalism department, said he is glad the department wants to maintain its history of striving for continued excellence and improvement. “It demonstrates that we meet strict standards for journalism education established by knowledgeable

academics and media and public relations professionals. It makes it easier to sell our program to potential students and their parents and to promote our students with potential employers,” Tidwell said, according to an Eastern press release. The journalism department is one of five Illinois universities to currently be accredited. The other universities include: Northwestern University, Southern Illinois University in Carbondale and Edwardsville and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. According to the Accrediting

Council for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication website, the process universally focuses on nine standards: mission, governance and administration; curriculum and instruction; diversity and inclusiveness; full-time and parttime faculty; scholarship: research, creative and professional activity; student services; resources, facilities and equipment; professional and public service; and assessment of learning outcomes. Nike Ogunbodede can be reached at 581-2812 or ovogunbodede@eiu.edu.

MAGICIAN, from page 1

MIR ANDA PLOSS | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Illusionist Mike Super prepares to prove to the audience that his volunteer is levitating Friday in the Grand Ballroom of Martin Luther King Jr. University Union. Super also performed tricks such as card and rope tricks, voodoo, and a game of Clue.

Another famous trick is when he made a car appear on the stage with the technique he learned with illusions.

Super said he is currently organizing the biggest magic trick for the Guinness Book of World Records.

Uriah Berryhill can be reached at 581-2812 or usberryhill@eiu.edu.

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M O N DAY, O C TO B E R 10, 2011 N o. 129, V O LU M E 96

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T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS

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Edited by Will Shortz ACROSS

...bottom of the 9th... ...tied game... ...bases loaded... ...fast ball, down the middle... ...looks like it could be...

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60 63 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73

Swedish liquor with memorable ads Melt Qty. Jack the ___ Elvis’s “___ Las Vegas” Doctor’s charge Log-in info Fix, as a cat Finish Eagle’s grabbers

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  1 Masticates   2 Focused-beam emitters   3 Takes steps in response to   4 32-card game   5 Venomous snake   6 Oktoberfest vessel   7 Abrupt finishes to phone conversations   8 Genius   9 Ready for business 10 Japanese motorcycle maker 11 Bullfight cheer 12 North, east, west or south: Abbr. 13 Off-road transport, briefly 21 Four Monopoly properties: Abbr. 22 Chicago columnist Kupcinet 26 Fashion magazine founded in France 27 ___ the Terrible 28 What literally comes from the north, east, west and south? 30 “Feels great!”

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Informed Sportscaster Albert Bit of Morse code Look-for-it children’s game Common event the day after Thanksgiving Favorable sign Permit for leaving a country Russian fighter jet Stiffly phrased Sort of Indenting key College Web site suffix One who knows the ropes Earn tons of, as dough Walk proudly

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SPORTS

M O N DAY, O C TO B E R 10, 2011

N o. 129, V O LU M E 96

VIE WS

It’s all uphill My sisters played volleyball in high school. I remember being dragged to their matches at 9 a.m. on the Saturday mornings that I didn’t have basketball games. When I understood the rules, I started to enjoy the games. I began to be one who dragged my parents to the games. I knew from looking at my sisters’ faces whether they had won or lost. The frustration, the excitement, the anger, and the joy: it seemed as if sometimes they had no idea that at the end of the day, it was still just a sport. The Panthers are on a losing streak, losing the last five match-ups. I was there for the last two home games against Eastern Kentucky and Morehead State. I could see the frustration setting in. I have seen those looks since the age of 13. I have seen those looks at the dinner table, in the car ride home and anywhere else you looked in a gym after a tough loss. I saw that look of disappointment in my sister’s face when I didn’t know what to say to make her feel better. I remember that look every time I write about another Panthers’ loss. I know what it is like. The Panthers are 4-15 overall and 2-7 in the Ohio Valley Conference. It seems that the opponents change, but the results do not. I have been to their practices and to their games so I know there is a team dynamic and there are bonds between

Lenny Arquilla players, but when the teams take the court, it seems that just disappears. When I played grade school basketball, we won one game over six seasons. One game. I know what it is like to turn on your teammates, turn on your coach and turn on yourself. I am not saying this is what is happening with the volleyball team, I am simply stating that not only have I suffered a losing streak, but I know what it feels like when nothing seems to go right. To me, it is just a problem that needs to end. Sophomore Reynae Hutchinson has not skipped a beat. She still stays consistent whether the team wins or loses. Head Coach Kate Price still has confidence in her team. The team just needs confidence in themselves. If I was able to walk out on that basketball court with a record of 1-and-who-knows, then the women’s volleyball team putting a five-match skid behind them should be nothing at all. Lenny Arquilla can be reached at 581-7944 or lrarquilla@eiu.edu

FOOTBALL, from page 8 “We’re handing out career days to anybody who plays us,” Whittaker said. Next week the Panthers will hit the road for another OVC match-up against Murray State, who is coming off a 48-24 win on the road against

Georgia State. The game is at 3 p.m. Saturday in Murray, Ky. Dominic Renzetti can be reached at 581-7942 or dcrenzetti@eiu.edu.

RUGBY, from page 8 “When we went back on the field for the second half we were all at the right place at the right time,” she said. “We were starting to work a little harder, and we were doing the little things to get the win.” Williams said it boosted overall team morale. “I think that we proved to ourselves that we have the ability to win every game. We are a great rugby team and I feel that this win is a turning point for the freshman,” Williams said. “I felt that we fit in with the veterans and now we are understanding the game and where we need to be.” The Panthers are 5-0 for the third

time in the last four seasons. In each of the previous two seasons where the Panthers started 5-0, they ran the table and recorded an undefeated season. The Panthers are scheduled to travel to Hamden, Conn., for next weekend’s NCAA Division-1 battle against the Quinnipiac Bobcats. The Panthers got the best of the Bobcats in their Sept. 18 match-up at Lakeside Field where he Panthers won 24-0. The rematch is scheduled for Oct. 15, and kickoff is slated for 1 p.m. Jordan Pottorff can be reached at 581-7942 or jbpottorff@eiu.edu.

VOLLEYBALL, from page 8 Friday, however, they were bested in almost every aspect of the game, including kills (40 to 28), attack (.277 to .026), assists (40 to 26), aces (4 to 2), digs (48 to 44), and blocks (7 to 4). After a hard fought match with 19 ties and seven lead changes, the Panthers just could not pick up a victory. The team, however, says the focus is always on the future. “The past is the past and there is a

new EIU volleyball team every year,” said Franklin. “I don’t like to look at whether we lost to them or not the last time we played just because on every given night the outcome will be different.” The Panthers travel to Jacksonville State Friday and Tennessee Tech Saturday to continue OVC play. Lenny Arquilla can be reached at 581-7944 or lrarquilla@eiu.edu

SOCCER, from page 8 Howarth also said it was a great win for the team as the team picked up its defensive play in the second half. The Panthers return to action Wednesday on the road at Loyola.

Game time is scheduled for 7 p.m. Rob Mortell can be reached at 581-7944 or at rdmortell@eiu.edu.

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@DEN_Sports tweet of the day: Women’s swimming fell 110-93 against Butler on Friday.

S ports RUGBY

Still a perfect season

Sports Editor Dominic Renzetti 217 • 581 • 2812 DENSportsdesk@gmail.com

T H E DA I LY E ASTE R N NEWS D A I LY E A S T E R N N E W S . C O M

M O N DAY, O C TO B E R 9, 2011 N o. 1 2 9 , V O L U M E 9 6

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FOOTBALL

By Jordan Pottorff Staff Reporter

The Panthers continued their perfect season on the road over the weekend. Eastern traveled north to take on the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in their first true road test of the season. The battle of the two Panthers remained close until the second half when the team began to separate themselves. The game was physical and full of potentially changing moments. The first half was a low scoring affair that left the game up for grabs at the break. “I don’t know if we just assumed we were going to walk out on the field and play well, but for the first 20 minutes of the game we had no passion at all,” head coach Frank Graziano said. “I don’t have an explanation for our first half, but we warmed up with enthusiasm and had excitement, but we did nothing at all in the first half.” Eastern led University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 10-7 after the first 40 minutes of play, the second lowest scoring output in the first half this season. Coming out of the half-time break, the Panthers tallied an early try and led Eastern by a score of 15-7. The eight-point deficit was the most the Panthers have trailed by in the second half this season. Senior captain Narissa Ramirez in the second half energized the Panthers. Ramirez’s play was the turning point, and she was able to get her teammates involved in the game. “To be honest, I’m not really sure if it was something I said or if it was leading by example,” she said. “I motivated my team to play the kind of rugby we know how to play. The light bulb turned on and we pulled out the win.” Eastern rallied off 36 consecutive points to take control of the game and walk away with their second road win of the season. “I think we grew up a little bit today,” Graziano said. “The freshmen started to realize that if they do the basics and make the little passes and run the plays, good things will come from it.” “It was nice to see us rally when we were down and it speaks to our maturity as a squad,” he said. Freshman center Nia Williams talked about pulling the team together for the second half. RUBGY, page 7

KIMBERLY FOSTER | THE DAILY EASTERN NE WS

Eastern Kentucky University’s Kevin Hamlin, junior linebacker, jumps to aid senior defensive back Jeremy Caldwell in tackling Eastern Illinois junior wide receiver Chris Wright Saturday on O’Brien Field. Eastern Kentucky defeated Eastern Illinois 48-16.

Colonels crash weekend By Dominic Renzetti Sports Editor

Eastern football remains w i n l e s s i n O h i o Va l l e y Conference play and dropped its fifth straight game in front of this season’s largest crowed of 9,063 at O’Brien Field. The Panthers lost by a score of 48-16 to Eastern Kentucky. The largest point differential of the season for the team. Eastern Kentucky rushed for a team total of 358 yards with running backs Matt Denham and Jeremiah Williams rushing for 216 yards and 73 yards, respectively. Fullback H.B. Banjoman had two touchdowns and 41 yards against

the Panthers. Denham also had two touchdowns, while Williams had one. The Panther running backs were unable to match the Colonels’ numbers. They only had 24 rushing yards. Sophomore quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo rushed for a net total of -21 yards, while red-shirt freshman quarterback Taylor Duncan had just four. With all the success on the ground, the Colonels did not have to throw much. Quarterback T.J. Prior threw 14 passes, completing 11 of them for a total of 133 yards. Garoppolo had a total of 251 yards. He completed 21 of 32 passes, while also throwing one

MEN’S SOCCER

touchdown and one interception. “The only thing I know to do is continue to work, continue to practice and hope plays go our way,” head coach Bob Spoo said. With red-shirt junior Lorence R i c k s i n a c t i ve f o r t h e t h i rd straight game, junior wide receiver Kenny Whittaker led the team in receptions with seven. He h a d 5 1 y a rd s t o s h ow for the day, while junior wide receiver Chris Wright led the team with 84 yards on four catches. “You put a lot of time and effort into this and you really want it to show on Saturday,” Whittaker said. Whittaker recorded his 100th career reception in the game,

but said the team’s performance is more important than individual accolades. The team’s performance has the Panthers with an overall record of 1-5 and still struggling to find their first OVC win. “We’re all trying to figure out what’s going on,” Whittaker said. Sp o o s a i d t h e t e a m’s t w o biggest factors to improve on are defending the run and running the ball efficiently. Wa l k e r a v e r a g e d j u s t 2 . 3 yards per carry, while Woodson averaged 2.7 yards. On the opposition, Denham was averaging 9.8 yards per carry and Banjoman was averaging 10.2 yards per carry. 
 FOOTBALL, page 7

VOLLEYBALL

Own goal gives team victory Eastern swept on Penning. Child said he thanks Penning and the training staff for their hard work on getting him back for his senior season. Eastern’s men’s soccer team got its first Eastern was able to extend its lead just Summit League win with a 2-1 victory 13 minutes later when Oral Roberts scored over Oral Roberts on Friday. an own goal. The goal was a mistake made The win improves the Panthers record to by the defense after senior defenseman 5-5-1 overall and 1-1-1 in conference play, Mike Picinich served the ball off a foul call. while Oral Roberts falls to 3-7 overall and The Golden Eagles were able to trim 1-2 in the Summit League. the lead to 2-1, when Jarrett Hamilton The Panthers were able to get on the connected on his fourth goal of the season. board early when senior forward Ryan Hamilton hit an unassisted strike for the Child connected on his first goal of the top of the box past sophomore goalkeeper season. Jake Brillhart took a shot that was Tyler Kelley. mishandled by Oral Roberts goalkeeper The second half was a defensive battle as Nick Potolick. The shot bounced right to both teams struggled to get shots off. The Child who kicked it in from three yards Panthers and Oral Roberts combined for out. six shots in the second half; however, they “I was lucky when (Potolick) spilled (the also combined for 18 fouls. save),” Child said. “Then I just tapped it Head coach Adam Howarth said these in.” conference games are always physical This offseason Child broke his leg, and because both teams are fighting for their DANNY DAMIANI | DAILY EASTERN NE WS said he might not have been ready in lives. Red-shirt freshman midfielder Chris time for the season if it were not for the Boswell tries to get the ball for Eastern. work of assistant athletic trainer Brett SOCCER, page 7 By Rob Mortell Staff Reporter

weekend match-up By Lenny Arquilla Staff Reporter

The Panthers drop their fifth straight match overall and are swept by Tennessee-Martin to bring their record to 4-15 overall a n d 2 - 7 i n t h e Oh i o Va l l e y Conference. Sophomore Reynae Hutchinson led all players in kills with 13 and also had eight digs Friday. The team, however, was unable to snap their losing streak and dropped a three-set OVC road match at Tennessee-Martin (2624, 25-14, 25-16). Her partner in crime for the past couple of matches, junior Emily Franklin, had five kills and five digs, while senior Christie Albers brought some light to

the match recording her third double-double and the 15th in her career. The Panthers were looking to hand Tennessee-Martin their fourth consecutive loss in the alltime series between the two league rivals. In both wins last season, the Panthers were leading in almost every category, including kills and assists. Friday, however, they were bested in almost every aspect of the game, including kills (40 to 28), attack (.277 to .026), assists (40 to 26), aces (4 to 2), digs (48 to 44), and blocks (7 to 4). After a hard fought match with 19 ties and seven lead changes, the Panthers just could not pick up a VOLLEYBALL, page 7

Issue No. 129, Vol. 96  

Oct. 10, 2011

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