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Saturday April 7,

2012

50 cents

Daily Corinthian Vol. 116, No. 85

Pleasant Today

Tonight

74

50

• Corinth, Mississippi • 16 pages • 1 section

March becomes warmest month on record BY JEBB JOHNSTON jjohnston@dailycorinthian.com

The National Weather Service has combed through the records and found no warmer March or first three months across north Mississippi and west Tennessee. Mild temperatures allowed residents to save on winter heating costs and to get an early start on gardening. The Corinth Gas & Water Department is among those that has seen the impact of a balmy winter. “We normally come out of winter with [natural gas] storage at least under 40 percent,” said Gas & Water Manager John Rhodes. “This year, here we are out of the winter months, and our storage is about 80 percent.” Similar circumstances can be found across much of the country, including the northern states, he said. According to the National Weather Service Memphis Forecast Office, March was the warmest on record, with an average temperature of 63.8 in Tupelo, 9.8 degrees above normal, and 64.8 in Memphis, 10.8 de-

grees above normal. March had 19 days with temperatures at least 10 degrees above normal in Tupelo. Corinth had 16 days in March with high temperatures of at least 75 degrees, according to Corinthweather. net. The lowest temperature recorded in March was a low of 31 on March 4. The weather service said the warm March resulted from a lack of strong cold fronts moving through and a strong ridge of high pressure over the eastern U.S. It is also the warmest year to date through March 31, with an average temperature of 53.8 in Tupelo, 6.6 degrees above the normal, and 54 in Memphis, 6.8 degrees above the normal. The warm weather and lack of a late cold snap present the area with a “tremendous opportunity” for fruit and vegetable production, said Patrick Poindexter, county director for the Mississippi State University Extension Service. “I’m seeing a good deal of excitement generated by this warm weather,” he said. “Everybody is really busy right now as far as planting and

preparations.” He shares in the enthusiasm. “My blueberry bushes are loaded down, as well as my apple tree,” said Poindexter. The critical test is getting past the threat of last freeze around April 15. “If we can get past that and not have a freeze, we should have a bumper crop of fruit and a tremendous vegetable year,” he said. Disease and insect pressures could be concerns, however, as well as adequate summer rain. And the temperature does not have to go below freezing to cause problems. “Especially with these fruit trees, the temperature even bordering on freezing can cause a stresser, and the first thing they are going to do is shed their fruit,” said Poindexter. Although the chances of avoiding a late freeze are getting better each day, he said he remembers snow on April 21 just a few years ago. The weather service says the outlook for April through June calls for warmer than normal temperatures in northeast Mississippi and across the Mid-South.

Oakland Pre-school student Mabry Nelms enjoys a cool threat at a recent outside event when temperatures reached the high 70s. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dal Nelms.

Van Hedges collects Civil War treasures, especially anything with Corinth interest BY BOBBY J. SMITH bjsmith@dailycorinthian.com

In the second-floor office of a downtown Corinth business is an treasure of information for historians and students of the Civil War. The collection belongs to Van Hedges, president of Southern Insurance Consulting on Waldron Street. Hedges is a collector of any document that originated in or depicts Corinth during the American Civil War. The most numerous items in Hedges’ collection are the soldiers’ letters. “Over 300,000 soldiers were in Corinth during the course of the war,” Hedges said. “As you can imagine, that created a lot of paper.” Other documents include telegraphs, passes granting soldiers permission to go on leave or travel, parole papers and much. One document is an invitation to a New Year’s Eve officers’ banquet. A wide variety of life during the Civil War is represented in the collection of paperwork. Hedges’ collection of soldiers’ portraits is extensive as well. With two photog-

raphers’ studios in Corinth during the war, soldiers stationed in the town had ample opportunities to sit for a portrait photo. Many of the soldiers’ portraits are called carte de vistas, a small type of photograph that was popular in the mid 19th century. “Basically they were the baseball cards of the day. Soldiers would send them home and trade them with others from their unit,” Hedges said. While letters and carte de vistas are among the more numerous items in Hedges collection, “you will find a little bit of everything,” he said. One poignant item is a small, palm-sized New Testament that was found in the hand of a dead Confederate soldier after the Battle of Corinth. Inside the front cover is a message from the soldier addressed to his “dear” sister. “I’m on my way to Glory,” wrote the dying soldier. The most valuable item in the collection is the order by Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard for Please see HEDGES | 3

Submitted

The Open Youth Horse Show is set for 10 a.m. this morning at the Crossroads Arena.

4-H Club kicks off show year BY STEVE BEAVERS sbeavers@dailycorinthian.com

Staff photo by Bobby J. Smith

Van Hedges is a collector of documents related to Corinth in the Civil War. Here he holds the most valuable document of his extensive collection, General P.G.T. Beauregard’s orders for the evacuation of Corinth.

The gate has been open for the Open Youth Horse Show to barrel into the Crossroads Arena. Sponsored by the Alcorn County Showdeo 4-H Club and the arena, the youth show is set for 10 a.m. today. Registration begins at 9 a.m. “This is a way for the 4-H Club to kickoff its show season,” said 4-H agent with the Alcorn County Extension Service Tammy Parker. “We are really excited to have the county horse show at the arena and are working on making it an annual event here.” Please see SHOW | 3

Church service, egg hunt move to stadium BY STEVE BEAVERS sbeavers@dailycorinthian.com

Staff photo by Steve Beavers

First Baptist Church members Suzie Glover (left) and Stephanie Tacker get some of the 6,000 eggs ready to be used for the church’s hunt on Sunday morning.

SELMER, Tenn. — First Baptist Church is going on the road to reach the lost. The church will move its annual Easter service to McNairy Central’s Don Whitaker Stadium on Sunday morning in hopes of bringing out more of the unchurched. “Our vision team was talking about things we could do and we came up with this outside the box way to reach people,” said church pastor Bro. Mark Thompson. “Lost people need Jesus and Easter is for them.” The outside service is replacing the church’s normal two-service time, which sees around 800 attend on Easter Sunday. “Easter with First Baptist” is set to begin at 9 a.m. with a meet and greet time with coffee,

Index Business........7 Classified......14 Comics...... 13 Wisdom...... 12

Weather........5 Obituaries........ 3 Opinion........4 Sports...... 10

juice and doughnuts. A community Easter Egg hunt will begin at 9:30 with over 6,000 eggs to be gathered by youngsters. “Out of the concept of having services at the stadium, the eggs became the draw,” said minister of music Bryan Essary. “With the exception of Judgment House, this is the biggest thing we have done.” First Baptist has set an attendance goal of 1,200. The church easily surpassed its target of 5,000 eggs filled with candy. From flyers, to in-house videos, and plastic coffee cups, the church has pooled all its assets to promote the unique service. “We want people to see that First Baptist Church wants to serve Jesus,” said Thompson. “We are praying for 1,200 people and that a number of them will be saved on Sunday.” The church’s outside the box

effort has created an excitement within the congregation, according to their pastor. “People are enthused and asking what they can do to help,” said Thompson. “When this was brought up it was suppose to be a thing to get everyone involved in church,” added Essary. “I haven’t heard anything negative, it has all been positive.” First Baptist will begin the 10 a.m. worship service with 20 minutes of music led by the worship choir, praise team, soloists and orchestra. “We will be hitting all gamuts with much more upbeat music followed by traditional hymns,” said Essary. Thompson’s message will be, “Why Three Crosses?” A nursery will be provided for newborn age through two years old.

On this day in history 150 years ago The Union army counterattacks at Shiloh and drives the Confederates from the field. The number of casualties is staggering. After two days of heavy fighting, the total is 23,746 killed, wounded and missing — more than all of the previous U.S. wars combined.


2 • Saturday, April 7, 2012 • Daily Corinthian


Local/Region

3 • Daily Corinthian

Things to do today Easter egg hunt

as well as homemade baked goods. For more information, contact Rickey Crane at 662-415-5876.

■ The 8th Annual Community Egg Hunt sponsored by the Corinth/ Alcorn County Parks and Recreation Department will begin at noon today. ■ Real Life Church, (located between Fred’s and Shiloh Market) in Corinth is having an egg hunt for kids today starting at 11 a.m. with over 1,000 eggs filled with candy as well as hamburgers and hotdogs for lunch for free.

Chili Cook-Off The 5th Annual Crossroads Chili Cook-Off will be held today from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. in historic downtown Corinth at the CARE Garden.  This event will be held in conjunction with the season’s first Green Market at the Corinth Depot. Everyone is encouraged to enter their favorite chili recipe in the Local Favorites portion of the competition.  There is no gate fee for this event and music all day. For a $2 donation to charity, folks can sample chili and vote for their favorite in the People’s Choice competition. There are 20 teams in People’s Choice and the tasting is from noon until 3 p.m.

Auction fundraiser Veterans and Family Honors, Inc. are sponsoring an auction fundraiser at The Perry A. Johns American Legion Post 6 on South Tate in Corinth at 10 a.m. today to help raise funds to bring the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall to Corinth. Good, clean items in working order are needed for the auction now. Anything of good selling value will be accepted,

Deaths

Green Market The first Green Market of the year at the Corinth Depot will be held today from 8 a.m.– 5 p.m. at the CARE Garden in historic downtown Corinth.  This Green Market will be held in conjunction with the Crossroads Chili Cook-Off. An assortment of handmade and homegrown items will be for sale at the Green Market and there will be entertainment throughout the day. There is no gate fee and this event is family friendly.

All horses must have a negative Coggins test. No stallions. Divisions include gaited halter, stock halter, gaited pleasure, Western pleasure, trail, pole bending, barrels, goat tying, speed events and more. For more information, contact Cathy Potts at 415-4545 or the Alcorn Extension Service at 286-7756.       

Battlefield hikes

The Alcorn County Showdeo 4-H Club & The Crossroads Arena are sponsoring an Open Youth Horse Show today at the arena. Registration starts at 9 a.m. and showtime will be at 10 a.m. The horse show is open to all youth, ages 18 and under. Entry fee is $3 per class. 1st-5th places will be awarded.

Three days of in-depth battlefield hikes are being led by park rangers at Shiloh Park this anniversary weekend. Participants will have a chance to learn the stories of the men who fought the battle while walking the ground where the events occurred exactly 150 years ago. Each hike will last approximately two hours and will cover easy to difficult terrain. For hike schedules check the Shiloh Park website at www. nps.gov/shil.

Corinth including coverage of the battle in the major east coast newspapers; original lithographs of the battle from Currier & Ives and other popular illustrators of the time; a photograph from the 1926 reunion of Confederate soldiers who fought at Corinth as they posed in front of the Alcorn County courthouse; the original map of America from Corona College, the female university in Corinth that was destroyed during the war; and a hand-carved walking stick made by Hedges’ great-grandfather while he was in a Union prison. The largest item in the collection is the scale model of Corinth and the

surrounding area during the Civil War. The crossroads town and all its buildings are accurately depicted on a table made by a professional modelmaker. All of the buildings are historically accurate, based on the sketches of Matthew Amos Miller, a Pennsylvania-born engineer who made a very detailed sketchbook of Corinth in 1860. Hedges has lived in Corinth for 35 years. His collection began with newspaper in which the battle was the main story. It has since expanded to included a wealth of information that will be prized by historians as long as there is interest in the Battle of Corinth.

4-H Showdeo

HEDGES in a letter home). Next he’ll organize it within the collection according to type and chronology. Lastly, he makes a copy of the document that will stay in the Corinth Civil War Interpretive Center’s Library. Many authors have utilized Hedges’ collection while researching books. Hedges said his intent is to make the collection available for anyone who wants to use it. In fact, he doesn’t consider the collection as his own. “I see myself as the temporary custodian,” he said. In addition to the documents, the collection also contains many items related to the Battle of

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

the evacuation of Corinth almost a month after the Battle of Shiloh. When Hedges discovers a new document he follows a system to make its contents more accessible to anyone pursuing the Corinth area’s history. First he will make a copy of the document by scanning it. Next, he will research the soldier who wrote the it (a task made easier due to the tendency of Civil War soldiers to sign their full names, even

SHOW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

The event is open to all youth ages 18 and under. Entry fee is $3 per class with 1st through 5th place awards presented. All horses must have a negative Coggins test and no Stallions are allowed. The open show divisions are Gaited Halter, Stock Halter, Gaited Pleasure, Western Pleasure, Trail, Pole Bending, Barrels, Goat Tying along with speed events.

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Marvin Christophersen

Marvin Bernard “Mr. Chris” Christophersen, 87, of Corinth, died Thursday, April 5, 2012 at his residence. Born Dec. 28, 1924, he was a retired machinist who worked at Vonachen Service, Inc. in Corinth. He was a United States Army veteran of WWII who served in the South Pacific and was of the Christian faith. He was preceded in death by his wife, Darlene Hildreth Christophersen; a son, Robert Christophersen; and his parents, Hans and Magda Runor Christophersen. Survivors include three daughters, Linda Deese and husband Thomas of Rockingham, N.C., Candy Christophersen of BellFlower Calif., and Ann Cooper and husband David of Rienzi; a son, Steven Sprague of Corinth; a brother, John Boysen and wife Deloris of Dansbury, Iowa; four sisters, Leona Montaque and husband Charles of Calif., Loulla Brandt of Anthon, Iowa, Viola Stark of Clinton, Iowa, and Violet Stiehoff and husband of Trenton, Missouri; five grandchildren; and 10 great grandchildren. Magnolia Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Gladys Heard

Funeral services for Gladys Heard, 89, of Corinth, are set for 11 a.m. Monday at Macedonia M.B. Church with burial in the National Cemetery. Mrs. Heard died Tuesday, April 3, 2012 at Whitfield Nursing Home. Born Sept. 25, 1922, she was a seamstress, headstart teacher and member of Macedonia Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by her husband, William J. Heard; a son, Johnny Larry Foster, Sr.; her parents, Ervie and Wylie McManus; three brothers, Charles, AB and Vance McManus; a sister, Emma Jones, four grandchildren; and 11 great grandchildren. Survivors include a daughter, Evelyn Webb; a son, Frank James Sorrell (Shirley); grandchildren, Johnny L. Foster, Jr. (Dara), James Edward Foster, Reginald McDuffy, and Roslynn Webb. Rev. Lawrence Morris will officiate. Visitation is 5-6 p.m. Sunday at Patterson Memorial Chapel.

Memphis announces fall Dean’s List Special to the Daily Corinthian

Amy F. Madjlesi and Courtney L. Meeks, both of Corinth, were named to the Dean’s List at the University of Memphis for the fall 2011 semester. Students on the list met one of the following criteria for the semes-

ter: completion of six to eight graded hours with a semester grade point average of 4.00; completion of nine to 11 graded hours with a minimum GPA of 3.66; or completion of 12 or more graded hours with a semester GPA of 3.5 or above.

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Opinion

Reece Terry, publisher

Mark Boehler, editor

4 • Saturday, April 7, 2012

Corinth, Miss.

Column

What government owes us: Students speak to persuade I’ve been preparing my students for their last big assignment of the semester: a 5-7 minute persuasive speech. Of course, selecting topics is the first and most important hurdle because topics affect every aspect of preparation and delivery including research, fact-finding and audience analysis. We spend about a week discussing topics in class and I encourage students to survey their classmates regarding attitudes and beliefs on various topics. We’ve discussed everything from gun control to legalizing marijuana and prostitution, to keeping fine arts and physical education in high school. During one spirited classroom discussion some of my business majors began asking questions about Social Security Danny and entitlements. Someone Gardner said something about our soaring deficits and debt. And then Columnist a student said he didn’t believe we even had a debt, that his family had discussed all the press about the national debt and had concluded all the talk was made up. At this point the classroom exploded with protests and laughter. I enjoy teaching college students because I learn so much from them and what they have been taught. Last semester a student said Europe was in much better shape than the U.S. in terms of the economy. Really? We’re certainly heading in that direction but fortunately we’re not seeing austerity measures and street riots that have become so common across the pond. A while back FOX News featured an interview with a professor from Valencia College in Florida in which the professor shared answers his students gave to his question: “What is your American Dream and how can the federal government help you achieve it?” Answers included free healthcare, free college education, guaranteed jobs with good pay, down payment on a house, etc. Out of curiosity I asked my students a similar question (”What does the government owe you?”) and told them not to write their names on the paper. After they turned in their papers, we discussed the question in class as a means to stimulate thought about persuasive speech topics. About half the class responded the government owed us protection from attack (foreign and domestic), transportation (infrastructure), and truth in governing. I was impressed! Several students wanted more money and lower taxes from the government … literally. Yes, I know that begs the question of where the government gets money in the first place, but these students apparently believe the government has plenty of money without us having to give it more through taxes. Some surprising answers: free gas for cars; no taxes; provide more money; give higher tax refund checks; a better job and more and free college. And, the winner: “What the government owe me! More money for college, just more money in general.” Remember, these students, mostly freshmen and sophomores, will vote for the first time in November. Scarier than that, consider how these students developed these expectations of government. Their answers reflect not only what they’ve learned in their families, but also what they’ve learned in school about how our government works. Since the New Deal of the 1930s and through the Great Society and the War on Poverty of the 1960s, we’ve literally taught generations of families who are nearly if not totally dependent on Uncle Sam for their livelihoods that government’s role is to provide a long list of benefits and services (see lists above) including “money.” If I were among these generations of government-dependent families, I would certainly vote early and often for candidates who offered “free” benefits, services and money at the expense of “rich folks.” Because, after all, it’s only “fair.” (Daniel L. Gardner is a former resident of Corinth who now lives and teaches in Starkville. He may be contacted at Daniel@ DanLGardner.com.)

Prayer for today O God, help us to share in your work of bringing healing and salvation to the world. Amen.

A verse to share If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins. — 1 Corinthians 15:17 (NRSV)

Reece Terry publisher rterry@dailycorinthian.com

Reminder of the true meaning of redemption For the first time in 34 years, Chuck Colson won’t be in a prison for Easter. The famous Watergate figure and Christian convert usually spends the day ministering to prisoners, but is recovering from surgery to remove a blood clot on his brain. Colson, 80, is a giant of our time. He is a reminder of the true meaning of redemption, a concept that has been debased in our Tilt-a-Whirl media culture that can’t distinguish between notoriety and fame. In contemporary America, redemption begins sometime between the first check-in into rehab and the first cable-TV interview, and reaches completion when everyone gets distracted by someone else’s attentiongrabbing disgrace. Colson’s personal redemption was wrenchingly sincere, a shattering experience that brought him through that great narrative arc of conversion: worldly success, crushing humiliation and then victory in terms he never would have imagined when he was at the pinnacle of power by the side of the leader of the free world. Colson was known, in the words of a Wall Street Jour-

nal headline that stuck with him, as Nixon’s “hatchet man.” He helped build Rich the sinews Lowery of the Silent Majority with National outreach to Review constituencies like labor, and was an all-around fixer. Nixon loved his ruthlessness. Colson had every reason to feel proud of his status. He was in the swim of events, a big man, a tough guy, talked about, respected and feared. But pride is the great villain in Colson’s classic autobiography, “Born Again.” When he gave the valedictory at his high school in Cambridge, Mass., he emphasized pride. When he turned down a full scholarship to Harvard, he did it out of pride — to stick it to all the swells. In the Nixon White House, he served a man drunk on pride. Colson left government after Nixon’s re-election, feeling exhausted and empty. As the furor over Watergate grew, he visited a friend one night, a successful businessman who had converted to Christianity. The friend

read a passage from C.S. Lewis: “Pride always means enmity — it is enmity. And not only enmity between man and man, but enmity to God.” Later, Colson sat in his car outside the house weeping alone in the darkness, not tears of sadness nor of joy, but “of relief.” When he realized that the exigencies of his legal defense were inconsistent with the forthrightness entailed by his new faith, he pleaded guilty and became Prisoner 23226 at Maxwell Federal Prison Camp in Alabama, stripped of “power, prestige, freedom, even my identity.” Critics doubted and mocked Colson’s conversion. His Nixon administration adversary, former Attorney General John Mitchell, gibed that if Colson were a Christian, “I’ll take my chances with the lions.” Colson was forced, as he told James Rosen of Fox News a few years ago, to see “the world through the eyes of people who were disadvantaged and marginalized and rejected, the outcasts in society, the untouchables in American life.” Although in prison less than a year, he never quite left. He started his group Prison Fellowship, which is now active in most American prisons,

running Bible studies, sponsoring pen pals and providing gifts to the children of inmates. A devotee of the great English reformer and abolitionist William Wilberforce, Colson is one of the nation’s foremost voices for checking the excesses of America’s prison-industrial complex. He long ago came full circle from the enforcer of a “law and order” administration to an advocate of mercy and restraint. He doesn’t mind telling uncomfortable truths. He stirred up some of his fellow evangelicals when, in the 1990s, he promoted reconciliation with Catholics. He maddens the left with his unbending social conservatism. What seemed to be Chuck Colson’s fall from grace in the mid-1970s was really the opposite. It was the first step on an ascension to true courage and service. His life is a testament to how redemption, so often debased and abused in a 24/7 news cycle obsessed with celebrity and scandal, can be astonishingly powerful and real. (Rich Lowry is editor of the National Review. He can be reached via e-mail: comments.lowry@nationalreview.com.)

Please pass the $4 a piece shrimp Say goodbye to Martha Johnson. This week, she was forced to resign as chief of the General Services Administration, the federal agency that manages real estate for the government. Somehow Johnson managed to spend an incredible $820,000 for a conference outside of Las Vegas. Among the expenditures she okayed: $31,000 for a “networking reception,” $146,000 for catered food and drinks, as well as $130,000 in expenses to “scout” the conference’s hotel location. Apparently, Johnson’s advance team had to travel to Vegas six times to get a handle on where best to discuss GSA business. Somebody had to do it. In her resignation letter, Johnson acknowledged “a significant misstep.” Thanks.

Beth Cossitt

Mark Boehler

business manager bcossitt@dailycorinthian.com

editor editor@dailycorinthian.com

Willie Walker

L.W. Hodges

circulation manager circdirector@dailycorinthian.com

press foreman

President Obama’s chief of staff, Jacob Lew, says Obama “was outraged by the Bill e x c e s s i v e O’Reilly spending.” Oh, yeah? The O’Reilly Has he seen Factor the federal budget lately? This all ties in together. Federal bureaucrats know that tax dollars roll in no matter what. It’s the law. If you don’t want to wind up in the penitentiary like Wesley Snipes, you pay what the feds tell you to pay. And Johnson gets a taste. After all, what’s the big deal? The Obama administration is the biggest spending outfit in the history of the country. Why shouldn’t federal employees eat shrimp at $4 a piece at a cocktail

party? If the rich guys would only pay their fair share in taxes, they could swallow even more shellfish. I love the shrimp deal. A quick check with ShopRite confirms that one shrimp in that grocery chain sells for 30 cents. Peeled. But at the GSA bash, the shrimp was on a platter, so there’s that. By the way, the cheese display at that party cost $19 per person, and the sushi station was another $7,000. And just in case the federal employees were hungry the next morning, breakfast was $44 per person. Egg McMuffins, anyone? In case you haven’t noticed, Obama is fighting hard against cutting federal spending. He is now calling Congressman Paul Ryan’s austere budget proposal “Darwinism.” Obama contends that if the feds don’t continue to fund the money

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train, some folks will be denied the American Dream. Like eating $4 shrimp. But my dreams have turned to nightmares with folks working for the federal government purloining my wallet and running wild in Vegas. This causes me to toss and turn because I have worked very hard for the money they are wasting. Yet the president still tells me that I am not paying my fair share. So, how about this tradeoff, Mr. President? I’ll stop whining about taxes if you order all future federal “conferences” to be held at a ShopRite. Fair? (Veteran TV news anchor Bill O’Reilly is host of the Fox News show “The O’Reilly Factor” and author of the book “Pinheads and Patriots: Where You Stand in the Age of Obama.”)

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Editorials represent the voice of the Daily Corinthian. Editorial columns, letters to the editor and other articles that appear on this page represent the opinions of the writers and the Daily Corinthian may or may not agree.


Daily Corinthian • Saturday, April 7, 2011 • 5

State State near deal in lawsuit over beef plant BY JEFF AMY Associated Press

JACKSON — Mississippi could soon settle its 2007 lawsuit against the firms that built the financially disastrous beef plant in the Yalobusha County town of Oakland. Jan Schaefer, a spokeswoman for Attorney General Jim Hood, said the state and Georgia’s Facility Group, which was hired to oversee construction of the plant, have reached agreement although a settlement has yet to be submitted to Hinds County Circuit Judge Winston Kidd. “We have agreed on all

material terms but the formal written agreement is still being finalized,” Schaefer wrote in an email. Schaefer declined to release further details. Phil Abernethy, a lawyer for Facility Group, said Hood is still reviewing the document, but says it could be filed next week. The state’s lawsuit alleges that Facility Construction Management Inc., a subsidiary of the Smyrna, Ga., Facility Group, kept the project going even after executives knew it was doomed, so the company could keep bilking the state out

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of money. Mississippi Beef Processors LLC closed three months after it opened in 2004, laying off 400 people and sticking taxpayers with $55 million in statebacked loans. Federal, state and local subsidies for the project totaled more than $71 million. There has been some payoff, as frozenfoods firm Windsor Quality Foods bought the plant in 2007 and now employs

300 people there. A trial had been scheduled to begin March 19 before Kidd, but never took place. The last public action in the case was lawyers arguing motions before Kidd in February. The Facility Group had asked Kidd to rule in such a way that it would have gutted the state’s case, while the state had been seeking to obtain 2004 federal grand jury testimony from the criminal

investigation of the plant. Six people went to jail in that case, including three leaders of the Facility Group — Robert L. Moultrie, Nixon E. Cawood and Charles K. Moorehead. Their company took over after Richard Hall, a Tennessee businessman who originally led the effort, ran into trouble. Hall, whose company collected a $5 million state grant in addition to loan guarantees,

was sentenced to eight years in prison after admitting he kept $751,000 in public and corporate funds for himself. Facility Group leaders said they gave illegal campaign contributions to Ronnie Musgrove, a Democrat who was governor from 1999 to 2003. Musgrove had only indirect influence over the project, said he did nothing wrong, and never faced criminal charges.

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Parking Parking Parking Parking Wars Wars Wars Wars Basketball: NIKE Hoop Summit. From Portland, Ore. (N) (Live) } ›› The Longshots (08) Ice Cube. House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Khloe Khloe Soup Chelsea Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration

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Waitress reclaims $12,000 tip MOORHEAD, Minn. — Associated Press

Authorities have decided to return a $12,000 tip to a Minnesota waitress that police believed was drug money. Stacy Knutson of Moorhead says a customer told her she could keep a

takeout container she left behind at the Fryn’ Pan restaurant. The box turned out to contain $12,000 in bills in various denominations. Police initially told her she could keep the money if no one claimed it, but later said it was part of a

drug investigation. On Thursday, after the case drew national attention, Assistant Clay County Attorney Michelle Lawson told reporters the money could not be tied to a criminal investigation, and that Knutson would get a check.

Job market takes spring break after winter hiring BY PAUL WISEMAN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S. job market took a breather in March after its best hiring stretch since the Great Recession. Employers added 120,000 jobs last month — half the DecemberFebruary pace and well short of the 210,000 economists were expecting. The unemployment rate fell from 8.3 percent in February to 8.2 percent, the lowest since January 2009, but that was largely because many Americans stopped looking for work. Still, few economists expect hiring to fizzle in spring and summer, as it did the past two years. And they blamed seasonal factors for much of Friday’s disappointing report from the Labor Department. “We don’t think this is the start of another spring dip in labor market conditions,” said Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist with Capital Economics. The report was also closely watched in political circles. If employers retreat on hiring, consumers could lose confidence in the economy and potentially dim President Barack Obama’s re-election hopes. Ashworth and other economists cited the weather for the latest jobs report. A warm January and February allowed companies to hire workers for outdoor jobs a few weeks earlier than usual, effectively stealing jobs from March. It partially explains a 34,000-job drop in retail hiring and a 7,000 drop in construction jobs. “Our winter didn’t really exist,” said Alan Amdahl, who runs his own construction company in Sioux Falls, S.D. “It’s just incredible. People didn’t hibernate.”

Economists also say the numbers can bounce around from month to month. Consistently creating 200,000 jobs a month is tough. The economy hasn’t put together four straight months of 200,000 or more new jobs since early 2000. Economists are still encouraged by the recent hiring trend: The economy has generated an average 212,000 jobs a month from January through March. Anthony Chan, chief economist at JP Morgan Wealth Management, noted strong growth among businesses that are especially sensitive to the economy’s health. Hotels and restaurants hired 39,000 workers. Manufacturers added 37,000. The factory hiring is especially welcome. Expanding factories create more jobs at the mines that produce raw materials, in warehouses and at trucking companies and at utilities that generate power. Government jobs, which declined by an average 22,000 a month last year, fell just 1,000 in March. An improving economy is generating tax revenue and easing budget problems at city halls and statehouses across the country. The March slowdown brings back painful memories of what happened in mid-2010 and 2011, when the economy lost momentum and job growth sputtered. The job market had been on a recent roll. From December through February, the country added 734,000 jobs. The only three-month stretch that was better since the recession ended was March through May 2010, when the government was hiring tens of

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thousands of temporary workers for the census. Companies across the country are hiring: ■ Nimble Storage, a young information technology company in San Jose, Calif., is rapidly adding staff to keep up with demand for its data storage devices. Anup Singh, the company’s chief financial officer, says the explosive growth of data and the need for companies to store, analyze and deliver it is driving rapid expansion. Nimble Storage has added 30 employees so far this year, bringing its workforce to 175. It expects to hire 70 more by the end of the year. They are hiring engineers, sales people and customer support staff. ■ Landry & Kling Cruise Event Services in Miami, which arranges events on cruise ships, has added two workers this year and plans to hire two more. Sales are strong. “It’s like the floodgates are opening,” says CEO and co-founder Joyce Kling. “There’s an energy to our day now. We see a lot of leads floating through.” ■ IdeaPaint, a company that makes washable paint that people can use erasable markers on, has hired seven workers in the last three months. Sales have risen sharply and are expected to keep rising. So the Ashland, Mass.-based company has more plans to hire — it has 31 employees now and expects to have 40 at the end of the year. “We just had a board meeting yesterday and agreed to become more aggressive with our hiring, with our advertising, with our investment spending. We’re very confident,” CEO Bob Munroe said. The unemployment rate has dropped from 9.1 percent last August to 8.2 percent last month, the lowest since Obama’s first month in the White House. Each month, the government does one survey to learn how many jobs were created and another survey to determine the unemployment rate. Those surveys can produce results that sometimes seem to conflict. One is called the payroll survey. It asks mostly large companies and government agencies how many people they employed during the month. This survey produces the number of jobs gained or lost. The other is the household survey. Government workers ask whether the adults in a household have a job. Those who don’t are asked whether they’re looking for one. If they are, they’re considered unemployed. If they aren’t, they’re not considered in the work force and aren’t counted as unemployed. The household survey produces each month’s unemployment rate.

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Daily Corinthian â&#x20AC;¢ Saturday, April 7, 2012 â&#x20AC;¢ 7

Navy jet crashes into Virginia apartments BY ZINIE CHEN SAMPSON &RPPDQG 7KH MHW ZHQW GRZQ OHVV WKDQ  PLOHV Associated Press VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; IURP2FHDQD %UXFH 1HGHOND WKH 9LU (PHUJHQF\ FUHZV VHDUFKHG WKH FKDUUHG UHPDLQV RI D JLQLD %HDFK (06 GLYLVLRQ 9LUJLQLD %HDFK DSDUWPHQW FKLHI VDLG ZLWQHVVHV VDZ FRPSOH[)ULGD\DIWHUD¿JKW IXHO EHLQJ GXPSHG IURP HUMHWFUDVKHGLQWRLWMXVWDI WKHMHWEHIRUHLWZHQWGRZQ WHUWDNHRIILQZKDW1DY\RI DQGWKDWIXHOZDVIRXQGRQ ¿FLDOVFDOOHGD³FDWDVWURSKLF EXLOGLQJV DQG YHKLFOHV LQ WKHDUHD PHFKDQLFDOPDOIXQFWLRQ´ 7KH SODQH QRW KDYLQJ DV 7ZR1DY\SLORWV²DVWX GHQWDQGDQLQVWUXFWRUIURP PXFK IXHO RQ ERDUG ³PLWL QHDUE\ 1DYDO $LU 6WDWLRQ JDWHG ZKDW FRXOG KDYH 2FHDQD ² HMHFWHG MXVW EH EHHQ DQ DEVROXWH PDVVLYH IRUH WKH MHW FDUHHQHG LQWR PDVVLYH ¿UHEDOO DQG ¿UH´ WKH DSDUWPHQW FRPSOH[ 1HGHOND VDLG ³:LWK DOO GHPROLVKLQJ VHFWLRQV RI RI WKDW MHW IXHO GXPSHG LW VRPHEXLOGLQJVDQGHQJXOI ZDVPXFKOHVVWKDQZKDWLW LQJ RWKHUV LQ Ã&#x20AC;DPHV 6RPH FRXOGKDYHEHHQ´ 7KH FUDVK KDSSHQHG LQ  DSDUWPHQW XQLWV ZHUH GDPDJHG RU GHVWUR\HG LQ WKH +DPSWRQ 5RDGV DUHD WKHFUDVKEXWKRXUVODWHUQR ZKLFK KDV D ODUJH FRQFHQ IDWDOLWLHVKDGEHHQUHSRUWHG WUDWLRQ RI PLOLWDU\ EDVHV 6HYHQ SHRSOH LQFOXGLQJ LQFOXGLQJ 1DYDO 6WDWLRQ ERWK SLORWV ZHUH WDNHQ WR 1RUIRON WKH ODUJHVW QDYDO DKRVSLWDO$OOH[FHSWRQHRI EDVHLQWKHZRUOG1DYDO$LU WKHSLORWVZHUHUHOHDVHGE\ 6WDWLRQ 2FHDQD ZKHUH WKH ODWHDIWHUQRRQ )$' WKDW FUDVKHG ZDV 9LUJLQLD %HDFK )LUH 'H DVVLJQHGLVORFDWHGLQ9LU SDUWPHQW &DSW 7LP 5LOH\ JLQLD%HDFK%RWKWKHSLORWV VDLG PRUH WKDQ WZR GR]HQ ZHUH IURP 9LUJLQLD %HDFK UHVLGHQWV UHPDLQHG XQDF :HLVJHUEHUVDLG FRXQWHGIRUDOWKRXJKDOOEXW :HLVJHUEHU VDLG KH GLG WKHVL[PRVWGDPDJHGDSDUW QRWNQRZKRZPDQ\WLPHV PHQWVKDGEHHQVHDUFKHG WKHVWXGHQWSLORWKDGEHHQ ³:KDW , P SUD\LQJ IRU LQ WKH DLU EXW WKDW WKH LQ ZKDW , P WKLQNLQJ DERXW VWUXFWRUZDV³H[WUHPHO\H[ QRZ LV WKDW ZH GRQ W ¿QG SHULHQFHG´ DQ\PRUHYLFWLPV´9LUJLQLD 'R]HQV RI SROLFH FDUV %HDFK0D\RU:LOO6HVVRPV ¿UHWUXFNVDQGRWKHUHPHU WROGUHSRUWHUV JHQF\ YHKLFOHV ¿OOHG WKH 7KH WZRVHDW ) +RU GHQVHO\ SRSXODWHG QHLJK QHW KDG GXPSHG ORDGV ERUKRRG ZKHUH WKH SODQH RI IXHO EHIRUH FUDVKLQJ FUDVKHG <HOORZ ¿UH KRVHV WKRXJK LW ZDVQ W FOHDU LI VQDNHGWKURXJKVLGHVWUHHWV WKDWZDVEHFDXVHRIDPDO DV¿UHFUHZVSRXUHGZDWHU IXQFWLRQ RU DQ LQWHQWLRQDO RQ WKH FKDUUHG URRIWRSV RI PDQHXYHU E\ WKH SLORWV EULFNDSDUWPHQWKRXVHV%\ VDLG &DSW 0DUN :HLVJHU ODWHDIWHUQRRQWKH¿UHKDG EHU ZLWK 86 )OHHW )RUFHV EHHQSXWRXW

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Virginia Beach firefighters work the scene of a jet crash Friday in Virginia Beach, Va. Two Navy pilots ejected from a fighter jet, sending the unmanned plane careening into a Virginia Beach apartment complex and tearing the roof off at least one building that was engulfed in flames, officials said. Six people, including both pilots, were taken to hospitals, officials said. The Navy said both aviators on board the jet ejected before it crashed around noon and were being taken to hospitals for observation.

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National PTA seeks Judge upset over Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s membership turnaround remarks not his politics BY DAVID CRARY Associated Press

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Big lottery winners often prize anonymity      Your.       Regional. Business. Connection. BY JIM SUHR

Associated Press

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Eric M Rutledge, AAMS® Financial Advisor

1500 Harper Road Suite 1 Corinth, MS 38834 662-287-1409

Brian S Langley

Financial Advisor

605 Foote Street Corinth, MS 38834 MAY ISSUE publishes April 26 662-287-4471 BONUS: 2012 Golf Links 

www.edwardjones.com

www.fourriversbusiness.com


10 • Daily Corinthian

Baseball Amory 9, Corinth 8 Amory 410 100 3 — 9 15 1 Corinth 200 024 0 — 8 8 7   WP: Forrest Williams. LP: Hack Smith (4-2). Multiple Hits: (A) Daniel Simpson 4, Hayden Williams 2, Devan Hurley 2, Williams 2. (C) Tanner Maness 3, Lew Johnson 2. 2B: (A) Simpson, John David Poss. (C) Maness. 3B: (A) Williams Record: Corinth 7-13, 1-5 Division 1-4A Note: Maness was 3-for-4 with five RBI. Johnson was 2-for-3 with two RBI and two runs scored.   Thrasher 6, Biggersville 1 BHS 100 000 0 — 1 0 3 Thrasher 001 005 x — 6 5 0   WP: Josh Waldon. LP: Jordan Davis (4-4). Multiple Hits: (B) None. (T) None. 2B: (T) Luke Waldon, Fryar. Record: Biggersville 7-7, 5-2 Division 1-1A. Note: Waldon tossed a no-hitter.  

Sports

Saturday, April 7, 2012

MSU’s new offense needs work Associated Press

STARKVILLE — Mississippi State coach Dan Mullen wasn’t quite sure if his defense was that good or his offense was that bad. Regardless, he did know one thing after Friday’s first full scrimmage of spring workouts: There’s still a lot of work to do. “I don’t know that I ever get to really be happy after a scrimmage,” Mullen said. It wasn’t all bad for Mullen’s revamped offense that includes new starting quar-

terback Tyler Russell and new feature running backs LaDarius Perkins and Nick Griffin. There were a few encouraging signs — like Russell’s two touchdown passes and no turnovers during the nearly 150-play scrimmage — but there were also dropped passes, bad reads and ineffective stretches that plagued the marathon 21⁄2 hour scrimmage. In other words, the kind of things that won’t allow Mississippi State to win in the ultra-competitive Southeastern

Conference Western Division that includes Alabama, Auburn, LSU and Arkansas. “I want to see cleanness and consistency ... I think only four of our 13 drives had more than one first down and you can’t have that,” Mullen said. “That’s not moving the ball. That’s not playing the field position the game. Obviously, the defense really dominated.” Russell unofficially completed 22 of 44 passes for 218 yards and two touchdowns during Friday’s scrimmage. The 6-foot-5 junior from Me-

ridian, Miss., played quite a bit last season while splitting time with senior Chris Relf, but now that Relf is gone, Russell will play a much more prominent role. Backup Dak Prescott completed 17 of 32 passes for 226 yards and two touchdowns. Russell started out with a crisp first drive on Friday, completing 5 of 7 passes for 65 yards, including a 14-yard touchdown pass to Chris Smith. Please see BULLDOGS | 11

Tuesday Amory 7, Corinth 1 Corinth 100 000 0 — 1 2 3 Amory 200 302 x — 7 11 1   WP: Tanner Poole. LP: Brady Allen (1-5). Multiple Hits: (C) Jalen Kirk 2. (A) Destin Hahn 3, Daniel Simpson 2. 2B: (C) Kirk. (A) Simpson 2, Hahn, Austin Pearson.  

Monday  Corinth 3, Pontotoc 2 Corinth 000 012 0 — 3 5 1 Pontotoc 010 001 0 — 2 6 1   WP: Cody Davis (2-3). LP: Chance Witt. Multiple Hits: (C) Jacob McDuffy 2, Osiris Copeland 2. (P) Zach Gory 2, Brock Tutor 2. 2B: (C) McDuffy. (P) Ethan Gill, Jacob Stokes. HR: (C) Copeland. (P) Gory. Note: Copeland was 2-for-3 and drove in all three Corinth runs. He tied the game with solo homer in the fifth and the game-winning RBIs on a two-out, two-run single in the sixth.

Local Schedule Today Baseball Amory @ Kossuth,1 Corinth @ Myrtle, 1 Oxford @ Central, 2 Corinth @ West Union, 4 Tish County @ Central  

Monday, April 9 Baseball Blue Mountain @ Biggersville, 5 Central @ Biggersville, 7 Softball Biggersville @ Pine Grove, 5 Booneville @ Corinth, 6

Petrino didn’t want 911 call Associated Press

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark.— Moments after their motorcycle accident, Bobby Petrino and a female employee told a passer-by not to call 911, then got a ride back to Fayetteville where the Arkansas football coach was met by a state trooper who provides his personal security during the season. New details of the immediate aftermath of Petrino’s crash were in a 911 call released Friday by the state police. The passer-by, Larry Hendren, describes coming upon the accident scene Sunday evening just after Petrino and Jessica Dorrell “were getting up out of the ditch.” He said Petrino was “walking, but it looked like his face was bleeding quite a lot.” “The rider and the passenger of the motorcycle declined us to call 911,” Hendren told a dispatcher. “They got into a vehicle and headed toward the hospital.” Petrino was taken to a Fayetteville intersection by another passer-by. There, Dorrell left in her own car while Petrino was met by Capt. Lance King, his personal security guard during the season. King took Petrino to a hospital, where he was treated for broken ribs and a cracked neck vertebra. State police said Friday they planned to question the trooper, looking for “any information Captain King may have learned about the crash” during conversations with Petrino. Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long is considered the future of the football coach, whose salary averages more than $3.5 million.

Photo Courtesy Bubba McQueen

All-State Selection

Corinth’s John Mathis capped off his senior season by being named All-State for the third consecutive year. Mathis scored 33 goals this past season and helped the Warriors reach the 4A state title game despite missing time with to a broken collar bone. Mathis finished his career with a school-record 115 goals.

Plaza Lanes Bowling Leagues Standings and results from various leagues at Plaza Bowling Lanes.   Rebel Volunteer 3-22 Tons O’ Fun 28-12 We Bag Sand 26-14 Plumrose 23-17 They Aint Right 22-18 Russell’s Beef House 22-18 Kimberly-Clark 21-19 Alcorn Builders 20-20 Strikes & Spares, Inc. 20-20 Corinth Relics 18-22 Wayne’s Wrecker 16-24 Spoliers 13-27 Blue Light Specials 11-29   High Team Game: Tons O’ Fun 1208 High Team Series: Tons O’ Fun 3561 High Individual Games: Bud Brooks 299, Tyler Corbin 258, Justin Mercer 257 High Individual Series: Adam Ellsworth 796, Corbin 738, Chad Harmon 683   3-15 High Team Game: They Aint Right 1275 High Team Series: They Aint Right 3680 High Individual Games: Justin Lumpkin 267, Ryan Smith 257, Allen Woodhouse 255 High Individual Series: Lumpkin 745, Adam Ellsworth 709, Smith 683   3-8 High Team Game: Corinth Relics 1303 High Team Series: Corinth Relics 3649 High Individual Games: Tyler Corbin 288, Darren Lumpkin 259, Steve Price 247 High Individual Series: Corbin 772, Adam Ellsworth 684, Bud Brooks 670   Monday Major 3-26 That Dog’ll Hunt 30-14 Split Happens 28-16 Outlaws 26-18 Last Minute 23-21

Shot Who??? 23-21 Misfits 22-22 Old Codgers 20-24 Troy Boyz 20-24 Tons O’ Fun 15-29 Nelson’s Garage 13-31   High Team Game: That Dog’ll Hunt 1272 High Team Series: That Dog’ll Hunt 3655 High Individual Games: (Men) Roy Duncan 280, Stan Howell 266, Tyler Corbin 255. (Women) Cindy Wooley 245, Bea Brents 185, Belinda Hardin 184 High Individual Series: (Men) Duncan 781, Corbin 709, Adam Ellsworth 673. (Women) Wooley 590, Brents 493, Starr Martin 476   3-19 High Team Game: Tons O’ Fun 1245 High Team Series: Shot Who??? 3565 High Individual Games: (Men) Ed Fowler 258, Roy Duncan 244, Tyler Corbin 237. (Women) Christy Hickox 176, Bea Brents 172 High Individual Series: (Men) Kidd Curry 665, Corbin 645, Tony Harris 643. (Women) Brents 482, Hickox 482   3-12 High Team Game: Last Minute 1236 High Team Series: Old Codgers 3656 High Individual Games: (Men) Tyer Corbin 266, Corbin 263, Clint Harper 246, Sidney Robinson 234. (Women) Missy Joslin 208, Cindy Wooley 202, Christy Hickox 181, Bea Brents 181 High Individual Series: (Men) Corbin 740, Gary Wilburn 633, Stan Howell 597. (Women) Joslin 587, Hickox 515, Brents 510   Thursday Morning Coffee 3-9 Comediennes 32-8 Gunn Drug 25-15 G.R.I.T.S. 24-16 Sweetrolls 23-17 Liberty National 22-18

Iuka Discount Drugs 21-19 Country Girls 21-19 Alley Kats 20-20 Bowling Buddies 19-21 Sticky Pins 19-21 Gutter Girls 18-22 Sid’s 17-23 Handicap Unlimited 16-24 Iuka Wellness Center 15-25 Teapots 15-25 I.B.E.W. Local 852 13-27   High Team Game: Sid’s 831 High Team Series: G.R.I.T.S. 2367 High Individual Games: Verlene Strickland 201, Vera Reed 192, Mandy Thomas 190, Sue Dees 181, Rhoda Whitaker 181 High Individual Series: Reed 539, Thomas 517, Shirley Kiddy 513, Missy Joslin 498, Belinda Hardin 491   3-1 High Team Game: Iuka Discount Drugs 877 High Team Series: Liberty National 2501 High Individual Games: Joyce Lambert 216, April Clark 210, Shirley Kiddy 207, Velma Bugg 200, Pam Dunford 200 High Individual Series: Missy Joslin 524, Mandy Thomas 522, Dunford 518, Clark 496, Kiddy 481   2-23 High Team Game: Sid’s 937 High Team Series: Sid’s 2445 High Individual Games: Joyce Lambert 202, Vicki Frye 198, April Clark 191, Belinda Hardin 191, Shirley Kiddy 191 High Individual Series: Mandy Thomas 510, Kiddy 501, Hardin 489, Judy Clement 482   2-16 High Team Game: Bowling Buddies 874 High Team Series: Comediennes 2542 High Individual Games: Mandy Thomas 233, Betty Smith 198, Lorie Lerbert 197, Shirley Kiddy 191, Janice Wood 184 High Individual Series: Thomas

589, Annette Tucker 505, Velma Bugg 503, Smith 501, Kiddy 497   2-9 High Team Game: Sid’s 881 High Team Series: Sid’s 2512 High Individual Games: Barbara Ross 204, Pam Dunford 196, Mandy Thomas 195, April Clark 180, Quay Kares 179 High Individual Series: Thomas 533, Dunford 509, Belinda Hardin 473, Annette Tucker 473, Sharon Keen 473   2-2 High Team Game: G.R.I.T.S. 891 High Team Series: G.R.I.T.S. 2468 High Individual Games: Shirley Kiddy 200, Annette Tucker 200, Linda Bonds 191, Helen Carroll 189, Betty Smith 188 High Individual Series: Kiddy 505, Mandy Thomas 494, Tucker 488, Smith 487, Carroll 485   1-26 High Team Game: Sid’s 892 High Team Series: Sid’s 2513 High Individual Games: Marcia Cooper 216, Velma Bugg 214, Annette Tucker 209, Judy Clement 199, April Clark 195 High Individual Series: Tucker 560, Cooper 515, Debra Eskridge 498, Shirley Kiddy 498, Mandy Thomas 496, Teressa Fugitt 495   1-17 High Team Game: Handicap Unlimited 871 High Team Series: Sticky Pins 2470 High Individual Games: Velma Bugg 203, Mandy Thomas 202, Sherri Batie 193, Marcia Cooper 190, Pat Newton 188 High Individual Series: Bugg 550, Thomas 511, Newton 488, Lorie Lebert 480   1-12 High Team Game: Sweetrolls 902 High Team Series: Sweetrolls 2561 High Individual Games: Mandy

Please see BOWLING | 11


Scoreboard

Saturday, April 7, 2012

BOWLING

Baseball N.L. standings, schedule

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 Thomas 209, Linda Skinner 206, Barbara DeMattio 198, Louise Jackson 198, Judy Clement 196 High Individual Series: Skinner 584, Velma Bugg 517, Jean Amos 516, Judy Clement 515, Verlene Strickland 488   Ladies Major Handicap 3-20 James Pest Control 37-11 I.H.T.G. 29-19 Coca-Cola 27.5-20.5 Rolling Pins 26-22 Shaklee Ladies 22.5-25.5   High Team Game: I.H.T.G. 635 High Team Series: James Pest Control 1746 High Individual Games: Debbie Bowen 203, Peggy Wooten 200, Patsy Wilson 190, Stephanie Gleeson 183, Wilson 183, Linda Gilliam 178 High Individual Series: Wilson 526, Wooten 524, Bowen 494, Gilliam 489, Belinda Hardin 469   3-13 High Team Game: Rolling Pins 620 High Team Series: Coca-Cola 1744 High Individual Games: Belinda Hardin 192, Debbie Bowen 187, Peggy Wooten 180, Wooten 176, Deanne Thorne 170 High Individual Series: Wooten 516, Bowen 499, Hardin 470, Thorne 453   3-6 High Individual Games: Stephanie Gleeson 198, Helen Hickox 179, Belinda Hardin 178, Debbie Bowen 175, Bowen 167, Patsy Wilson 166, Linda Gilliam 166 High Individual Series: Gleeson 520, Bowen 486, Wilson 446, Peggy Wooten 438   2-14 High Team Game: Shaklee Ladies 602 High Team Series: Shaklee Ladies 1716 High Individual Games: April Clark 214, Belinda Hardin 193, Patsy Wilson 190, Linda Gilliam 186, Gilliam 186 High Individual Series: Hardin 535, Wilson 522, Gilliam 522, Barbara Burcham 491, Helen Hickox 478   1-24 High Team Game: I.H.T.G. 623 High Team Series: I.H.T.G 1669 High Individual Games: Laura Wood 203, Debbie Bowen 201, Mary Williams 190, Peggy Wooten 174, Betty Brooks 172 High Individual Series: Bowen 501, Wood 479, Williams 472, Wooten 462, Brooks 460 Note: Williams picked up the “Big Four.”

BULLDOGS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

But then the Bulldogs bogged down. It wasn’t all the fault of the offense. Mississippi State’s veteran defense had something to say about it too. Senior linebacker Cameron Lawrence discussed the defense’s good day as the offense ran sprints in the background — which was punishment for losing. “We had a chip on our shoulder,” Lawrence said. “We didn’t want to be doing what they’re doing right now.” The Bulldogs are replacing a few key starters on defense, but still return veterans like defensive tackle Josh Boyd, cornerbacks Johnthan Banks and Corey Broomfield and Lawrence. It’s a group that’s played together for four years, so it’s not particularly surprising they were usually a step ahead of the younger offense.

John got in the game with a wide range of sports, movies and more & saved up to $750!

East Division W L Pct GB 1 0 1.000 — 1 0 1.000 — 1 0 1.000 — 0 1 .000 1 0 2 .000 1½ Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 2 0 1.000 — Cincinnati 1 0 1.000 ½ Houston 0 0 .000 1 Chicago 0 1 .000 1½ Milwaukee 0 1 .000 1½ Pittsburgh 0 1 .000 1½ West Division W L Pct GB Arizona 1 0 1.000 — Los Angeles 1 0 1.000 — Colorado 0 0 .000 ½ San Diego 0 1 .000 1 San Francisco 0 1 .000 1 ___ Thursday’s Games N.Y. Mets 1, Atlanta 0 Philadelphia 1, Pittsburgh 0 Washington 2, Chicago Cubs 1 Cincinnati 4, Miami 0 L.A. Dodgers 5, San Diego 3 Friday’s Games St. Louis 11, Milwaukee 5 Colorado at Houston, (n) Arizona 5, San Francisco 4 L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, (n) Saturday’s Games Washington (Gonzalez 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 0-0), 12:05 p.m. Atlanta (Jurrjens 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 0-0), 12:10 p.m. St. Louis (Wainwright 0-0) at Milwaukee (Greinke 0-0),34:05 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 0-0) at Arizona (Hudson 0-0), 3:10 p.m. Colorado (Moyer 0-0) at Houston (Harrell 0-0), 6:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Lee 0-0) at Pittsburgh (Karstens 0-0), 6:05 p.m. Miami (Nolasco 0-0) at Cincinnati (Latos 0-0), 6:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Capuano 0-0) at San Diego (Moseley 0-0), 7:35 p.m. Sunday’s Games Atlanta at N.Y. Mets, 12:10 p.m. Miami at Cincinnati, 12:10 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 12:35 p.m. Colorado at Houston, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis at Milwaukee, 1:10 p.m. Washington at Chicago Cubs, 1:20 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at San Diego, 3:05 p.m. San Francisco at Arizona, 3:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Miami at Philadelphia, 12:05 p.m. San Francisco at Colorado, 3:10 p.m. Milwaukee at Chicago Cubs, 6:05 p.m. St. Louis at Cincinnati, 6:10 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Mets, 6:10 p.m. Atlanta at Houston, 7:05 p.m. New York Philadelphia Washington Atlanta Miami

American League East Division W L Pct GB 1 0 1.000 — 1 0 1.000 — 1 0 1.000 — 0 1 .000 1 0 1 .000 1 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 1 0 1.000 — Kansas City 0 0 .000 ½ Chicago 0 1 .000 1 Cleveland 0 1 .000 1 Minnesota 0 1 .000 1 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 1 0 1.000 — Oakland 1 1 .500 ½ Seattle 1 1 .500 ½ Los Angeles 0 0 .000 ½ ___ Thursday’s Games Detroit 3, Boston 2 Toronto 7, Cleveland 4, 16 innings Friday’s Games Texas 3, Chicago White Sox 2 Baltimore 4, Minnesota 2 Tampa Bay 7, N.Y. Yankees 6 Kansas City at L.A. Angels, (n) Seattle at Oakland, (n) Saturday’s Games Toronto (Morrow 0-0) at Cleveland (Jimenez 0-0), 12:05 p.m. Baltimore Tampa Bay Toronto Boston New York

Boston (Beckett 0-0) at Detroit (Fister 0-0), 3:05 p.m. Kansas City (Hochevar 0-0) at L.A. Angels (Haren 0-0), 3:05 p.m. Minnesota (Liriano 0-0) at Baltimore (Hunter 0-0), 6:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Kuroda 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Price 0-0), 6:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox (Peavy 0-0) at Texas (Holland 0-0), 7:05 p.m. Seattle (Hernandez 0-0) at Oakland (Colon 1-0),8:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Boston at Detroit, 12:05 p.m. Toronto at Cleveland, 12:05 p.m. Minnesota at Baltimore, 12:35 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa Bay, 12:40 p.m. Kansas City at L.A. Angels, 2:35 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Texas, 7:05 p.m. Monday’s Games L.A. Angels at Minnesota, 3:10 p.m. Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 6:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Baltimore, 6:05 p.m. Boston at Toronto, 6:07 p.m. Seattle at Texas, 7:05 p.m. Kansas City at Oakland, 9:05 p.m.

Pro basketball NBA standings, schedule EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB x-Chicago 43 13 .768 — x-Miami 39 15 .722 3 Indiana 34 21 .618 8½ d-Boston 30 24 .556 12 Atlanta 33 23 .589 10 Orlando 32 23 .582 10½ Philadelphia 29 25 .537 13 New York 28 27 .509 14½ Milwaukee 27 28 .491 15½ Detroit 21 34 .382 21½ Toronto 20 36 .357 23 New Jersey 20 37 .351 23½ Cleveland 18 35 .340 23½ Washington 12 44 .214 31 Charlotte 7 46 .132 34½ WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB d-San Antonio 39 14 .736 — x-Oklahoma City 40 15 .727 — d-L.A. Lakers 35 20 .636 5 L.A. Clippers 33 22 .600 7 Memphis 31 23 .574 8½ Dallas 31 25 .554 9½ Houston 29 25 .537 10½ Denver 29 25 .537 10½ Phoenix 28 26 .519 11½ Utah 28 27 .509 12 Portland 27 29 .482 13½ Minnesota 25 31 .446 15½ Golden State 21 32 .396 18 Sacramento 19 36 .345 21 New Orleans 14 41 .255 26 d-division leader x-clinched playoff spot ___ Thursday’s Games New York 96, Orlando 80 Detroit 99, Washington 94 Chicago 93, Boston 86 L.A. Clippers 93, Sacramento 85 Friday’s Games Indiana 103, Oklahoma City 98 Atlanta 101, Detroit 96 Memphis 97, Miami 82 New Jersey 110, Washington 98 Cleveland 84, Toronto 80 Portland 99, Dallas 97, OT San Antonio 128, New Orleans 103 Milwaukee 95, Charlotte 90 Phoenix at Denver, (n) Golden State at Utah, (n) Houston at L.A. Lakers, (n) Saturday’s Games Boston at Indiana, 6 p.m. Minnesota at New Orleans, 7 p.m. Dallas at Memphis, 7 p.m. Atlanta at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Orlando at Philadelphia, 7 p.m. Portland at Milwaukee, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Denver at Golden State, 9:30 p.m. Sacramento at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Chicago at New York, Noon Philadelphia at Boston, 5 p.m. Detroit at Miami, 5 p.m. Cleveland at New Jersey, 5 p.m. Toronto at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Utah at San Antonio, 6 p.m. Houston at Sacramento, 8 p.m.

NBA leaders Through Thursday SCORING

G FG FT Bryant, LAL 55 550 361 Durant, OKC 54 529 328 James, MIA 52 519 318 Love, MIN 52 456 365 Westbrook, OKC 54 495 278 Wade, MIA 43 372 217 Aldridge, POR 52 456 212 D. Williams, NJN 50 364 241 Nowitzki, DAL 51 385 254 Anthony, NYK 45 329 239 Griffin, LAC 55 462 210 Howard, ORL 53 412 269 Ellis, MIL 48 374 183 Lee, GOL 52 423 197 Jefferson, UTA 50 427 117 Paul, LAC 50 349 200 Parker, SAN 49 365 194 Pierce, BOS 51 324 242 J. Johnson, ATL 49 350 131 Smith, ATL 55 420 173 FG Percentage FG Chandler, NYK 206 Bynum, LAL 364 Howard, ORL 412 Gortat, PHX 364 McGee, DEN 249 Griffin, LAC 462 Nash, PHX 247 James, MIA 519 Boozer, CHI 388 Blair, SAN 220 Rebounds : G OFF DEF Howard, ORL 53 191 572 Love, MIN 52 215 491 Bynum, LAL 50 159 434 Humphries, NJN 53 203 380 Cousins, SAC 53 226 354 Griffin, LAC 55 176 425 Gasol, LAL 55 155 420 Gortat, PHX 54 144 389 Chandler, NYK 53 178 342 Monroe, DET 54 204 325 Assists G Nash, PHX 50 Rondo, BOS 44 Paul, LAC 50 Calderon, TOR 50 D. Williams, NJN 50 Rubio, MIN 41 Parker, SAN 49 Wall, WAS 55 Lowry, HOU 38 Conley, MEM 49

PTS 1544 1489 1398 1378 1320 975 1125 1080 1082 945 1136 1093 985 1043 972 963 938 972 932 1039

AVG 28.1 27.6 26.9 26.5 24.4 22.7 21.6 21.6 21.2 21.0 20.7 20.6 20.5 20.1 19.4 19.3 19.1 19.1 19.0 18.9

FGA 305 624 712 644 461 857 459 968 725 413

PCT .675 .583 .579 .565 .540 .539 .538 .536 .535 .533

TOT 763 706 593 583 580 601 575 533 520 529

AVG 14.4 13.6 11.9 11.0 10.9 10.9 10.5 9.9 9.8 9.8

AST AVG 562 11.2 487 11.1 448 9.0 445 8.9 429 8.6 336 8.2 381 7.8 427 7.8 273 7.2 343 7.0

Hockey NHL standings, schedule EASTERN CONFERENCE GP W L OT Pts z-N.Y. Rangers 81 51 23 7 109 y-Boston 81 48 29 4 100 x-Florida 81 37 26 18 92 x-Pittsburgh 81 50 25 6 106 x-Philadelphia 81 47 25 9 103 x-New Jersey 81 47 28 6 100 x-Ottawa 81 41 30 10 92 x-Washington 81 41 32 8 90 Buffalo 81 39 32 10 88 Winnipeg 81 37 35 9 83 Tampa Bay 81 37 36 8 82 Carolina 81 33 32 16 82 Toronto 81 35 36 10 80 N.Y. Islanders 81 34 36 11 79 Montreal 81 30 35 16 76 WESTERN CONFERENCE GP W L OT Pts y-Vancouver 81 50 22 9 109 y-St. Louis 81 48 22 11 107 x-Phoenix 81 41 27 13 95 x-Nashville 81 47 26 8 102 x-Detroit 81 48 28 5 101 x-Chicago 81 44 26 11 99 x-Los Angeles 81 40 27 14 94 x-San Jose 81 42 29 10 94 Dallas 81 42 34 5 89 Calgary 81 36 29 16 88 Colorado 81 41 34 6 88 Minnesota 81 35 35 11 81 Anaheim 81 34 35 12 80 Edmonton 81 32 39 10 74 Columbus 81 28 46 7 63 NOTE: Two points for a win, one overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Thursday’s Games Carolina 2, Montreal 1, SO Minnesota 2, Chicago 1, SO San Jose 6, Los Angeles 5, SO Toronto 3, Tampa Bay 2, OT N.Y. Islanders 5, Winnipeg 4

GF GA 225 183 265 199 199 226 278 219 262 228 224 207 247 236 218 229 215 226 222 242 231 278 212 239 230 260 200 248 208 225 GF GA 246 198 207 163 212 203 231 209 246 200 245 236 192 176 225 208 209 219 197 224 207 214 176 222 202 226 212 236 195 259 point for

Couples, Dufner lead Masters Associated Press

AUGUSTA, Ga. — Freddie Couples turned back the clock at the Masters on Friday — back to 1992 — during a seven-birdie second round that coaxed a fist pump from the California-cool 52-year-old and put him in a tie for the lead with Jason Dufner at Augusta National. “Can I win?” Couples said, repeating the question that so many are asking now. “Yeah, I believe I can. Yes.” He shot 5-under 67, the same score he posted 20 years ago during the second round of what turned out to be one of the most popular wins in

the history of the tournament. Were it not for the gray hair beneath his cap, this might have been confused for a replay of that ’92 win instead of the second round in 2012. “Standing out there, I said, ‘What the hell,’ a lot. What do I have to lose here?” Couples said. Meantime, Phil Mickelson made six birdies during a round of 4-under 68 to pull to 2 under for the tournament. Tiger Woods shot 3-over 75 and was at 3 over for the tournament, closer to the cut line of 5 over than the lead.

Daily Corinthian • 11

Philadelphia 2, Buffalo 1 Pittsburgh 5, N.Y. Rangers 2 Washington 4, Florida 2 Boston 3, Ottawa 1 New Jersey 2, Detroit 1 Nashville 2, Dallas 0 Columbus 5, Colorado 2 Calgary 3, Vancouver 2 Anaheim 3, Edmonton 2, OT Friday’s Games Phoenix 4, St. Louis 1 Saturday’s Games Chicago at Detroit, Noon Ottawa at New Jersey, 2 p.m. Buffalo at Boston, 3 p.m. Philadelphia at Pittsburgh, 3 p.m. Anaheim at Calgary, 3 p.m. Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 5:30 p.m. Toronto at Montreal, 6 p.m. Tampa Bay at Winnipeg, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at Columbus, 6 p.m. Carolina at Florida, 6:30 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 7 p.m. St. Louis at Dallas, 7 p.m. Nashville at Colorado, 8 p.m. Edmonton at Vancouver, 9 p.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 9:30 p.m Sunday’s Games No games scheduled.

Golf

Jose Maria Olazabal Larry Mize Kyle Stanley Tom Watson Mike Weir Robert Garrigus Bernhard Langer Ryan Palmer Rory Sabbatini K.J. Choi Ryo Ishikawa a-Bryden MacPherson Chez Reavie Johnson Wagner Darren Clarke Tim Clark Mark Wilson Ian Woosnam Simon Dyson a-Corbin Mills Alvaro Quiros Brendan Steele Ben Crenshaw a-Randal Lewis Craig Stadler Sandy Lyle Mark O’Meara Jason Day

75-76—151 76-75—151 75-76—151 77-74—151 72-79—151 77-75—152 72-80—152 75-77—152 72-80—152 77-76—153 76-77—153 77-76—153 79-74—153 79-74—153 73-81—154 73-81—154 76-78—154 77-77—154 78-77—155 74-81—155 78-77—155 76-89—156 76-83—159 81-78—159 81-82—163 86-78—164 WD WD

+7 +7 +7 +7 +7 +8 +8 +8 +8 +9 +9 +9 +9 +9 +10 +10 +10 +10 +11 +11 +11 +12 +15 +15 +19 +20

Miscellaneous

Masters par scores

Transactions

Friday at Augusta National Golf Club, Augusta, Ga. Yardage: 7,435; Par: 72 Second round (a-amateur) Jason Dufner 69-70—139 -5 Fred Couples 72-67—139 -5 Lee Westwood 67-73—140 -4 Louis Oosthuizen 68-72—140 -4 Sergio Garcia 72-68—140 -4 Rory McIlroy 71-69—140 -4 Bubba Watson 69-71—140 -4 Paul Lawrie 69-72—141 -3 Matt Kuchar 71-70—141 -3 Aaron Baddeley 71-71—142 -2 Miguel Angel Jimenez 69-72—141 -3 Ben Crane 69-73—142 -2 Peter Hanson 68-74—142 -2 Charles Howell III 72-70—142 -2 Phil Mickelson 74-68—142 -2 Vijay Singh 70-72—142 -2 Henrik Stenson 71-71—142 -2 Nick Watney 71-71—142 -2 Jonthan Byrd 72-71—143 -1 Jim Furyk 70-73—143 -1 Sean O’Hair 73-70—143 -1 Y.E. Yang 73-70—143 -1 Lucas Glover 75-79—144 E Padraig Harrington 71-73—144 E Fredrik Jacobson 76-68—144 E Hunter Mahan 72-72—144 E Zach Johnson 70-74—144 E Francesco Molinari 69-75—144 E Ian Poulter 72-72—144 E Justin Rose 72-72—144 E a-Hideki Matsuyama 71-74—145 +1 Adam Scott 75-70—145 +1 Sang-Moon Bae 75-71—146 +2 Stewart Cink 71-75—146 +2 Bill Haas 72-74—146 +2 Kevin Na 71-75—146 +2 Geoff Oglilvy 74-72—146 +2 Webb Simpson 72-74—146 +2 David Toms 73-73—146 +2 Bo Van Pelt 73-73—146 +2 Gary Woodland 73-73—146 +2 Kevin Chappell 71-76—147 +3 Martin Kaymer 72-75—147 +3 Graeme McDowell 75-72—147 +3 Charl Schwartzel 72-75—147 +3 Brandt Snedeker 72-75—147 +3 Scott Stallings 70-77—147 +3 Tiger Woods 72-75—147 +3 Luke Donald 75-73—148 +4 Ross Fisher 71-77—148 +4 Rickie Fowler 74-74—148 +4 Anders Hansen 77-72—148 +4 Robert Karlsson 74-74—148 +4 Martin Laird 76-72—148 +4 Steve Stricker 71-77—148 +4 Scott Verplank 73-75—148 +4 Keegan Bradley 71-78—149 +5 Thomas Bjorn 73-76—149 +5 G Fernandez-Castano 74-75—149 +5 Angel Cabrera 71-78—149 +5 a-Patrick Cantlay 71-68—149 +5 Trevor Immelman 78-71—149 +5 a-Kelly Kraft 74-75—149 +5 Edoardo Molinari 75-74—149 +5 Failed to qualify K.T. Kim 74-76—150 +6 John Senden 74-76—150 +6 Paul Casey 76-75—151 +7 Harrison Frazar 73-78—151 +7

BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS–Announced RHP Rick VanDenHurk declined his outright assignment and elected free agency. National League HOUSTON ASTROS–Placed INF Jed Lowrie on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 29. Selected the contract of INF Brian Bixler from Oklahoma City (PCL). NEW YORK METS–Placed OF Andres Torres on the 15-day DL. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS–Placed RHP Scott Linebrink on the 15-day DL, retroactive to March 30. Selected the contract of RHP Victor Marte from Memphis (PCL). American Association AMARILLO SOX–Signed LHP Chuck Lofgren. FARGO-MOORHEAD REDHAWKS– Signed RHP Alex Rivers and LHP Tony Butler. GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS–Signed RHP Ryan Hanna, INF Richard Paz, RHP John Brownell and INF Seth Boyd. LINCOLN SALTDOGS–Signed OF Jake Rife. WICHITA WINGNUTS–Signed RHP Derek Christensen and OF John Rodriguez. Eastern League PITTSBURGH PIRATES–Announced INF Jeremy Farrell was promoted to Indianapolis (IL) and INF was added to the roster from extended spring training. Can-Am League QUEBEC CAPITALES–Released OF Geofrey Tomlinson. WORCESTER TORNADOES–Signed LHP Kyle Regnault. HOCKEY National Hockey League BOSTON BRUINS–Assigned F Lane MacDermid to Providence (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS–Signed D Ben Blood to a two-year contract. American Hockey League BRIDGEPORT SOUND TIGERS–Signed F Brock Nelson. PEORIA RIVERMEN–Signed G Jordan Binnington. ECHL ECHL–Announced the Chicago Express has withdrawn its membership from the ECHL, effective immediately. Fined Idaho’s Jerry Kuhn an undisclosed amount for being assessed a major penalty and game misconduct for clipping in an April 4 game against Ontario. COLLEGE EASTERN ILLINOIS–Named Jay Spoonhour men’s basketball coach. FLORIDA INTERNATIONAL–Fired men’s basketball coach Isiah Thomas. GEORGE WASHINGTON–Named Jonathan Tsipis women’s basketball coach. TENNESSEE STATE–Named Russ Ehrenfeld offensive line coach and Mikhal Kornegay cornerbacks coach. UMASS DARTMOUTH–Named women’s basketball coach Amanda Van Voorhis associate director of athletics and senior women’s administrator.

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Wisdom

12 â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Corinthian

Saturday, April 7, 2012

Discovery of dad's secret life can't be kept quiet DEAR ABBY: I am a teenager who has recently discovered that my dad has been having sexually explicit conversations with w o m e n online for at least 10 years. He is usually withdrawn from the rest of the Abigail family, and I strongly Van Buren suspect it's Dear Abby because he cares more about his online fantasies than he does about his life with my brothers, my mother and me. I don't know what to do. I can no longer look him

in the eye. I don't respect him; I pity him. I'm afraid to tell anyone in my family because of the drama it will cause, and don't want to tell him because I know it will change our relationship. Still, I don't think I can keep this to myself. I have considered seeing a therapist, but I don't know how I can do that without giving my parents an explanation about why I'm going. What do you think I should do? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; CONFLICTED TEEN IN NEW YORK DEAR CONFLICTED: You have been exposed to a large dose of information you shouldn't have, and for that you have my sympathy. If you

feel you need to discuss this with a therapist, then you definitely should. As I see it, you have several options. The first would be to talk to a counselor at school and ask if counseling is available that way. If it isn't, then tell your father you need it, and why. And if he refuses, tell your mother everything. DEAR ABBY: I'm a 23-year-old college junior, double-majoring in English and education. Although I am pretty advanced in my degree field, I'm having second thoughts about my decision. Every day it seems as if I invest all my time and energy into something I don't even want to

be a part of. I have a very adventurous spirit. I want to constantly be doing, going and discovering. Part of me says I'm an adult and I should ignore the explorer part of me. But it's hard to say that change isn't possible because we're talking the rest of my life. How can I connect passion with occupation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially at this stage of the game? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; GYPSY SOUL DEAR GYPSY SOUL: By thinking out of the box. There are various options in the field of education, and one of them is teaching English in foreign countries. Start looking for opportunities in that area, and you may

be able to also fulfill your urge for adventure. Another option that comes to mind would be joining the Peace Corps or Teach for America. Please consider what I am suggesting and do some research on your own. DEAR ABBY: Is it ever proper to wear your napkin tucked into your shirt collar when dining out, instead of placing it on your lap? Traditionally, a napkin is placed on the lap to prevent soiling of the clothing, I would guess. But some plussized folks and women with large bustlines don't usually have food reach their laps, just their shirts. So what do you think?â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

JUST WONDERING IN NEW JERSEY DEAR JUST WONDERING: Your napkin belongs in your lap when dining out, regardless of what size you are. According to Emily Post, â&#x20AC;&#x153;an exception can be made for the elderly or infirm.â&#x20AC;? So if you are neither of those, consider carrying a stain remover â&#x20AC;&#x153;penâ&#x20AC;? with you in case there is a slip twixt the fork and the lip. (Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.)

TODAY'S BIRTHDAY (April 7). This year turns up your creativity and drive. By April's end, a new project consumes your energy and gives back tenfold. You'll have the attention of major players in

May. In June, friends lead you to different work. A trip in October helps financial prospects. The most romantic months will be July and December. Gemini and Sagittarius people adore you.

Horoscopes by Holiday BY HOLIDAY MATHIS If you still haven't mastered the art of doing nothing, the day after the full moon is a fine time to start figuring it out. Fifteen minutes of absolute nothingness could bring a deeper sense of relaxation than you'd get from a whole weekend of fun and games. But it has to be truly nothing. No television or Internet. Just sitting in the sanctuary of silence. ARIES (March 21-April 19). Sometimes it's lonely at the top, but you don't really mind because there is so much that's enjoyable there. Besides, you've worked so hard to get where you are. You can always remedy the situation by reaching out to friends. TAURUS (April 20May 20). You can handle the truth -- almost any truth -- when it's presented in a non-emotional manner. It's the feelings

that make facts difficult to process sometimes. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). You're getting a certain reputation with yourself. What you think about you is the only opinion that really matters today, as any other opinions aren't likely to affect you. CANCER (June 22-July 22). Center yourself. If you don't know how, it's worth learning, because there's much to gain from being in a solid place internally. For starters, you'll be able to correctly assess your situation and make a winning play. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). You like money because it buys you the freedom to arrange your life the way you want it. Without funding, less is possible. Seek financial aid to broaden your horizons. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You feel ready to take things to the next level.

Don't try to convince another person to feel the same. Act like they already do feel the same, and it will just happen naturally. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You'll feel better for getting something off of your chest. Whether it should go in your diary or you should actually tell the other person, well, that depends on what you're trying to accomplish. Which way is most selfless? SCORPIO (Oct. 24Nov. 21). Whatever you do, your instinct is to do it with style. This may take more money, time and effort than you originally wanted to give. However, you'll go forward anyway and later be glad you did. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21). Beware of trying to manage your feelings. Trying to feel what you think you should feel isn't going to work. When you let your true feelings

         

 

flow and accept them, other impulses such as grace and love will emerge. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19). Your heart is not exactly overrun with joy, but it is pretty full, and you have much love to give. Certainly you're better off than most. And you'll be in just the generous mood to try to even things out by contributing all you can. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18). You may feel guilty for seeking happiness when there is so much need and pain in the world. But you owe it to the ones who are suffering to experience all the joy you possibly can. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). It's been said that laugher is a form of exercise for your insides â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like jogging. Your sense of humor will be going strong, so share it. Everyone around you needs this kind of â&#x20AC;&#x153;workout.â&#x20AC;?

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Bain & Moss Attorneys At Law

LAW OFFICES OF CHARLES E. HODUM Announces the Re-establishment of Offices at 601 Main Street, Walnut, Mississippi 38683 Tippah County Hours by appointment Office 1-662-223-6895

Criminal Law: Federal State Drug Offenses â&#x20AC;˘ Assault & Battery â&#x20AC;˘ DUI Defense â&#x20AC;˘ Burglary â&#x20AC;˘ Theft â&#x20AC;˘ Violent Crimes â&#x20AC;˘ Murder â&#x20AC;˘ All Felonies & Misdemeanors Personal Injury www.corinthlaw.net

And

Nashville area office: 9005 Overlook Blvd. â&#x20AC;˘Brentwood, Tennessee 37027

Hours by appointment Office 1-615-242-0150 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax 1-615-274-4948 For information e-mail: Hodumlaw1@aol.com Other location: Nick Bain â&#x20AC;˘ Tyler Moss

662-287-1620 516 Fillmore St. â&#x20AC;˘ Corinth, MS Background Information Available Upon Request Listing Of These Previously Mentioned Area(s) Of Practice Does Not Indicate Any Certification Of Expertise Therein.

Collierville, Tennessee 38017

Office 1-901-853-8110 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax 1-901-853-0473 Continuing to serve West and Middle Tennessee and Northern and Middle Mississippi with representation in: Family Law â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Criminal Defense â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Contract and Corporate â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Personal Injury â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Entertainment Law Web site: Hodumlaw.com


Variety

13 â&#x20AC;˘ Daily Corinthian

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Dilbert

Zits

y ACROSS 1 Human mind 7 Petty disagreement 15 Show whose original house band was The Buckaroos 16 Shoe parts 17 Phrase that gets a callerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attention? 18 Clancyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jack Ryan, e.g. 19 Closer 20 Round Stic maker 21 Frond part 22 __ jure 23 Nut crackers 25 Modify 26 21st Greek letter 27 Hairstyles like MacGyverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 29 Understand 30 Upright citizen? 32 Meshed dividers 34 Words from the head of a line 35 Kind of justice 39 Work that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be done alone 41 Undermine 42 Wagnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;__ Rheingoldâ&#x20AC;? 45 Pump pick 47 Rabbit friend 48 Marine predator 50 Leg strengthener 51 Streamlet 52 City in Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s horse country 54 Carrier letters 55 Enter 56 Home entertainment piece 58 Delivery class? 59 Regularly monitored, in a way 60 Brings out 61 City near the Khyber Pass 62 Shooting locale? DOWN 1 City where a Pauline letter was received 2 Ranking angels 3 Reminiscent of the 1919 poem â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Second Comingâ&#x20AC;?

4 City with a California State campus 5 Dish of leftovers 6 Lea bleater 7 Talkative 8 Popular financial software 9 Hagen of the stage 10 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Immediately!â&#x20AC;? 11 â&#x20AC;&#x153;I made more lousy pictures than any actor in historyâ&#x20AC;? speaker, familiarly 12 Homogenizes 13 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of Mice and Menâ&#x20AC;? rabbit lover 14 Impressive spread 20 Middle manager? 23 Raid squad 24 Run an errand, say 27 Error 28 Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s often preceded by a warning 31 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pushing Daisiesâ&#x20AC;? pie maker 33 Ninth in a series: Abbr. 36 Japanese restaurant order

y 37 Adored 38 Hipsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trait 40 Only word heard in a 1958 song of the same name 41 ReuniĂłn attendees 42 Genre characterized by nonsense syllables 43 RecherchĂŠ

44 Works near an arena, perhaps 46 Assemble, as troops 49 To whom many pray 51 Clean again 53 Vibes 55 Island brew 57 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Immediately!â&#x20AC;? 58 The Once-__: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Loraxâ&#x20AC;? character

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

Beetle Bailey

Wizard of Id

Dustin

xwordeditor@aol.com

04/07/12

Baby Blues

Barney Google and Snuffy Smith

By Peter A. Collins (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

04/07/12

Saturday, April 7, 2012


040712 Corinth E Edition