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The story of an Irish soldier in the Civil War

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Daily Corinthian Vol. 117, No. 131

• Corinth, Mississippi •

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22 pages • Two sections

The Cat’s Meow

Municipal elections to be held Tuesday BY JEBB JOHNSTON jjohnston@dailycorinthian.com

The municipal general election day will be a quiet one for most of Alcorn County. Rienzi is the only one of the county’s municipalities with an election on Tuesday, which is election day for the majority of cities across Mississippi. Rienzi voting will take place between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. at the Town Hall. The town has a lively race for alderman with 11 people seeking a seat on the five-member board. All of the incumbents are seeking reelection — Harold W.

Palmer, Jimmy Harwood, David Wayne Massey, Melissa Bearden Morgan and Sandra Williams. The six challengers are James Harold Hall, Johnny R. Stewart, Bonnie D. Davis, Dale A. Leonard, Betty J. Williams and Bill Burnett Jr. Rienzi Mayor Walter Williams, who was elected four years ago, has no opposition and will get another term. Elsewhere in the county, Farmington’s election was decided in a Republican primary Please see ELECTIONS | 2A

Statistics shed light on state of county Staff photo by Jebb Johnston

BY BRANT SAPPINGTON

Jonah Byrom visits with a cat named Sonny on the porch of the Corinth-Alcorn Animal Shelter during Saturday’s open house and dedication. Sonny, who is available for adoption, spent the morning lounging on the pillow and enjoying the attention of visitors.

bsappington@dailycorinthian.com

Northeast Mississippi is on the move and Alcorn County is joining in the progress. The CREATE Foundation released its annual regional profile for Northeast Mississippi along with county-bycounty statistical profiles Friday during the annual State of the Region meeting held in Tupelo. The profiles show a region and a county experiencing

Animal shelter shows off improvements BY JEBB JOHNSTON jjohnston@dailycorinthian.com

The Corinth-Alcorn Animal Shelter is working hard to be the cat’s meow. With an open house and dedication on Saturday, the commu-

nity had a chance to see how far the shelter has come since the organization took over management of the Proper Street facility in August 2011. “There’s been a lot of hard work and effort by a lot of volunteers,

old and young,” said Charlotte Doehner, shelter director. “That’s good, because as us older people move on, we need the younger people to keep this going.” Please see SHELTER | 2A

growth but also continuing to face many of the same challenges being confronted by the entire country. In 2012 Alcorn County saw a significant drop in the overall unemployment rate compared to the previous year. Unemployment in the county fell from 11.9 percent in 2011 to 9.2 percent in 2012, with the overall number of people employed in the county risPlease see CREATE | 3A

Cummings honored as Phenomenal Woman BY STEVE BEAVERS sbeavers@dailycorinthian.com

Ready for Relay

Staff photo by Steve Beavers

Lydia Moore helps set up the BancorpSouth camp for Friday night’s Relay for Life. The bank went with Toy Store as part of the theme of Toon Out Cancer. (See more photos, 3A)

Dorothy Cummings was honored to be nominated for the 2013 Boys & Girls Club Phenomenal Woman of the Year. The Refreshment, Inc. retiree was shocked she took home the second annual award. Cummings raised over $2,000 for the club in being named winner at the 2nd Annual Phenomenal Woman Awards Gala which honors extraordinary women in the community. “People were so loving and

Submitted photo

Please see CUMMINGS | 2A

Dorothy Cummings (left) receives the 2013 Phenomenal Woman of the Year award from 2012 winner Rebecca Spence.

Index Stocks......8A Classified......6B Comics Inside State......5A

On this day in history 150 years ago

Weather......9A Obituaries......6A Opinion......4A Sports....10A

Former Ohio Congressman Clement Valandingham, an anti-war Democrat (Copperhead), was deported to the South last month for his volatile statements. He is not wanted in the South where President Davis has him imprisoned in North Carolina as an “Enemy Alien.”

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Sunday, June 2, 2013

SHELTER ters such as Garfield and Snoopy throughout the building. Jacinda Byrom, who organized the project, explained that the shelter was divided into 12 areas for students to come up with designs. “I’m very proud of each one of the students that stepped up,” she said. “I think that they really got to shine with their talents. This was a good learning and growing process for themselves and myself.” Doehner said the quarter-mile walking trail is one way the shelter intends to get the community more involved. A dog-walking program will begin in a couple of weeks. Plenty of eager pups and kitties are awaiting a new home, and adoptions are just $20 for dogs and $10 for cats for the next week.

CONTINUED FROM 1A

Submitted photo

Phenomenal Woman of the Year candidates had their photo taken with guest speaker Stephanie Burkholder during the gala on May. 4. Those on hand for the gala were Phyllis Dilworth; Tina H. Bugg; Shana Green, runner-up; Burkholder; Dorothy Cummings, winner; Erika Wright Donnell and Kristy Knight.

Much work since 2011 has transformed a building that was in disrepair into “a shelter that the people of Alcorn County can be proud of,” she said. Knowing that appealing shelters are more successful in getting the animals adopted, the shelter has aimed to make it a fun, inviting place to visit. Several cats now roam the outdoors and enjoy the attention of visitors. A new walking trail meanders along the spacious front lawn, and the new screened area where cats can get a break from their cages is next to the front porch. Inside, the shelter walls are brightened by the artwork of a group of youth who participated in the Art for the Shelter Project, painting charac-

CUMMINGS CONTINUED FROM 1A

kind to contribute,” said the winner. “I had no idea people loved me as much as they do.” “Everyone in the room was so proud she won,” said club unit director Christy Grice. “She was so excited and thought it was just a honor to be in the running for the award.” Corinth Middle School guidance counselor Shana Green was runner-up for the honor at the club's gala on May 4 at the Crossroads Arena. “It was an awesome night,” added Grice. “Everything was perfect and I couldn't have been more pleased … we had a great selection of women up for the award and the community really came

together to make things work out.” Cummings, a 50-plus year member of Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church, was the first African American to retire from Refreshment after 28 years with the company. Since retiring, the active member of the senior choir at church has worked part-time as a caregiver. She celebrated her 75th birthday on May 14. The entire month has been an exciting one for Cummings with Mother's Day, her birthday and winning the phenomenal award all coming within weeks of each other. “My daughter in Dallas wanted to know which of the three I wanted her to be here for,” she said. “I

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told her the Phenomenal Woman Gala because there would never be another chance like this.” The other 10 females nominated for the honor were Kathi Irwin, Yulanda Grayson, Cory Holmes, Kristy Knight, Erika Wright Donnell, Tina H. Bugg, Crista Norman, Phyllis Dilworth, Myra Rencher and Nan Green. Corinth School District Chairperson Ann Walker and Corinth-Alcorn County United Way Executive Director Betsy Whitehurst were also recognized during the gala. Walker received the Trailblazer Award while Whitehurst was presented the Champion of Youth Award. “Our committee stepped in and did wonders and all of our women

worked so hard in fundraising,” said Grice. Members of the committee were Donna Wright, Sheila Gardner, Rebecca Spence, Janice Kelly and Dioannys Ortega. Grice also commended Jay Walker for donating his time to grill chicken for the night. A red carpet reception was held for the 12 monthly winners. Ole Miss student Stephanie Burkholder, the reigning Miss Cobb County, was the guest speaker. Last year, Spence took home the first honor with Ortega finishing runnerup. “All of our monthly winners the last two years are woman who have inspired, educated and empowered other females to go beyond mediocrity and create excellence in their lives,” said Grice.

Staff photo by Jebb Johnston

Jacinda Byrom introduces some of the youth who participated in the Art for the Shelter project by painting animal characters on the walls.

ELECTIONS Contested mayoral races are on the ballot in Burnsville, Iuka and Booneville. Burnsville Mayor David Nixon faces a challenge from Billy Cockrell. Iuka Mayor Jackie Bryant faces John Castleberry, and Booneville will elect a new mayor in either Derrick Blythe or Lin Floyd.

CONTINUED FROM 1A

held last month. With five candidates for alderman and one for mayor, Glen and Kossuth are not required to hold elections on Tuesday. Corinth elections for mayor, aldermen and police chief will be next year.

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3A • Daily Corinthian

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Today in History Today is Sunday, June 2, the 153rd day of 2013. There are 212 days left in the year.

Today’s Highlight in History: On June 2, 1953, the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II took place in London’s Westminster Abbey, 16 months after the death of her father, King George VI; it was the first such ceremony to be broadcast on television.

On this date: In 1863, during the Civil War, Union Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman wrote a letter to his wife, Ellen, in which he commented, “Vox populi, vox humbug” (The voice of the people is the voice of humbug).  In 1886, President Grover Cleveland, 49, married Frances Folsom, 21, in the Blue Room of the White House. (To date, Cleveland is the only president to marry in the executive mansion.) In 1897, Mark Twain, 61, was quoted by the New York Journal as saying from London that “the report of my death was an exaggeration.” In 1924, Congress passed a measure that was then signed by President Calvin Coolidge guaranteeing full American citizenship for all Native Americans born within U.S. territorial limits. In 1941, baseball’s “Iron Horse,” Lou Gehrig, died in New York of a degenerative disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; he was 37. In 1962, Soviet forces opened fire on striking workers in the Russian city of Novocherkassk; a retired general in 1989 put the death toll at 22 to 24. In 1966, the U.S. space probe Surveyor 1 landed on the moon and began transmitting detailed photographs of the lunar surface. In 1979, Pope John Paul II arrived in his native Poland on the first visit by a pope to a communist country. In 1983, half of the 46 people aboard an Air Canada DC-9 were killed after fire broke out on board, forcing the jetliner to make an emergency landing at Cincinnati/ Northern Kentucky International Airport. In 1986, for the first time, the public could watch the proceedings of the U.S. Senate on television as a six-week experiment began. In 1987, President Ronald Reagan announced he was nominating economist Alan Greenspan to succeed Paul Volcker as chairman of the Federal Reserve Board. In 1997, Timothy McVeigh was convicted of murder and conspiracy in the Oklahoma City bombing. (He was executed in June 2001.)

Ten years ago: President George W. Bush, visiting the Middle East, pledged to work unstintingly for the goal of Israel and a Palestinian state living side by side without bloodshed. The Federal Communications Commission eased decades-old limits on media ownership.

P.O. Box 1800 Corinth, MS 38835

Staff photo by Steve Beavers

Ready For Relay

Wheeler Grove Baptist Church’s Jacob Hinton (above left) puts up signs for the women’s ministry camp of Bob the Builder. Relay for Life Chairperson Lori Moore (above right) gets decorations ready for event on Friday night.

Agenda set for supervisors meeting The Alcorn County Board of Supervisors will meet at 9 a.m. Monday. The agenda includes the following items: ■ Minutes of May 20 meeting ■ Financial report and claims, May 20 - June 3 ■ Termination of lease agreement — sheriff’s department and airport — Bill Odom ■ Request to split College Hill voting precinct — Joe Caldwell and Keith Settlemires ■ Presentation from Nichols & Associates regarding long-term cash benefits through payroll deduction ■ Jail warden’s report ■ Juvenile Detention Center report ■ Emergency management report ■ Travel authorization for chancery clerk’s con-

vention, June 25-28 ■ Travel authorization for Mississippi assessors and collectors conference, Kenneth Brawner, June 24-27 ■ Uniform assessment schedule - motor vehicles ■ 2014 mobile home assessment schedule ■ Notification from Mississippi Development Authority – CSD Instruction #13-011 – Request for cash between two state years (2013 and 2014) ■ Receipt of 2013 continuing disclosure submission ■ Authorization to pay for services rendered – Butler/Snow – Preparation and submission of continuing disclosure statement ■ Authorization to pay Invoice – Cook Coggin Engineers, Inc. – Holly Church Road/Henson

CREATE CONTINUED FROM 1A

ing from 13,410 in 2011 to 13,980 in 2012. The 2011 number represents the beginning of a slide downward for unemployment in the county from the five-year-high of 12.4 percent that was posted in 2010. The region saw a similar drop in unemployment over the past year, with the rate falling from 11.3 percent in 2011 down to 9.5 percent for 2012. Job growth also brought an increase in income for the county over the past year with the average perperson income rising from $27,942 in 2011 to $29,533 in 2012. Regionally per capita income also rose from $29,074 in 2011 to $31,673 for 2012. However, the county also saw a slight rise in the number of households living below the poverty line with a total income less than $24,999. In 2011, 40.62 percent of households in Alcorn County fell below that figure while in 2012 the number rose to 43.63 percent. The county also saw

gains over the past two years in educational achievement with the number of people over the age of 25 holding a high school diploma rising to 79.93 percent in 2012, up from 77.32 percent in 2011. Those numbers remain in line with the figures for the overall region which had 78.15 percent of the population 25-years-old or older holding high school diplomas in 2012. Health related statistics show a mixture of rises and falls for Alcorn County. The county saw 444 births in 2011 (the latest year for which figures were available), up from 436 in 2010. The five-year-average infant mortality rate fell from 7.9 percent in 2010 to 6.9 percent in 2011. However, the percentage of pregnant women receiving prenatal care in the first trimester also fell from 84.2 percent in 2010 to 80.4 percent in 2011. Heart disease remained the leading cause of death in the county for 2011 followed by cancer, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and stroke.

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Opinion

Reece Terry, publisher

Mark Boehler, editor

4A • Sunday, June 2, 2013

Corinth, Miss.

Guest View

Union workers are also taxpayers This is in response to the recent column by Sid Salter regarding the United Auto Workers’ attempt to win a union organization vote at the Canton Nissan Plant (”UAW offers crocodile tears for Nissan job incentives,” May 23). He characterized UAW’s exposure of the company’s failure to live up to Mississippi taxpayers’ expectations as “crocodile tears.” UAW workers are also taxpayers, whose contributions to the state coffers are involved in the recent revelations that Nissan’s employment practices have not matched their incentive package promises. Mr. Salter should know that the Nissan plants in Japan are unionized. For the record, Nissan workers in Japan received an average $21,000 bonus for FY 2013. Why? According to a report in e-Nikkei.com dated March 13, “Nissan said its decision was based on its hope to maintain and improve motivation among its workers as it seeks to continue growth in the upcoming fiscal year which [began] April 1.” More than 21,300 union employees will receive the bonus. In other civilized places, offering the many benefits of union membership is a welcomed opportunity to improve the quality of life for families. Mississippi should try it. Yes, a Washington, D. C. nonprofit group, Good Jobs First, conducted a study that showed Nissan’s failure to hire a certain number of employees in exchange for tax breaks and other economic incentives. Just because it took an out-of-state organization to make the revelation does not make the issue any less true. We are pleased that Nissan has pumped $2 billion of its own money into its own operation in addition to the $1.33 billion provided by Mississippi taxpayers, including UAW members. We shouldn’t be overly congratulatory, though. It seems the least they should do, since it is, in fact, their business. Mr. Salter asserts that UAW members would never have exposed Nissan’s lack of follow-through if the plant already had been a union shop. Most any scholar of logic will tell you that a “what if” scenario laid out like this is not valid. There is no way to determine the consequence of something that doesn’t exist. I would say this argument against the UAW’s exposure on behalf of Mississippi taxpayers is “most disingenuous,” using Mr. Salter’s terms. He further makes assertions about what UAW members care about. Unless he is a UAW member himself, I fail to see how he thinks he can authoritatively declare what members care about. He is correct that the UAW is conducting union-organizing campaigns at various plants in the “right-to-work” states. Why? Because unions believe that workers should earn a decent wage, with benefits and safety considerations. Nissan has skirted its responsibility to its employees and Mississippi taxpayers by using part-time workers instead of full-time workers. We believe it’s because they don’t want to pay benefits, which full-time workers receive. Benefits include insurance, the opportunity to save toward retirement, to have breaks during the work day, paid holidays and leave time, someone to help you with disputes with management, and a safe workplace. Many times, part-time employees in industry who are injured on the job not only have no insurance to pay for their injuries, but they also don’t receive pay during the time they are off, and they may be fired for not being on the job. The auto industry has a high incidence of worker injury. Is the convenience of being able to fire injured workers rather than help them get better an incentive for resisting unionization? It’s a question worth asking, in my opinion. As to his subsequent column disparaging Labor’s political contributions to Mississippi campaigns – tell our endorsed candidates that a quarter of a million dollars combined with our on-the-ground support isn’t important. I think they will disagree. (Robert Shaffer is president of Mississippi AFL-CIO.)

Prayer for today Lord, how wonderfully extravagant is Your works that we enjoy each day, for it is truly the heavens declaring Your glory and the firmament showing Your handiwork. For them we are grateful. Amen.

A verse to share “Being confident of this very thing, that he which hath begun a good work in you will perform it until the day of Jesus Christ:” — Philippians 1:6

Civil rights atrocities paved the way for Pridgeon STARKVILLE — A halfcentury ago, the little tableau I saw unfold this week simply would not have happened. Mississippi State University hosted the 2013 Mississippi American Legion Boys State program this week and I watched as Gov. Phil Bryant posed for several photographs with the newly elected governor of Boys State. Bryant shook hands with his counterpart and engaged him in friendly banter, then put his arm around him in a congratulatory hug as the photographers took care of their business. The young man, Horn Lake High School product Malik Pridgeon, seemly equally happy for his face time with Mississippi’s governor. Bryant’s white. Boys State Gov. Malik Pridgeon is African American. Bryant was elected governor in a state with a solid white majority. Pridgeon was also elected by a constituency that is majority white in the 2013 Boys State delegation. The point is that Pridgeon’s election as governor

of Mississippi Boys State was a non-event from a racial standpoint. So, too, was Sid Salter Bryant’s pubColumnist lic embrace — literally and figuratively — of this impressive young man. In 2013, race was not a component of the scene. Mississippi’s governor congratulated Mississippi’s Boys State governor. Period. It is as things should be. No matter how traumatic it was for the people of this state, the racial progress enjoyed today in Mississippi is a directly product of the racial atrocities that took place in Mississippi in the 1950s and 1960s. Without the blood sacrifices of civil rights martyrs like Mack Charles Parker, Emmitt Till, Medgar Evers, Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, James Chaney, Vernon Dahmer and so many others, Malik Pridgeon’s opportunities today might

well be as limited as were those of Evers before him. The assassination of NAACP Field Director Medgar Evers on June 12, 1963, was particularly cowardly and particularly jarring to the sensibilities of white Mississippians. Evers was gunned down in the driveway of his Guynes Street home in Jackson. The World War II U.S. Army veteran was shot in the back, mortally wounded and bleeding to death in front of his wife and three children. The manner in which Evers died and his widow Myrlie’s public stoicism in the wake of his death, was an event that fomented the seeds of real change in this state. Clearly, those seeds did not flourish overnight. Mississippi was the last state to abolish slavery. It took Mississippi 41 years to convict anyone on state charges in the 1964 murders of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner by the Ku Klux Klan in Neshoba County. It took Mississippi 31 years to convict Byron

De La Beckwith on state charges in the assassination of Evers. But change did come. That change came in the fact that Malik Pridgeon and other African American young people in Mississippi can now enjoy a reasonable expectation of achieving great things based on their own drive and abilities rather than the expectation of being limited by the color of their skin. Those who believe Medgar Evers’ death is not perhaps more meaningful today than it was a halfcentury ago in Mississippi haven’t watched — as I did this week — the next generation of Mississippi young people interact. They get it. They understand. And for the most part, they live it. Who knows? One day in the not-so-distant future it may be Gov. Pridgeon encouraging the new young governor of Mississippi Boys State. (Daily Corinthian and syndicated columnist Sid Salter can be contacted at 601-507-8004 or sidsalter@sidsalter.com.)

Let’s abolish the corporate income tax! Sen. Carl Levin was aghast. Before his committee sat, unapologetic and uncontrite, Apple CEO Tim Cook, whose company had paid no U.S. corporate income taxes on the $74 billion it had earned abroad in recent years. “Apple has sought the Holy Grail of tax avoidance,” said Levin. “Apple has exploited an absurdity.” Actually, Apple had done nothing wrong, except hire some crack accountants who chose Ireland’s County Cork as the headquarters of their international division. Thus Apple paid on profits earned outside the U.S.A. nothing but a 2 percent tax imposed by the Irish government. Far from being condemned, Apple’s CPAs ought to be inducted into the Accountants Hall of Fame. It is no more immoral for Apple to move its headquarters for foreign sales to Ireland than for Big Apple residents to move to Florida to escape the 12 percent combined state and city income tax. Among the reasons the Sun Belt is booming at the expense of the Rust Belt is not just the weather. Southern states strive to keep income and estate taxes low or nonexistent. They want companies and families to relocate and live there, and to spend their money there. The problem here is not with Apple, it is with Sen. Levin & Co. In a press release, “Avoiding Their Fair Share of Taxes,” the AFL-CIO hails

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Levin and bewails the fact that though the U.S. corporate tax rate is 35 percent, highest Pat in the world, Buchanan c o r p o r a t e income tax Columnist revenue has fallen to well below 10 percent of federal tax revenue. “Cash tax payments by non-financial companies in the S&P 500 Index fell ... to $222 billion in 2010,” moaned the AFL-CIO. “Another corporate tax avoidance strategy is to move overseas to a corporate tax haven like Bermuda. By reincorporating offshore, companies avoid paying federal income taxes on profits earned outside the United States.” Yes, they do. But instead of bewailing this, perhaps we should start thinking and acting as our forebears did. In the same Wall Street Journal that reported on Cook’s defense of Apple, former Sen. Phil Gramm described that earlier America: “Over the late 19th century, real GDP and employment doubled, annual average real earnings rose by over 60 percent and wholesale prices fell by 75 percent, thanks to marked improvement in productivity.” Astonishing. And what is the difference between that age and ours? A 35 percent income tax rate on individuals and corporations that did not exist then, and

would have been regarded by Americans of the Gilded Age as the satanic work of Friedrich Engels and Karl Marx. From the Civil War to World War I, our economy grew from one-half the size of Great Britain’s to twice Britain’s. American companies were capturing markets abroad. Today’s U.S. companies are looking for ways to relocate abroad. Herewith, a modest proposal to turn this around. Since the U.S. corporate income tax produces less than 10 percent of federal revenue and less than 2 percent of gross domestic product, abolish it. Get rid of it. Think of it. A continentwide nation that doesn’t tax business. Assume this would cost the Treasury $250 billion in lost revenue. How to make it up? Put a 10 percent tariff on imports entering the United States, which last year added up to $2.7 trillion. This tax reform would thus be revenue neutral. And what would a corporate income tax rate of zero, with a 10 percent tariff on goods entering the U.S.A. from abroad, accomplish? First, every U.S. corporation that had moved abroad in search of lower taxes in recent years would start thinking about coming home and bringing its production and its jobs back to America. Second, that $2 trillion in income U.S. companies have stashed abroad would come roaring back into U.S. institutions.

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Third, foreign companies would begin to relocate and produce here in America, both to get around the tariff and pay no taxes. Fourth, U.S. producers would see sales soar inside the $17 trillion U.S. market, at the expense of foreigners who would pay a 10-percent admission fee to get into this market, a fraction of what they used to pay in the 19th century. While this would cause a surge in unemployment among IRS agents and accountants, hundreds of millions of man hours could be redirected away from filling out tax forms and into productive work. “Since 1980, the U.S. has run trade deficits in every year totaling about $9 trillion,” writes columnist Robert Samuelson. That is 9 thousand billion dollars in trade deficits! It is what unmade America as a self-reliant republic and made China a manufacturing marvel. And those trade deficits are how America became a dependent nation in hock to the world. From 1865 to 1914, America had 10 Republican presidents. All believed in financing government by taxing imports, not the incomes of U.S. citizens or the U.S. companies that employed them. And this was how the miracle Sen. Gramm details came about. (Daily Corinthian columnist Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of “Suicide of a Superpower: Will America Survive to 2025?”)

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State/Nation

5A • Daily Corinthian

Nation Briefs Associated Press

Twisters, floods sweep across Midwest, Plains OKLAHOMA CITY — Emergency officials set out Saturday to assess damage from a series of violent storms and tornadoes that killed nine people as it swept through Oklahoma City and its suburbs with tornadoes, large hail and heavy rain. More than 100 people were injured. Muddy floodwaters stood several feet deep in the countryside surrounding the metro area. Torrential downpours followed for hours after the twisters moved east, and water damage was reported at the city’s airport. The storms battered a state still reeling after the topof-the-scale EF5 tornado that ripped through suburban Moore last month, killing 24 people and decimating neighborhoods. Water surged hood-high on many streets, snarling traffic at the worst possible time: Friday’s evening commute. Even though several businesses closed early so employees could beat the storm home, highways were still clogged with motorists worried about a repeat of the chaos in Moore. Bart Kuester, 50, a truck driver from Wisconsin, said he was driving along Interstate 35 past Moore when he realized a dangerous storm was approaching. “I heard the sirens going off and I could see it coming,” he said. Kuester said the interstate was flooded and jammed with people trying to outrun the storm. “Everyone was leaving. ... Just because that one that hit Moore was so fresh in their memory,” he said. Though it was in the tornado warning zone, Moore was spared major damage by the storms, but still experienced heavy rain and high wind. A convention center where the town held its graduation in the days after the storm suffered minor flooding damage, officials said. The Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office said a man was missing from a vehicle near Harrah, east of Oklahoma City, and a pair of sinkholes were reported on each side of the metro area. When the storm passed between El Reno and Yukon, it barreled right down Interstate 40 for more than two miles, ripping billboards down to twisted metal frames. Debris was tangled in the median’s crossover barriers, including huge pieces of sheet metal, tree limbs, metal pipes, a giant oil drum and a stretch of chain-link fence. The warped remains of a horse trailer lay atop a barbed-wire fence less than 50 yards from the highway. Violent weather also

moved through the St. Louis area. Early aerial images of the storm’s damage showed groups of homes with porches ripped away, roofs torn off and piles of splintered wood scattered across the ground for blocks. Officials in St. Charles County also reported that local schools suffered some damage.

New Mexico crews fight wildfires JEMEZ SPRINGS, N.M.— Fire crews are battling a pair of wild blazes in New Mexico that have scorched thousands of acres, spurred evacuation calls for dozens of homes and poured smoke into the touristy state capital. State officials say the uncontained blaze near Santa Fe grew to 8 square miles Saturday, leaving the city under a blanket of haze. The fire in New Mexico’s Santa Fe National Forest is burning just 25 miles from the city. Meanwhile about 80 miles west, forestry officials say the Thompson Ridge fire near Jemez Springs started had grown to about 1 square mile. Between 40 and 50 homes in the area were evacuated as around 80 crew members and a helicopter arrived to help fight the blaze.

Sunday, June 2, 2013

State Briefs

than usual that minimalist government isn’t necessarily a one-size-fits-all solution. “You’ve grown up hearing voices that incessantly warn of government as nothing more than some separate, sinister entity that’s at the root of all our problems,” Obama recently told graduates at Ohio State University. “You should reject these voices,” he added, promoting the positive role government can play.

4 firefighters killed in motel fire HOUSTON — Four firefighters searching for people they thought might be trapped in a blazing Houston motel and restaurant Friday were killed when the part of the structure collapsed and ensnared them, authorities said. At least five other firefighters were hospitalized in the blaze that became the deadliest in the 118-year history of the Houston Fire Department. Flames were shooting from the roof of the Southwest Inn, along one of Houston’s most heavily traveled freeways, U.S. Highway 59, and black smoke was blanketing the area as firefighters tried to extinguish the fire.

Associated Press

DNA tests identify victim of house fire PURVIS — Authorities have used DNA tests to identify the victim of a house fire that a Purvis man allegedly set. The Hattiesburg American reports that the tests confirmed 76-year-old Claudette Ezell died in the May 13 fire inside her Purvis home. Lamar County Deputy Coroner Anna Miller said the cause of Ezell’s death remained under investigation. Police arrested a suspect, 36-year-old Timothy Taylor, on murder and arson charges. Taylor was ordered held without bond at the Lamar County Jail. Lamar County Sheriff Danny Rigel said it appears Taylor and Ezell knew each other.

Pearl River drowning victim identified PICAYUNE — Authorities have released the identity of a Picayune teenager who drowned in a gravel pit in Pearl River County. The Sun Herald reports that 15-year-old Edgar Ponce had been swimming with other teens Thursday when he drowned. County Coroner Derek Turnage said an autopsy

and preliminary investigation indicates the drowning was an accident. Turnage said he and other area coroners are concerned about a spate of recent drowning. At least eight have been reported in south Mississippi since February, including six in May.

Inmate wants federal review of parole denial JACKSON — Milton Trotter says he shouldn’t be in a Mississippi prison. In a case before the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans, he claims he entered into an agreement in 1981 to plead guilty to a state murder charge and a federal kidnapping charge with the understanding he would be freed by Mississippi parole officials once he was released from federal prison. Trotter said the state didn’t parole him, and he claims his murder conviction should be tossed because the state violated the plea agreement. A three-judge panel said he can pursue the challenge to denial of parole, but that time ran out long ago to challenge the murder conviction on any grounds. Trotter and two co-defendants pleaded guilty in October 1981 to fed-

eral kidnapping charges and murder charges in Lauderdale County in the death of Gail C. Allen. In sentencing documents, all three said Allen was killed in a motel in Laurel, Miss., and her body was dumped in Lauderdale County. Trotter, Edward Davidson and Denise Daquigan were each sentenced to life in prison for kidnapping and life for murder. Documents show the sentences were to be served concurrently and in a federal prison. Davidson and Daquigan have been released from federal prison and are serving life sentences in Mississippi, according to the Department of Corrections. They are not parties to Trotter’s appeal.

Group offers reward in horse shooting SCOBEY — An international animal protection group has offered a $500 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a suspect in the shooting of a horse in Scobey. In Defense of Animals operates Hope Animal Sanctuary in Grenada. The sanctuary’s director, Doll Stanley, says anyone who could commit the attack on a defenseless animal is a danger to everyone.

GOP resolve tested by federal aid need WASHINGTON — One major principle of Barack Obama’s presidency that his foes love to hate — that government, when it works right, can be bestequipped to aid and protect Americans — is finding fresh currency among some Republicans. Their doctrine that smaller government is better government is being tested by pressing needs in storm-battered states, security threats that play up the need for a robust defense apparatus and offers for federal funds that are tough to turn down. To be sure, conservatives looking to pare the government have had their pick of examples to make Obama the poster boy for overreaching, bloated government — think “Obamacare,” bailouts, the stimulus, universal pre-kindergarten and environmental regulations, to name a few. The perception that Obama has let government grow out of control has been bolstered in the rocky first few months of his second term by word that the Justice Department was aggressively snooping on reporters in leak investigations and an admission by the IRS that its agents unfairly targeted conservative groups. But on other policy fronts, unmet needs are forcing Republicans to concede more publicly

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6A • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • Daily Corinthian

Deaths Bea Kemp

Bea Coleman Kemp, 87, died on April 29, 2013, in Houston, Texas, her home for the past 67 years. She was born on Oct.13, 1925, to W.E. (Tonce) and Maggie Hancock Coleman in Kossuth. Bea was preceded in death by her parents and her six older siblings, R.L. Coleman, Mary Elma Dalton, Sallye Hughes, Hazel Coleman, Eva Mae Suitor and Corinne Mashburn; and her nephew, James Cliff Hughes. After working for 40 years as an executive secretary, Bea retired in May 1986. She had 27 years to spend with family and friends in Houston and Mississippi. Until the great grandson was born, Bea and Tom spent Spring through Fall at her home place in Kossuth. At the Shiloh Cumberland Presbyterian Church everyone knew to look for Bea and Tom when the dogwoods bloomed. Bea was an active member of the First Cumberland Presbyterian Church in Houston, a member of the CPW, a founding member of the Reed Women’s Club and was on the Reed Credit Union Board. Bea is survived by her hus-

Willa Lee Crowell

CHEROKEE, Ala. — Willa Lee Crowell died Saturday, June 1, 2013, at her home in Cherokee. Arrangements are pending with Cutshall Funeral Home.  

Glen Hulsey

Glen Hulsey, 59, of Corinth, died Saturday, June 1, 2013, at his residence. Arrangements are pending with Magnolia Funeral Home.  

Chloris Lewis

Funeral services for Chloris Marie Lewis, 85, of Corinth, are set for 3 p.m. today at Corinthian Funeral Home with burial at Pleasant Ridge Cemetery. Mrs. Lewis died Friday, May 31, 2013, at Dogwood Plantation. Born June 13, 1927, she was a member of Clear Creek Church of Christ. Survivors include a grandson, Barron Ray

Fred Reiselt

band, Thomas Kemp, and her daughter, Teresa Hendley, and husband Robert. Bea lived to be with her grandchildren no matter what the occasion. She attended graduations Pre-K through college, recitals, ball games, award functions, plays, wedding showers, luncheons, and church functions involving her “kids.” The “kids” are Elizabeth and husband James Folmar, Rebecca and husband Clint Reed, and Cliff Thomas Hendley. Bea was there for the birth of her great grandson, James Byron Folmar, in December 2008. Even at the end she always found the energy to laugh and play with J.B. He adores his Granny and Pa. For the past six years Bea dealt with macular degeneration, hearing loss, and vascular dementia. Bea was buried on May 3, 2013, at a private graveside funeral in Houston as per her request. A celebration of her life will be held on June 8, 2013, in Corinth. On a daily basis Bea asked Tom when they were going “home” — her footstone will read “Home at Last.”

Bowling (Elisa) of Kansas City; four great-grandchildren; and several nieces a n d nephews. S h e w a s p r e ceded in death by her h u s band, Lewis William Orville Lewis; a daughter, Gwendolyn Marie Bowling; her parents, Burga Joe Rickman and Bonnie Nettie Bowers Rickman; and nine siblings, Alonzo Rickman, Alvin Rickman, G.B. Rickman, Pascal Rickman, Carl Rickman, Mary Maudie Rickman, Lucille Parvin, Kate Riddell and Mavis Gerneal Mask. The Rev. Warren Jones will officiate the service. Visitation is from 1 p.m. until service time. 

State Briefs

Mass of Christian Burial for Paul “Fred” Frederick Reiselt is set for 11 a.m. Tuesday June 4, 2013, at St. James Catholic Church with Father Richard Smith officiating. Burial will be in Forrest Memorial Park. Mr. Reiselt died Friday, May 31, 2013, at his Reiselt residence. He was born July 19, 1931, in Camden, Ark., to the late Paul Carl Reiselt and Blanche Hendriks Reiselt. He graduated from Camden High School where he was on the state champion track team and also the University of Arkansas with a degree in business. He was personal manager for Singer in Truman, Ark., before moving to Corinth where he was personnel manager for Wurlitzer. Mr. Reiselt served as a staff sargent in the US Air Force. He was a member of the St. James Catholic Church. He was an avid

Lynn Thomas

COUNCE, Tenn. — Funeral services for Lynn (Tootie Newell) Thomas, 48, are set for 1 p.m. today at Pisgah United Methodist Church in Shiloh, Tenn., with burial at Pisgah Cemetery in Shiloh. Ms. Thomas died Thursday, May 30, 2013, at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Born Nov. 5, 1964, in Savannah, Tenn., she was a driver. Pat Terry and Paul Childers will officiate the service. Shackelford Funeral Directors is in charge of arrangements.  

Bonnie Tucker

IUKA — Funeral services for Bonnie Ruth Glover Tucker, 83, are set for 12 noon Monday at Magnolia Funeral Home Chapel of Memories with burial at Corinth National Cemetery. Mrs. Tucker died Thurs-

sports fan, golfer and an Arkansas Razorback fan. Mr. Reiselt was preceded in death by his parents. Survivors include his wife of 57 years, Betty Hollingsworth Reiselt; sons Fred Reiselt and his wife, Janie, Doug Reiselt and his wife, Michelle, and Bill Reiselt; one daughter, Paula Gunn and her husband, Mike, all of Corinth; a sister, Susan Quick and her husband, Eldon, of Hollywood, Calif.; grandchildren Michelle (Ben) Ramirez, Cliff (Sarah) Gunn, Logan, Justin, Emma and Jake Reiselt; and two great-grandchildren, Ana and Christian Ramirez. He also has a host of other family and friends. Pallbearers are Cliff Gunn, Mike Gunn, Ben Ramirez, Justin Reiselt, Logan Reislet and Jake Reiselt. Honorary pallbearers are Mike Clifford, Benson Robbins, Rick Roper and Wayne Bethea. Family will receive friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Monday at Memorial Funeral Home. Condolences can be left at memorialcorinth.com. Memorial Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

day, May 30, 2013, at McNairy Health Care Center in Selm e r . B o r n Aug. 24, 1929, she was a homemaker who attended BurnsTucker v i l l e Pentecostal Church. Survivors include three sons, Lester Tucker Jr. of Corinth, J.D. Tucker of Lawrenceburg, Tenn., and Bobby Joe Tucker (Teresa) of Corinth; four daughters, Ruby Burns of Iuka, Betty Whitaker (Lloyd) of Iuka, Patricia Barber (James) of Iuka and Nelda King (Carlous) of Booneville; one brother, Billy Glover (Katherine) of Iuka; a sister, Clara Bell Cooper of Burnsville; 19 grandchildren, Wendall Marlar, Chris Marlar,

Vicky Shea, Amy Gray, Jason Burns, Chessy Turner, Mindy Houston, Lynn Holloway, Jojo Gardner, Brandy Moore, Trista Tucker, B.J. Tucker, Christy Bonds, Sabrina Hyde, Derek Barber, Jenny Pedigo, Brandon King and Dustin King; 25 great-grandchildren; and four great-great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband of 58 years, Lester LaFayette Tucker; her father David Crockett Glover; her mother, Ivy Nora Sanders Glover; a daughter, Mary Marlar; a grandson, Brian Tucker; three brothers, John D. Glover, Albert Lee Glover and D.C. Glover; and two sisters, Evelyn Rickman and Jewel Glover. The Rev. James Rich and the Rev. Jimmy Kennedy will officiate the service. Visitation is today from 5 until 8 p.m. and Monday from 11 a.m. until service time.

Obituary Policy The Daily Corinthian include the following information in obituaries: The name, age, city of residence of the deceased; when, where and manner of death of the deceased; time and location of funeral service; name of officiant; time and location of visitation; time and location of memorial services; biographical information can include date of birth, education, place of employment/occupation, military service and church membership; survivors can include spouse, children, parents, grandparents, siblings (step included), and grandchildren, great-grandchildren can be listed by number only; preceded in death can include spouse, children, parents, grandparents, siblings (step included), grandchildren; great-grandchildren can be listed by number only.

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Life sentence in 2011 shooting death JACKSON — A Jackson man has been given a life sentence for a 2011 murder. The Hinds County District Attorney’s Office says Willie Bernard Jr. received the sentence for the shooting death of 28-year-old Jacksonian Larry Johnson in March 2011. The two had argued at Jackson’s Arbor Park Apartments when Bernard shot Johnson in the arm and chest. Johnson died the next day. Prosecutors say following Bernard’s conviction Friday, Hinds County Circuit Judge Winston Kyd sentenced Bernard to life in prison. During the trial, three witnesses testified Johnson berated the driver of a car in which Bernard was a passenger.

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Daily Corinthian • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • 7A

Haynes wins Wal-Mart FLW Tour at Lake Eufaula When a sportsman gets on a roll, everything seems to fall into place. Nothing can go wrong. The birds are singing. The sun is shinning. All’s right with the world. That’s exactly how bass fishing pro Randy Haynes of Counce, Tenn. must be feeling about now. Haynes, fresh off of winning the Ever Start Series Central Division bass tournament held on Pickwick Lake, recently made an even bigger splash in the bass fishing world. Randy displayed why he is known as one of the best deep-water ledge fishermen in the country when he targeted the ledges of Lake Eufaula to win a Wal-Mart FLW Tour event in convincing fashion. On the final day of

the fourday competition, Haynes’ limit of five bass eighing David w 16 pounds, Green 1 ounce Outdoors gave him a combined weight of 73 pounds, 1 ounce. The total was an astonishing eleven pounds more than that of the second place challenger, which earned him the championship trophy plus the $125,000 purse. “There are an awful lot of good fishermen out here,” said Haynes, who was fishing only his third event as a pro at the sport’s highest level, The Wal-Mart FLW Tour. “Everything has to go

just right for you in order to win a tournament of this size. I’ve really been blessed this entire week.” Haynes said that he had five or six different areas he fished throughout the week, though he really only concentrated on three during the final day of the event. “Today, I was just trying to catch a limit and get by,” Haynes said. “I had three main spots where I was fishing, and I was rotating through them, giving them a few hours of rest before I would go back. I figured out that they were setting up in different ways. In the early morning, they would suspend in front of the bars. I’d fish a swim-bait, and they really started eating.” According to Haynes,

most of his fish caught during the week came from throwing a mixture of swim-baits and cranking Strike King 5xD and 6xD crank-baits. His go-to rod-and-reel combination for the week was a Kistler Mark Rose Series Z-Bone crank-bait rod paired with a Lew’s BB1 reel. “That rod and reel is just an unbelievable combination.” Haynes said.” I was using 14-to 20pounds -test line when I was fishing the swim-bait, and 14-pound test line when I was cranking.” “I’m real lucky that I have been able to stay on the road with Mark Rose and Greg Bohannan, “Haynes continued.” It’s nice to be with two great guys like that, and I’ve learned a lot. They are definitely one of the rea-

sons I’m up here.” Randy went on to say of his win, “This is pretty awesome. I’m so happy for my family and friends. There are so many people back home that I compete for, and against. This is just special for me to do this for them.” The tour stop on Lake Eufaula presented by Straight Talk Wireless was hosted by the Eufaula Barbour Chamber of Commerce and was the fourth of six events slated in the Wal-Mart FLW Tour’s 2013 season. Coverage of the Lake Eufaula tournament will be broadcast in highdefinition on the NBC Sports Network when “FLW” airs June 23 from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. ET. The Emmy-nominated “FLW” television show is hosted

by Jason Harper and will be broadcast to more than 564 million households world-wide, making it the most widely distributed weekly outdoors sports television show in the world. A complete list of the Lake Eufaula tournament results can be found by logging onto FLWOutdoors.com. (Communications Specialist Joe Opager contributed to this story. Daily Corinthian columnist and Alcorn County resident David Green is an avid hunter and fisherman in the Crossroads area. Anyone wishing to share their own unique outdoor story or have any news to report pertaining to the outdoors, David can be contacted at dgreen_ outdoors@yahoo.com.)

Community Events Marine Corps meets The Corinth Marine Corps League will meet Tuesday, June 4 at Martha’s Menu, downtown Corinth, at 6 p.m. The League meets the first Tuesday of every month.  

Blood drives United Blood Services is having the following local blood drive: Monday, June 3 -- 2-7 p.m., Harmony Hill Baptist Church, multi-purpose building, Burnsville; and Sunday, June 9 -- 12:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m., Kossuth Community, Bloodmobile.  

Class reunions A meeting to plan the Alcorn Central High School Class of 1988’s 25th Class Reunion is being held Saturday, June 8 at 8 a.m. at KC’s coffee shop in downtown Corinth. All classmates are invited to attend. For more information, call Lisa Steen Green at 662286-6908. ■ The Kossuth High School Class of 1988 will be having a 25th Class Reunion planning meeting on Sunday, June 9 at 2 p.m. at the USDA Service Center office located at 3103 Mullins Drive in Corinth. Classmates are invited to attend. For more information, call Sandy C. Mitchell at 662-284-5569 or Roxanne Cornelius at 284-5548.  ■ The Corinth High School Class of 1973 40th reunion will be held June 22 at Pickwick Landing Inn Restaurant, State Park Road, Pickwick Dam, Tenn. A meet/greet in the private dining room will begin at 4 p.m. and dinner at 6 p.m. (buffet/menu options). For more information, contact DeLois Gates, 662-728-7293, 720-2298, dtgates@ hotmail.com or bill@wad■

lington.net.  

Activity center The Bishop Activity Center is having the following activities for the week of June 3 - June 7: Monday -jigsaw puzzles, quilting, table games, Rolo Golf and open discussion; Tuesday -- outing to Tate Baptist Church to exercise, table games, quilting, puzzles and open discussion; Wednesday -- bible study, table games, quilting, puzzles and open discussion; Thursday -- pet therapy from the animal shelter, Bingo, table games, quilting, puzzles and open discussion; and Friday -- grocery shopping at Rogers’ supermarket, table games, quilting, puzzles and open discussion. Senior citizens, age 60 and above, are welcome and encouraged to attend. The center offers a variety of activities for everyone.  

Car show The 5th annual Rockabilly Festival Car Show is being held Saturday, June 8 in downtown Selmer, Tenn. Registration is $25 which  includes a 8 by 10 plaque with a picture of car at the show and also a car show T-shirt. There will also be several sponsor trophies. The show is open to  all makes, models and years and will run from 8:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. There will be music entertainment including three great Rockabilly bands, kids’ activities, arts and crafts, food vendors and a tractor show. For car show information, call Melanie King at  731-697-9149 or for information on other areas call the McNairy Regional Alliance at 731-645-6360.  

Retirees luncheon The MRHC Retirement Group is an excellent way to socialize with former

co-workers. All MRHC retirees are encouraged to attend this gathering held monthly in the conference center at MRHC on the second Thursday of each month at 12 p.m. The next MRHC Retirement Group meeting will be held on Thursday, June 13 at noon. If interested in attending, RSVP to Deonne Henry, 662293-1315 or dhenry@ mrhc.org.  

Book signing Corinth native and best-selling Kindle author J.E. Gurley is having a book signing for his new book, “Grave Dancer’s Club” from 12-3 p.m., Tuesday, June 11 at KC’s Espresso in downtown Corinth. The horror supernatural story is set in Corinth. The author will be available to sign copies of all his books.  

Dinner party First United Methodist Church is having a Dinner Party on Wednesday, June 19 at 6 p.m. in the church fellowship hall. Entertainment will be by Elvis Impersonator, Mitchell Johnson from Vardaman. The dinner menu will be pork tenderloin, baked potato, salad and dessert. The event is sponsored by the BEES (senior adult ministry). The public is invited to make reservations by calling the church office at 2873111, $10 per adult. Reservations will close on Friday, June 14.  

Juneteenth Celebration The Minority Volunteers Organization, Inc. is having its Juneteenth Celebration on Saturday, June 15 at the E.S. Bishop Memorial Park in Corinth. The opening ceremony begins at 10 a.m. There will be various contests,

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drawings for give-aways and entertainment. Organizations are encouraged to set up booths to display arts and crafts, have a garage sale, sell food items or have a membership drive. The booth fee is $25. Contact Shirley Rolland at the Project Attention Center, 287-5200, to reserve booth space. Registration deadline is Friday, June 7. Proceeds from the event will benefit programs at the Project Attention Center.  

‘Vacation Adventure’ “Vacation Adventure” will be the theme for the Boys & Girls Club’s summer camp that starts Monday, June 3 and continues through July 26. The fun days begin at 9 a.m. and go to 5 p.m. Youngsters in first through 12th grade are eligible for the free camp. Children will take part in activities such as music and drama week. Nickelodeon week is also being planned. Campers will also get a chance to build and race some go karts. Field trips are being planned to go skating, bowling and to the movies as well. There will also be some swimming trips during the camp. The camp is free and lunch will be served each day. Applications for the camp can be picked up at the Boys & Girls Club at 511 Clark Street.

 

office at 287-8977.

CT-A season finale Corinth Theatre-Arts is presenting “Nunsense — The Mega Musical Version” as its season finale. The humorous musical focuses on the nuns of the convent and school of Mt. St. Helen’s, Hoboken, N.J. as they struggle with being under-staffed, under-funded and underappreciated. “Nunsense” is appropriate for all ages, but some of the situations and language are more appropriated for those over 13 years old. A performance is bring held at 2 p.m. today at the Crossroads Playhouse. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for children. For more information, visit www. corinththeatrearts.com.  

Registration held Wheeler Grove Learning Center registration is open for the 2013-2014 school year. WGLC is a Christian faith-based school that follows the ABeka curriculum. Spaces are limited. Bring the following when registering: child’s Social Security card, child’s certified birth certificate, and child’s up to date 121 forms. For more information contact the school

AMISH GOODIES

(LISTINGS FOR FRI. 5/31-THUR. 6/6/13) CALL THEATRE OR GO TO MALCO.COM FOR SHOW TIMES

The Alcorn County 4-H Modeling Squad, “Mod Squad” is having a community yard sale on Saturday, June 8 at the Alcorn County Extension Center. Vendors can purchase booths for outside, $10 or inside the building for $15. The yard sale will be held rain or shine with concessions available all day. For more information about the Mod Squad or yard sale, call 662-7501949.  

Froglevel Festival/ Run The 30th Annual Froglevel Festival and Run is being held Saturday, June 8 in the Pratts Community (six miles east of Baldwyn). A 5K run begins at 8 a.m. with registration at 7 a.m.  Registration fee is $15. There will be arts and crafts, food, entertainment, antique cars display, children’s games throughout the day. A live Frog Race begins at noon. T-shirts available for $15.  Arts and crafts booth fees are $5. For more information, call 365-2278 or 2311479.

The Market Place Wilbanks Produce

113300 1300 00 H Hwy w 72 wy 72 West West st • Corinth, Cori orinth th M MS S Mon-Sat 8am-6pm

Vine-Ripe Tomatoes Mississippi Grown Squash Cucumbers Eggplant Fresh Purple Hull Peas Green Beans • Okra 8 Ib. Bag Potatoes $1.00

AFTER EARTH (PG13) 1:15 4:25 7:15 9:35 NP NOW YOU SEE ME (PG13) 1:25 4:25 7:25 10:00 NP MUD (PG13) 1:05 4:05 7:05 9:50 FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG13) 1:10 4:10 7:10 7:45 10:00 NP 3-D EPIC (PG) 1:30 4:30 NP EPIC (PG) NON 3-D 1:00 4:00 7:00 9:25 NP THE HANGOVER PART III (R) 1:20 4:20 7:20 9:45 NP 3-D STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG13) 4:00 STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG13) NON 3-D 1:05 7:05 9:55 THE GREAT GATSBY (PG13) NON 3-D 1:15 4:15 7:25 IRON MAN 3 (PG13) NON 3-D 1:00 3:50 7:00 9:50 NP

Yard sale

Local Honey & Sorghum

Field Grown Cantalope Sweet Watermelons Sweet Georgia & Alabama Peaches

Avocados 4/$1.00 10 Ib. peanuts $15.00 Seedless Watermelons $2.99

Hibiscus Trees $10.99 (While Supplies Last) Kimberly Ferns Mandevillas • Hibiscus Bush

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2024 A Hwy 72E Annex • Corinth, MS Located at Magnolia Funeral Home bfinsure@gmail.com • 662-665-7970 • 662-286-9500 37 Years Insurance Experience


THE WEEK IN REVIEW WEEKLY DOW JONES Dow Jones industrials

CLOSED 106.29 -106.59 21.73 -208.96

Close: 15,115.57 1-week change: -187.53 (-1.2%)

MON

16,000

TUES

WED

THUR

Daily Corinthian • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • 8A

Business & Farm Soybean planting advances as soil improves

FRI

15,000

BY BONNIE COBLENTZ 14,000

MSU Ag Communications

13,000 12,000

D

J

F

M

A

M

WEEKLY STOCK EXCHANGE HIGHLIGHTS NYSE

NYSE MKT

NASDAQ

GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) GAINERS ($2 OR MORE) Name

Last Chg %Chg

Name

Last Chg %Chg

Name

Last Chg %Chg

KrispKrm Lentuo SmithfF HltMgmt CSVInvNG Caplease DxGldBll rs SibanyeG n NV Energy DrxRsaBear

17.32+4.14 4.36 +.94 32.94+7.03 13.79+2.75 11.02+2.02 8.62+1.52 11.16+1.93 3.62 +.61 23.44+3.72 21.57+3.42

GldFld TanzRy g DocuSec GrahamCp TherapMD NDynMn g InvCapHld Barnwell eMagin NovaGld g

2.61 +.49 3.24 +.52 2.94 +.44 28.00+4.18 2.79 +.39 2.62 +.32 4.14 +.47 3.78 +.40 3.89 +.41 2.52 +.25

Omthera n Affymax NatlReshB VestinRMII Sonus StewEnt Vermillion Clearwire OmniVisn OrchardSH

13.13+6.36 +93.9 2.08 +.69 +49.6 34.12+11.32 +49.6 2.24 +.63 +39.1 3.21 +.81 +33.8 13.00+3.19 +32.5 4.04 +.96 +31.2 4.48+1.06 +31.0 18.47+4.07 +28.3 2.37 +.51 +27.4

+31.4 +27.5 +27.1 +24.9 +22.4 +21.4 +20.9 +20.3 +18.9 +18.8

+23.1 +19.1 +17.6 +17.5 +16.3 +13.9 +12.9 +11.8 +11.8 +11.0

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

LOSERS ($2 OR MORE)

Name

Last Chg %Chg

Name

Last Chg %Chg

Name

Last Chg %Chg

NBGrce rs DirDGldBr CSVLgNGs DrxBrzBull DxRssaBull Mechel GlbGeophy DxREBull s DoleFood GolLinhas

7.22-4.98 -40.8 79.12-23.18 -22.7 26.90-6.42 -19.3 30.50-6.85 -18.3 21.15-4.34 -17.0 3.00 -.58 -16.2 3.57 -.63 -15.0 48.21-8.37 -14.8 9.47-1.59 -14.4 4.46 -.70 -13.6

Flanign Oragenics Gastar grs MGT Cap OrchidIsl n Lannett PowrREIT NuvREst Univ Insur PfdAptCm

9.91-2.46 2.84 -.51 2.48 -.35 4.53 -.54 12.01-1.43 11.47-1.27 9.41 -.99 11.94-1.11 6.67 -.62 8.50 -.73

UniPixel RealGSolar RetOpp wt EnerNOC Kingtne rs NatResh A AMAG Ph Ziopharm JamesRiv OxygnB rsh

15.21-8.73 2.70-1.31 2.05 -.96 13.38-4.46 2.25 -.51 16.35-3.65 18.50-3.75 2.18 -.44 2.59 -.52 3.73 -.75

-19.9 -15.2 -12.4 -10.7 -10.6 -10.0 -9.5 -8.5 -8.5 -7.9

-36.5 -32.7 -31.8 -25.0 -18.5 -18.3 -16.9 -16.8 -16.7 -16.7

MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) MOST ACTIVE ($1 OR MORE) Name

Vol (00) Last Chg

BkofAm 5549582 13.66 S&P500ETF 5229664163.45 iShEMkts 2766781 41.20 iShJapn 2667411 10.84 FordM 2344592 15.68 Pfizer 2068622 27.23 SPDR Fncl 2041049 19.84 SprintNex 1918733 7.30 GenElec 1596603 23.32 BariPVix rs 1530637 19.14

+.42 -1.86 -1.07 -.57 +.89 -1.81 +.11 -.03 -.21 +.41

Name

Vol (00) Last Chg

CheniereEn NwGold g Rentech AlldNevG NovaGld g AbdAsPac PhrmAth Aurizon g VantageDrl NA Pall g

186914 162976 139601 111755 110645 110579 92345 87683 74583 73481

29.35 6.81 2.20 7.72 2.52 6.70 1.78 3.85 1.92 1.09

Name

-.12 +.17 -.02 +.31 +.25 -.49 +.18 -.32 +.01 -.07

Vol (00) Last Chg

SiriusXM 2231755 Facebook 2054258 Microsoft 1824141 Cisco 1597118 Intel 1331635 Clearwire 1310509 PwShs QQQ 1259334 Celsion 1223378 MicronT 992130 RschMotn 820611

3.49 24.35 34.90 24.12 24.28 4.48 73.25 1.69 11.68 13.96

-.10 +.04 +.63 +.59 +.36 +1.06 -.16 +.65 +.09 -.53

STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST Last

Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg%Chg

Name

Ex

Div

AFLAC AT&T Inc AlliantTch Annaly Aon plc BP PLC BcpSouth BkofAm BariPVix rs BarrickG Bemis Caterpillar Celsion Checkpnt Chevron Cisco Citigroup Clearwire CocaCola s Comcast Deere Dover DowChm EMC Cp EnPro ExxonMbl Facebook FstHorizon FordM FrkUnv FredsInc FMCG GenElec HewlettP iShJapn iShEMkts iS Eafe iShR2K Intel IBM JPMorgCh KimbClk

NY NY NY NY NY NY NY NY NY NY NY NY Nasd NY NY Nasd NY Nasd NY Nasd NY NY NY NY NY NY Nasd NY NY NY Nasd NY NY NY NY NY NY NY Nasd NY NY NY

1.40 55.69 +.74 +1.3 +4.8 1.80 34.99 -1.76 -4.8 +3.8 1.04 78.52 +1.04 +1.3 +26.7 1.95 13.58 -.84 -5.8 -3.3 .70 63.67 -2.06 -3.1 +14.5 2.16 42.91 -.61 -1.4 +3.0 .04 17.16 -.18 -1.0 +18.0 .04 13.66 +.42 +3.2 +17.7 ... 19.14 +.41 +2.2 -39.8 .80 21.12 +2.16 +11.4 -39.7 1.04 39.15 -.99 -2.5 +17.0 2.08 85.80 -.41 -0.5 -4.3 ... 1.69 +.65 +62.5 -79.4 ... 13.66 +1.27 +10.3 +27.2 4.00 122.75 -2.70 -2.2 +13.5 .68 24.12 +.59 +2.5 +22.7 .04 51.99 +1.47 +2.9 +31.4 ... 4.48 +1.06 +31.0 +55.0 1.12 39.99 -2.25 -5.3 +10.3 .78 40.17 -1.79 -4.3 +7.5 2.04 87.11 +.82 +1.0 +.8 1.40 78.25 -.59 -0.7 +19.1 1.28 34.46 -.62 -1.8 +6.6 .40 24.76 +1.11 +4.7 -2.1 ... 50.37 -.13 -0.3 +23.2 2.52 90.47 -1.06 -1.2 +4.5 ... 24.35 +.04 +0.1 -8.5 .20 11.48 +.35 +3.1 +15.8 .40 15.68 +.89 +6.0 +21.1 .46 7.13 -.41 -5.4 +1.0 .24 15.86 +.67 +4.4 +19.2 1.25 31.05 +.65 +2.1 -9.2 .76 23.32 -.21 -0.9 +11.1 .58 24.42 +.21 +0.9 +71.4 .19 10.84 -.57 -5.0 +11.2 .74 41.20 -1.07 -2.5 -7.1 1.76 60.07 -1.38 -2.2 +5.6 1.70 97.80 -.08 -0.1 +16.0 .90 24.28 +.36 +1.5 +17.7 3.80 208.02 +2.30 +1.1 +8.6 1.52 54.59 +.93 +1.7 +25.0 3.24 96.83 -6.68 -6.5 +14.7

Last

Wk Wk YTD Chg %Chg%Chg

Name

Ex

Div

Kroger Lowes MktVGold McDnlds MeadWvco MicronT Microsoft MorgStan NV Energy NY Times NiSource NokiaCp NorthropG Penney PepsiCo Pfizer PwShs QQQ PrUVxST rs ProctGam RadioShk RegionsFn RschMotn S&P500ETF SearsHldgs Sherwin SiriusXM SmithfF SouthnCo SprintNex SP CnSt SPDR Fncl SP Util TecumsehB TecumsehA Torchmark Vale SA VangEmg WalMart WellsFargo Wendys Co Weyerhsr Xerox

NY NY NY NY NY Nasd Nasd NY NY NY NY NY NY NY NY NY Nasd NY NY NY NY Nasd NY Nasd NY Nasd NY NY NY NY NY NY Nasd Nasd NY NY NY NY NY Nasd NY NY

.60 33.67 -.56 -1.6 +29.4 .72 42.11 -.53 -1.2 +18.6 .46 29.50 +2.00 +7.3 -36.4 3.08 96.57 -2.95 -3.0 +9.5 1.00 35.00 ... ... +9.8 ... 11.68 +.09 +0.8 +84.2 .92 34.90 +.63 +1.8 +30.7 .20 25.90 +1.55 +6.4 +35.5 .76 23.44 +3.72 +18.9 +29.2 ... 10.57 +.21 +2.0 +23.9 1.00 28.73 -.04 -0.1 +15.4 ... 3.44 -.21 -5.8 -12.9 2.44 82.39 +1.13 +1.4 +21.9 ... 17.58 -1.40 -7.4 -10.8 2.27 80.77 -1.81 -2.2 +18.0 .96 27.23 -1.81 -6.2 +8.6 .86 73.25 -.16 -0.2 +12.5 ... 6.34 +.23 +3.8 -69.7 2.41 76.76 -5.12 -6.3 +13.1 ... 3.70 -.18 -4.6 +74.5 .12 9.13 +.03 +0.3 +28.1 ... 13.96 -.53 -3.6 +17.6 3.18 163.45 -1.86 -1.1 +14.8 ... 48.83 -1.42 -2.8 +18.1 2.00 188.53 -.67 -0.4 +22.6 .05 3.49 -.10 -2.7 +20.6 ... 32.94 +7.03 +27.1 +52.7 2.03 43.90 -1.30 -2.9 +2.5 ... 7.30 -.03 -0.4 +28.7 1.08 40.05 -1.65 -4.0 +14.8 .27 19.84 +.11 +0.6 +21.0 1.45 37.68 -1.15 -3.0 +7.9 ... 8.90 +.12 +1.4 +93.5 ... 9.18 +.18 +2.0 +98.7 .68 64.51 +.25 +0.4 +25.2 .78 14.40 -1.11 -7.2 -31.3 1.05 41.54 -1.30 -3.0 -6.7 1.88 74.84 -2.47 -3.2 +9.7 1.20 40.55 +.31 +0.8 +18.6 .16 5.95 -.09 -1.5 +26.6 .80 29.82 -1.92 -6.0 +7.2 .23 8.79 -.13 -1.5 +28.9

AGRICULTURE FUTURES WkHigh WkLow Settle WkChg CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 13 Sep 13 Dec 13 Mar 14 May 14 Jul 14 Sep 14

669.75 601 573 582.50 588 594 575.25

649.50 570.75 541.50 552.50 560 567.75 556

662 597.25 567.25 577 582.75 587.50 572.50

CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. +4.75 +30.50 +30.75 +29.50 +27.50 +24.75 +19

SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 13 Aug 13 Sep 13 Nov 13 Jan 14 Mar 14 May 14

1528.50 1449 1358 1314.75 1319.50 1319.25 1317

1472.50 1400 1299.50 1249.50 1254.75 1255 1256.50

1510 1437.75 1347.25 1304.25 1310 1310.25 1306.75

707.50 717.50 731.75 746.50 756 761 765.75

687.50 695.75 711 726.75 735.25 738.50 744.50

705.50 715.50 730 744.50 754 759.25 765.75

Jun 13 Aug 13 Oct 13 Dec 13 Feb 14 Apr 14 Jun 14

121.75 120.67 124.42 126.32 127.60 129.30 124.85

120.17 118.95 122.77 124.77 126.05 127.60 123.20

121.30 120.45 123.75 125.85 127.22 128.97 124.50

+.73 +1.23 +.95 +1.03 +1.15 +1.65 +1.30

95.62 93.85 93.47 83.80 80.70 83.80 85.30

+.75 +.55 +1.27 +1.35 +.75 +1.55 +1.50

79.36 82.06 81.89 82.06 82.38 83.03 83.71

-2.13 -1.71 -1.41 -1.71 -1.20 -.86 -.47

HOGS-Lean 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. +33.75 +35.25 +47.25 +56.50 +55.75 +52.75 +48.25

WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Jul 13 Sep 13 Dec 13 Mar 14 May 14 Jul 14 Sep 14

WkHigh WkLow Settle WkChg

Jun 13 Jul 13 Aug 13 Oct 13 Dec 13 Feb 14 Apr 14

95.92 94.37 93.60 83.82 80.90 83.80 85.30

94.32 92.85 92.05 82.02 79.20 81.55 83.20

COTTON 2 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. +8 +11 +12 +12.25 +14.50 +17.50 +20.75

Jul 13 Sep 13 Oct 13 Dec 13 Mar 14 May 14 Jul 14

82.93 ... 84.33 84.91 84.53 84.79 85.44

79.30 ... 81.83 82.00 82.07 82.78 84.16

Tables show seven most current contracts for each future. Grains traded on Chicago Board of Trade; livestock on Chicago Mercantile Exchange; and cotton on New York Cotton Exchange.

MUTUAL FUNDS Name

Obj

PIMCO TotRetIs Vanguard TotStIdx Vanguard InstIdxI Vanguard TotStIAdm Vanguard 500Adml Fidelity Contra American Funds CapIncBuA m American Funds IncAmerA m American Funds GrthAmA m Vanguard InstPlus American Funds CpWldGrIA m American Funds InvCoAmA m FrankTemp-Franklin IncomeA m Vanguard TotStIIns Dodge & Cox Stock Dodge & Cox IntlStk

CI LB LB LB LB LG IH MA LG LB WS LB CA LB LV FB

Total Assets ($Mlns) NAV 182,816 92,413 76,879 69,516 67,851 64,295 63,587 63,319 60,603 58,245 50,546 49,009 46,945 46,939 45,650 44,296

11.07 40.99 149.87 41.01 150.83 87.14 55.83 19.51 39.01 149.88 40.70 34.28 2.34 41.01 142.60 37.74

Total Return/Rank 4-wk 12-mo 5-year

Pct Min Init Load Invt

-2.2 +2.3 +2.3 +2.3 +2.3 +2.0 -2.6 -0.7 +2.8 +2.3 -0.4 +1.1 -0.8 +2.3 +3.1 +1.0

NL 1,000,000 NL 3,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 10,000 NL 10,000 NL 2,500 5.75 250 5.75 250 5.75 250 NL200,000,000 5.75 250 5.75 250 4.25 1,000 NL 5,000,000 NL 2,500 NL 2,500

+4.4/B +27.7/C +27.2/C +27.8/C +27.2/C +21.6/C +17.3/B +20.2/B +28.6/A +27.3/C +28.7/B +26.7/C +19.6/A +27.8/C +37.8/A +35.7/A

+7.6/A +5.8/A +5.5/B +5.9/A +5.4/B +5.3/B +2.9/C +5.8/A +3.7/D +5.5/B +1.6/C +4.4/C +5.8/B +5.9/A +4.2/C +0.4/A

CA -Conservative Allocation, CI -Intermediate-Term Bond, ES -Europe Stock, FB -Foreign Large Blend, FG -Foreign LargeGrowth, FV -Foreign Large Value, IH -World Allocation, LB -Large Blend, LG -Large Growth, LV -Large Value, MA -Moderate Allocation, MB -Mid-Cap Blend, MV - Mid-Cap Value, SH -Specialty-heath, WS -World Stock, Total Return: Chng in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. Source: Morningstar. Stock Footnotes: g = Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h = Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf = Late filing with SEC. n = New in past 52 weeks. pf = Preferred. rs = Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50 percent within the past year. rt = Right to buy security at a specified price. s = Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. un = Units. vj = In bankruptcy or receivership. wd = When distributed. wi = When issued. wt = Warrants. Mutual Fund Footnotes: b = Fee covering market costs is paid from fund assets. d = Deferred sales charge, or redemption fee. f = front load (sales charges). m = Multiple fees are charged. NA = not available. p = previous day’s net asset value. s = fund split shares during the week. x = fund paid a distribution during the week.Gainers and Losers must be worth at least $2 to be listed in tables at left. Most Actives must be worth at least $1. Volume in hundreds of shares. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

STARKVILLE — Many Mississippi farmers celebrated Memorial Day in their tractor seats as they took full advantage of about a week of good weather to make significant strides in planting. A nearly unbroken string of rains kept farmers mostly out of the fields through the early-spring planting window. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s May 26 Crop Progress and Condition Report shows their efforts to catch up. Soybeans are 46 percent planted in the state, when normally this crop would be about 88 percent planted. Cotton is still far behind the norm, with just 36 percent of the crop planted rather than the five-year average of 84 percent. Rice planting is farther ahead at 72 percent, compared with the normal 96 percent planted. Corn planting is all but finished. Trent Irby, soybean specialist with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said poor conditions also have forced growers to replant some acreage. “The frequent rains and cooler temperatures forced a number of growers to have to replant this season, making part of an already late crop even later,� Irby said. Some growers had to pause planting to spray herbicides on soybean fields that had already emerged. “Windy conditions made it difficult to catch up on herbicide applications,� Irby said. “With only a limited amount of time between rains, making timely herbicide ap-

Households far from regaining wealth Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The average U.S. household has a long way to go to recover the wealth it lost to the Great Recession, a report by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis concluded Thursday. The typical household has regained less than half its wealth, the analysis found. A separate Federal Reserve report in March calculated that Americans as a whole had regained 91 percent of their losses. Household wealth plunged $16 trillion from the third quarter of 2007 through the first quarter of 2009. By the final three months of 2012, American households as a group had regained $14.7 trillion. Yet once those figures are adjusted for inflation and averaged across the U.S. population, the picture doesn’t look so bright: The average household has recovered only 45 percent of its wealth, the St. Louis Fed concluded. That suggests that consumer spending could remain modest as many Americans try to rebuild their wealth by saving more and paying off debts. The number of U.S. households grew 3.8 million to 115 million from the third quarter of 2007 through the final three months of last year, the report said. As a result, the rebound in wealth has been spread across more people and reduced the average wealth for each household.

plications has been difficult, especially in areas where producers are battling resistant pigweed.� Early in the season, Mississippi farmers had been expected to plant about 1.95 million acres of soybeans. Irby said he expects the statewide delay in planting all crops could increase soybean acreage by as much as 10 percent. However, lateplanted soybeans face late-season insect and disease problems. Tom Allen, MSU Extension Service plant pathologist at the Delta Research and Extension Center in Stoneville, said later-planted crops require more vigilance, additional scouting and better management to be successful. “One of the main reasons we adopted an early soybean production system was to prevent lateseason disease issues,� Allen said. “You get to the end of the growing season and often tropical storm systems can delay harvest and bring added moisture, which can increase the incidence of some diseases.� Soybean rust has become a significant lateseason threat in recent years. With funding from the Mississippi Soybean Promotion Board and the United Soybean Promotion Board, MSU has again planted 25 sentinel plots across the state to monitor the arrival of this disease. “The poor weather prevented us from planting sentinel plots as early as we wanted to, but some are far enough along to have already reached reproductive stages in

the southern part of the state,� Allen said. Last year’s appearance of frogeye leaf spot that is resistant to the fungicide strobilurin may be an even bigger threat than rust. “We’re going to continually monitor this issue,� Allen said. “Farmers need to be aware of this resistance and know that we are actively monitoring the situation in Mississippi and adjacent states.� If any growers treat frogeye leaf spot with strobilurin fungicide and the disease appears to worsen, they should send samples of the diseased plants to MSU. Soybeans are a desirable crop to plant because of their late planting window and good prices. Brian Williams, Extension agricultural economist, said good prices caused some producers to sell

stored grain, which prevented pricesfrom climbing quickly, but the late planting date is helping increase soybean prices. “Old crop July soybeans are currently trading for $15.01 per bushel, while new crop September soybeans are trading for $13.31 per bushel,� Williams said. The current planting pace for the U.S. soybean crop is at its slowest in 17 years. “The current slow progress combined with weather reports earlier this week calling for more rain in the northern Corn Belt have caused soybean prices to continue to move upward as fears grow that the crop will not be planted on time,� he said. MSU specialists offer current crop information on the state’s major row crops at http://www.mississippi-crops.com.

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   Financial Advisor Financial Advisor 605 Foote Street 1500 Harper Road Suite 1 Corinth, MS 38834 Corinth, MS 38834 662-287-4471 662-287-1409

       

   Financial Advisor Financial Advisor 605 Foote Street 1500 Harper Road Suite 1 Corinth, MS 38834 Corinth, MS 38834 662-287-4471 662-287-1409 

www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC

Kiwanis CLub of Corinth Corinth Alcorn Convention & Visitors Bureau Dogwood Plantation

Proudly Present

16th Annual Leon Frazier Memorial Concert

June 8, 2013 6:00 pm

The LeFerve Quartet Juan Parker Also appearing Talent Contest Winners from Friday Night’s Eve

Historic Coliseum Civic Center

Downtown Corinth, Mississippi Advanced Tickets $12 At the Door $15 Artist’s Circle $25 Tickets available at New Life Christian Supply or www.CorinthKiwanis.org

A r t is t Circle n tio R e ce p at m 4:00 p

For Artist’s Circle or special group rate call 662-665-1175

Door s open At 5: 00 pm


Daily Corinthian • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • 9A

SUNDAY EVENING C A WPTY ^ ^ WREG # # QVC $ . WCBI

$

WMC

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The Bachelorette Desiree and her suitors arrive.

Motive The murder of a ABC 24 Two and Two and Big Bang limo driver. News Half Men Half Men Theory The American Baking The Good Wife The Mentalist “Red Sails Channel 3 (:37) Criminal Minds (:37) LeverCompetition in the Sunset” Sunday “Haunted” age Computer Shop Summertime Susan Graver Style Easy Solutions Travel in Style The American Baking The Good Wife The Mentalist “Red Sails News (:35) Paid (:05) Paid Cold Case Competition in the Sunset” Program Program (6:00) The Voice The Women’s Concert for Change: Live From News Action Matthews Law & London (N) News 5 Order The First The First Mr. Box Mr. Box CW30 News (N) House of Sanford & Andy The JefFamily Family Office Office Payne Son Griffith fersons The Bachelorette Desiree and her suitors arrive. Motive The murder of a News Castle Investigating a Private limo driver. psychic’s death. Practice (6:00) The Voice The Women’s Concert for Change: Live From News (N) Law & Order “Agony” The Closer London (N) Masterpiece Classic “Downton Abbey, Season 3” Trip to a Scot- Delicious I, Claudius “Fool’s Luck” Dr. Fuhrman’s Immunity tish hunting lodge. Europe Solution! How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met News at Instant } ››› Eight Men Out (88, Historical Drama) John Nine Replay Cusack, Clifton James. In Performance at the Masterpiece Mystery! Murder of a Architect Moyers & Company In Performance at the White House baby sitter in a suburb. 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(N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) (Live) (Live) } Star Wars V: The } ››› Star Wars VI: Return of the Jedi (83) Mark Hamill. Luke and his al- Bar Rescue “Swanky Troubles” Empire lies have a confrontation with Darth Vader. Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Law & Order: Special Suits “War” Differing } I Now Pronounce Victims Unit Victims Unit Victims Unit opinions. You See Dad Wendell } ›› Racing Stripes (05, Comedy) Friends Friends Friends Friends Alaska: The Last Fron- North America “The Sav- Deadliest Catch North America “The Sav- Deadliest Catch tier (N) age Edge” age Edge” Duck Dy- Duck Dy- Duck Dy- Duck Dy- Storage Storage Storage Storage Duck Dy- Duck Dynasty nasty nasty nasty Wars Wars Wars Wars nasty nasty World Poker Tour: UFC Unleashed (N) World Poker Tour: World Poker Tour: Bull Riding: ChampiSeason 11 Season 11 Season 11 onship. } ››› American Gangster (07) Denzel Washington. The Sheards Popoff Inspir. Extreme Homes You Live in What? (N) House Hunters House Hunters You Live in What? Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l } Little Fockers Kardashian The Wanted Life Kardashian The Wanted Life Ax Men “Risking It All” Ax Men “In Too Deep” Ax Men “Fight to the Fin- (:02) Swamp People (:01) Ax Men “Risking (N) ish Line” (N) It All” MLB Baseball: Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees. (N) SportCtr ESPN Bases Loaded (N) (Live) Long Island Long Island Island Me- Island Me- Breaking Amish: Brave Island Me- Island Me- Breaking Amish: Brave Me Me dium dium New World dium dium New World Chopped “Fry, Fry Food Network Star (N) Iron Chef America (N) Chopped “Food Network Food Network Star Again” (N) Stars!” } ›› Ivanhoe (82) James Mason, Anthony Andrews. } ›› Ivanhoe (82) James Mason. Army Wives “DamThe Client List “When I (:01) } ›› Rumor Has It... (05, Comedy) Jennifer (6:00) } ›› Rumor aged” (N) Say I Do” Has It... (05) Aniston, Kevin Costner. Osteen Kerry Believer Creflo D. 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King/Hill King/Hill Cleve Fam Guy Fam Guy The Venture Bros. Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden Golden King King King Tunnel NASCAR Faster Faster Classic Hot Rod SPEED Center Tunnel NASCAR } ›› The Karate Kid (10) Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. A Chinese master } ›› The Karate Kid (10, Drama) Jaden Smith, schools an American boy in the martial arts. Jackie Chan. Hunt Adv Wild Realtree Hunting NRA Bone Wild Sky Hal & Hunt Adv Realtree (6:30) NHL Hockey (N) (L) NHL Live To Be Announced TBA Oprah’s Next Oprah’s Next Master Class Oprah’s Next Oprah’s Next Huckabee (N) Fox News Sunday Geraldo at Large Huckabee Stossel Wildman Wildman Wildman Wildman Top Hooker (N) Wildman Wildman Top Hooker Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier (6:00) } ››› Backyard The Sweeter Side of Life A jilted woman takes a job at her father’s bakery. Wedding GoodAustin & Shake It Jessie Dog With a Shake It A.N.T. Farm Austin & GoodGoodCharlie Ally (N) Up! (N) Blog Up! 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Coming Up In The Daily Corinthian Corinth aldermen and Alcorn County supervisors will hold their regular meetings this week. See complete coverage from Staff Writer Jebb Johnston.

Neighbors continue to drop in even after couple moves out DEAR ABBY: We moved my elderly parents into an adult assisted-living center last year because they were no longer able to safely care for themselves or their home. They have now decided to put their house up for sale. Our problem is that sometimes when we have driven by the house to check that everything’s OK, we have found some of the neighbors enjoying the afternoon sitting on my parents’ front porch. The house has been shown three times, and one of the times another neighbor was in the backyard sitting on the deck. Another time, a neighbor walked into the house during a private showing. We have been as polite as possible in requesting them to please not do this. We finally told them plainly to stay off the property. But it continues. We would hate to post “No Trespassing” signs for fear that a prospective buyer may think there are problems with the neighborhood, and I don’t think a sign would deter these perpetrators. Any ideas on how to get them to stay in their own homes? My sisters and I are starting to think the neighbors don’t want the house to sell so they can enjoy it themselves. — FED UP IN TENNESSEE DEAR FED UP: Because of the long relationship your parents may have had with these neighbors, ask them once more, firmly

and politely, to stop using the property as an extension of theirs. If the request is ignored, it will be time to your Abigail involve lawyer, who Van Buren will have to write these Dear Abby nervy people a strong letter on your behalf. Not only is what they are doing illegal, but if an accident should happen while they are on your property, your family would be liable. DEAR ABBY: Living in New York City, public transport is the way to travel. After picking up my 5-yearold from school, we took the train home as usual. During the ride, my son fell asleep and his head happened to rest on the arm of another passenger — a middleaged man who was sitting next to us. As my son’s head rested on the man’s arm, he reacted by pushing my son’s head up violently, waking him from his sleep. Disgusted by the man’s reaction, I lost my cool and yelled at him, almost forgetting my screaming 5-year-old. Other passengers expressed their feelings, too, and the man left the train earlier than he wanted. After my boy calmed down, I

had time to reflect and concluded I didn’t handle the situation correctly. The other passengers suggested I hadn’t been assertive enough. What should I have done? — COMMUTER MOMMY IN BROOKLYN DEAR COMMUTER MOMMY: Your seat partner clearly overreacted to having his space invaded. But by screaming at him, you escalated the situation. So your little boy wasn’t caught in the crossfire, it would have been better to have moved your seats. If that wasn’t possible, you should have switched seats with your son so he wouldn’t be near that volatile individual. DEAR ABBY: If a doctor is present at a party and another guest takes ill, would it be appropriate to ask the doctor to treat the person? — CURIOUS IN DAYTON DEAR CURIOUS: If the problem is not life-threatening, it would be advisable that the guest contact his or her own doctor, who is already familiar with the person’s medical history. However, in an acute emergency such as a stroke or a heart attack, help should be summoned by calling 911 immediately. (Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.)

Horoscopes ARIES (March 21-April 19). The stakes are getting higher in a personal relationship. Give a serious look to what you really want out of this, and then step out of yourself and see whether you can sense what the other person wants. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Today’s task will likely be more difficult to execute than you thought it would be. Do some research, though, because there are some tricks you might be overlooking. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You feel the crunch of time. Your no-nonsense mood has you cutting to the quick. Timesaving tips: Assume nothing. Minimize guesswork. Ask direct questions. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You’ll be drawn to an idiosyncratic person, perhaps because things are always more interesting around this person. Expect nonconformity. Appreciate and treasure this person’s unique-

ness instead. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). There are some stages of life that are hard enough without other people trying to impose new rules and beliefs on the situation. This realization may have you easing up on a loved one and affording yourself more leeway, too. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You’ll see today’s situation differently from the way other involved parties see it. You’ll enjoy discussing these differences in reality so long as you can detach from your own point of view a bit. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Can success really be measured in financial and statistical terms? For you, it’s more of a feeling than an actual number. You’ll seek your success through the channels of the spirit. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). You’ll have a clear picture of what is getting in your way. Note that you don’t have to blast right through the obstacle. You can instead mentally rise above it.

It’s not unreasonable to think you’ll float right on by. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Visualize a world in which everyone you know is capable of living peaceably in spite of their different beliefs, opinions and wants. It may not happen in your lifetime, but you’ll see glimmers of it in your day. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19). You have rules and standards. Today, though, it seems that the world did not get your memo on these matters. Make it easier on yourself. Compromise. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). Homogeny is good in milk, but in groups of people, it scares you. You love to mingle where many different types of people are mixing. You’ll get your wish today. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Your cause rises to the forefront of important items within an impressive group. You don’t want to get your hopes up, but this is a moment to savor. You’re on the brink of something.


10A • Daily Corinthian

Prep Baseball 1A/2A/3A All-Stars South 4, North 1 (10 inn.)

Shorts Summer Softball Jam Northeast Mississippi Community College and its softball program will host Summer Softball Jam II at the Booneville City Park on June 7-8. Ages eligible for the tournament include Fast Pitch 10-U, 12-U, 14-U and 16-U/18-U/High School as well as an 8-U Coach Pitch division. Each team entered is guaranteed four teams, and each division requires four teams to play in the tournament. Deadline to register is today. Brackets for the session will be drawn on June 5. Entry fees are $150 for fastpitch divisions and $100 for doubleelimination Coach Pitch. For more information, or to register, contact NEMCC Head Softball Coach Jody Long at jwlong@nemcc.edu or call 720-7305.  

Sports

MSU advances to regional championship Associated Press

STARKVILLE — Mississippi State scored four runs in the fifth inning to overcome an early deficit and beat South Alabama 6-2 at an NCAA regional Saturday night. Brett Pirtle had the big hit during the Bulldogs’ fifth inning, with a two-run single to right field that put Mississippi State ahead 3-2. C.T. Bradford added a tworun single in the seventh inning to give the Bulldogs a 6-2 lead. Mississippi State (45-17) advances to the regional championship game, where it will play the winner of South Alabama/Central Arkansas on Sunday night.

Ross Mitchell (12-0) pitched 5 1-3 innings of scoreless relief for the win. Alex Detz was 3 for 4 with a run scored. South Alabama (43-19) didn’t score a run after the fourth inning. Matt Bell (6-2) took the loss, giving up five runs in 6 1-3 innings.

UCA 6, Mercer 5, 11 inn. Jonathan Davis scored the go-ahead run on a throwing error in the 11th inning to lead Central Arkansas over Mercer in Saturday’s first game at Starkville. Central Arkansas (40-21) led 5-1 before allowing three

runs in the seventh inning. Mercer tied the game in the bottom of the ninth on Chesny Young’s run-scoring double to right field. In the top of the 11th, Davis reached on an error and then stole second. Ethan Harris’ groundout advanced Davis to third, and then C.J. Reed overthrew home plate after catching a pop up to right field, allowing Davis to score. Harris finished 2 for 4 with two RBIs. Michael Marietta also had two RBIs. Bryce Biggerstaff (6-4) worked five innings of relief to earn the win. He struck out three and allowed one earned run.

The 1A State Champion Biggersville Lions will be hosting two basketball camps June 11-14. Camps times are 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. for boys and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. for girls and any child entering grades 1-8 are eligible. Every camper will receive a camp t-shirt and camp cost is $40 per child. To register, or for more information, contact Cliff Little at 665-1486.  

CHS Volleyball Camp

Booneville Football Camp The Booneville Blue Devils will be hosting a Junior Football Camp open to area youngsters grades secondseventh on June 6-7. Those entering second-fourth grade will participate on June 6, while incoming fifth-seventh graders will attend on June 7.  The camp will be held on the BHS practice field from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., with a guest speaker afterward. Cost is $25, which includes camp t-shirt, lunch and instruction on fundamentals from Blue Devils players and staff. College football players are also scheduled to appear. Walk-up registration is welcome. Parents can register children at any Booneville city school. Additional camp info and forms can also be found at www.boonevilleschools.org or by calling Trey Ward at 416-1537.

COLUMBIA, S.C. — Jordan Montgomery had a careerhigh 11 strikeouts in seven innings, Kyle Martin drove in four runs and South Carolina took control of the Columbia regional. The Gamecocks (41-18) set a school record for runs in an NCAA game and took their 26th straight tournament home win. They try for No. 27 — and the regional title — on Sunday night against Liberty Please see MSU | 11A

BY H. LEE SMITH II

The Corinth Area Softball Camp for ages 6-12 is set for June 3-6 at Crossroads Regional Park. Cost is $75 for entire session and includes noon meal each day along with camp T-shirt. Accident insurance is included. Discount will be given if more than one family member attends. Camp is from 8:30 a.m. until 1 p.m. A $40 deposit is required with the remaining balance due on the first day of camp. Checks should be made payable to Diamond S/Baseball Camp, 3159 Kendrick Road, Corinth, Ms. 38834. For more information contact John Smillie at 808-0013.  

The 2013 Kossuth Aggies Football Camp will be held on June 3-5 from 8-11:30 a.m. at the KHS football facility. The camp is open to students grades K-5. Cost is $60 (payable to Kossuth High School) and includes t-shirt and lunch on final day. Registration can be done at the school from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. or mailed to KHS, attn: Brain Kelly, 15 CR 604, Kossuth, MS 38834. For questions contact Kyle Bond (255-3818) or Brian Kelly (6640719).  

South Carolina 19, Liberty 3

lsmith@dailycorinthian.com

Corinth Area Softball Camp

Aggie Football Camp

The loss eliminated Mercer (43-18) from the tournament.

6-year-old shines in kids triathlon

Biggersville Basketball Camp

Corinth High School will host their 4th Annual Basic Skills Volleyball Camp on June 10 (9 a.m. to 3 p.m.) and 11 (6 p.m. to 8 p.m.) in the high school gym. Kids ages 6-12 from any school are eligible for the camp, which will teach basic skills such as serving and blocking. Children who wish to improve on these skills are welcome to attend. Registration is limited to the first $100 students, and all campers must pre-register by June 3. Cost is $35 per camper and includes a camp t-shirt. Campers will provide their own lunch on June 10, and an exhibition game for parents and guests will close camp on June 11. Registration forms can be picked up at all Corinth Elementary Schools, or Med Supply Plus. For more information, to obtain forms, or to register e-mail Ronnie Sleeper (ronnie@medsupplyplus.net).  

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Submitted Photo

Six-year-old Ethan Kimbrough (right) finished third in the 7-yearold group at the Nashville Kids Triathlon.

The third time was a charm for Ethan Kimbrough. The 6-year-old son of Kevin and Sarah Kimbrough recently finished third in the 7-year-old group of the Nashville Kids Triathlon. The May 19 event was the Rienzi resident’s third ever triathlon. Over 600 participated in the competition that combines swimming, biking and running. Youngsters competed in either the Junior (610) or Senior (11-5) Division. Kimbrough earned a third-place finish with a total time of 25:25 in the tree events. Junior Division participants swim 100 yards, bike three miles and run one-half of a mile. The Nashville Kids Triathlon is organized by Kids Triathlon, Inc. Based

in Jacksonville, Fla., the organization’s sole mission is to utilize the sport of triathlon to help build a generation of healthy, active kids. Team Magic of Nashville is the official USATriathlon Race Director. The YMCA of Middle Tennessee, the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt and Nashville Parent are the three Founding Partners of the event in Nashville. The youngster is a member of the Tallahatchie Tidal Waves (TTW), a swim team based out of New Albany in Union County. The youngest member of the TTW joined the team last summer. Kimbrough has won three high point meet awards during his stint with TTW. The team, of whom his father is an assistant coach, works out at the New Albany Baptist Healthplex.

CRP Adult Softball Leagues Standings and results heading into May for the various adult softball leagues at Crossroads Regional Park.  Coed W-L GB Peaches & Plums 2-1 -Papa John’s/Leather & Lace 1-2 1   Peaches & Plums 6, Papa John’s 5 LEADING HITTERS -- PP: Dusty Roby HR, Ashley Jones 2-3. PJ: Brandi Clark 2-3, Mandy Hughes 2-3.  Senior 50-Plus W-L GB Corinth Merchants 2-1 -Metal Works 2-1 -Aaron’s 2-1 -Corinth Medical Services 2-2 0.5 Fabpro Welding 0-3 2 Metal Works 16, Corinth Medical Service 8 LEADING HITTERS -- MW: Charles Curtis 2HR, Rick Preslar 3-3. CMS: Chris Tays 3-3, Carl Hall 3-3. Aaron’s 25, Fabpro Welding 3 LEADING HITTERS -- A: Willie Bush HR, Jack HR. F: Gerry Jackson 2-3  Corinth Merchants 27, Fabpro Welding 0

LEADING HITTERS -- CM: Rick Wallins 3-3, Zeke Craft 3-3. FW: David Thrasher 2-3. Aaron’s 16, Corinth Medical Services 15 LEADING HITTERS -- A: Alan Miles HR, Phillip Spence HR. CM: Jamie Dixon 2HR, Charlie Curtis 2HR. Senior 55-Plus W-L GB Corinth Merchants 4-0 -Taylor’s Escape 1-3 3 Magnolia Orthopedic 0-2 3   Corinth Merchants 13, Taylor’s Escape 8 LEADING HITTERS -- CM: Jack Melson HR, Ronnie Joslin 4-4. TE: Gary Roberts 3-4, Rudy Massengill 2-3  Taylor’s Escape 25, Corinth Merchants 3 LEADING HITTERS -- TE: Gary Roberts HR, Joe Ben Sumler HR. MO: Vernon Hickman 2-3, Royce Howie 2-3 Church W-L GB Tuscumbia 5-0 -First Baptist 3-2 2 Calvary 2-2 2.5 West Corinth 2-2 2.5 Church/Crossroads 0-6 5.5

Tuscumbia 18, Church of the Crossroads 5 LEADING HITTERS -- T: James Houston HR, Chip Suggs HR. CC: Marc Cornelius 2-3, Dustin Marsh 2-3. West Corinth 18, First Baptist 5 LEADING HITTERS -- WC: Seth Kirkland HR, Jason Bascomb HR, Steven Huff HR, Sandy Robinson HR. FB: Ephraim Menchacha HR, Nick Thompson 2-2. Tuscumbia 15, First Baptist 5 LEADING HITTERS -- T: James Houston HR, Clay Talley HR, Jamie Butler HR. FB: Graham Harrison HR, Kyle Holcomb HR. Calvary 20, Church of the Crossroads 5 LEADING HITTERS -- C: Jon Isbell HR, Steve Thompson 3-4. CC: Buddy Johnson HR, Marc Cornelius 2-2. West Corinth 16, Church of the Crossroads 1 LEADING HITTERS -- WC: Sandy Robinson 3-4, Jason Bascomb 3-4. CC: Israel Orozco 3-4, Marc Cornelius 3-4. First Baptist 14, Calvary 13 LEADING HITTERS -- FB: Grant Smallwood 3-4, Ephraim Menchaca 3-4. C: Steve Thompson 3-4, Donnie Jones 3-4.

Women’s W-L GB Phillip’s Motors 2-1 -Angie’s Painting 2-1 -Dentistry of the Shoals 1-2 1 Outlaw Women 1-2 1 Angie’s 16, Phillips 0 LEADING HITTERS -- A: Mandy Hughes 3-4, Brittney Robertson 3-4. P: No one had multiple hits. Outlaw 17, Dentistry 16 LEADING HITTERS -- O: Micah Killough 3-4, Kristin Ruby 3-4. D: Kana Henry 3-4, Shalain Benford 3-4. Open Kenny’s 16, Gold Bond 4 LEADING HITTERS -- K: Michael Killough HR, Josh Killough HR. GB: Justin Cole HR, Stacy Stone HR. Smith Cabinet Shop 11, Reaper Crew 10 LEADING HITTERS -- SC: Brennan Hendrix HR, Jon Isbell HR, Jake Glidewell HR, Neil Taylor HR. RC: Jake Dunaway 2 HR, Bob Brockman HR. Corinth Auto Salvage 10, Rib Shack 5 LEADING HITTERS -- CAS: Chris Dickerson HR, Chris Brooks HR. RS: Logan Doyle 2-3, Butch Essary 2-3.

Ole Miss pulls away from Binghamton Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. — Austin Anderson had four hits and an RBI, and Mississippi pulled away to beat Binghamton 8-4 on Saturday in an elimination game in the Raleigh regional. The second-seeded Rebels (38-23) scored two runs in the seventh inning and four more in the eighth to avoid

their first 0-2 tournament appearance since 2004. Tanner Mathis broke a 2-all tie with an RBI single in the seventh off Jake Lambert (73). Anderson followed two batters later with his runscoring single. Two unearned runs scored an inning later on first baseman Brian Ruby’s fielding er-

ror on Anderson’s grounder to make it 8-2. Ole Miss ace Bobby Wahl (10-0) allowed eight hits and struck out two in seven innings. Zach Blanden had four hits — giving him seven for the tournament — for fourthseeded Binghamton (30-25), which tied it in the sixth on

Jordon Smucker’s sacrifice fly.

Alabama 3, Savannah St. 2 TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Mike Oczypok threw seven shutout innings and Alabama Please see MISS | 11A

Valpo stuns Florida with first NCAA win since 1966 Associated Press

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. — Valparaiso won its first NCAA tournament game since 1966, scoring four times in the seventh inning and holding on to eliminate Florida with a 5-4 victory Saturday in the Bloomington regional.

The Crusaders (32-27) had only two hits in the seventh, but took advantage of mistakes by Florida (29-30), which led 4-1. Gators third baseman Josh Tobias made an error with the bases loaded, allowing Valpo’s first run of the inning. The Crusaders got two more

on bases-loaded walks to Tanner Vavra and John Loeffler. The go-ahead run came on Chris Manning’s run-scoring fielder’s choice. Valparaiso, coached by former major league infielder Tracy Woodson, last won in the NCAA tournament against

Southern Illinois in the Columbus regional in 1966. “These guys know about (47) years ago,” Woodson said. “We try to let them know that all the time. I know what it feels like, but this is their time Please see SEC | 11A


Scoreboard

Sunday, June 2, 2013

MSU

Baseball NL standings, schedule

CONTINUED FROM 10A

or Clemson. The Flames (35-28) face the Tigers (40-21) in an elimination game to start Sunday’s play. That winner would have to beat the Gamecocks (41-18) twice at Carolina Stadium — something no one’s done in the postseason since 2002. South Carolina turned up its offense with home runs by Martin, Tanner English and Max Schrock. Not that they needed them all with the way Montgomery (5-1) threw as he retired 18 of the last 19 hitters he faced.

MISS CONTINUED FROM 10A

eliminated Savannah State. The Crimson Tide (35-27) will meet the winner of Saturday’s winner’s bracket game between Troy (Ala.) and host Florida State. Oczypok, who didn’t make the team a year ago as a freshman, was bothered by a blister, but didn’t allow a run. He gave up six hits, struck out four and walked one. Savannah State (32-23) made it 3-2 in the eighth off reliever Tucker Hawley before the rally ended when pinch-runner Jason Wynn was thrown out trying to score on a squeeze bunt. Ray Castillo pitched a scoreless ninth for his 12th save. Kenny Roberts led Alabama with two doubles and a single. Austen Smith had an RBI double, and Brett Booth and Georgie Salem knocked in the other Crimson Tide runs.

Arkansas 3, Wichita St. 1 MANHATTAN, Kan. — Ryne Stanek held Wichita State to one run and two hits in 7 1-3 as Arkansas eliminated the Shockers. The Razorbacks (38-21) got on the scoreboard quickly on Tyler Spoon’s two-run single in the first inning, and Stanek held Wichita State hitless for the first three innings. The Razorbacks added a late run on an RBI single by Brett McAfee in the seventh. Stanek’s command was shaky throughout the game, walking a season-high six batters. The Shockers couldn’t capitalize though, leaving five runners on base with Stanek on the mound. Stanek (10-2) finished with three strikeouts and has allowed one or fewer runs in 13 of his 16 starts this season. Wichita State (39-28) scored its lone run on Casey Gillaspie’s homer in the fourth. AJ Ladwig (5-6) allowed two runs on nine hits in six innings.

Texas A&M 6, Texas-San Antonio 1 CORVALLIS, Ore. — Cole Lankford went 5 for 5 and drove in two runs and Texas A&M eliminated Texas-San Antonio. Aggies starter Parker Ray (21) picked up the win with 8 2-3 dominant innings, giving up just one earned run on five hits with eight strikeouts. Brock Hartson (0-2) took the loss for Texas-San Antonio (35-25).

East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 33 22 .600 — 1 Washington 28 28 .500 5 ⁄2 Philadelphia 26 30 .464 71⁄2 New York 22 31 .415 10 1 Miami 15 41 .268 18 ⁄2 Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 37 18 .673 — 1 Cincinnati 35 21 .625 2 ⁄2 1 Pittsburgh 34 22 .607 3 ⁄2 Chicago 23 30 .434 13 1 Milwaukee 21 33 .389 15 ⁄2 West Division W L Pct GB Arizona 30 24 .556 — Colorado 29 27 .518 2 San Francisco 29 27 .518 2 San Diego 25 29 .463 5 Los Angeles 23 31 .426 7 ——— Friday’s Late Games L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 5, 10 innings San Diego 4, Toronto 3, 17 innings Saturday’s Games St. Louis 8, San Francisco 0, 1st game Milwaukee 4, Philadelphia 3 Colorado 7, L.A. Dodgers 6, 10 innings Miami 8, N.Y. Mets 1 Cincinnati 2, Pittsburgh 0 St. Louis 7, San Francisco 1, 2nd game Atlanta 2, Washington 1, 10 innings Arizona at Chicago Cubs, (n) Toronto at San Diego, (n) Today’s Games N.Y. Mets (Harvey 5-0) at Miami (Slowey 1-5), 12:10 p.m. Cincinnati (Latos 5-0) at Pittsburgh (J.Gomez 2-0), 12:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Fiers 1-3) at Philadelphia (Lee 6-2), 12:35 p.m. Washington (Karns 0-0) at Atlanta (Maholm 6-4), 12:35 p.m. San Francisco (Gaudin 0-1) at St. Louis (Lyons 2-0), 1:15 p.m. Arizona (Corbin 8-0) at Chicago Cubs (E.Jackson 1-7), 1:20 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Ryu 6-2) at Colorado (J.De La Rosa 6-3), 3:10 p.m. Toronto (Undecided) at San Diego (Volquez 4-5), 9:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Miami at Philadelphia, 6:05 p.m. Colorado at Cincinnati, 6:10 p.m. Pittsburgh at Atlanta, 6:10 p.m. Oakland at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m. Arizona at St. Louis, 7:15 p.m. San Diego at L.A. Dodgers, 9:10 p.m.

Cardinals 8, Giants 0 San Francisco ab r GBlanc cf 4 0 Mijares p 0 0 Quiroz c 0 0 Scutaro 2b 2 0 Arias 3b 1 0 Pence rf 4 0 Posey c 4 0 Kontos p 0 0 Belt 1b 3 0 AnTrrs lf-cf 4 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 Noonan 3b-2b4 0 M.Cain p 2 0 Pill ph-lf 2 0 Totals 34 0

St. Louis h 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 1 0 0 7

bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

ab r MCrpnt 3b 4 1 Jay cf 4 1 Hollidy lf 4 0 VMarte p 0 0 KButlr p 0 0 Craig rf 4 1 MAdms 1b 3 2 T.Cruz c 4 1 Descals 2b 3 1 Kozma ss 4 1 SMiller p 2 0 SRonsn lf 0 0 Totals

h 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 2 0 0

bi 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 0

32 8 10 8

San Francisco 000 000 000 — 0 St. Louis 007 000 01x — 8 LOB—San Francisco 9, St. Louis 3. 2B—Posey (13), T.Cruz 2 (2), Descalso (8). S—S.Miller. SF—Descalso. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco M.Cain L,4-3 6 9 7 7 0 9 Mijares 1 0 0 0 0 1 Kontos 1 1 1 1 1 0 St. Louis S.Miller W,6-3 7 6 0 0 1 7 V.Marte 1 0 0 0 0 0 K.Butler 1 1 0 0 1 1 T—2:42. A—42,359 (43,975).

Cardinals 7, Giants 1 San Francisco ab r GBlanc cf 4 0 BCrwfr ss 4 0 Kontos p 0 0 Scutaro 2b 4 0 Pence rf 4 0 Belt 1b 4 1 AnTrrs lf 4 0 Arias 3b-ss 3 0 Quiroz c 3 0 Bmgrn p 2 0 RRmrz p 0 0 Noonan ph-3b 1 0 Totals 33 1

St. Louis h 1 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 8

bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

ab r Jay cf 4 1 YMolin c 4 1 Beltran rf 4 1 Freese 3b 3 1 Wggntn 1b 3 1 Descals 2b 4 0 SRonsn lf 3 0 Kozma ss 3 1 Wnwrg p 4 1

Totals

h 0 1 2 2 2 1 0 0 1

bi 1 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 0

32 7 9 7

San Francisco 000 000 100 — 1 St. Louis 003 002 20x — 7 DP—San Francisco 1, St. Louis 2. LOB—San Francisco 5, St. Louis 5. 2B—Scutaro (14), Belt (12), Freese (7), Wainwright (1). SB—Descalso (4). SF—S.Robinson. IP H R ER BB SO San Francisco Bumgarner L,4-4 6 6 5 5 1 6 R.Ramirez 1 3 2 2 1 0 Kontos 1 0 0 0 0 2 St. Louis Wainwright W,8-3 9 8 1 1 0 10 HBP—by Bumgarner (Wigginton). T—2:33. A—42,175 (43,975).

Rockies 7, Dodgers 6 10 innings Los Angeles Colorado ab r h bi ab r Crwfrd lf 2 0 2 0 Fowler cf 6 1 VnSlyk pr-lf 2 1 0 0 LeMahi 2b 5 0 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 CGnzlz lf 5 1 AdGnzl 1b 2 0 1 1 Tlwtzk ss 5 1

h 2 0 2 2

bi 2 0 2 0

Ethier rf 5 0 0 0 Cuddyr rf 4 2 2 2 HrstnJr 3b 5 1 2 1 Helton 1b 5 0 1 0 Guerrir p 0 0 0 0 Arenad 3b 5 0 2 1 Schmkr cf 5 1 2 1 Torreal c 4 2 2 0 Punto ss 5 1 1 0 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 Fdrwcz c 5 1 2 3 Pachec ph 0 0 0 0 Greink p 3 1 1 0 Outmn p 0 0 0 0 PRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 Escaln p 0 0 0 0 Belisari p 0 0 0 0 EYong ph 1 0 0 0 L.Cruz ph 1 0 0 0 Brothrs p 0 0 0 0 Howell p 0 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 Uribe 3b 0 0 0 0 WRosr ph 1 0 1 0 Totals 39 6 11 6 Totals 42 7 14 7 Los Angeles 003 002 100 0— 6 Colorado 010 030 200 1— 7 Two outs when winning run scored. E—M.Ellis (2), Federowicz (1), LeMahieu (1). DP—Los Angeles 1, Colorado 1. LOB—Los Angeles 8, Colorado 10. 2B—C.Crawford 2 (12), Hairston Jr. (3), Federowicz (1), Arenado (8). 3B—C.Gonzalez (3). HR—Federowicz (1), C.Gonzalez (14), Cuddyer (9). SB—Fowler (10). S—Chacin. SF— Ad.Gonzalez. IP H R ER BB SO Los Angeles 1 Greinke 5 ⁄3 9 4 4 3 3 P.Rodriguez H,7 1 0 0 0 0 1 Belisario BS,3-4 2-⁄ 2 2 2 0 1 Howell 21⁄3 0 0 0 0 4 1 ⁄3 3 1 1 0 0 Guerrier L,1-2 Colorado Chacin 6 9 5 5 2 2 2 Outman ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 1 Escalona 1 ⁄3 2 1 1 0 2 Brothers 1 0 0 0 1 2 Belisle W,3-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 HBP—by Chacin (M.Ellis). PB—Federowicz, Torrealba. T—3:39. A—36,703 (50,398).

Brewers 4, Phillies 3 Milwaukee

Philadelphia ab r Revere cf 4 0 CHrndz 2b 5 0 DBrwn lf 4 1 Howard 1b 3 0 Mrtnz pr-rf 1 0 DYong rf 4 1 Mayrry 1b 0 0 Frndsn 3b 4 0 Kratz c 4 0 Galvis ss 3 1 Cloyd p 2 0 L.Nix ph 1 0 MAdms p 0 0 Bastrd p 0 0 Rollins ph 1 0 Kndrck pr 0 0 34 4 9 3 Totals 36 3

ab r Aoki rf 4 1 Segura ss 4 0 Braun lf 4 0 ArRmr 3b 3 1 Lucroy c 4 2 LSchfr cf 4 0 YBtncr 1b 4 0 Bianchi 2b 4 0 WPerlt p 2 0 Grzlny p 0 0 Kintzlr p 0 0 Weeks ph 1 0 FrRdrg p 0 0

Totals

h 1 1 0 1 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

bi 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

h 1 3 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 11

bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Milwaukee 020 010 010 — 4 Philadelphia 000 101 001 — 3 E—Bianchi (1), D.Young (2). DP— Milwaukee 1. LOB—Milwaukee 5, Philadelphia 10. 2B—Ar.Ramirez (9), L.Schafer 2 (4), Bianchi (3), Revere (4), C.Hernandez (1). 3B—Segura (6). HR—Lucroy (6), Galvis (4). SB—D. Brown (4). S—W.Peralta, Revere. IP H R ER BB SO Milwaukee W.Peralta W,4-6 7 8 2 2 1 6 Gorzelanny 0 0 0 0 1 0 Kintzler H,9 1 0 0 0 0 1 Fr.Rodriguez S,3-3 1 3 1 1 1 0 Philadelphia Cloyd L,1-2 7 8 3 2 1 3 Mi.Adams 1 1 1 1 0 0 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 2 Gorzelanny pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WP—W.Peralta, Kintzler. T—3:00. A—41,114 (43,651).

Marlins 8, Mets 1 New York Quntnll ss JuTrnr ph-ss DnMrp 2b DWrght 3b Duda lf Buck c Ankiel cf I.Davis 1b Vldspn rf Byrd ph-rf McHgh p Carson p Burke p Lagars ph Lyon p Totals

h 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

bi 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

Pierre lf Polanc 3b Dietrch 2b Ozuna rf Coghln cf Dobbs 1b Hchvrr ss Mathis c Frnndz p DJnngs p JBrown ph Webb p

Totals

ab r 4 1 4 1 4 1 3 1 4 1 4 1 3 0 3 1 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0

h 0 2 2 0 3 1 1 1 2 0 0 0

bi 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 0

33 8 12 8

New York 000 000 010 — 1 Miami 110 200 40x — 8 E—Ju.Turner (2), Dan.Murphy (3). DP—New York 1. LOB—New York 4, Miami 7. 2B—Ju.Turner (5), Fernandez (1). 3B—Mathis (1). CS—Ankiel (1). S—Pierre. SF—Hechavarria. IP H R ER BB SO New York McHugh L,0-1 4 6 4 4 3 1 1 Carson 2 ⁄3 3 3 2 0 0 2 ⁄3 2 1 1 1 1 Burke Lyon 1 1 0 0 0 0 Miami Fernandez W,3-3 7 3 0 0 1 8 Da.Jennings 1 2 1 1 0 0 Webb 1 0 0 0 0 1 McHugh pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. T—2:41. A—16,283 (37,442).

Braves 2, Nationals 1 10 innings Atlanta ab r h bi ab r Span cf 5 0 0 0 Smmns ss 4 0 Lmrdzz lf 4 1 0 0 Heywrd rf 3 0 Zmrmn 3b 4 0 2 0 Jhnsn ph-rf 1 0 LaRoch 1b 3 0 1 0 J.Upton lf 4 0 Dsmnd ss 4 0 1 1 FFrmn 1b 4 0 Berndn rf 4 0 0 0 Gattis c 3 0 Espinos 2b 4 0 0 0 JSchafr pr 0 1 KSuzuk c 4 0 0 0 CJhnsn 3b 3 0 GGnzlz p 2 0 1 0 R.Pena ph 1 0 Koerns ph 1 0 0 0 Uggla 2b 2 1 Storen p 0 0 0 0 BUpton cf 4 0 Abad p 0 0 0 0 THudsn p 1 0 Tracy ph 1 0 0 0 Avilan p 0 0 HRdrgz p 0 0 0 0 McCnn ph 1 0

Washington 000 100 000 0— 1 Atlanta 001 000 000 1— 2 One out when winning run scored. E—F.Freeman (5). DP—Washington 1. LOB—Washington 6, Atlanta 5. 2B—LaRoche (6), C.Johnson (11). SB—J.Schafer (7). S—T.Hudson. IP H R ER BB SO Washington G.Gonzalez 7 3 1 1 1 7 Storen 1 0 0 0 0 2 Abad 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 ⁄3 1 1 1 2 0 H.Rodriguez L,0-1 Atlanta 1 T.Hudson 7 ⁄3 3 1 0 1 4 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Avilan Kimbrel 1 2 0 0 0 1 Walden W,2-1 1 0 0 0 0 0 T—3:07. A—46,910 (49,586).

AL standings, schedule East Division W L Pct GB Boston 34 23 .596 — New York 31 24 .564 2 1 Baltimore 31 25 .554 2 ⁄2 Tampa Bay 30 25 .545 3 Toronto 23 32 .418 10 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 30 24 .556 — 1 ⁄2 Cleveland 30 25 .545 Chicago 24 29 .453 51⁄2 1 Minnesota 24 29 .453 5 ⁄2 1 Kansas City 23 30 .434 6 ⁄2 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 34 21 .618 — Oakland 33 24 .579 2 Los Angeles 25 30 .455 9 1 Seattle 24 32 .429 10 ⁄2 Houston 18 37 .327 16 ——— Friday’s Games Tampa Bay 9, Cleveland 2 Oakland 3, Chicago White Sox 0 Houston 6, L.A. Angels 3 San Diego 4, Toronto 3, 17 innings Saturday’s Games Cleveland 5, Tampa Bay 0 Minnesota 5, Seattle 4 Oakland 4, Chicago White Sox 3, 10 inn. Detroit 10, Baltimore 3 Kansas City 4, Texas 1, 10 innings Boston 11, N.Y. Yankees 1 Houston at L.A. Angels, (n) Sunday’s Games Tampa Bay (Hellickson 2-2) at Cleveland (McAllister 4-4), 12:05 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 2-2) at Baltimore (Gausman 0-2), 12:35 p.m. Seattle (Bonderman 0-0) at Minnesota (Diamond 3-4), 1:10 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 3-5) at Texas (Darvish 7-2), 2:05 p.m. Houston (Lyles 2-1) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 4-3), 2:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Sale 5-2) at Oakland (Parker 3-6), 3:05 p.m. Boston (Buchholz 7-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 6-3), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (R.Ortiz 1-2) at San Diego (Volquez 4-5), 9:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Cleveland at N.Y. Yankees, 6:05 p.m. Oakland at Milwaukee, 7:10 p.m. Houston at L.A. Angels, 9:05 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Seattle, 9:10 p.m.

Athletics 4, White Sox 3 Chicago

Miami ab r 3 0 1 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 4 0 2 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 31 1

Kimrel p 0 0 0 0 Walden p 0 0 0 0 36 1 5 1 Totals 31 2 5 2

Totals

Washington

h 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0

bi 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0

10 innings Oakland h bi ab r 2 2 Lwrie 2b-ss5 1 1 0 Young cf-lf 6 1 2 0 Cespds dh 5 0 1 1 Dnldsn 3b 5 1 0 0 Freimn 1b 3 0 0 0 Mss ph-1b 1 0 1 0 Reddck rf 5 0 0 0 DNorrs c 4 1 2 0 S.Smith lf 4 0 1 0 Crisp ph-cf 0 0 Rosales ss 3 0 Sogard 2b 2 0 39 3 10 3 Totals 43 4

ab r De Aza cf 5 1 AlRmrz ss 5 0 Rios rf 4 0 A.Dunn 1b 5 0 Konerk dh 2 0 C.Wells ph-dh 2 0 Viciedo lf 4 0 Gillaspi 3b 4 0 Kppngr 2b 4 1 Gimenz c 4 1 Totals

h 4 3 2 2 1 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 16

bi 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Chicago 001 000 200 0— 3 Oakland 110 010 000 1— 4 Two outs when winning run scored. DP—Chicago 1, Oakland 1. LOB— Chicago 7, Oakland 18. 2B—De Aza (11), Gimenez (2), Lowrie (17), C.Young 2 (8), Cespedes (8), D.Norris (9). 3B—Freiman (1). SB—De Aza (6). CS—Cespedes (5). IP H R ER BB SO Chicago 1 Quintana 5 ⁄3 10 3 3 3 4 2 Lindstrom 1 ⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 Crain 1 2 0 0 0 1 N.Jones 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 H.Santiago L,1-4 1 ⁄3 2 1 1 5 1 Oakland Straily 6 6 1 1 0 8 Doolittle BS,2-2 1 3 2 2 1 0 Cook 1 0 0 0 0 1 Balfour 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 Neshek ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 1 Blevins W,4-0 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 0 N.Jones pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Balk—Quintana. T—3:49. A—26,646 (35,067).

Red Sox 11, Yankees 1 Boston

New York ab r h bi ab r Nava lf 6 2 4 4 Gardnr cf 4 0 Carp rf 3 1 2 1 Youkils dh 3 0 JGoms rf 2 0 0 0 Cano 2b 4 0 Pedroia 2b 5 0 1 0 Teixeir 1b 4 0 D.Ortiz dh 3 1 0 0 V.Wells lf 4 0 Napoli 1b 5 1 3 4 J.Nix ss 3 1 Drew ss 5 1 2 1 DAdms 3b 4 0 Sltlmch c 5 1 1 0 ISuzuki rf 4 0 Iglesias 3b 5 2 2 1 CStwrt c 0 0 BrdlyJr cf 5 2 3 0 AuRmn c 1 0 Totals 44111811 Totals 31 1

h 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 6

bi 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

Daily Corinthian • 11A

Boston 005 000 033 — 11 New York 000 100 000 — 1 DP—Boston 1, New York 1. LOB— Boston 9, New York 7. 2B—Carp (8), Saltalamacchia (14), Bradley Jr. 2 (3). HR—Nava (8), Napoli (9), Drew (4). SF—C.Stewart. IP H R ER BB SO Boston Doubront W,4-2 6 6 1 1 3 6 Tazawa 1 0 0 0 0 1 Breslow 1 0 0 0 0 1 Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 2 New York 1 P.Hughes L,2-4 4 ⁄3 7 5 5 2 7 2 Claiborne 1 ⁄3 3 0 0 0 2 Warren 3 8 6 6 1 3 WP—P.Hughes. T—3:25. A—48,784 (50,291).

Royals 4, Rangers 1 10 innings Texas ab r h bi ab r h bi AGordn lf 4 0 0 0 Andrus ss 4 0 0 0 AEscor ss 5 1 1 0 DvMrp lf 5 0 1 0 Hosmer 1b 5 1 3 0 Brkmn dh 1 0 0 0 BButler dh 4 1 0 0 Bakr ph-dh 3 0 0 0 Mostks 3b 5 0 0 0 Beltre 3b 4 1 1 0 L.Cain cf 4 0 2 0 LGarci 3b 0 0 0 0 Lough rf 4 1 1 1 N.Cruz rf 4 0 1 0 Francr pr-rf 0 0 0 0 Morlnd 1b 3 0 1 1 AMoore c 3 0 2 0 Przyns c 4 0 2 0 Kottars ph-c 2 0 1 2 Profar 2b 4 0 0 0 EJhnsn 2b 5 0 1 0 LMartn cf 1 0 0 0 Gntry ph-cf 2 0 0 0 Totals 41 4 11 3 Totals 35 1 6 1 Kansas City 000 010 000 3— 4 Texas 000 100 000 0— 1 E—A.Moore (1), L.Martin (2). LOB— Kansas City 11, Texas 7. 2B—Kottaras (3), Pierzynski (3). SB—Hosmer (4), A.Moore (1), E.Johnson (8), L.Martin (8). CS—Pierzynski (1). IP H R ER BB SO Kansas City Shields 7 5 1 1 1 5 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 1 0 Collins Crow W,1-1 11⁄3 1 0 0 1 0 G.Holland S,9-11 1 0 0 0 0 1 Texas 1 Tepesch 6 ⁄3 7 1 0 0 2 2 ⁄3 1 0 0 1 1 Cotts Scheppers 1 0 0 0 1 1 Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 2 R.Ross L,2-1 1 3 3 3 1 3 Cotts pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP—by R.Ross (Lough). PB—Pierzynski. T—3:19. A—36,107 (48,114). Kansas City

Tigers 10, Orioles 3 Detroit

Baltimore

ab r Infante 2b 5 1 Dirks rf-lf 4 1 MiCarr 3b 4 1 Fielder 1b 5 1 VMrtnz dh 3 2 JhPerlt ss 5 1 Avila c 5 1 Tuiassp lf 3 1 D.Kelly cf 1 0 AGarci cf-rf 3 1 Totals

h 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 0 1

bi 1 0 4 1 1 1 1 1 0 0

ab r McLoth lf 5 0 Machd 3b 3 1 Markks rf 4 0 A.Jones cf 4 0 C.Davis 1b 4 0 Wieters c 4 0 Hardy ss 3 2 Dickrsn dh 3 0 Valenci ph 1 0 Flahrty 2b 3 0 ACasill ph 1 0 38101210 Totals 35 3

h 2 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 9

bi 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 3

Detroit 010 801 000 — 10 Baltimore 001 110 000 — 3 DP—Detroit 1, Baltimore 1. LOB— Detroit 7, Baltimore 7. 2B—Infante (9), Tuiasosopo (3), Wieters (14). HR—Mi.Cabrera (17), Fielder (10), V.Martinez (3), Jh.Peralta (6), Avila (5), Hardy 2 (12). SB—McLouth (18), A.Jones (9), Dickerson (3). IP H R ER BB SO Detroit Verlander W,7-4 7 8 3 3 1 5 Smyly 2 1 0 0 1 2 Baltimore Hammel L,7-3 3 5 5 5 3 0 McFarland 3 5 5 5 2 2 Patton 2 2 0 0 0 3 Tom.Hunter 1 0 0 0 0 1 Hammel pitched to 4 batters in the 4th. HBP—by Hammel (Tuiasosopo). T—3:06. A—38,945 (45,971).

Twins 5, Mariners 4 Seattle EnChvz rf Bay lf Seager 3b KMorls 1b Ibanez dh Frnkln 2b MSndrs cf Shppch c Ryan ss Totals

ab r h bi 4 0 1 0 5 2 2 2 5 2 2 1 4 0 1 0 4 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 4 0 2 0 4 0 0 0 4 0 1 0 37 4 10 4

Minnesota ab r EEscor 3b 4 1 Mauer dh 3 1 Wlngh lf 4 0 Doumit c 5 1 Parmel rf 3 1 Colaell 1b 4 0 Dozier 2b 3 0 Hicks cf 4 0 Flormn ss 3 1 Totals 33 5

h 0 1 0 3 1 1 1 0 0 7

bi 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 4

Seattle 200 000 200 — 4 Minnesota 010 001 003 — 5 One out when winning run scored. E—Harang (1), Ryan (4), E.Escobar (3). DP—Minnesota 1. LOB—Seattle 8, Minnesota 10. 2B—M.Saunders (6), Doumit (11). 3B—Doumit (1). HR—Bay 2 (8), Seager (7). SF—Willingham. IP H R ER BB SO Seattle Harang 6 4 2 1 2 4 2 ⁄3 1 0 0 0 1 O.Perez H,2 1 Capps H,5 ⁄3 1 0 0 0 0 Furbush H,3 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 Whlmsn L,0-1 BS,3-15 ⁄3 1 3 3 3 0 Minnesota 2 Correia 6 ⁄3 7 4 4 2 3 2 ⁄3 2 0 0 0 0 Duensing 2 ⁄3 0 0 0 0 1 Fien Thielbar W,1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 Capps pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. WP—Wilhelmsen. T—3:05. A—33,417 (39,021).

Pro basketball NBA playoffs CONFERENCE FINALS Best-of-7 Saturday Indiana 91, Miami 77, series tied

3-3 Monday Indiana at Miami, 8:30 p.m.

WNBA scores, schedule Saturday’s Games Minnesota 90, Connecticut 74 San Antonio 83, Los Angeles 78 Today’s Games Atlanta at Washington, 3 p.m. Tulsa at Chicago, 5 p.m. Phoenix at Seattle, 8 p.m.

Pacers 91, Heat 77 MIAMI — James 10-21 7-8 29, Haslem 0-2 0-0 0, Bosh 1-8 2-2 5, Chalmers 3-8 2-2 10, Wade 3-11 3-5 10, Cole 4-7 0-0 9, Anthony 1-5 0-0 2, Allen 2-8 1-2 6, Battier 0-0 0-0 0, Miller 2-2 0-0 6, Lewis 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 2672 15-19 77. INDIANA — George 11-19 3-4 28, West 5-14 1-2 11, Hibbert 11-20 2-4 24, Hill 6-12 2-2 16, Stephenson 1-4 2-2 4, Augustin 1-1 0-0 2, T.Hansbrough 1-2 1-4 3, Young 1-2 0-0 3, Mahinmi 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-74 11-18 91. Miami 23 17 15 22 — 77 Indiana 21 18 29 23 — 91 3-Point Goals—Miami 10-18 (Miller 2-2, Chalmers 2-3, James 2-4, Bosh 1-1, Wade 1-2, Cole 1-2, Allen 1-4), Indiana 6-11 (George 3-5, Hill 2-4, Young 1-1, Stephenson 0-1). Fouled Out— Hibbert. Rebounds—Miami 36 (Anthony 8), Indiana 58 (West 14). Assists— Miami 10 (James 6), Indiana 19 (Hill 6). Total Fouls—Miami 21, Indiana 19. Technicals—James, Miami Bench, Stephenson. A—18,165 (18,165).

Hockey Stanley Cup playoffs CONFERENCE FINALS Best-of-7Saturday Chicago 2, Los Angeles 1, Chicago leads series 1-0 Boston 3, Pittsburgh 0, Boston leads series 1-0 Today Los Angeles at Chicago, 7 p.m. Monday Boston at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Tuesday Chicago at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Wednesday Pittsburgh at Boston, 7 p.m. Thursday Chicago at Los Angeles, 8 p.m. Friday Pittsburgh at Boston, 7 p.m.

Golf The Memorial At Muirfield Village Golf Club; Dublin, Ohio; Yardage: 7,352; Par: 72; Purse: $6.2 million Third Round Matt Kuchar 68-70-70 — 208 -8 Kevin Chappell 71-71-68 — 210 -6 Kyle Stanley 67-70-73 — 210 -6 Matt Jones 69-72-70 — 211 -5 Justin Rose 70-70-71 — 211 -5 Bill Haas 68-67-76 — 211 -5 J.J. Henry 72-72-68 — 212 -4 Adam Scott 73-70-69 — 212 -4 Scott Piercy 66-75-71 — 212 -4 Charl Schwartzel 65-71-76 — 212 -4 Gary Woodland 70-73-70 — 213 -3 Pat Perez 72-69-72 — 213 -3 Bubba Watson 71-67-75 — 213 -3 Russell Henley 67-77-70 — 214 -2 Jim Furyk 75-70-69 — 214 -2 Brian Davis 75-70-69 — 214 -2 Davis Love III 73-69-72 — 214 -2 Charley Hoffman 73-69-72 — 214 -2 Bo Van Pelt 73-69-72 — 214 -2 Fred Couples 70-75-70 — 215 -1 Michael Thompson 69-76-70 — 215 -1 Carl Pettersson 71-71-73 — 215 -1 Charles Howell III 72-70-73 — 215 -1 Ryan Moore 70-72-73 — 215 -1 Chris Stroud 69-77-69 — 215 -1 Scott Stallings 70-70-75 — 215 -1 Richard H. Lee 73-71-72 — 216 E Ken Duke 75-69-72 — 216 E Ben Curtis 73-70-73 — 216 E Cameron Tringale 71-71-74 — 216 E Graham DeLaet 70-72-74 — 216 E George McNeill 74-71-71 — 216 E David Hearn 71-71-74 — 216 E Trevor Immelman 70-72-74 — 216 E K.J. Choi 72-74-70 — 216 E Hunter Mahan 73-68-75 — 216 E Roberto Castro 71-70-75 — 216 E Robert Karlsson 69-71-76 — 216 E Ernie Els 73-70-74 — 217 +1 George Coetzee 70-75-72 — 217 +1 David Lingmerth 75-70-72 — 217 +1 William McGirt 73-73-71 — 217 +1 Martin Laird 71-75-71 — 217 +1 Luke Donald 73-73-71 — 217 +1 Tom Gillis 73-70-75 — 218 +2 Stewart Cink 70-72-76 — 218 +2 James Driscoll 70-75-73 — 218 +2 Charlie Wi 67-74-77 — 218 +2 Luke Guthrie 72-74-72 — 218 +2 Henrik Stenson 71-73-75 — 219 +3 John Senden 71-72-76 — 219 +3 Camilo Villegas 72-71-76 — 219 +3 Rickie Fowler 72-71-76 — 219 +3 Justin Leonard 70-76-73 — 219 +3 Robert Allenby 74-73-72 — 219 +3 Jason Day 72-75-72 — 219 +3 Bud Cauley 71-73-76 — 220 +4 Keegan Bradley 71-74-75 — 220 +4 Derek Ernst 70-73-78 — 221 +5 Fabian Gomez 76-68-77 — 221 +5 Billy Horschel 70-75-76 — 221 +5 Josh Teater 67-79-75 — 221 +5 Ryo Ishikawa 74-73-74 — 221 +5 Mike Weir 75-72-75 — 222 +6 Rory McIlroy 78-69-75 — 222 +6 Brandt Jobe 70-75-78 — 223 +7 Gonzlo Fernandez-Castano72-74-77 — 223 +7 Marc Leishman 74-72-77 — 223 +7 Tiger Woods 71-74-79 — 224 +8 Jimmy Walker 72-75-77 — 224 +8 Zach Johnson 73-72-81 — 226+10 Jordan Spieth 72-73-82 — 227+11 Justin Hicks 73-73-81 — 227+11

SEC CONTINUED FROM 10A

now and I want to make sure that they understand that. They are setting the precedence for us as a university.” The Crusaders are playing in the NCAA tournament for the seventh time in school history. They take on Austin Peay in an elimination game Sunday, with the winner needing to beat host Indiana twice to advance to the super regionals. “It’s a huge win, a huge boost and we have been working at it all year,” shortstop Spencer Mahoney said. “In years past, we have had a great group of guys that have come through the program and been able to build it. I think Coach Woodson has built this program up to where it is now and we are just looking to move forward.”

The Crusaders are playing in the NCAA tournament for the seventh time in school history. They take on Austin Peay in an elimination game Sunday, with the winner needing to beat host Indiana twice to advance to the super regionals. Florida, which outhit Valparaiso 13-6, put runners on second and third with one out in the ninth, but Kyle Wormington (67) struck out Taylor Gushue and got Harrison Bader to ground out to end it. “It’s exhilarating to get that win,” Wormington said. “First one in a long time. So that was huge. But as soon as it’s over, I think as a team, we are just looking forward to tomorrow. We want to keep winning. We came to win and that’s what we want to do.”

Daniel Gibson (2-1) took the loss for the Gators, who dropped both of their NCAA tournament games — to Valparaiso and Austin Peay. “To be honest with you, this season is not the standard we want in Florida and there’s no rebuilding at Florida,” Gators coach Kevin O’Sullivan said. “I keep hearing that all year long. We’ve got young players, but it’s time to grow up. They are not freshmen anymore. The game comes down to pitching defense and hitting.”

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2001 Shiloh Rd. • Corinth, MS 662-286-8105


12A • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • Daily Corinthian

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Daily Corinthian â&#x20AC;˘ Sunday, June 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ 1B

Kossuth celebrates 3A state baseball title

Staff photos by Donica Phifer


History

2B • Daily Corinthian

Sunday, June 2, 2013

‘A Completely Used Up Man’ The story of an Irish soldier in the Civil War Since this story is about a fine Irish lad, I had hoped to save it for next St. Patrick’s Day, but it’s too good a tale to put off. Denis John Francis Murphy was born in the summer of 1830, and hailed f r o m County Cork, Ireland. He came from Tom a farming Parson family hit hard by Park Ranger the terrible potato famine that forced thousands to head for a better life in America. When he was 18 he, his parents, and an older brother took passage on the steamer Josiah Quincy from Liverpool to Boston. Soon the whole family was settled in Brown County, Wisconsin, just south of Green Bay. Denis bought some land and married Bridget McGinnis, the mother of his 10, possibly 11, children. Life was good. He had a farm near Glenmore and in 1858 he became a citizen of the United States. When the war broke out Denis made the ten-mile trip to De Pere on the Fox River where he enlisted as a private in the 14th Wisconsin Infantry, Company F “The De Pere Rifles.” By the end of March the regiment was in Savannah, Tenn., and was waiting to join Grant’s army at Pittsburg Landing. They got there in time to fight on the second day of the battle. The regiment did well in the Battle of Shiloh and Denis got his first taste of fighting. When the army marched into Mississippi for the Siege of Corinth the 14th Wisconsin stayed behind as the Provost Guard of the huge supply depot. Eventually they made it down to Corinth and were assigned to Col. John Oliver’s brigade in the division of Gen. Thomas McKean. Denis had done well in the Battle of Shiloh, good enough to be promoted to sergeant and entrusted to carry the regiment’s flag into battle. This was a huge honor. The Color Sergeant went in to battle without a weapon, just the flag. He had to be the bravest man in the outfit; the job required nerves of steel. If the guy with the flag was the bravest, the men on either side of him were a close second. You’ve seen them yourself at parades and at the ballgame. The flag is brought out for the national anthem and there are a couple of men on either side with rifles.

Submitted photos

This bronze plaque marks Denis Murphy’s final resting place

Submitted photos

The flag of the 14th Wisconsin has Denis Murphy’s blood still visible on the right edge. It is currently in the Wisconsin Veterans Museum in Madison. Sadly, conservation efforts in 1985 removed the bloodstains. They are the color guard and a reminder to us of the men who guarded the man who carried that precious piece of cloth. There was no greater disgrace to a regiment than to lose their flag in battle. On the other hand, there was no greater triumph than to capture a flag from the enemy. The flag was the living symbol of the regiment; literally its heart and soul. The color sergeant and the color guard protected it with their very lives. Denis was a good choice as he was a commanding figure. He was a “Black Irishman” with dark brown hair, a dark complexion, and dark blue eyes. He stood a towering 6’ 2,” a full head higher than the average soldier. The color guard were all volunteers and the

colonel swore “they were all brave and trustworthy fellows.” At the Battle of Corinth the 14th Wisconsin was in the fight from the very beginning. They were in Chewalla on the 1st of October and watched the Confederates approaching from the Tuscumbia River. For two days they skirmished with the cavalry of Gen. Van Dorn’s Army of West Tennessee. The morning of the 3rd the Confederates made their bid to retake Corinth and the 14th fought them from Alexander’s Crossroads to the bluffs of Cane Creek. With the whole Southern army in front of them they crossed the creek and took a position inside the old Confederate earthworks on Oliver’s Hill. Three small brigades of Union troops were on

the hill; they were not nearly enough. A division of Confederates stormed up the heights but was driven back. They came again and for an hour the men in blue and gray slugged it out. Another division joined in the attack. In the final charge the 14th Wisconsin was cut to pieces by the 22nd and 33rd Mississippi. Two of the color guard were shot down, one killed and the other desperately wounded. The regiment was ordered to fall back and Denis was hit. And then hit again, and again, and again. One bullet hit his right side, puncturing his lung and lodging against his spine. Two more balls struck his left side damaging the hip joint, and the fourth bullet shat-

tered the bones in his left hand. He crumpled to the ground, his blood staining the flag he had sworn to protect. He never let it go. As the color guard was pulling Denis to his feet, Private William Lowndes of the 15th Michigan dashed forward to grab the bloody flag so it would not fall into enemy hands. The color guard took back the flag and the desperately wounded sergeant was taken to a hospital in Corinth. When his wounds were stable enough he was sent to an army hospital in Keokuk, Iowa where a surgeon issued Denis a “Certificate of Disability for Discharge.” He was discharged from the service on November 13, and sent home. But Denis would have nothing to do with civilian life while there was a war on. “For gallant conduct in action,” Murphy was promoted and given an officer’s commission to First Lieutenant. He was still suffering from the effects of the wounds and his hand was crippled for life, but Denis reported for duty in December. He was assigned to Company B, 34th Wisconsin Infantry, a unit of draftees pulled into active duty for nine months. The regiment was destined for garrison duty in Memphis and never did see combat. In fact the highlight of Murphy’s time with the unit was an argument he got into with a ranking officer of a cavalry regiment who had Denis briefly placed under arrest. In September of ’63 the regiment was disbanded and this time Murphy accepted his discharge. At least for a little while. In March of 1864 Denis hired a pair of local lawyers to handle the paperwork in securing an Invalid Pension. The ink

was still wet on the application when Murphy paid a visit to the Surgeon of the Board of Enrollment at Green Bay. After a careful examination he was found to be unfit for active duty but fully capable of performing garrison duty. He was cleared for duty in the Invalid Corps. The Invalid Corps was made up of armless and legless men who couldn’t fight but were able to perform duties at garrisons and prisons which allowed more fit soldiers to head for the front. Murphy didn’t want anything to do with them and pressed for duty in a combat regiment. A year later, just as the war was winding down, Denis was commissioned as 1st Lieutenant in Company D of the 53rd Wisconsin. It was the last regiment raised in the state. He saw some light duty at Leavenworth, Kansas, and in the summer the regiment was merged with the 51st Wisconsin. His last duty for his country was guarding the tracks of the Union Pacific Railroad. As part of the pension process the army gave Denis another physical exam in 1866. The examining surgeon detailed his four wounds and at the bottom of the form penned “a completely used up man.” In 1891 Denis applied for the Medal of Honor. His regimental commander in the old 14th had told Murphy he was putting him up for the medal but nothing ever came of it. There were some difficulties with the application which required affidavits from comrades who had been with him at the Battle of Corinth, but most of them were dead. A year later Denis received a small package in the mail marked “Postage Due.” It was the Medal of Honor, the highest military award in the nation. There was no presentation by the President, no parades, no fanfare, not even a mention in the local paper. The citation, which spelled his name incorrectly, simply stated, “Although wounded three times, carried the colors throughout the conflict.” Recognition so feeble they didn’t even get the number of wounds right. Denis was never able to return to farming but he stayed busy ensuring the graves of his fellow soldiers were marked and cared for. When he passed away in 1901 he was buried under a family headstone that didn’t make note of his being a veteran. The man and his deeds were nearly forgotten. In 1978, a bronze plaque was placed at his grave in the Allouez Cemetery to remind the world that a hero is resting there. A man who never let go of his flag and who would never stop serving his country.

Brits’ 1777 New York surrender site becoming US park SCHUYLERVILLE, N.Y. — The history of the world changed on a grassy knoll on a hill overlooking the upper Hudson River, although it would be some time before anyone would realize the significance of what happened there in October 1777, according to National Park Service Ranger Joe Craig. “You had an enormous change that probably they didn’t figure out at the

time, but the shock waves eventually went out from there,” said Craig, who works at Saratoga National Historical Park, also known as the Saratoga Battlefield. The shock was caused by British Gen. John Burgoyne’s surrender to American forces after two battles fought at Saratoga in September and October 1777. On Oct. 17, 10 days after the second bat-

tle, Burgoyne handed his sword to his counterpart, Gen. Horatio Gates, in a field atop a hill just south of the present-day village of Schuylerville, 30 miles north of Albany. The American victory over the world’s mightiest army would eventually convince France to ally itself with the rebellious colonies, which sorely needed French troops, ships and money to defeat

the British. Many historians consider the outcome at Saratoga to be the turning point of the American Revolution. On Saturday, a ceremony will be held at the sword surrender site to officially unveil a bronze sculpture that will be the centerpiece of a memorial when the property becomes part of the historical park’s holdings. The 19-acre site is being

donated to the park service by the Open Space Institute, which bought it in 2006 from the family that had owned it since the Revolutionary War. The sculpture protrudes from a 6-foot-by4-foot flat surface and is a bas relief version of John Trumbull’s 1821 painting, “Surrender of General Burgoyne,” which hangs in the U.S. Capitol. The name of the new

site is a bit of a misnomer because Gates only held the sword for a few moments before handing it back to Burgoyne, a common practice among generals of the era, Craig said. The rest of the British army wasn’t allowed the same courtesy. Several thousand redcoats laid down their weapons at a riverside fort in what is now a park in Schuylerville.


3B • Daily Corinthian

Celebrations

Sunday, June 2, 2013

Engagements Manning — Murphy

Jordan McCull Gillentine, Caroline Elaine Cooley 

Miss Leann Greer Manning and Mr. Perry Kendal Murphy will exchange wedding vows at 6 p.m. on June 15, 2013 at Harmony Baptist Church in New Albany. The bride-elect is the daughter of Dale and Teresa Manning. She is the granddaughter of Jackie and Jean Greer and the late Elliott and Geraldine Manning. The prospective bridegroom is the Leann Greer Manning, Perry son of Perry and Kendal Murphy Hope Murphy. He is the grandson of Faye Kendall and the late Lowell Kendall and Ival Murphy and the late Paul Murphy. Miss Manning is a 2006 graduate of West Union High School. She received her marketing degree from the University of Mississippi in 2010. Other education includes being a graduate of Corinth Academy of Cosmetology in 2009. She is presently owner of Obsessions Boutique & Salon in downtown New Albany. Mr. Kendall is a 2006 graduate of Corinth High School and a 2012 graduate of the University of Mississippi where he received his park & recreation management degree. He is presently employed at New Albany High School as assistant baseball coach. All friends and relatives of the couple are invited to attend the ceremony and the reception which follows.

Cooley — Gillentine Miss Caroline Elaine Cooley and Mr. Jordan McCull Gillentine will exchange wedding vows at 7 p.m. on Friday, June 7, 2013 at Heartwood Hall in Rossville, Tenn. The bride-elect is the daughter of the Rev. and Mrs. Kevin Cooley of Corinth. She is the granddaughter of Sen. and Mrs. Travis Little and Mr. and Mrs. W.A. Cooley of Corinth. The prospective bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ricky Gillentine of Corinth and Mr. and Mrs. Terry Crabb of Ramer, Tenn. He is the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Benny Teague of Ramer, Tenn. Miss Cooley is a 2009

graduate of Alcorn Central High School. She received her bachelor of arts in psychology degree from Mississippi State University in 2013. She will be attending Southern Baptist Theological Seminary this fall in pursuit of a master of arts degree in biblical counseling. Mr. Gillentine is a 2006 graduate of McNairy Central High School and a 2011 graduate of the University of Alabama where he received his B.S. in business administration. He is presently employed as general manager at the La Quinta Inn & Suites in Starkville. Invitations have been sent, wedding is RSVP only.

Anniversary

James Gurley’s new book, “The Grave Dancer’s Club,” is set in Corinth.

J.E. Gurley’s newest novel set in Corinth Special to the Daily Corinthian

Doty 50th Anniversary Family and friends are invited to celebrate the 50th wedding anniversary of Joe and Gail Doty today from 2-4 p.m. at the Church of the Crossroads, Mildred Bennett Hall, 2037 U.S. Hwy. 72 East, Corinth. No gifts, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Doty please.

Best selling Kindle author J.E. Gurley’s newest novel, “Grave Dancer’s Club,” is set in his hometown, Corinth. Gurley writes in the horror supernatural genre. “The Grave Dancer’s Club” is a club formed by a group of teenagers to wile away their summer boredom. Tiring of retelling ghost stories, the teenagers decide to investigate a ghost sighting for themselves. They get caught up in what turns out to be a mystery involving unsolved deaths as far back as the Civil War. Gurley, 59, is a retired Atlanta chef and the son

of Pearl Kellum Gurley of Corinth and the late Joe Vance Gurley. His other published books include, “Hell Rig,” “Blood Lust,” “Ice Station Zombie,” “Judgement Day,” “Godseed,” “Father Blood: Demon Spawn,” “Judgement Day: Retribution” and “Judgement Day: Redemption.” “Grave Dancer’s Club” is published by Angelic Knight Press. The full-time writer lives in Tucson, Ariz., with his wife, Kim. Gurley will be available to sign copies of his books on June 11 from 12-3 p.m. at KC’s Espresso in downtown Corinth.

Strapless dress styles can give sleekness to bride’s silhouette BY SAMANTHA CRITCHELL AP Fashion Writer

NEW YORK — The traditional bridal gown isn’t a skimpy silhouette: It’s long and typically without a plunging neckline or high slit. There’s often a whole lot of fabric. One of the few opportunities for brides to be a little bare is to go with a strapless or sleeveless dress — and go with them they do. David Tutera, wedding planner, designer and host of WeTV’s “My Fair Wedding With David Tutera,” says that besides those restricted by

religious customs, he encounters very few brides who want to be more covered than they have to be. More often they want to savor their moment in the spotlight and show themselves off as youthful, pretty and sexy, he says. New bridal collections are dominated by dresses with no sleeves, even though that takes many women out of their comfort zone. There was a brief period when sleeves were hot — after Kate Middleton wore a long-sleeve Alexander McQueen gown to become the Duchess of

Cambridge — but it didn’t last. Bare arms are again the norm. It wasn’t always that way. “It feels like strapless has been the go-to in wedding dresses forever, but, historically speaking, it’s still a very recent trend,” says Keija Minor, editor in chief of Brides magazine. “With some notable exceptions, gowns had high necks and long sleeves up through the 1990s. Just think about Princess Diana’s wedding gown in 1981 with those big puffy sleeves. It was larger than life to be sure,

but still very on trend for the times.” The shift, she says, came about 20 years ago as tradition gave way to a hint of sex appeal. Strapless wedding dresses “are the majority of what’s out there. They dominate in the stores and on every bridal magazine’s editorial pages. They are the easiest to try on and fit,” says designer Romona Keveza. Brides’ Minor says that women of many sizes and shapes, including fullfigured ones, can benefit from the illusion of a longer, leaner arm created by

the uncovered shoulder. And, Keveza adds, strapless gowns have come a long way and are now comfortable, sturdy and stable. Still, she thinks there’s room for a few more sleeved and off-theshoulder numbers. “Brides have come to believe a strapless gown is ‘the uniform’ even if it’s not what she wants,” she says. Tutera says brides should consider the season, location and overall vibe of the wedding before heading straight to strapless.

GRESSETT-ORR

Roberts Moe Miss Jodie Roberts and Mr. Kyle Moe will exchange vows at 5:00 on June 8, 2013 at West Corinth Church of Christ in Corinth, MS. The bride-elect is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Joe Roberts of Corinth. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. & Mrs. James Roberts of Corinth and the late Mr. & Mrs. Tom Lancaster of Corinth. The prospective bridegroom is the son of Mr. & Mrs. John Reynolds of Gillette, WY and Gary Moe of Oregon and the late Mrs. Sally Lorain Sedgley. He is the grandson of Mr. Ernest Reynolds and the late Hellen Reynolds and the late Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Paul Derise & Cleone Derise and the late Jack Sedgley. Miss Roberts is a 1995 graduate of Alcorn Central High School. She is presently employed at Magnolia Regional Health Center in Corinth. Mr. Moe is presently employed at Lake Hill Motors in Corinth. All friends and relatives of the couple are invited to attend the ceremony and the reception which follows.

A compromise could be the strapless dress topped with a mohair-lined silk shawl or a dramatic cape, suggests designer Anne Bowen. Whether a bride chooses to be sleeved or not, she needs to find balance in her gown, adds Bowen. If it’s a “big ball of tulle ballgown,” then the open neckline and bare arms might be the way to go, she says, but for a slim column gown, sleeves that go past the wrist can be delicate and feminine. (She’d stick with a light fabric, such as lace or sheer silk.)

Dane Gressett and Erica Gressett announce the engagement of their daughter, Ellen Taylor Gressett, to James William Orr, son of John and Jennifer Orr of Eureka, MO. The couple was engaged on September 21, 2012, and the wedding will be Saturday June 8, 2013 at Poplar Springs Drive Baptist Church in Meridian, MS. Miss Gressett is the granddaughter of Sam and Sue Gressett of Meridian, Paul and Judy Wilcox of Meridian, and Kendall Blake and the late Rebecca Blake of Madison, MS. The bride-elect is a graduate of Meridian High School and a Summa Cum Laude graduate of Mississippi College with a degree in English Literature. Mr. Orr is the grandson of Jim and Margaret Anne Orr of Corinth, MS and William Huggins and the late Sandra Huggins of St. Clair, MO. The bridegroom elect is a graduate of Tupelo High School and a Summa Cum Laude graduate of Mississippi College with degrees in Computer Science and Mathematics. The reception will be held at Soule Steam Feed Works in Meridian. The couple will make their home in St Louis, MO where James will attend Washington University to pursue a doctorate in computer science.


4B • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • Daily Corinthian

‘After Earth’ joins exclusive ultra-HD movie club BY RYAN NAKASHIMA Associated Press

LOS ANGELES — Sony Corp. is taking a deeper dive into ultrahigh-definition video as it comes out Friday with “After Earth,” the first of Sony’s three movies this year both shot and presented in the emerging 4K digital format. At a screening for journalists, I got a closeup look at even the pores on Will Smith’s face as details were rendered with greater clarity on the big screen. Sony and other consumer electronics makers are betting that 4K images will become the new standard, prompting consumers to buy fancier TVs just as they did when high definition, or HD, rolled out over the past decade. It could also entice more people to buy movie tickets to see for themselves what the super-clear format is like. But the more detailed images present a host of problems. They use four times the number of pixels as the current HD

standard, which results in larger data files. Budgetstrapped digital effects companies are having trouble handling all that data. The cost and time to deal with the extra visual information means the majority of the special effects shots in “After Earth” — comprising about a third of all the shots in the movie — were actually worked on in lower-resolution HD. At the screening I attended, I could see details I’ve never noticed before — the actors’ tiny skin imperfections, or Smith’s salt-and-pepper whiskers. In a distant shot of Smith’s son Jaden running down a riverbed, I was struck by how many small rocks were defined clearly from such a distance. Yet other shots that included computergenerated cityscapes or otherworldly creatures looked less sharp. I was sitting in the seventh row — close enough to tell the difference. If you sit at the back of a theater, you might not be able to tell

Cryptoquip

the difference between 4K and HD. Sony has 15,000 4K projectors installed in theaters worldwide, with more than 11,000 in the U.S. Other manufacturers such as Barco, Christie and NEC also make 4K projectors. So far, major theater chains Regal and AMC are not charging extra for 4K screenings. AMC says nearly all of its 344 theaters have at least one 4K projector. Regal says more than 300 of its 579 theaters have a 4K projector. You’ll have to check with your local theater to see if the movie will be projected in 4K. The push toward higher resolution follows the industry’s emphasis on HD in recent years. Many TV sets tout the “1080p” resolution standard, so named because its images are 1,080 pixels high and 1,920 pixels wide. A slightly wider version with 2,048 pixels across is known as 2K. But 4K is 4,096 pixels wide and 2,160 pixels high. That

gives 4K images 8.8 million pixels compared with roughly 2 million for high definition. Higher-definition movies are a key component in Sony’s strategy to maximize the benefits of both owning the Sony Pictures movie studio and making electronic gadgets. Sony Electronics makes 4K motion picture cameras — such as the F65 used to shoot “After Earth” — as well as 4K movie theater projectors, 4K TVs, home media servers that play 4K movies and other technologies needed to get ultra-HD video from one end to the other. The camera-making division has even had talks with Sony Music Entertainment about shooting concerts in 4K. “It touches an awful lot of the ecosystem,” says Rob Willox, director of large sensor technology for Sony Electronics. So far, 56 movies have been converted to 4K, the majority distributed by Sony. Those include ones originally shot on film, including last year’s Oscar-nominated “Django Unchained.” Sony’s other end-to-end 4K releases planned for this year are “The Smurfs 2,” due out in July, and “No Good Deed,” set for release in October. After Red Digital Cinema began selling a 4K camera, the Red One, in 2007, companies including Sony and Canon Inc. also began making them. Thousands of movies have been shot in 4K, but almost all of them have been shrunk down to HD format before being screened. One exception was Sony’s 2011 remake of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo,” which was shot in 4K with a Red camera and also shown in theaters that way. Having “After Earth” and two others on the release schedule this year marks another milestone for the format. “There is a new movement now where movies are actually being shot at high resolution and finished at high resolution,”

says Ted Schilowitz, a cofounder of Red. “We see huge advantages to deliver four times as many pixels on the screen as HD.” The cinematographer of “After Earth,” Peter Suschitzky, says he picked Sony’s F65 digital camera after side-by-side comparisons of footage taken by other digital and film cameras. Although some people prefer film for its sometimes grainy, soft, romantic look, Suschitzky says those benefits are lost when shown in theaters with digital projectors, as many are today. He says he likes the look of the movie and regrets that special effects scenes were mostly done at the lower standard. “True 4K is amazingly detailed,” he says. “The movie is only half in true 4K. I’m sad about that. It still looks good.” Sony executives say the increased pixel count has made its F65 camera more sensitive than either film or other digital cameras in low-light situations, enabling filmmakers to shoot with more natural lighting. There were some lowlight scenes in “After Earth,” such as when Jaden Smith’s character is in a cave, but I didn’t notice any particular clarity there. Where I did notice extra detail was in scenes that were slow and still, and where the actors’ faces were shot close up. Chris Cookson, the president of Sony Pictures Technologies, keyed in on how the F65 camera catches subtleties. “Look at how much more lifelike the eyes and faces are,” he says. “I personally think there’s more life in human beings when you see them in a way that doesn’t have that filtering effect when you’re looking at HD.” Working entirely in 4K means a movie could take up to 30 percent more time, as well more money on labor and better computers, says Jenny Fulle, chief executive of The Creative-Cartel, which handled the special effects in “After Earth.”

The extra cost and time is one of the reasons that the sci-fi flick starring Tom Cruise, “Oblivion,” was released in 2K in April. It would have cost an extra $1.5 million to finish the film in 4K, according to Sony Electronics’ business development manager, Keith Vidger. Jeffrey Okun, chairman of the Visual Effects Society, a nonprofit organization of Hollywood special effects practitioners, says that making the change to all-4K effects will be difficult but necessary. Ultimately, 4K may mean new TVs for consumers, too. At the International CES gadget show in Las Vegas in January, several electronics manufacturers including Sony, Samsung Electronics Co. and LG Electronics Inc. showed off smaller sizes of 4K TVs whose screens spanned as little as 55 inches diagonally. Sony’s 55-inch ultraHD TV is selling at Best Buy for $5,000. Gerald Belson, a media industry consultant for accounting and consulting firm Deloitte, says the price is “already at the level of some of the early 1080p sets.” His firm predicts that within five years, 4K TV prices will drop below $1,000. The 4K format is also an easier upgrade for most people than 3-D, which in most cases requires wearing special glasses that people find uncomfortable, says Sweta Dash, an analyst with research firm IHS iSuppli. The company predicts companies will ship nearly 1 million ultra-HD sets this year, growing to 7.1 million in 2015 and 20.8 million in 2017. Even though there isn’t much 4K video content now — and 4K broadcasts are likely years away — Dash says the format will likely become popular as TV set prices come down and content grows. But she warned that studios, theaters and electronics makers need to explain exactly what people are watching.

Mickey Mouse returning to Fantasyland in high-tech show BY DERRIK J. LANG AP Entertainment Writer

ANAHEIM, Calif. — Mickey Mouse is center stage again in Fantasyland. The world’s most famous mouse has reclaimed Disneyland’s Fantasyland Theatre for himself after a six-year occupation by the Disney princesses. In recent years, the theme park venue was used as a meeting place for Disney royalty instead of an actual theater. It’s now home to a new song-and-dance extravaganza called “Mickey and the Magical Map.” “It was time,” said director Tracy Halas, who performed two decades ago as a dancer in various productions on the outdoor stage. “With the expansion of Disney’s California Adventure over the past few years, we were really focused on more atmospheric and interactive shows. We sort of work in cycles, and it was the right time again for this kind of show.” The production stars a mischievous Mickey — less corporate icon, more “Fantasia” rookie — who’s teleported across a huge magical map after attempting to paint a blank spot on the sketch, which is digitally displayed on a new 240-square-foot (22-square-meter) LED screen that Mickey and a cast of about two dozen singers and dancers interact with during the 22-minute show.

Michael Jung, Disney’s vice president of theatrical development, said the biggest challenge in creating “Mickey and the Magical Map” wasn’t building the enormous three-tiered LED screen but balancing the demands of a new production that would appeal to all Disneyland visitors, including new generations who are well-versed in computer-generated wizardry. “We always want to appeal to a classic audience, people who’ve grown up with the films and properties and want to relive them or share them with their families,” said Jung. “At the same time, we want the kids of today to be engaged, present and feel like it’s relevant. I think the creative team really worked hard to find the best of both worlds.” “Magical Map” features several Disney characters in six production numbers. There’s an opening routine set to the original new tune “Journey to Imagination,” composed especially for the show, as well as a mash-up where Pocahontas, Mulan and Rapunzel and Flynn Rider from “Tangled” all join together to belt out ballads from their respective films. Mickey and King Louie from “The Jungle Book” are both portrayed in “Magical Map” by actors in costumes with animatronic heads, which allow their giant cartoony eyes to blink and mouths

to move in sync with the show’s soundtrack. The updated articulated “talking” characters have previously been used in Disney theme park and cruise line productions. “Magical Map” is scheduled to run during the summer five times a day. In preparation for the show, the Fantasyland Theatre received an overhaul, including the addition of new audio and lighting systems, stage supports to accommodate the weight of the 71,000-pound (32,273 kilos) LED screen and benches that can seat an audience of up to 1,800. The venue first opened in 1985 as Videopolis, a 5,000-square-foot (465-square-meter) disco with monitors broadcasting music videos and live shots of clubgoers. It was transformed into a fulltime theater in 1989, playing host to shows starring characters like Mickey, Dick Tracy, Pocahontas and Snow White until 2006 when the ever-popular princesses moved in for photo ops. Mickey didn’t completely evict the noblewomen though. They were moved last March to Fantasy Faire, their newly erected permanent residence on the other side of Sleeping Beauty castle that features a gift shop, food cart and meet-andgreet space where guests can pose with a revolving roster of princesses. It also has its own theater that seats 300.


Daily Corinthian â&#x20AC;˘ Sunday, June 2, 2013 â&#x20AC;˘ 5B

For Philadelphia cyclist, cat is his furry co-pilot PHILADELPHIA â&#x20AC;&#x201D; For bicyclist Rudi Saldia, you could say a cat is his copilot. Saldia often buzzes around Philadelphia with his year-old feline Mary Jane perched on his shoulder. Their urban adventures have turned heads on the street and garnered big hits on YouTube. The 26-year-old bike courier didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t intend to become Internet-famous. He originally shot footage of the outings only to prove to his mom that he was taking Mary Jane â&#x20AC;&#x201D; nicknamed MJ â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for a spin. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;No way! Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not taking your cat out for the ride,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; which is the reaction I still get even after people see this video,â&#x20AC;? Saldia said. Saldia used a GoPro sports camera mounted on his bike to capture images of him and MJ, a brown and black tabby with bright yellow eyes. She seems to take the trips in stride, even nuzzling her owner as he pedals, though she gets a bit spooked by sirens and buses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She enjoys seeing everything and having the wind blow in her ears, especially being an indoors cat. This is really her only time outside,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On the shoulder, she loves it. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in total zen mode.â&#x20AC;? The first video, which he posted last October, has more than 1.2 million views on YouTube. GoPro spokeswoman AnneMarie Hennes said she saw it earlier this year and was blown away. She immediately reached out to Saldia to get permission to use the footage in a camera ad, which was posted online last month.

Funding for Medicaid Ends on June 30,2013.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;She enjoys seeing everything and having the wind blow in her ears, especially being an indoors cat. This is really her only time outside. On the shoulder, she loves it. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in total zen mode.â&#x20AC;? Rudi Saldia Philadelphia bicyclist â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just unique and he did a really good job shooting it,â&#x20AC;? said Hennes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hooked him up with some cameras so he can make more cool MJ content.â&#x20AC;? Saldia, who also belongs to long-distance riding club, said he began taking out MJ when she was 2 months old, at first just along his quiet street in downtown Philadelphia. The rides eventually went farther, with positive reactions from both MJ and passers-by. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are thrilled to see the guy with the cat ride his bike down the street,â&#x20AC;? Saldia said. But online commenters have been less kind,

questioning whether the unharnessed cat is safe. Saldia noted he is equally vulnerable while riding in the city and takes necessary precautions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very confident that the cat would be better off in an accident than I would be, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not worried about taking her out,â&#x20AC;? he said. Saldiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mom said although she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe her son at first, she now thinks the tandem rides are â&#x20AC;&#x153;kind of cool.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;He enjoys it, the cat loves to be with him (and) itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better than being home alone,â&#x20AC;? said Sarah Saldia, of Sewell, N.J. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hurting anybody.â&#x20AC;?

But You Can Help Keep Medicaid Funded for the Future! The Mississippi Legislature recently concluded its regular session in early April without approving any legislation to fund the Medicaid program beyond June 30, 2013. If Medicaid is not funded beyond that date, it will have a major, detrimental effect on health care access and availabilityâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;including our nursing homesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ability to provide care to our residents. Please call your legislator and ask them to support funding the current Medicaid program for the futureâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;so quality care can continue being provided to our stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most vulnerable citizens.

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6B • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • Daily Corinthian

LEGAL NOTICE

I, Bobby Marolt, Chancery Clerk of Alcorn County, Mississippi, do hereby make public to the local newspaper this list of names and addresses of reputed owners and the description of property the year of 2010. If not redeemed in this office on or before the 29TH day of August, 2013, the owner will lose title to the property. This notice is given pursuant to the provisions of Section 27 Code Annotated, 1972, Recompiled as amended. Witness my hand and official seal of office, this the 2ND day of June, 2013. Bobby Marolt, Chancery Clerk Alcorn County, Mississippi

2010 DELINQUENT TAXES TAX SALE#

640 PPIN5723 18647 PPIN6991 9 PPIN8358 216 PPIN6758 317 PPIN17679 322 PPIN22686 526 PPIN14521 694 PPIN847 1206 PPIN20417 18449 PPIN21992 1260 PPIN3943 1346 PPIN8518 1347 PPIN25102 1366 PPIN24290 1377 PPIN7474 1782 PPIN10214 1783 PPIN10338 1784 PPIN21120 1796 PPIN3120 1818 PPIN14762 2806 PPIN20052 3253 PPIN7893 3463 PPIN6886 3537 PPIN24919 3705 PPIN26722 3850 PPIN20581 3860 PPIN6988 3861 PPIN6358 3897 PPIN5149 3921 PPIN11804 3954 PPIN 7616 3958 PPIN 6733 4019 PPIN4713 4533 PPIN7803 4547 PPIN7736 4775 PPIN17765 4779 PPIN19997 4870 PPIN3672 4882 PPIN5761 4976 PPIN20339 4975 PPIN8129 4981 PPIN7955 5423 PPIN24727 6046 PPIN3855 6054 PPIN15483 6055 PPIN20382 6079 PPIN3531 6081 PPIN10498 6226 PPIN7965 6316 PPIN6092 6554 PPIN8045 6556 PPIN20668 7009 PPIN10730 7010 PPIN10731 7004 PPIN11799 7043 PPIN6755 7044 PPIN8220 7363 PPIN8064 7570 PPIN10499 7919 PPIN13381 7950 PPIN20900 8165 PPIN1493 8218 PPIN7738 8246 PPIN11670 8363 PPIN6333 8369 PPIN4451 8569 PPIN25557 8949 PPIN13421 9037 PPIN15132 9072 PPIN16932 9124 PPIN9371 9125 PPIN9373 9126 PPIN9738 9123 PPIN26709 9170 PPIN4280 9418 PPIN8953 9506 PPIN16657 9592 PPIN8066 9769 PPIN8017 10008 PPIN17819 10600 PPIN6068 10603 PPIN21732 10964 PPIN7458 11141 PPIN13630 11466 PPIN27076 11516 PPIN4858 11517 PPIN4859 11518 PPIN21321 11821 PPIN26674 11853 PPIN19644 11856 PPIN8903 11857 PPIN8886 12049 PPIN4284 12056 PPIN20547 12132 PPIN6785 12131 PPIN6781 12364 PPIN8126 12655 PPIN4301 12845 PPIN20636 13002 PPIN7205 13200 PPIN7842 13369 PPIN435 13621 PPIN6081 13622 PPIN18755 14107 PPIN7963 14108 PPIN3251

ASSESSED OWNER

ABSOLUTE AUTO ACCEPTANCE ABSOLUTE AUTO ACCEPTANCE ADAIR HOLDINGS LLC PREVIOUS OWNER – WILLIE COLEMAN EST. PROPERTY ADDRESS ANDERSON, JOHN

ADDRESS

DESCRIPTION

964 EASON BLVD., TUPELO, MS 38804 BLK 578 WALKER ADDN (1518 BUCHANAN ST.) 964 EASON BLVD., TUPELO, MS 38804 LT 47 & W 20 FT LT 48 ADAMS ADDN 405 N. 115TH ST. SUITE 100 LT 5,6,7, & 8 BLK 1 LINCOLN PLACE OMAHA, NE 68154 1212 LYON ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 C/O VEROY AGNEW PT BLK 20 GRAHAM’S ADDN 1408 MEIGG ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 ARNOLD, JERRY ETUX NINA 30 CR 156, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT SW 1/4 NE 1/4 SEC 22 TWN 1 RNG 8 1 ACRE ARNOLD, NINA JEAN 30 CR 156, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT W 1/2 OF S 1/2 OF NE 1/4 SEC 22 TWN 1 RNG 8 1 ACRE BAIN, HERMAN C/O HEATHER WHITE TRACT N 1/2 N RD 571 CR 343, GLEN, MS 38846 SEC 14 TWN 3 RNG 8 4 ACRES BARNES, FREDDY 65 CR 152, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT S 1/2 W 1/2 W 1/2 NW 1/4 SEC 28 TWN 1 RNG 8 1.40 ACRES BLANKENSHIP, SHELIA P. O. BOX 264,WALNUT, MS 38683 PT OF NE 1/4 SEC 19 TWN 2 RNG 5 1.80 ACRES BOATWRIGHT, EDDIE C JR. 1401 HWY 7 N., HOLLY SPRINGS, MS 38635 PT NW 1/4 SEC 20 TWN 1 RNG 5 2.42 ACRES PREVIOUS OWNERS: WARE, JAMES O. ETUX MARY L. 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HUMBERS, GARY LEE 39 CR 653, WALNUT, MS 38683 TRACT SW 1/4 SE 1/4 SEC 16 TWN 2 RNG 5 4.70 ACRES ISBELL, WILLIAM JAMES 186 B CR248, GLEN, MS 38846 PT NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 RICKMAN, TAMICA 819 FULTON ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 SEC 18 TWN 3 RNG 8 1 ACRE JOHNSON, JEFFREY ALLEN 12 CR 239, GLEN, MS 38846 PT NW 1/4 NW 1/4 SEC 34 TWN 2 RNG 8 JOHNSTON, PAMELA H. 413 AIRVILLE RD., TEMPLE, TX 76501 LT NE 1/4 SW 1/4 SEC 6 TWN 3 RNG 7 JONES, BOBBY 570 CR 531, RIPLEY, MS 38663 PT NW 1/4 SEC 15 TWN 2 RNG 5 1/2 ACRE JONES, JAMES CHRISTOPHER 10560 HWY 45 N, COLUMBUS, MS 39705 PT S 1/2 NW 1/4 SEC 22 TWN 2 RNG 7 17.50 ACRES JONES, JAMES CHRISTOPHER 10560 HWY 45 N, COLUMBUS, MS 39705 PT SW 1/4 NW 1/4 SEC 22 TWN 2 RNG 7 1 ACRE JONES, JAMES CHRISTOPHER 10560 HWY 45 N, COLUMBUS, MS 39705 E 1/2 NE 1/4 NE 1/4 N RD SEC 28 TWN 2 RNG 7 17 ACRES JONES, JAMES CHRISTOPHER 10560 HWY 45 N, COLUMBUS, MS 39705 PT SE 1/4 SEC 21 TWN 2 RNG 7 95 ACRES JONES, LARRY CLINTON JR. 29-A CR 612, WALNUT, MS 38683 TRACT N 1/2 NE 1/4 SEC 6 TWN 2 RNG 5 BAKER, JANE MARIE 3 ACRES GLISSON, KEVIN 626 CR 600, WALNUT, MS 38683 KEMP, ROYCE M., JR. 10 CR 626, CORINTH, MS 38834 LT N 1/2 SW 1/4 SEC 18 TWN 2 RNG 7 KILCREASE, JOHN D. 154 HWY 356, RIENZI, MS 38865 PT NW 1/4 SW 1/4 S HWY SEC 5 TWN 4 RNG 7 1.05 ACRES KING, JAMES JR. 1306 BUCHANAN ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 PT BLK 377 MITCHELL & MASK KOZAM, GOUNI 920 CASS ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 N 1/2 BLK 383 MITCHELL & MASK ROSS ST COR HSE & 211 PIERCE LANGLEY, EVALENA EST. 77 B HWY 367, BURNSVILLE, MS 38833 SEC 36 TWN 3 RNG 8 4 ACRES C/O DEWEL GREEN LUKER, MARK W. ETUX MICHIE H. 295 CR 602, CORINTH, MS 38834 LT W/S POLK ST. BLK 566 WALKER ADDN LUKER, NATHANIEL H. & FAYE ELLA 295 CR 602, CORINTH, MS 38834 REMAINDER OF POLK ST BLK 566 WALKER C/O MARK LUKER MATHIS, BOBBY R. ETUX DIANA L. 3691 STEELE ST., MEMPHIS, TN 38127 PT BLK 18 PT 19 H MITCHELL SURVEY MAYES, JEARLEAN 35 CR 474, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT SW 1/4 NW 1/4 SEC 31 TWN 2 RNG 8 MCGREGOR, FRANKIE 2068 WICKER RD., PONTOTOC, MS 38863 SW 1/4 SE 1/4 SEC 29 TWN 3 RNG 8 9.15 ACRES MCLAURIN, MARTY 149 CR 755, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT W 1/2 NW 1/4 S RD SEC 6 TWN 2 RNG 6 14 ACRES MCLAURIN, MARTY 149 CR 755, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT W 1/2 NW 1/4 SEC 6 TWN 2 RNG 6 1.29 ACRES MCLAURIN, MARTY 149 CR 755, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT W 1/2 NW ¼ SEC 6 TWN 2 RNG 6 3.35 ACRES MILES, BILLIE SUE BURROW 193 CR 761,WALNUT, MS 38683 PT SE 1/4 SEC 15 TWN 1 RNG 5 22.07 ACRES MILLER, BILLY ETUX REGINA 37 CR 676, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT SW 1/4 SEC 20 TWN 2 RNG 6 7.67 ACRES MILLER, EDDIE ETUX CINDY 157 CR 519, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT SE 1/4 NE 1/4 SEC 18 TWN 2 RNG 7 1 ACRE MILLER, EDDIE ETUX CINDY 157 CR 519, CORINTH, MS 38834 SEC 17 TWN 2 RNG 7 MITCHELL, ASHLEY 6 CR 672, WALNUT, MS 38683 TRACT W 1/2 NE 1/4 SEC 6 TWN 2 RNG 5 MITCHELL, PEYTON 11.30 ACRES MITCHELL, BRENDA 22 CR 629, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT W 1/2 SW 1/4 SEC 18 TWN 2 RNG 7 C/O BEVERLY TRANTHAM 1 ACRE MITCHELL, JAMES M. 3832 HWY. 25 N., IUKA, MS 38852 LT 19 HOYT HORN SUB MITCHELL, JAMES M. 3832 HWY. 25 N., IUKA, MS 38852 PT BLK 18 GRAHAM’S ADDN MOORE, PATRICK J. & BRENDA G. 208 PENN ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 PT BLK 302 MITCHELL & MASK NAILS, JIMMY 32 CR 672, WALNUT, MS 38683 PT E 1/2 N CREEK SEC 6 TWN 2 RNG 5 75 ACRES NEWCOMB, THERESA G. 4160 CR 200, APT. #22, CORINTH, MS 38834 PT SW 1/4 SEC 18 TWN 3 RNG 9 PROPERTY ADDRESS – 21 CR 346 NORTON, LOLA FAY 102 STANLEY ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 LT 3 & 4 BLK 5 G. H. NELSON ADDN NORTON, LOYD CARLOS C/O DANNY NORTON OWENS, ETHEL 605 W. SHILOH RD., CORINTH, MS 38834 LT 25 BLK 651 ANDERSON ADDN GREEN, QUAVIS (CURRENT OWNER) 510 S PENN ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 VACANT LOT ON ROSS ST. PARKER, BRYAN SHANE 115 SHAW RD., CORINTH, MS 38834 LT SW 1/4 SW 1/4 SEC 21 TWN 1 RNG 8 PEDEN, VIOLA 1509 WASHINGTON ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 LT BLK 552 WALKER ADDN PEDEN, VIOLA 1509 WASHINGTON ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 LT N 1/2 SW CORNER BLK 553 WALKER ADDN PORTER, JERRY P. O. BOX 1292, CORINTH, MS 38835 LTS 1 &2 BLK 666 ANDERSON ADDN (1210 HORTON ST.) PORTER, JERRY P. O. BOX 1292, CORINTH, MS 38835 LT E 1/2 NE 1/4 S RD SEC 34 TWN 1 RNG 7


Daily Corinthian • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • 7B

TAX SALE#

2010 DELINQUENT TAXES

ASSESSED OWNER

14975 PPIN14649

ROBERTSON, DOUGLAS DR.

15293 PPIN16870

ROSS, M. C.

15449 PPIN6763 6994 PPIN61

RUTHERFORD, MATTIE SAGELY, ROGER D. MILLS, LORA F. SANDERS, FRANCES SANDERS, FRANCES

15521 PPIN5692 15522 PPIN6941 15544 PPIN3248 15735 PPIN6352 15860 PPIN16564 15922 PPIN8001 13799 PPIN10343 16643 PPIN12557 16776 PPIN17888 13156 PPIN13826 16976 PPIN20712 17058 PPIN8004 17056 PPIN8005 17057 PPIN8012 17299 PPIN18614 18012 PPIN6747 15525 PPIN11671

18103 PPIN11673

18113 PPIN8863 18448 PPIN7923 16796 PPIN1945 19551 PPIN7798 19640 PPIN8031 19707 PPIN12458 19734 PPIN7734 19891 PPIN8276 19892 PPIN7886

SANDERS, MICHAEL SELLERS, GERALD SHADBURN, KELLIE W. SHELBY, WILL C/O ANNETTE EDMOND SMITH, DORETHA SUZANNE

ADDRESS

418 WEST MAYFIELD DRIVE GRAND JUNCTION, CO 81503 C/O FRANKLIN S. ROSS, JR. 14305 KAWIL LANE, RED BLUFF, CA 96080 P. O. BOX 2371, CORINTH, MS 38835 61 CR 161, CORINTH, MS 38834 53 CR 161, CORINTH, MS 38834 1306 BUCHANAN ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 1306 BUCHANAN ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 P. O. BOX 1943, MEMPHIS, TN 38101 15 CR 242, IUKA, MS 38852 14 CR 462, RIENZI, MS 38865 P.O. BOX 883, CORINTH, MS 38835 834 JACOB COURT STEVENSVILLE, MT 59870 145 CR 218, GLEN, MS 38846

DESCRIPTION

E 1/2 SE 1/4 LESS TRACT SEC 28 TWN 3 RNG 8 35.78 ACRES SW 1/4 SEC 5 TWN 4 RNG 9 160 ACRES PT BLK 25 GRAHAM’S ADDN PT SE 1/4 NW 1/4 SEC 19 TWN 1 RNG 9 7.20 ACRES BLK 575 WALKER ADDN PT BLK 10 BELL, YOUNG & MCCORD (CRUISE ST. VACANT LOT) PT SE 1/4 NE 1/4 SEC 34 TWN 1 RNG 7 15 ACRES LT 3 ADAMS ADDN PT E 1/2 SE 1/4 E RR SEC 2 TWN 4 RNG 7 3.40 ACRES LT 7 BLK 673 ANDERSON ADDN (1316 DICKEY ST.) P E 1/2 E RD SEC 3 TWN 2 RNG 8 1.20 ACRES

SOUTH, DONALD ETUX SOUTH, CHARLOTTE SPENCER, SUSAN D. 292 CR 702, CORINTH, MS 38834 STEVENS, AMANDA 31 CR 259, GLEN, MS 38846 STEWARD, JARROD C. ETUX AUDREY J. 43 CR 761, WALNUT, MS 38683 STONE, BILLY JOE 1202 TATE ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 BRYANT, ADAM ETUX JESSICA BRYANT STONE, BILLY JOE 1202 TATE ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 BRYANT, ADAM ETUX JESSICA BRYANT STONE, BILLY JOE 1202 TATE ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 BRYANT, ADAM ETUX JESSICA BRYANT SUMMITT, ELISHA MARLENE BROOKS 16 CR 708, CORINTH, MS 38834 VAN, MITCHELL ETUX AMBER 5428 MT. MCKINLEY RD. FORT WORTH, TX 76137 VESELKA, BUFFY ETAL 3534 LEBLANC, SAN ANTONIO, TX 78247 SHREFFLER, CAMERON FOWLER, DANIEL MCMAHAN, CRISSIE FOWLER 400 LIBERTY RD, MICHIE, TN 38357 FORMERLY HUBERT & MARIE SANDERS PROPERTY VESELKA, BUFFIE ETAL 3534 LEBLANC, SAN ANTONIO, TX 78247 SHREFFLER, CAMERON FOWLER, DANIEL MCMAHAN, CRISSIE FOWLER 400 LIBERTY RD, MICHIE, TN 38357 FORMERLY HUBERT & MARIE SANDERS PROPERTY VILLAGE CREEK PROPERTIES, INC. P. O. BOX 1427, GRENADA, MS 38901 WARE, CHRISTOPHER O. 605 KING ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 WILLIS, DAVID 136 CR 715, CORINTH, MS 38834 PREVIOUS OWNERS: NORVELL GENE STACY GLENDA STACY WILLIS, CLARA P. O. BOX 342, CORINTH, MS 38835 WINDOM, BEN ETUX BEA 1113 E 4TH, CORINTH, MS 38834 C/O ANNIE WINDOM WOOD, DONALD R. 14 CR 286, CORINTH, MS 38834 WOOD, PHYLLIS EATON 1411 ALLEN ST., CORINTH, MS 38834 WREN, SONJA M. 1702 MEADOW DR., CORINTH, MS 38834 WREN, SONJA MECHELLE 1702 MEADOW DR., CORINTH, MS 38834

PT NE 1/4 NE 1/4 W HWY SEC 22 TWN 2 RNG 8 2 ACRES NE 1/4 NE 1/4 SEC 21 TWN 1 RNG 7 1.40 ACRES TRACT NW 1/4 NW 1/4 NE 1/4 SEC 31 TWN 2 RNG 9 3.87 ACRES PT SW 1/4 & SE 1/4 SEC 23 TWN 1 RNG 5 26.59 ACRES PT BLK 382 MITCHELL & MASK PT BLK 382 MITCHELL & MASK PT BLK 382 MITCHELL & MASK TRACT SW 1/4 NW 1/4 SEC 27 TWN 1 RNG 7 PT BLK 19 GRAHAMS ADDN

1.50 ACRES

PT NE 1/4 NW 1/4 SEC 7 TWN 2 RNG 8

PT NE 1/4 NW 1/4 SEC 7 TWN 2 RNG 8 PROPERTY ADDRESS – 101 NOEL ST

NE 1/4 N & W CREEK SEC 8 TWN 2 RNG 7 LT 17 BLK 662 ANDERSON ADDN LT SW 1/4 NE 1/4 S RD SEC 21 TWN 1 RNG 7

48 ACRES

LT 10 BLK 679 ANDERSON ADDN BLK 375 MITCHELL & MASK PROPERTY ADDRESS – 916 ALLEN ST. PT W 1/2 SEC 21 TWN 2 RNG 8 LT 4 & 5 BLK 612 ANDERSON ADDN LT 58 LAKE RD SUB PROPERTY ADDRESS – 1702 MEADOW DR. LT 3 BLK 664 ANDERSON ADDN PROPERTY ADDRESS – 1216 MEIGG ST.

0114 HAPPY ADS

“Because Little Things Mean A Lot, Give Him a Gift From The Heart”

BUZZ

Want to Create a Buzz About Your Business?

This year give him that picture perfect Father’s Day Gift. Send us your favorite photograph of Dad, a memorable photo of Dad and the family or just a funny little snapshot to publish in our Father’s Day Section in The Daily Corinthian on Sunday, June 16, 2013.

The right advertising strategy can take your business to the next level. As a senior account representative with over 10 years of ADVERTISING IS THE experience helping retailers advertise effectively,WAY I have the TO marketing expertise and resources to help your business succeed. GO! From print and online advertising to special events, coupon campaigns,EVERYONE inserts and direct mail, find outKNOW! which marketing LET tools can maximize your exposure to your target audience.

You may include a short description with names or memo (approx. 10-20 words).

LET’S GET STARTED! Call me today, and let’s get started!

THE COST IS ONLY $10.00 (MUST BE PREPAID)

You may bring your photo(s) by The Daily Corinthian office at:

1607 S. Harper Rd., Corinth, MS or Email to classad@dailycorinthian.com (only 1 picture per ad)

HURRY! DEADLINE IS MONDAY, JUNE 10, 2013

Daily Corinthian Matthew Emerson

Senior Account Representative

1607 South Harper Road Corinth MS 38834 memerson@namewebsite.com | 000.000.0000 662-287-6111


8B • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • Daily Corinthian

T

he World Is At Your Feet Take in a world of information every day, with home delivery of the

Business & Finance • World Affairs • Health & Medicine • Editorials Technology • Reviews • Sports

Call 287-6111 for subscription details.

SERVICES

BUSINESS & SERVICE GUIDE Daily Corinthian And The Community Profiles RUN YOUR AD In TheFOR $ ONLY 200 A MONTH ON THIS PAGE (Daily Corinthian Only 165) $

CHIROPRACTOR

HOUSE FOR SALE

2107 Weston Drive

Dr. Jonathan R. Cooksey Neck Pain • Back Pain Disc Problems Spinal Decompression Therapy Most Insurance Accepted Mon., Tues., Wed. & Fri. 9-5 3334 N. Polk Street Corinth, MS 38834 (662) 286-9950

Loans $20-$20,000

upstairs (could be 4 BR), 2-car garage, tile & carpet flooring throughout. 2400 sq. ft. Asking $156,900. 662-643-3221 before

40 Years

KITCHEN & BATH CABINETS Produced daily at our modern plant in Corinth Industrial Park

We have the BEST Values for your Kitchen and Bathroom Cabinets Just bring your measurements and we will help you with the rest!

Raised Panel Oak Flat Panel Oak MDF white or black (Prefinished or Unfinished) One of the state’s largest dealers in kitchen counter tops Formica or Granite

SMITH CABINET SHOP 1505 South Fulton Dr. • Corinth, MS

662-287-2151 Coldwell Banker Southern Real Estate offers beautiful lots for sale at Shiloh Ridge. Included w/ each lot purchase is a 1-yr. familty membership w/golf, tennis, swimming & work-out facility. We are here on site, 7 days a week to show you what is available. Prices start at $25,000. Pick your lot & start looking for house plans.

Phone number 662-279-3902 or 662-279-3679

HARRELL

GENERAL CONTRACTING Specializing in roofing, metal & shingle. 35 yrs. experience. Referrals if needed.

Owner, Bubba Harrell 662-872-9109

www.southernhomesafety.com

nook, living room, bonus room

Remodeling or New Construction

“Live where you play!”

3 BR, 2 BA, dining room, kitchen

SOUTHERN HOME SAFETY, INC. TOLL FREE 888-544-9074 or 662-315-1695

HOUSE FOR SALE

5pm & 662-287-8350 after 5pm.

Farmers & Merchants Bank 662-720-4580 NOT YOUR ORDINARY ........ FLEA MARKET/ANTIQUE MALL

EASTVIEW COLLECTlQUES, LLC 5534 Hwy 45, Eastview, Tn 38375 1 mi N of Hwy# 57/45 Junction GRAND OPENING JUNE 7TH-8TH-9TH

• "The Cottage" Vintage Style Clothing • HUGE INVENTORY DECO NETTING • Antiques & Collectables • "MAN CAVE" • Old Vintage Clothing Closet • "Sew Sassy" monograming • "Boots & Stuff" • Pickwick Pickers • 2 Vintage Cuzens • Antique Glasware & Pottery

Jeanette Storey Tempe & Janet Gurley Owners 731-645-5677 open 7 days

JIMCO ROOFING.

SELDOM YOUR LOWEST BID ALWAYS YOUR HIGHEST QUALITY

• Carports • Vinyl Siding • Room Additions • Shingles & Metal Roofing • Concrete Drives • Interior & Exterior Painting FREE ESTIMATES 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE FULLY INSURED 731-689-4319 JIMMY NEWTON

$1,000,000 LIABILITY INSURANCE

• SAME PHONE # & ADDRESS SINCE 1975 • LIFETIME WARRANTIED OWENS CORNING SHINGLES W/TRANSFERABLE WARRANTY (NO SECONDS) • METAL, TORCHDOWN, EPDM, SLATE, TILE, SHAKES, COATINGS. • LEAK SPECIALIST WE INSTALL SKYLIGHTS & DO CARPENTRY WORK

662-665-1133 662-286-8257

JIM BERRY, OWNER/INSTALLER

Bill Phillips Sand & Gravel

1299 Hwy 2 West (Marshtown) Structure demolition & Removal Crushed Lime Stone (any size) Iuka Road Gravel Washed gravel Pea gravel Fill sand Masonry sand Black Magic mulch Natural brown mulch Top soil

“Let us help with your project” “Large or Small” Bill Jr., 284-6061 G.E. 284-9209

Smith Discount Home Center 412 Pinecrest Road 287-2221 • 287-4419

Hinkle community. 807 CR 518, Rienzi MS 38865. 5 BR, 3 BA, 3 acres. Price Reduced! $140,000

TORNADO SHELTERS Large full size 6x12 tall x 6’9” concrete

HOME REPAIRS

All types of lumber regular and treated

OPEN HOUSE SAT., 12-4 Great 3 BR, 2 BA home, 153 CR 255, Glen, MS near Alcorn Central School. New paint, floors, appliances, C/H/A. $54,000. Call/text 662-415-4405 after 4 p.m.

www.facebook.com/alcorn.homes “White & Black Bookcases Available Now!”

4695 6995

$ Air Compressors.Starting at Huge Selection of $ Area Rugs ...................Starting at

Croft Windows ...................................................... $ 95 Foil Back Foamboard 1/2”... $ 95 Foil Back Foamboard 3/4”... $ 95 Foil Back Foamboard 1” ..... $ 95 5/8 T1-11.......................................

5 6 8 17

1x6 & 1x8 White Pine

50000 $ 4x8 Masonite 1695 $ 00 Vinyl Floor Remnants 1 $ 95 CROSSTIES 6 $ 95 25 Year 3 Tab Shingle 54 35 Year Architectural $ 6295 Shingle ¢-$ 09 Laminate Floor From 39 1 $ 00-$ Pad for Laminate Floor 5 1000 $ Handicap Commodes 6995 $ Round Commodes 4995 $ 12 x 12 Celotex Ceiling (40Sq Ft) 3995 $ Tubs & Showers 21500 Pattern Board

$

.......................

1,000 Board Ft.

.......... starting

at

.....

sq. yd.

......................................

...

.............................................

...

...

.......

...........

.......

.... starting

box

at

Don’t Waste Your Money... Shop With Us!

SMITH CABINET SHOP

1505 South Fulton Dr. • Corinth, MS

662-287-2151 CrossRoads Heating & Cooling

RUN YOUR AD IN THE DAILY CORINTHIAN &

Simple tune-up gives you more comfort, lower energy cost, prolonged life of unit & reduce risk of costly repairs.

COMMUNITY PROFILES

Programs starting at $75.00

ONLY $200 A MONTH

Services offered:

(DAILY CORINTHIAN

•Maintenance Programs •HVAC Systems •HVAC Tune-ups & Inspections

ONLY $165.00).

We Service All Makes & Models

15% Senior Citizen & Vet Disc. Mention this ad & save 10%

(662) 212-4735 Bill Crawford

ON THIS PAGE FOR

CALL 662-287-6147 FOR DETAILS.

Specializing In Above Ground Pools

662-842-2728 BACKYARD POOLS 1292A North Veterans Boulevard Tupelo, MS www.backyardpoolstupelo.com

FOR SALE BY OWNER

Beautiful brick ranch home, 3 BR, 2 BA, LR & kitchen (appl. stay). Glass & screened back porch, Little red barn storage shed w/riding mower & weedeater incl., large carport (easy in & out).

Farmington area $72,000. 662-286-5736. No agents or Sunday calls!

PLUMBING & ELECTRIC

Licensed & Bonded

• Bucket Truck Service • Backhoe

662-396-1023 JASON ROACH-OWNER R 1159 B CR 400 Corinth, MS 38834


Daily Corinthian • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • 9B

0232 GENERAL HELP

0135 PERSONALS

YARD SALE SPECIAL

ANY 3 CONSECUTIVE DAYS Ad must run prior to or day of sale! (Deadline is 3 p.m. day before ad is to run!) (Exception-Sun. deadline is 3 pm Fri.)

5 LINES (Apprx. 20 Words)

$19.10 (Does not include commercial business sales) ALL ADS MUST BE PREPAID We accept credit or debit cards

0121 CARD OF THANKS

CAUTION! ADVERTISEMENTS in this classificaCARD OF tion usually offer inforTHANKS mational service of products designed to Thanks to everyone who called, help FIND employment. visited, brought flowers 0149 FOUND Before you send money PETS & stood by our side during the FOUND: LARGE key ring to any advertiser, it is full of keys west of airpassing of our loved one. port on CR 614. Call 287- your responsibility to 0320 CATS/DOGS/PETS 3206 to identify & claim. From the family of verify the validity of the FREE KITTENS to good Kenneth Wilbanks home. Raised indoors. offer. Remember: If an 662-212-2307, 872-9071. ad appears to sound EMPLOYMENT 0180 INSTRUCTION KITTENS “too good to be true”, 9 wk FREE old; 3 males/2 fe0204 ADMINISTRATIVE then it may be! Inquir- males. 662-415-3098 CORINTH SCHOOL DISTRICT ies can be made by conHEAVY VESSEL FARM Fabrication Facility Notice of Vacancies tacting the Better BusiCorinth, MS area ness Bureau at Need Mechanical EnFARM gineer and ConstrucPrincipal 1-800-987-8280. 0470 EQUIPMENT tion Management apDRIVER TRAINEES Needed Now! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800+ per week! No experience needed! CDL-Trained and Job-Ready in 15 days! 1-888-540-7364

SEMI-RETIRED MAN who owns his home, seeks June bride with good personality & a good driver. Non-drug & smoking residence. Send info & phone number to P.O. Box 225, Selmer, TN. 38375.

ADVERTISE IN THE DAILY CORINTHIAN

0244 TRUCKING

plicants for Production and Quality Control planning and management. Email jobs@contractfab.com

0503 AUCTION SALES

Assistant Superintendent Elementary Teachers Math Teacher English Teacher Social Studies Teacher Speech Pathologist Science Teachers Special Education Teacher Spanish Teachers

TODDLER'S electric John SCREEN PRINT OPERATDeere tractor & trailer, OR. Email references to: gently used. Loads of blue.crest.llc@gmail. fun! Gave over $200, will com take $80. 662-643-7650.

0244

TRUCKING

Drivers

Saturday, June 8, 2013 at 10:00 am (MOMMA WHIT) RAYMER WILSON 112 Duboise St., Iuka, MS 38852 IN IUKA, MS. FROM RED LIGHT TURN ONTO QUITMAN RD., GO EAST (OLD HWY 72), GO TO NATIONAL GUARD ARMORY AND TURN LEFT TO BRIDGEPORT, THEN GO STRAIGHT ACROSS TO SALE SITE. WATCH FOR SIGNS!

FUNITURE • GUNS • APLLIANCES • OLD MARBLES • ETC. - OAK CLAW FOOT TABLE W/ CHAIRS - OLD KITCHEN CABINET W/ SIFTER - 4 PIECE CEDAR BEDROOM SUITE - OLD 3/4 BED - MAGAHONY POSTER BED - FRIGIDAIRE REFRIGERATOR - FRIGIDAIRE AIR CONDITIONER - DISPLAY CASE OF CASE KNIVES

- RED WAGON -FARM TOOLS - DISPLAY CASE OF MINIATURE HAND TOOLS

MANY, MANY MORE ITEMS, TOO NUMEROUS TO LIST! BRING A LAWN CHAIR AND THE FAMILY FOR A FUN FILLED DAY. YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS THIS AUCTION!

For more information and photos, visit us on auctionzip.com or americanauctionusa.com (ID #4676). TERMS: CASH OR GOOD CHECK W/VALID ID. 10% BUYER’S PREMIUM WILL BE ADDED TO ADJUST THE FINAL SELLING PRICE. ALL ITEMS ARE BELIEVED TO BE TRUE AND CORRECT PER THE SELLER. AMERICAN AUCTION NOR ANY OF THE STAFF MAKES ANY GUARANTEES. ANNOUNCEMENTS MADE THE DAY OF THE AUCTION SUPERCEDES ANY AND ALL PRIOR PUBLICATIONS OR ANNOUNCEMENTS.

Nationwide Auctioneers & Liquidators TN 4309· AR 1987 Auctionzip 10 #4676 Keith Moore: MALl59· MFl416

Call Classified at (662) 287-6147

Our HOMERUN Fleet will get you miles for your paycheck and home time for your family. ********************************** *CDL-A w/ 6 months of recent OTR experience required * 401k & Paid Vacation * Family Medical/Dental ********************************** Apply By Phone Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

877-826-4605

For more information, or for all your auction needs, call

KEITH MOORE AMERICAN AUCTION CO.

or online

731-610-1458 “We work harder for your top dollar”

www.HomerunFleet.com

For information and application contact:

Corinth School District 1204 North Harper Road Corinth, MS 38834 Phone: 662-287-2425 www.corinth.k12.ms.us

Corinth School District does not discriminate on the basis of disability, color, religion, national origin, race, gender, age, or any other legally protected status. Equal Opportunity Employer.

DRIVE SAFELY

AUTO SERVICES

0840

GUARANTEED Auto Sales 804 BOATS

868 868 868 AUTOMOBILES AUTOMOBILES AUTOMOBILES

Advertise your CAR, TRUCK, SUV, BOAT, TRACTOR, MOTORCYCLE, RV & ATV here for $39.95 UNTIL SOLD! Ad should include photo, description and price. PLEASE NO DEALERS & NON-TRANSFERABLE! NO REFUNDS. Single item only. Payment in advance. Call 287-6147 to place your ad. 864 TRUCKS/VANS SUV’S

864 TRUCKS/VANS SUV’S

864 TRUCKS/VANS SUV’S

‘07 Dolphin LX RV, 37’ 1981 Bluebird Bus

1989 FOXCRAFT

18’ long, 120 HP Johnson mtr., trailer & mtr., new paint, new transel, 2 live wells, hot foot control.

$7500.

662-596-5053

816 816 RECREATIONAL RECREATIONAL VEHICLES VEHICLES

2011 Chev. Malibu

2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA 19,800 miles, garage kept w/all service records, 38 mpg, tinted windows & XM radio. Asking $17,500. 662-594-5830.

4-dr. sedan, 36,900 miles, white w/black leather & velour int., w/small wood grain trim around dash. Asking price $12,500. Contact

662-287-6218 or 662-664-0104

1967 CHEVY Needs paint & body work $4000. 504-952-1230 Corinth

2004 MERCURY MONTEREY

2002 Chevrolet Z-71,4-dr., 4W.D., Am.Fm cass./CD, pewter $7,000 OBO in color, $6200. Call or text 662-643-5908 or 956-334-0937 662-643-5020

fully loaded, DVD/ CD system, new tires, mileage 80,700, climate controlled air/heat, heat/ cool power seats.

gas burner, workhorse eng., 2 slideouts, full body paint, walk-in shower, SS sinks & s/s refrig w/ im, Onar Marq gold 7000 gen., 3-ton cntrl. unit, back-up camera, auto. leveling, 2-flat screen TVs, Allison 6-spd. A.T., 10 cd stereo w/s.s, 2-leather capt. seats & 1 lthr recliner, auto. awning, qn bed, table & couch (fold into bed), micro/conv oven, less than 5k mi.

$85,000 662-415-0590

REDUCED

Imagine owning a likenew, water tested, never launched, powerhouse outboard motor with a High Five stainless prop, $

for only

7995.

Call John Bond of Paul Seaton Boat Sales in Counce, TN for details.

731-689-4050 or 901-605-6571

‘90 RANGER BASS BOAT

1984 CORVETTE 383 Stroker, alum. high riser, alum. heads, headers, dual line holly, everything on car new or rebuilt w/new paint job (silver fleck paint).

$9777.77 Call Keith 662-415-0017.

1983 NISSAN DATSUN 280 ZX

2007 GMC 3500 2 WD, 175k miles, 6-spd., auto., $18,000; 2013 PJ 40’ Gooseneck trailer.

Turbo, exc. cond.

$12,000. 662-415-1804

$5000. 662-415-1482

361V W/MATCHING TRAILER & COVER, RASPBERRY & GRAY, EVINRUDE 150XP, 24-V TROL. MTR., 2 FISH FINDERS, NEW BATTS., NEW LED TRAILER LIGHTS, EXC. COND.,

2000 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX GT 228k miles.

$2500 obo.

662-643-6005

$6,400.

864 TRUCKS/VANS SUV’S

662-808-0113.

1999 CHEV. TAHOE 4 W.D., leather seats, cold air, hitch on back.

$6250 OBO.

287-7403 REDUCED

1991 Ford Econoline Van, 48,000 miles, good cond., one owner, serious interest. $6500 287-5206.

2000 Ford F-350

super duty, diesel, 7.3 ltr., exc. drive train, 215k miles, excellent, great mechanical condition”.

JOHNSON, TROLLING MTR., GOOD COND., INCLUDES TRAILER,

$1200 OBO

OR WILL TRADE. 731-610-8901 OR EMAIL FOR PICS TO

AYLASISCO@GMAIL.COM

2008 Chev. Uplander LS

1984 CHRYSLER LEBARON convertible, antique tag, 39,000 actual miles.

7-pass. van, 90,500 miles, white w/tan interior, dual air, asking

$8000.

662-287-6218 or or 662-284-6752 or 662-664-0104

$3950.

286-2261

2006 GMC YUKON Exc. cond. inside & out, 106k miles, 3rd row seat, garage kept, front & rear A/C,tow pkg., loaded

$13,995

662-286-1732

1977 Chevy Big 10 pickup,

long wheel base, rebuilt & 350 HP engine & auto. trans., needs paint & some work.

$1500

662-664-3958

$7400.

662-664-3538

REDUCED

ALUMA CRAFT 14’ BOAT, 40 H.P.

2006 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR, 94,500 miles, black, loaded,heated/cool seats, DVD, exc. cond., $14,500. 662-287-7424.

2008 Travel Trailer Gulf Stream Ultra-lite, 26’, rarely used, queen bed w/super slide, sleeps 6, built-in 32” flat screen w/ceiling surround sound.

$14,000 OBO 731-727-5573

REDUCED

Cruisemaster Motorhome by Georgieboy, 1997 GM 454 ci chassie, 37’ with slider, 45,000 miles with white Oak interior. $19,500. $14,999 662-808-7777 or 662-415-9020

2007 Ford F-150

‘05 GMC 1500 HD LT Crew Cab

91,000 miles, 6.0 liter, all leather, power everything, no rips, stains or tears. BOSE system, ON Star avail., premium tow pkg w/KW roll over hitch & dig. brake sys. Possible trade.

$12,900.

662-664-0210.

extended cab, new tires, all power, towing pkg.

$8600

662-415-8553

2012 STARCRAFT CAMPER Fiberglass 18’ bunk house, gray & black water tanks, cable ready w/TV. Will consider trade for small tractor w/mower

$10,500

662-396-1390

REDUCED

1991 Mariah 20’ ski boat, 5.7 ltr. engine, new tires, $6700. 662-287-5893, leave msg. & will return call.

2000 Ford Mustang GT

4.6, V-8, 5-spd., leather, new tires, 56,051 miles, extra clean, $6500. 662-462-7634 or 662-664-0789.

1987 Honda CRX, 40+ mpg, new paint, new leather seat covers, after market stereo, $3250 obo.

2004 Ford F350 work truck, V10, underbed tool boxes, towing package, DVD. $8600 obo. Truck is in daily use. Please call for appt. to see,

340-626-5904. 340-626-5904.

2006 Chevy Colorado 4x4

crew cab, Z71 pkg., white/ black, only 42,000 miles, KBB-good value is $17,416 Asking

$14,300.

Call 662-462-7859 or 662-415-3177

2008 Jeep Wrangler Sahara

V-6, auto., power windows, hard top, Sirius radio w/nav cd, dvd, very clean & well maintained. 47,500k mi.

$21,500.

662-396-1705 or 284-8209

$5500

662-415-0084

Excaliber made by Georgi Boy

REDUCED

2000 MERCURY Optimax, 225 H.P.

Caterpillar 210 engine, 6 new tires, sleeps 6 or 8, bathroom, holding tank, fresh water tank, full size refrig., seats 8

2005 AIRSTREAM LAND YACHT

30 ft., with slide out & built-in TV antenna, 2 TV’s, 7400 miles.

$75,000. 662-287-7734

1985 30’ long motor home, new tires, Price negotiable.

662-660-3433 832 MOTORCYCLES/ ATV’S REDUCED

2000 Custom Harley Davidson Mtr. & Trans., New Tires, Must See

$10,500 $9,500 $12,000

662-415-8623 or 287-8894

1500 Goldwing Honda 78,000 original miles, new tires.

$4500

662-284-9487


10B • Sunday, June 2, 2013 • Daily Corinthian

0533 FURNITURE

MERCHANDISE

MISC. ITEMS FOR 0563 SALE

HOUSEHOLD 0509 GOODS

BABY BED with mat- 8X12 METAL building tress, $30. 662-415-3770. w/wooden floor, $400. You move it! 665-8815. BISSELL PULL round vac, BLUE CHAIR, $15. 662BIRD HOUSES, $7. 662$12. 662-415-3770. 415-3770. 415-3770. BOX SPRINGS, full size, $30 each. 662-415-8549 BLUE COUCH, $30. 662- C H A I R F O R t u b o r 415-3770. shower, $10. 662-415or 662-643-3565. 2436. KENMORE GAS dryer, END TABLE, $12. 662-415EVENFLO CAR seat, $12. 3770 $35. 662-415-3770. 662-415-3770. LAMPS, $7 each. 662- TAN QUEEN anne chair, FISHER PRICE high chair, 415-3770. $20. 662-415-3770. $15. 662-415-3770. MAGIC CHEF STOVE, BUILDING works perfect, good 0542 MATERIALS condition. $75 Call 662231-1951 1 ANTIQUE door, $20. NEW WHIRLPOOL tub 662-415-3770. with 6 jets, by Aqua glass, $300 obo. 287- ANTIQUE WINDOWS, $10. 662-415-3770. 3981. QUEEN MATTRESS only, $35. 662-415-3770.

STORE/OFFICE 0551 EQUIPMENT

FREE ADVERTISING Advertise one item valued at $500 or less for free. Price must be in ad & will run for 5 days in Daily Corinthian, 1 day in Reporter & 1 day in Banner Independent. Ads may be up to approx. 20 words including phone number.

T V / D V D / V C R B L A C K (2) STRAIGHT, 1 curved ROLLING STAND. $10. lighted glass display CALL 662-603-5187 cases, full counter height. All for $400. 2863302. 0518 ELECTRONICS

MISC. ITEMS FOR 0563 SALE

MISC. ITEMS FOR 0563 SALE

HOMES FOR 0710 SALE

MANUFACTURED

HUD 12 PLACE setting of Mi- FISHER PRICE musical PUBLISHER’S kasa dinnerware with hopping horse, $12. 662NOTICE fruit trim and several 415-3770. All real estate adverextra serving pieces. tised herein is subject $150. 286-5463. REAL ESTATE FOR RENT to the Federal Fair Housing Act which HUGE BOX of miscelmakes it illegal to adlaneous toys (boys): anvertise any preference, imals, cars, army men, 0610 UNFURNISHED limitation, or discrimiAPARTMENTS etc. $20. 662-643-7650. nation based on race, 1 BR apt., Strickland color, religion, sex, JEEP TWIN baby stroller, community. 286-2099 or handicap, familial status $15. 662-415-3770. 808-2474. or national origin, or inMOTORIZED SCOOTER CANE CREEK Apts., 1 mi. tention to make any wheel chair & ramp, W. of Hosp., 72 & CR 735 such preferences, liminever used, $2500 obo. in Kossuth/Corinth Sch. tations or discrimina662-415-2436. Dist. 2 BR, 1 BA, stv., tion. State laws forbid disPOWER WHEEL CHAIRS, frig., W&D h/u. $400. 287 crimination in the sale, different brands, work -0105, 8-5, M-F. rental, or advertising of good, batteries good, D O W N T O W N A P A R T real estate based on nice condition, $250- MENT, huge floor plan. factors in addition to $375. 662-223-6299 or 662-643-9575. those protected under 662-223-9091, Walnut. HARMONY HILLS, 2 BR federal law. We will not accept any REVERSE YOUR apts. avail. 662-415-0006 knowingly advertising for real esAD FOR $1.00 or 286-0005. tate which is in violaWEAVER APTS. 504 N. tion of the law. All perEXTRA Call 662-287-6147 Cass, 1 BR, scr.porch, sons are hereby inw/d. $375+util, 284-7433. formed that all dwellfor details. ings advertised are available on an equal ROADMASTER WAGON, 0620 HOMES FOR opportunity basis. RENT $30. 662-415-3770.

The ads must be for private party or personal mdse. & does not include pets, livestock (chickens, ducks, cattle, goats, fish, hogs, etc), (2) COLOR TV'S, $15 each. WANTED TO garage sales, hay, fire662-415-3770. 0554 RENT/BUY/TRADE wood, & automobiles. ROYAL DOULTON fine bone china, Sonnet patSPORTING M&M. CASH for junk cars 0527 GOODS & trucks. We pick up. NO BUSINESS OR tern, 47 pcs., 8-place plus platter & 662-415-5435 or COMMERCIAL setting TODDLER'S adjustable serving bowl. $150. 662731-239-4114. ball goal. Great Deal! ADS ALLOWED! 603-9082. $10. 662-643-7650. MISC. ITEMS FOR STYLING CHAIR, floor Email ad to: 0563 SALE TODDLER'S foam weight mat, 2 cabinets, 1 shamfreeads bench, replica of (2) FISH aquariums, $10 @dailycorinthian.com poo bowl, $400. 662-287Daddy's! Gave $110, will 2509 or 808-3908. or each. 662-415-3770. take $70. 662-643-7650. classad@dailycorinthian. WALKER, LIKE new, $40. com (2) RAISED toilet seats, 662-415-2436. 0533 FURNITURE $30. 662-415-2436. Or mail ad to Free Ads, 3 CHAIRS, straight back, 60 DVD'S, $50 for all. P.O. Box 1800, Corinth, leather-like, bought MS 38835, fax ad to 662662-415-3770. new at Kirklands, $250. 287-3525 or bring ad to 662-287-2509 or 808- BABY STROLLER, $15. 1607 S. Harper Rd., Cor3908. 662-415-3770. inth. 3-PC. living room set: (love seat, 4 recliners & BAMBOO CAIN POLES, 7 * N O P H O N E C A L L S WANT TO make certain 1 s e p a r a t e r e c l i n e r . cents per foot, good for PLEASE. INCLUDE NAME your ad gets attention? $150. 662-643-5022 (call gardens & decoration. & ADDRESS FOR OUR RE- Ask about attention 662-396-1326. or text). getting graphics. CORDS.

(2) NICE 3 BR (Section 8) houses, in city. 2862525. 2 1/2 BR, 2 BA, 4244 CR 200. $650 mo., $500 dep. 662-415-6606. 3 BR, 2 BA, 2143 Hwy 72 E. $750 mo., $500 dep. 662-415-6606. 3 BR, 2 BA, CR301; Newly Deco,$500.mo/$350 Dep. 662-643-7014

FINANCIAL

0747 HOMES FOR SALE CREDIT A little LOW? With a qualified income we CAN get you APPROVED on a new home with a score as low as 575 and only 10% down! AND that is with a fixed interest rate! Windham Homes Corinth, MS 1-888-287-6996

TRANSPORTATION

LEGALS HOME SERVICE DIRECTORY

HANDYMAN

HANDYMAN'S Home care, anything. 662-643 6892.

HAULING

0804 BOATS FOR SALE

BIG D'S Hauling, LLC. Owner, Dale Brock. 648 14 FT. boat (only), v-bot- C R 6 0 0 , W a l n u t , M S tom, $350 obo. 662-643- 38683. If you need it 5741 hauled, give us a call! 1 901-734-7660.

AUTO/TRUCK 0848 PARTS & ACCESSORIES

HOME IMPROVEMENT & REPAIR

(4) 17 inch tires, $40. BILLY'S Home Improve662-415-8549 or 662-643- m e n t . R o o f i n g , e x t . 3565. painting & pressure (4) 6-lug, 14" wheels, washing. Free est. 662$40. 662-415-8549 or 415-7979. 662-643-3565. BUTLER, DOUG: Founda20" BOSS wheels & tires, tion, floor leveling, new, $499. 662-415-8549 bricks cracking, rotten or 662-643-3565. wood, basements, shower floor. Over 35 CARS FOR SALE 0868 yrs. exp. Free est. WANT TO make certain 731-239-8945 or your ad gets attention? 2000 MONTE CARLO, 662-284-6146. Ask about attention Sunroof, $3250/OBO. 662-415-6008 getting graphics. STORAGE, INDOOR/

0876 BICYCLES

MOBILE HOMES 0741 FOR SALE

SALE - SALE - SALE 3BR, 2BA brick, CHA, Model Displays Must Go! fenced yard, S. of CorNew Spacious 4 BR, 2 inth. $550 mo, $500 dep. BA homes starting at No Sect. 8. 731-439-2900. $43,500 Single Sections start at MOBILE HOMES $29,500 0675 FOR RENT Clayton Homes Hwy 72 West, Corinth, MS 1/4 mile past Magnolia REAL ESTATE FOR SALE Hospital

GIRL'S quest bike, $12. 662-415-3770. KID'S Disney girl's bike, $12. 662-415-3770. KID'S Huffy girl's bike w/training wheels, $12. 662-415-3770. KID'S rock it Huffy boy's bike, $12. 662-415-3770. SCHWINN 20 inch boy's bike, $15. 662-415-3770.

OUTDOOR

AMERICAN MINI STORAGE 2058 S. Tate Across from World Color

287-1024

MORRIS CRUM MINI-STORAGE 286-3826.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY

0848 AUTO/TRUCK PARTS & ACCESSORIES

AT THE

NATIONAL SPRING SAVINGS EVENT 662.427.8408

FROM MAY 1 - JUNE 30, 2013 When you buy a new set of four qualifying tires today, you’ll get a Visa Prepaid Card worth up to $80 by mail. GET A COOPER We Salute Our TIRES Military, Veterans ® $80 Reward - CTS, Cooper Zeon RS3-S & their Families for their Service $70 Reward - Cooper Zeon RS3-A to Our Country! $60 Reward - CS4, H/T

662.427.8408 VISA PREPAID CARD

FOR UP TO $80

Apply for fely ve sa ri Drive with D e n w with new wheels your Timbes and heels &w tires from CARCREDIT om fr tires Timbes! s! e b im T Card!

•Affordable • All sizes •Tires for 4-wheelers

Timbes proudly carries American-Owned

90 DAYS SAME AS CASH!

•Reliable • Tires for tractors • Tires for 18-wheel trucks

warranties Road warrantes available for your convenience. convinience. Roadhazard hazard warranties for your convenience. Come by to purchase new tires and have them Come by to purchase new or at used tires and have mounted and balanced no extra cost. We also have used tires. them mounted and balanced at no extra cost.

WE APPRECIATE OUR TUPELO COOPER TIRE EMPLOYEES! Timbes Tire & Auto Accessories and Wrecker Service has been serving the area for more than 20 years. We are a family-owned-and-operated business that focuses on providing highly professional services at unbeatable prices. Call us at 662-427-8408 (888) 366-0410 to receive more information about our selection of wheels and tires. This is the “way we roll”

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301 U.S. Highway 72 Burnsville, Mississippi www.timbesautoandwrecker.com


060213 corinth e edition