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Septemb er

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2009

A r e g u l a r n e w S l e t t e r f r o m t h e C r u i s i n g Y ac h t C l u b o f S o u t h A u s t r a l i a

inside > Port Line Cup > Racing winter series > First cruise to Port Lincoln > croatia to Turkey > commodore’s dinner > club calendar > cruising the south pacific


John Gerard President Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia

From the President

Board of Management President Treasurer

John Gerard Henry Petersen Wayne Coonan Andrew Corletto David Murray Andrew Saies Tom Tymons

Flag Officers Commodore Vice Commodore Rear Commodore

Geoff Catt Chris Morphett Rob Sellick

Administration Executive Officer Finance Manager Administration Manager Leasing Coordinator Receptionist Marine Academy Coord. Racing Manager Food & Bev. Manager Head Chef Functions Manager Slip Master Gardener Pt Vincent Marina

Craig Evans Zoya Gretchkosiy Jenny Krogdahl Laura Cowley Danielle Stringer Brett Yardley Simon Irving (Acting) Mario Cataldi Dorian Molga Michelle Matte Tim Went Robert Gray Rob Marner

Association Chairpersons Cruising John Sibly Fishing Peter Schembri Racing Richard Parkes Social Activities Jacq Heffernan Life Members Arthur F Carolan Richard H Fidock AO Graeme L Footer James A Henry (Dec’d.) Malcolm A Kinnaird AC Editors of Groundswell Gay Footer, Anja Richards, Rob Perrin, Craig Evans. Contributions to reception@cycsa.com.au Advertising in Groundswell Jenny Krogdahl: telephone 08 8248 4222 Groundswell is the official journal of the Cruising Yacht Club of South Australia Inc. Lady Gowrie Drive, North Haven PO Box 1020 North Haven SA 5018 Telep hone: 08 8248 4222 Facsimile: 08 8248 5888 Email: reception@cycsa.com.au Web: www.cycsa.com.au Phone Port Vincent: 0414 611 110 Registered by Australia Post Publication No PP565001/00184 ISSN 1039-4230 Graphic design by Paynter Visuals & Associates Printed by Reflex Printing

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n your behalf, I congratulate the Board of Management for their successful nomination and re-election and look forward to working with them during the coming year. I also congratulate Geoff Catt upon his appointment as Commodore and wish him well in carrying out the important duties of office. Chris Morphett and Rob Sellick again take on the roles as Vice Commodore and Rear Commodore respectively. They performed extremely well last year and, I am sure, will support Geoff in their usual efficient manner. It is with sadness that at the AGM we farewelled Peter Page from the position of Commodore. Peter has held official positions within the Club over the past 13 years and we all thank him for his dedication and support. Best wishes to him and Barbara for the future. With the new season rapidly approaching, and the Annual General Meeting behind us, the Board and Flag Officers can begin planning the projects for the coming year. With this in mind, we are having a Future Directions meeting during October to ratify some of the projects associated with the Master Plan. I shall keep you informed on progress. The Volunteer of the Year Award, this year won by Jacqueline Heffernan, was well deserved. Jacq’s dedication, happy disposition and effort have been to the benefit of the Club and we thank Jacq, together with Marty, for their support. Fellow Board Member, Andrew Saies presented a report, several months ago, on the benefits of installing an External Cardiac Defibrillator Unit. This was quickly embraced by all concerned and with the assistance of the Social Activities Association, a Defibrillator was purchased. Installation and training is now being carried out. The Associations have held their respective AGMs and committees have been formed along with flag officer appointments being made: congratulations to the new appointees. The Board members look forward to working closely with the Associations during the coming year. Thank you to all retiring committee members for your support and effort. Congratulations to the Social Activities Association for hosting a very successful Commodore’s Dinner on Saturday 15 August: the atmosphere, food and activities were fantastic. The planning for Opening Day has commenced: please diarise Saturday 14 November as a day not to be missed. The Board of Management is proposing to have a designated central storage location to eliminate unsightly areas presently situated around the Club such as the gardener’s shed, garbage area and the two Club containers. Within this new facility we intend to offer members a general and sail storage unit, along with meeting Associations’ storage requirements. An information statement and questionnaire will shortly be circulated to members seeking your possible storage need requirements. Once the results have been analysed, and the design finalised, rental charges can be determined and advised. As reported at this year’s AGM, the Club is currently in a good stable financial position, especially with all the Marina West original berth contracts coming to fruition. We are enthusiastic to sell the remaining Marina West berths and therefore encourage members to ‘spread the word’. We also intend to commence a new marketing campaign, shortly, to coincide with the new summer season. The Racing Season will be commencing next month: I wish all crews a great competition. This period of the year can be fantastic boating weather so please enjoy your time on the water. John Gerard, President

THE PLANNING FOR OPENING DAY HAS COMMENCED: PLEASE DIARISE SATURDAY 14 NOVEMBER AS A DAY NOT TO BE MISSED. Cover Photo: Andrew Coletto and crew contesting the Port Line Cup aboard Shining Sea. Photo by Traci Ayris

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Craig Evans Executive Officer

At the Helm

CLUB NEWS

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he Annual General Meeting of the Club and also those of our various Associations have recently been held. Congratulations to all members successfully nominated and thank you to those that have retired from the various committees. I would also like to take this opportunity to acknowledge and thank the efforts of our retiring Commodore, Peter Page, and also welcome our new Commodore, Geoff Catt, into his new role.

Housekeeping issues With spring now upon us, and the construction of Marina West now behind, staff have commenced many smaller projects around the Club and generally tidying up our facilities. If you are aware of any areas requiring maintenance please contact the office and let us know. Visual inspections of vessels, marina berths and hard standing berths will commence in September. I would ask that all boat owners please ensure that the appearance of your vessel and your area is of a reasonable standard.

Navigational issues For some time now I have been working with the Department of Transport Energy and Infrastructure (DTEI) to review and improve navigational lights at the entrance into North Haven marina. I am happy to advise that navigating into the marina will now be much easier at night due to both improved lead lights and lights on the ends of the southern and northern breakwaters.

John Gerard presented Peter Page with a small token of appreciation on behalf of all the club members, on the occasion of his retirement from the position of Commodore at the Club AGM. He also thanked Barbara for her help and support and wished them both well in the future.

The lead lights into North Haven marina will now be a blue ‘rising’ strobe type light that will operate 24 hours a day. In an effort to improve the visibility of the actual entrance into the marina the white light that exists on the end of the southern breakwater will be replaced with a green light. As many of you would know, the white light is very difficult to find due to street lighting behind it. The red light that is on the northern breakwater will remain, however both the new green light and the red light will have a 5 nautical mile range in lieu of the original 3 nautical mile range.

Positions Vacant No references required

In addition to the many valued Club members who contribute to Groundswell, we have also received some good constructive feedback. It seems that there are many areas of boat ownership our readership would like to see covered in future issues: articles of a technical nature, boating maintenance, problem solving and specific boat-topic reviews just to name a few.

In the past the CYCSA has been responsible for the maintenance and replacement of navigational lights into North Haven. I am delighted that DTEI has now taken over this responsibility.

We would therefore like to invite members, who are keen to regularly write feature articles, to get in touch with us. If you would like to help the editorial team by talking to members, tapping into their experiences, carrying out research and putting together articles for publication please give us a call - we will be only too happy to discuss what is involved.

Following many complaints in relation to the speed of vessels in the marina from both our members and also local berth owning residents I submitted a request to DTEI to include North Haven Marina within Schedule 4 & 5 of the Harbors and Navigation Regulations 1994. I have been advised that from September 2009 a 4 knot restriction will apply to all motor driven vessels within the marina from the end of the inner breakwater near Marina West.

Anja Richards (0417 844 636 after hours) and Rob Perrin (8374 2203)

For many years there have been a number of submerged rocks in the fairway of ‘A’ Row in Marina East. We believe that these rocks were dislodged around 20 years ago from the revetment wall when building work commenced on the storm water drainage system from neighbouring One & All Drive. At low tide these rocks have posed a risk to sailing vessels, with many boats receiving keel damage over the years. In August of this year we commissioned divers and used an anchor barge to finally remove these rocks.

NEW MEMBERS

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ver the last three months the following people have joined the Club. Please make them welcome.

Miss Katherine Buchanan Mr Jon Carapetis Mr Gareth Davies Mr Gavin De Livera Mrs Lisa Dimitri Master Luka Dimitri Master Theo Dimitri Mr Sam Dolan Mr Paul Edge Ms Andrea Gerson

Mr Anthony Gibb Ms Hannah Goode Mrs Susan Harford Mr Clive Holland Mrs Lynn Keogh Mr Simon Langbein Mr Mark Lunn Mr Daniel Mentzel Mr Craig Nagel Mrs Maljeet Nagel

Ms Kerry Parker Mr Robert Redman Mr David Somerville Mr Bryce Washington Mr Gary Washington Mr Breck Waterman Mrs Robbie Waterman Mr Bryndon Wooding

Maintenance dredging work at the entrance of North Haven marina is due to commence shortly. When navigating through the marina entrance please keep a look out for the dredge and its anchor lines. In closing I would like to congratulate our Food & Beverage Manager, Mario Cataldi who recently married Lida, and also our Gardner, Rob Gray and wife Norma on the arrival of their sixth child. Safe boating. Craig Evans, Executive Officer 4


In Graeme’s absence we are finally able to bring you his profile: one in a series featuring Club members who, through their long term commitment and outstanding support, have contributed significantly to the life of the Club.

Graeme FOOTER B

orn in Fremantle, Western Australia in 1945, Graeme has been an Adelaide boy since 1955 and a member of the CYCSA for 28 years. Married to Gay, they have two children, Mark and Nicole, who in turn each have two children who keep Graeme constantly bemused and busy. Educated at Scotch College, Graeme holds an Economics Degree from Adelaide University, a Builder’s Licence and Land Broker’s Licence as well as being a member of the Australian Institute of Accountants. Now semi-retired (he says he will never fully retire), Graeme’s work life has been involved with running the family business of ‘Footersville’, timber merchants, building umpteen office blocks in Adelaide, Melbourne and Brisbane and generally trying to keep abreast of other business interests. He also spent two years in the Army under National Service and served in Vietnam during 1969. His early involvement with water sports was not in sailing, but in rowing: competing in the Penrith Cup, for South Australia, several times. Gymnastics, athletics and football were other sports where he was an active and more than capable participant. As a teenager, he sailed on a friend’s boat out of the Squadron several times, but it was not until the family purchased a Hobi 14’ that sailing became part of the scene. After chartering in the Whitsunday’s in 1981 the decision was made to try keel boat sailing and Graeme and Gay joined the Club and had a Lexcen 30 built. This was called Super Foot, a play mainly on the timber measurement and coincidentally on their name (Super Foot is a measure of volume equal to 12”x12”x1” – Ed.). In 1986 they purchased a Pan Oceanic 38 and called it Marnico, a combination of their children’s names. Graeme hankered for a bit more performance and the desire to travel further afield by boat resulted in designing and building their current Adelaide yacht, a Dibley 50’ performance cruiser, also called Marnico. The travel bug was well and truly planted when they travelled to the Pacific in 2003 and 2005. Graeme reflects on the humbling experiences encountered while sailing around Vanuatu, when the contrast between the have and have nots was marked, and feels privileged to have been allowed to interact with the locals as he did.

funded by the sale of unwanted land for housing. Graeme is an opportunist with a capital ‘O’ who has been an enormous asset to the Club. We would not be the great Club we are today without ‘Foots’. (John Gerard) The Port Vincent Marina being included under the umbrella of the Club and the development of the Western Basin also occurred during his watch. The first thing to say about Graeme is that he is a man of outstanding integrity and that he shows great determination in meeting his business and personal objectives. He is a man who I am happy to travel with at any time. His interest in yachting is well known within the Club and he has designed and built a high quality yacht which he has raced and cruised extensively. He has also been able to maintain a vessel in the northern hemisphere and takes advantage of this for extended periods which enables him to truly enjoy all that cruising yachting can offer. His commitment to the success of the CYCSA is remarkable. He has effectively pursued the commercial interests of the Club with tenacity. In particular, his commitment on the Marina West which is now complete is a tremendous example of his determination to improve the facilities of the Club. Graeme is a very dedicated man and one with whom the Club has had a most fortunate and valuable relationship. (Malcolm Kinnaird)

Getting to the Pacific is a trek in itself, and wanting to see different destinations without having to sail all the way to Europe or take the time involved, saw another boat on the horizon: a Jeanneau 54’ Sun Odyssey Deck Saloon, called Jemmaroo, now based in Europe. The name came about as their only granddaughter’s name is Jemma and the ‘Roo’ bit, well... They thought they were safe with the name, as boats are female, but Jemma’s older brother Oscar announced one day that “it was Jemmaroo because ‘Grumpy’ is still building Oscaroo”: so now the dinghy is Oscaroo. With three seasons travelling to Europe to cruise in the Mediterranean so far, the best of both worlds is enjoyed, and most of the Australian winter is avoided.

Now that the development of the Western Basin is complete, Graeme has stepped down from active involvement at the Club but it is unlikely, with his knowledge and experience, particularly with regard to the processes that have taken place, that Craig or the Club will let him off the hook for too long. Campaigning for three Sydney to Hobart Races with Dick Fidock on Dictator and Graeme Williams on Prime Example was a great learning experience: only one was completed on board Dictator. Graeme recalles sitting on the rail during a storm in Bass Strait watching a pacific gull riding the thermals thinking that “one of us shouldn’t be here”. A passage from Sydney to Port Vila in 2005 was particularly challenging and several Adelaide to Port Lincoln races have also been interesting to say the least. A racing bug seems to have infected him as he is planning on entering Marnico in the Lincoln Week Regatta next year. Marnico going around the cans will be an interesting sight – twenty tons does not tack as quickly as eight tons!

Graeme has been an active, involved member of the Club, first as a member of the Cruising Association, followed by a stint as its Chairperson, before going on to the Board where he has been a Board Member, Rear Commodore, Vice Commodore, Treasurer and President. After retiring from the Board, he was Commodore for four years until 2006 and granted Life Membership in 2007. Many milestones at the Club occurred during his tenure the most notable being the purchase of the Southern Land.

Time is now taken up with travelling backwards and forwards to Europe, maintaining an active interest in the family businesses and checking on the grandchildren. Graeme is a person who does not stand still and Gay has a bit of trouble getting him to slow down.

During my initial years on the Board in the early 90s I recall the opportunity arose to acquire property that was loosely termed the ‘Southern Land’. This was vacant land to the south of the Club incorporating the public boat ramp. Graeme, along with David Urry, both then Board Members, became obsessed with the idea of the Club entering the property market. Their obsession grew stronger day by day and with the assistance of a small group of senior Club members the deal was done. With Graeme’s determination and property management skills the Club finished up with a refurbished clubhouse, additional Club grounds, a new entrance gate location and a public boat ramp, all

He loves his time at the Club even though this is more limited now and has watched with pride as it has gone from strength to strength as the premier sailing club in South Australia. From wide observation he states that there is no other facility like it in the world and we should all treat it with respect and ENJOY!! Gay Footer 5


Geoff Catt Commodore

Commodore’s Report

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’m proud and honoured to be have been asked by the Board to represent the Club as your Commodore and look forward to fulfilling the duties to the very best of my abilities. Thanks to all who have offered their best wishes and support so far – it has been much appreciated. The role of Commodore is not defined in our Constitution but an early note gives some guidance as to what our foundation members had in mind: • To uphold the image, protocol and tradition of the CYCSA, • To represent the Club at kindred club functions, Yachting SA activities, and other functions where invited, • To liaise with the General Manager regarding the on-water activities of Opening Day and • To attend Board meetings of the Club. The Flag Officers are also a conduit for feedback from members to the Executive Officer and the Board, although members should always refer queries and suggestions to the Club Office. On checking the roll of previous commodores, I realise that I have some mighty big shoes to fill – Richard Fidock AO, Malcolm Kinnaird AC, Graeme Measday, Tess McGrath, Graeme

Footer and Peter Page – all have contributed so much to our Club over the last thirty three years.

bring a few guests, jump on the boats and enjoy! Mavis and I look forward to seeing as many of you as possible on the day.

As spring and summer draw near, the increasing pace of maintenance activity is clear – the slipway bookings are starting to rise and it’s great to sense that another summer boating season is drawing near.

On a personal note, in December I will be sailing Liberator down to Hobart via the spectacularly beautiful and rugged west coast of Tasmania (…. but not via Sydney!) in company with Richard Pope in Celebrity and Chris Wood in Back Friday – we are looking forward to some relaxing cruising. In Hobart I plan to be on the water to welcome this year’s CYCSA entrants in the Sydney to Hobart Race, and to represent our Club at the presentation ceremony, before cruising back to Adelaide later in the new year.

The 2009/2010 racing program that has been crafted by the committee looks innovative and exciting – to all skippers and crew, please give as much support as you can. Likewise, after listening to the reports of the various chairs at the Annual General Meeting, I know that the Cruising, Fishing and Social Activities committees have all been working hard on a summer program of exciting events that will keep us all busy and enjoying our boats, our club and our friendship. It’s great to see some ‘new blood’ coming on to all committees – thank you all for volunteering. Opening Day is to be held on Saturday 14 November. I’ve already put in a request for perfect weather and I’ll work hard with Craig and his team to put everything else in place to create the setting for an enjoyable and relaxing day – all we then need is for you as members to

During my absence I know that we can count on Vice Commodore, Chris Morphett and Rear Commodore, Rob Sellick to act on my behalf as necessary. The effects of the economic slowdown have affected many members but hopefully the worst will soon be behind us (… if not already!). In any case, what better reason could there be to escape to the Club for a while, to relax and enjoy the company of family and friends – or “just to muck around in boats”! Geoff Catt, Commodore

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www.blueskymarine.2ya.com 6


NEW BOATS 34’

This is another in the series of articles aimed at providing you with a little insight into a few of the ‘new’ boats to the Club over recent months. While not all are newly built, most are relatively new to the Club and others have moved to new owners within the Club. We warmly welcome all these ‘new’ boats and owners.

IMPULSE

SHINING SEA Shining Sea is Andrew and Carolyn Corletto’s latest acquisition. The boat was previously at RPAYC at Pittwater (NSW) and was campaigned by its previous owner in regattas along the East Coast, including winning its class at Hamilton Island Race Week. The Sydney 38 is an Australian designed and built racing yacht of approximately 12m in length and is normally raced with eight to ten crew. There are significant fleets of Sydney 38s in New South Wales, Victoria and the United States and emerging fleets in Tasmania, Queensland and now South Australia. Racing in the class is very competitive with some of Australia’s best sailors competing in the class at major regattas around Australia, including Skandia Geelong Week, Audi Sydney Harbour Regatta and Hamilton Island Race Week. As the boats are all one design, the racing is very close and often only seconds separate a number of boats. The close racing was demonstrated at this year’s Lincoln Race Week with Shining Sea winning PHS from Hold On in second and Hold On 5th in IRC to Shining Sea’s 6th on countback.

They have been all over the place in New South Wales with their boat including Mile Lakes near Newcastle, Hawkesbury, Pittwater, and Sydney’s Darling Harbour, and all over Victoria’s lakes, bays and rivers. In Victoria they are members of the Victorian Family Motor Cruising Club and Club Whittley Victoria Incorporated. Since joining the CYCSA they have met many people and had many drinks and meals in the restaurant and have found everybody to be very friendly.

Editors’ Note If you would like your boat featured in this section of Groundswell, please write around 180-200 words and provide a high resolution print-quality digital photo (or ask Gay Footer or Anja Richards to take a photo for you) and submit your contribution to the CYCSA office.

In mixed fleet racing, the Sydney 38 is a competitive boat which provides an exciting ride for its crew in typical Adelaide sea breeze conditions. Andrew Corletto is enthusiastic about the class and his boat: “We love being able to race boat–on-boat with the other Sydney 38, Hold-On. Close competition on the water is fantastic as it helps improve both boat handling and tactical skills. It would be even better if we had a few more Sydney 38s here to race against as that would make for some really exciting racing and benefit all the crews involved, especially those intending to compete in the major interstate regattas like Geelong Week or Hamilton Island Race Week.” Shining Sea is being prepared for the Geelong Week campaign next summer, as well as the full local programme.

36’

Monica and Mike Jones, who hail from a small town in Victoria called Wallan, are now living in South Australia and both working on the Northern Expressway Project as Administration Assistant and Machinery Maintenance Manger respectively. They have three grown-up sons and have been boating for most of their lives one way or another. Their current boat, Impulse, is a Whittley 700 cruiser, actually their second Whittley, which has a V8 stern drive, sleeps four and has all the Whittley features as well as a few extras such as a DVD flat screen.

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37’

CATALYST

38’

Keith and Sue Langley and Catalyst are refugees from Hindmarsh Island where, tragically, there is no water. Catalyst is a 10 metre Power Cat Cabriole built in Caboolture, Queensland and delivered to Hindmarsh Island by truck on 24 December 2006. Sadly it has never been moored at the Langley’s jetty as the river is now 300 metres away. She was bought as a “lunch boat” for cruising the Lower Lakes and the Coorong, and with the hope of doing river rambles upstream.

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Living up to the meaning of its name, Catalyst is now at the CYCSA and Keith and Sue are enjoying a new world of boating experiences and learning a great deal about the sea.

41’

Lunching and crabbing have become regular weekend activities, along with several trips to Port Vincent and a memorable trip to Kangaroo Island which proved to be a baptism of fire when rough weather in Backstairs Passage on the way home tested both boat and crew.

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Because of her shallow draft, 0.8 metres, Catalyst is ideal for exploring the Gulf, but long term, the Langley’s are hoping for water so they may return to Hindmarsh Island and combine both holiday house and boating; but for now they are enjoying the excellent facilities of the Club and having a lot of fun at sea.

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44’

BLu-BY-U After over 40 years on ski boats or fishing boats, Magret and Al Vos decided to buy a Mustang 2800. They bought the boat from a CYCSA member, and in the process, were impressed enough to become members themselves. Magret and Al, who recently retired from their civil earthmoving business, own and run a storage business in St Agnes. Their two sons, who now run the earthmoving business, love to go water skiing or fishing with them. With a holiday home at Moonta Bay, Magret and Al often go fishing from Port Hughes. After recently purchasing a tri-axle trailer, their plans are to also travel to other destinations. As members of the Porsche Club of SA, as well as 27 years involvement with their local Highbury Lions Club, Magret and Al expect to be kept quite busy with social club activities at different levels including fund raising, and now also cruising, fishing and social activities at the yacht club. 7

45’

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Port Line Cup

Kaizen p

roduces

an excel

lent race

result

Ruffian crew feel the chill Dr Feelgood crew

Bullistic 8


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RACING ASSOCIATION

Chair’s Report

s we near the end of another year’s racing this is perhaps an opportune moment to reflect on the 2008/09 season.

At our recent AGM it was pleasing to report that the Racing Executive has maintained a positive cash position whilst increasing on-water assets in an undeniably tough economic climate. Most significantly the purchase and conversion of Perina II – now CYC1 – has positioned the club as our State’s premier yacht racing venue.

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raditionally, the Port Line Cup is contested on days that are overcast, chilly and drizzly and the most recent event held true to expectations. Despite a bleak start to the day, a good-sized fleet of more than fifty boats had gathered outside the Port Adelaide Sailing Club by mid-morning to compete in the historic race. Bullistic, Cookie Monster, Doctor Feelgood, Firecracker, Freedom, Fun2, G-Wizz, Hi, Kaizen 2, Le Poisson, Liberator, Locomotion, Oh Really, Patrice III, Ruffian, War & Peace and Shining Sea represented the CYCSA. Fireball was unable to race for a back-to-back victory due to a shortage of available crew but it was good to see William Strangways on his Beneteau among the spectator fleet. With more than a few boats packing supplies of rum tipples onboard, crews enjoyed a good day’s racing in the light, shifty N-NE breeze which rarely gusted over 10 knots. Michael McGlinchey hit the line beautifully in the J24 start and Kaizen 2 subsequently held off strong competition from Peter Stevens and Alyn Stevenson to secure top place in her division. Due to light winds and flat seas it eventuated that nine out of the top ten finishers on handicap were trailer-sailers, sports boats or J24s – a contrast to last year’s race where the first boat of a similar type placed eigth. Final results in Division One revealed CYCSA boats in the top four positions. Stefan Marcel’s War & Peace achieved a commendable third place in Division 2 with Firecracker and Oh Really finishing mid-fleet on handicap in Division 4 (Trailerable). Line Honours went to Darren Degilio and his Bullistic crew. Overall Handicap placings confirmed Kaizen 2 as the top-placed CYCSA boat with a well-deserved third place on the podium after Mighty Fine Lyons (RSAYS) second and Voodoo Child (CSC) in first place. Presentations were held at the Port Adelaide Clubrooms on Friday 14 August. The crews of Kaizen 2, Bullistic and Locomotion recognised the efforts of the host club and were in attendance to receive their trophies. Traci Ayris

OVERALL HANDICAP 1st Voodoo Child (M Read) CSC 2nd Mighty Fine Lyons (B Van Riet) RSAYS 3rd Kaizen 2 (M McGlinchey) CYCSA

DIVISON 1 1st Bullistic (D Degilio) CYCSA 2nd Dr Feelgood (W & J Coonan) CYCSA 3rd Locomotion (W Rowe) CYCSA

Subsequent to a Special General Meeting and Annual General Meeting, the racing program for 2009/10 has been finalised. In consultation with racing members at those meetings, our final program has been tailored to provide more races and greater diversity, to satisfy the needs, and promote the best possible competition, for all members. After many years of valued service, Andy Shipp chose not to stand for REX election this year. Whilst Andy may view this as a permanent retirement we live in hope that it will be a brief sabbatical. The REX for 2009/10 consists of returning members Simon Irving, William Strangways, Traci Ayris and myself. We welcome onto REX our two incoming members, Peter Hendy and Nicole Burtt and look forward to their contributions to our association.

This season has seen the club conduct its first international regatta for many years and also host two highly-successful national championships in addition to a comprehensive club racing program.

The REX strongly believes that hosting such significant championship events is integral to maintaining the vibrancy of racing within any club. To that end we look forward to conducting the 29er Australian Championships over the upcoming New Year period. All CYCSA members (not just members of the Racing Association) are invited to become a part of this regatta by acting as a volunteer during this event. There are many and varied roles both on and off the water to fill and we are appealing for assistance from club members who may be able to help us in providing vessels and boating equipment (fenders, anchors etc) for use. You may notice some 29er dinghies at the club prior to the event as crews from around the country gather for coaching and training on our gulf waters, please make them feel welcome. Any successful season is not possible without the contribution of numerous volunteers, our highly valued sponsors, CYCSA staff and most importantly our competitors. We thank everyone for their time and effort and look forward to another excellent year.

DIVISON 2 1st Spoonbill (I Fraser) RSAYS 2nd Outcast (J Armitage) PASC 3rd War & Peace (S Marcel) CYCSA

Richard Parkes, Chair Racing Association

J24 1st Kaizen 2 (M McGlinchey) CYCSA 2nd Hi (P Stevens) CYCSA 3rd Fun2 (A Stevenson) CYCSA 9


Photo upper left: PRMS Leica Theodore presents Stormy Seas PFDs to Peter Page and Ingrid from Alliance Photo centre: Peter Stevens and his J24 Hi crew Photo lower left: Divison 1 Winter Series winners Wayne Coonan, Darren Degilio, Jim Hallion with Peter Kelly from RSAYS and Leica Theodore

Port River Marine Winter Series

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t should have been the final race day of the Port River Marine Winter Series but adverse weather saw competitors meeting on the CYCSA patio, not out on the water, on Sunday 16 August. Both RSAYS and CYCSA members gathered for the combined Winter Series presentations which were held in conjunction with presentations for the Short Handed Short Course Series. Series Sponsor, Port River Marine’s Leica Theodore and her team, presented Stormy Seas PFD Jackets to the winners of the Winter Series free raffle, and also put on a barbecue lunch, which was well received by skippers and crews.

CYCSA WINTER SERIES RESULTS Div 1: 1st - Alliance (J Hallion); 2nd - Shining Sea (A Corletto); 3rd - Bullistic (D Degilio) Div 2: 1st - Oh Really (M O’Reilly); 2nd - Freedom (B Schahinger); 3rd - Synergy (M Hutton) J24 PHS: 1st - Hi (P Stevens); 2nd - Cookie Monster (B Walsh); 3rd - Kaizen 2 (M McGlinchey) J24 OD: 1st - Hi (P Stevens); 2nd - Kaizen 2 (M McGlinchey); 3rd - Cookie Monster (B Walsh)

COMBINED WINTER SERIES RESULTS (CYCSA & RSAYS) Div 1: 1st - Dr Feelgood (W Coonan); 2nd - Alliance (J Hallion); 3rd - Bullistic (D Degilio) Div 2: 1st - Naiad (I Power); 2nd - Trim (T Weymouth); 3rd - Freedom (B Schahinger)

SHORT HANDED SHORT COURSE SERIES RESULTS 1st - Seduction (M Williams); 2nd - Synergy (M Hutton); 3rd - G-Wizz (G Patten)

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FA BURGEE Fishing Association members who would like to fly an FA burgee from their boat can purchase one from the Club office. Enthusiasts can purchase bigger ones as a special order upon request to the FA.

Fishing Association News

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fter the Club Associations AGMs held on 26 July the Fishing Association has established a new committee for 2009/2010. This new committee is comprised of Peter Newmarch, Geoff Wiggins, Ray Baddeley, Glenn Spear, Barbara Page as treasurer, newcomer John Colella as secretary and myself in the chair again. If there is anyone out there who enjoys fishing and would like to join our group, there is always room for more helpers. I especially would like to thank our retiring committee members Peter Fairbrother, Trevor Paynter and Jim Smyth who all made very significant contributions to our activities last year. Jim deserves a very special mention and thank you as he has been a long term member of this association and his experience and willing involvement in all activities will be greatly missed. Trevor Paynter had a very busy year on committee as secretary, coming up with new activities to consider and freely making his graphic design skills available to generate promotional posters, award certificates and re-design our Fishing association burgee. Hopefully many of you would have seen our new bright blue version of the FA flags around the club at various FA events. We now have a smaller version (45cm X 90cm) available to members at a cost of $50.00 each. You can view these and purchase them at the CYCSA office. At the Association AGM we announced the FA awards for 2008/2009. The award winners for the various categories were: Heaviest Eagle Ray Award – not awarded. • Heaviest Scale Fish Awar – went to Wayne Palmer fishing from his own boat, The Reel Thing. Wayne landed two 12kg Snapper off the Orontes Bank …. “Just to be sure!” • Largest Shark Award – went to David Murray fishing from Portia at the Cutter Patch early in the year for landing a School Shark weighing in at 18kgs. • Game Fish Award – went to Geoff Gowing fishing from Andante around Double Cone Island in the Whitsundays. Geoff landed a Spanish Mackerel weighing 31.5kgs and 1.56m long.

Fishing Association chairman Peter Schembri, his father Fred and son Tyler spent a few relaxing days fishing around Troubridge Island earlier in the new year, taking advantage of the few good days they had to get off shore. Fortunately the fishing gods were kind and they managed to land a couple of fine specimens. Peter indicated the trip to Troubridge Island and Edithburgh has been an annual trip since 2001.

• Keith Waterman Award for “Most Meritorious Catch Outside of SA Waters” – went to Trevor Paynter who tested his skill with a 15 kilo Tuna landed from a charter boat out of Broome. I would like to really encourage all our FA fishers (men, woman and kids) to submit their catch records to us throughout the year. All you need to do is provide the FA with a photo of your catch along with the date, location and weight which can be addressed to our committee care of the CYCSA office. For those of you who are not FA members and would like to be involved with our various activities becoming a member is only $22.00 per annum (Incl. GST). The FA membership fee provides you with an invitation to our annual Boating Showcase event held in November (an exclusive event for FA members, partners and sponsors), discount for other events such as fishing competitions and Crabbing Day, and access to the FA bait storage freezer on site. All FA members also receive a discount card for use at Ray & Anne’s Tackle and Marine Superstore covering terminal tackle and bait. A Fish Filleting Demonstration Event is being planned for next year, as time is running out for 2009, having been indicated in our member survey as being a “most requested activity”. The FA committee is seeking volunteer help from expert filleters in the Club and would love to hear from those members who could provide help with this event. There are a few dates to note in your diary regarding coming events… Fishing Competition - Saturday 24 October, Boating Showcase - Friday evening 20 November 2009 and Crabbing Day - Sunday 14 February 2009. After the fun we had with our Inaugural Fishing Competition we are really looking forward to again meeting up with various fishing mates (and ladies), going fishing and meeting afterwards for a BBQ, some fun awards and some fishing stories. It’s a perfect occasion for all FA members to get together socially and do what we do best …. tell fishing stories!! Please send photos of your fishing catches to either peter@theschembris.com.au or CYCSA reception@cycsa.com.au for inclusion in the FA News in Groundswell. We always love to see good catches and how and where you caught them. Peter Schembri, Chair Fishing Association

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Tim Vreeker caught this “4-can squid” recently. We appreciated his novel way of measuring it. Peter Newmarch boated a couple of barramundi while cruising the Kimberley aboard True North.


First Cruise to Port Lincoln Mike and Morag Draper share the story of their first trip across to Port Lincoln after buying their boat Matador.

Cruising group at Blyth Island, Spencers Gulf

Morag at the helm

Mike organising cocktails

Sea Lions at Blyth Island

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had only sailed to Port Lincoln once as a Crew Member on Miss Jane in the Lexus Blue Water Classic earlier this year, and as anyone who knows me will agree, I was more than itching to get back out on the water for a decent sail. I was also super keen to sail my own yacht, Matador, as she had only ventured into local waters and the Gulf of St Vincent with her new owner at the helm.

Dave and Vicki Henderson of Namche, with guests Barry and Bernadette Willoughby onboard, were also due to set sail the same day. It was good to know a familiar boat would be travelling common water. It was also good to know that Dave’s unwanted kidney stones were also no longer onboard (onboard Dave that is). After days of weather-watching and the ritualistic ‘decision-making-changing’ debates with myself, Saturday 4 April was deemed the day of departure. A mate of mine, Steve, had sleeping bag and potato salad at the ready and Matador was well equipped and kitted with all the cruiser-comforts a skipper could want. At 0900 we were off! Both vessels had a good sail to Edithburgh. I had hoped we would get around the foot to West Cape the next day. A small front was coming through however, and as we weren’t in any particular hurry, we sat it out for a couple of days and actually sailed back to Stansbury on the second night for a more comfortable anchorage. Dave collected Steve and I both nights in his trusty dinghy and ferried us to Namche for pre-dinner drinks and nibbles. Thanks Dave, as I wasn’t keen on inflating my new Zodiac until I got to Port Lincoln. It was a good sail of around 16-22 knots back to Edithburgh on day 3 and moorings were picked up on arrival. Selkie, with Chris and Rosalie Morphett, plus Sachan, with Owen and Delia Mace arrived soon after, and more drinks on Namche were had, our cruising crowd slowly growing. It was looking good for West Cape next day so an early night was had by all. I must add at this point that Matador had zero cell phone coverage nor did my fantastic new (refurbished) laptop even light up (it dropped into a cyber-galactic hole the first night’s departure). I was totally reliant on my trusty chart plotter, also the way the wind blew my hair and the familiar, comforting voice of VMR American River - Alan’s daily weather reports kept us up to date and well informed. Tuesday, day 4, 0530 hrs: drizzling, 13-18 knots. A big ‘breakie’ was consumed to counter or attack a big day. Off we sailed at 0645 with Selkie in the lead, Namche following and Matador close behind. Sachan plotted a separate course, returning to North Haven to sail another day. We headed down Sultana Passage with eyes on depth sounders but encountered no problems. Out past the last marker and along Investigator Strait 13-18 knots and dropping. It was an easy sail until the wind dropped right out with just enough to hold the headsail in shape. At least under motor we had an opportunity to take in the great views. We motored around Cape Spencer, sails in, heading between Emmes Reef and Reef Head which, if you stay halfway between, will give you more than enough room to pass safely. By the time we reached West Cape, the boom-bag was on and out came the first Stella! There was good holding and a well earned sleep was had after more drinks on Club Namche! I actually found West Cape easy to enter. A good tip is stay close to South Rock with the light beacon on top, anchor close to the cliffs at the southern point just before the start of the beach. Day 5, Wednesday 8 April. Steve and I are looking a little feral to say the least – and loving it by the way! Steve in particular appreciated the early wake-ups (not) and so after a kick-start of coffee and toast, we weighed anchor and headed off. Selkie and Namche headed to Taylor Island for a sleepover and Matador set her course for Port Lincoln. Most of the day was spent motoring through a gentle swell (I never get sick of that hypnotizing motion) past Dangerous Reef with all the seals and dolphins around, approaching Donington Point and passing easily between Island and Point with plenty of water. It was starting to get dark but my homework was done and it was no problem to get from Donington to Port Lincoln Marina. That pre-booked berth was looking better and better ….hmmm hot shower, tavern, restaurant food, no dishes, and tavern! I had plenty of time to re-stock Matador and get her ready for Morag and Heather’s arrival on Saturday. Steve flew back to Adelaide on Thursday and Morag and Heather were due into Lincoln 8am Saturday. They missed their flight (doh) and jumped a later one. We managed to cast off from the marina around 11.30am for Reevesby Island, part of the Sir Joseph Banks Group Conservation Park - about 18 - 20 islands, islets or rocks approximately 20 nautical miles from Pt Lincoln with reefs and rocks all over the place ……Yay!

Still under motor, with not much wind at all, we headed out past Donington Island again and on past the tuna farms. Tuna farms are not so nice to look at and were all over the place. They’re not a problem once you know where they are – until the wind turns and you have to go around 1 or 2 of them! We approached Kirby and Dalby Islands, sailing between on approach to Reevesby. Be careful there is a large and long reef as you enter this bay. Stay well left and give it a wide berth! We had a good holding on anchor here, not that there was much weather to worry about - sun and flat sea all week. We radioed in to VMR Tumby Bay and let our new friend, Gary, know that we were safely at our destination. We laughed and listened to several other vessels stating their position as in the ‘carpark’ at Reevesby Lagoon – nice one Royce.

Namche and Selkie also anchored up arriving from their night at Spalding Cove and Far Star, another CYCSA vessel with Royce and Delene at her helm, arrived from Port Augusta, on their return from a long sojourn on the water. It was time to get the new Zodiac out and inflated. Heather was in her element zipping around the lagoon on our newly acquired tender and it was a great pleasure to watch her; she is a natural on the water….hang on, did I just hear drinks on Namche over Channel 81?, Heather, get back here! We anchored comfortably at Reevesby for two nights. The walks and scenery were spectacular and highly recommended. Easter Sunday was spent with good company, good wine, and a yummy lamb roast dinner complete with Easter eggs for desert! It was a change of plans for the third night. A front was apparent so we made an ‘executive decision’ to move back to Port Lincoln and pop into either Spalding Cove or Boston Bay – whichever the calmest (good idea Chris). Leaving the southern end of Reevesby, we sailed around the island for a look at Morton Bay with its cool white sand and crystal blue water; definitely worth a stay next time. We carried on to look at the sea lions at Blyth Island where we anchored, got in the Zodiac and went for a play! To my surprise, we were greeted by the sea lions that were not at all scared of us or our inflatables! Definitely a highlight of the trip for us all! Our visit to Blyth was nothing short of awesome! We waded in with the sea lions, Dave and I swam with these graceful, inquisitive creatures and it was definitely a memorable experience for Morag, Heather and me! After our sea lion encounter, we headed back to our boats for a quick lunch and then the sail back towards Pt Lincoln We headed off down towards Spilsby Island then tacked west towards Port Lincoln. The wind was coming up on the nose, about 18-22 knots and the water was like being in a washing machine. All in all it was a bit of a bumpy ride back. About 5 nautical miles out of Pt Lincoln the weather calmed down but night was falling quickly. I jotted my coordinates down, just in case any instruments decided to melt down, and decided to bypass Boston Bay, where all were heading, and sailed straight into Pt Lincoln Marina. Although the chart plotter was fine, navigating in the pitch black around those tuna farms was interesting, to say the least! We got back to the marina safe and sound. Namche, Selkie and Far Star all anchored at Boston Bay. Off the ‘sked’, thank you VMR. Tuesday afternoon brought everyone back to the marina. Berths were tight however and after a call to Malcolm (on his personal cell which Morag had managed to ‘acquire’), she managed to slot Selkie in nicely. Dinner that night at the Marina Hotel Tavern was enjoyed by us all. Morag and Heather flew back to Adelaide on Wednesday, day 12 of my extended Easter sail. Namche headed off to Thistle Island with Selkie and Far Star on Thursday. My mate and fellow tattooer Andy was due in Port Lincoln Thursday and we were off home Friday. Andy arrived with his new Stormy PFD Jacket in tow, we got the boat ready and organized the last leg of our journey from the comfortable confines of the Marina Hotel with Stellas in hand and knives and forks at the ready! On the morning of Friday 17 April, Andy and I had time on our side. The weather was good so we decided to head for Whalers Bay at Thistle Island. The day progressed with non-existent wind hence motoring for most of the day. When we approached Whalers Bay we stayed close to the cliffs and took in the great views. We anchored there for the night, then headed to West Cape Sunday night and made it back to the CYCSA on Monday afternoon in time for afternoon coffee, motoring 80% of the way. I would definitely recommend Whalers Bay for a stop-over before West Cape, if the wind is right. Combined with fantastic views, great weather and wild life everywhere, I recommend this trip to those who enjoy a little adventure, being self-reliant and obviously sailing must feature high on their list of recreational activities! It’s all about picking your weather and the Spencer Gulf can be a lot of fun. In closing I just want to say, I love my boat!

Mike Draper 13


croatia to turkey GAY AND GRAEME FOOTER CONTINUE THEIR MEDITERRANEAN TRAVELS ABOARD JEMMAROO

raeme and I left Adelaide on 28 April and arrived in Biograd in Croatia late in the afternoon of the 29th. Jemmaroo was on the slip having its bottom scrubbed and did not go back in the water until 2 May due to rainy weather and so we stayed at a hotel close to the marina. Rob and Sue Last arrived about lunchtime on 3 May and Bob Culbert, our mate from New Zealand, arrived around 6pm. The weather delayed our departure a couple of days only to find that ‘Murphy’ was at play as the instruments were playing up. We returned to Biograd where the Raymarine technician found we had a loose wire. While he was at it, he installed the latest software version on the plotters and we eventually left at 4pm. Rob and Sue were with us to cruise a bit of Croatia as we travelled south down the coast on our way to Greece. We spent some time at places we had visited before but also anchored in different bays as well. The world renowned Split Flower Show was being held in the Palace there so this was a ‘must do’. We visited Trogir by bus from Split, a tiny walled town on the island of Clovo reached by a small bridge. Milna on the island of Brac was another lovely anchorage where we anchored right in the middle of the bay. Korcula and Dubrovnik were revisited and Rob and Sue took in lots of sightseeing. We exited Croatia at Cavtat and Rob and Sue left us there. Bob, Graeme and I left Croatia bound for Greece on Friday 15 May. Rather than call into Montenegro and Albania, we chose to do an overnighter to Corfu and arrived at around 2pm the following day. We attempted to find Customs and Immigration and some 27 Euros later for taxi fares and a lot of frustration, found that no-one was around and they weren’t that interested. We did however have our first dinner on Greek soil and found many, many English tourists around. We walked through the old town of Corfu with its narrow cobbled

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streets and although quite charming, it was also quite dirty. The group of islands from Corfu down the west coast of Greece form the Ionian Islands and if you are looking for a delightful, easy area to cruise, then this is the go. Lakka on Paxoi was a beautiful anchorage and we eventually officially entered Greece three days after arriving at Port Gaios further south on Paxoi. We paid our 50 Euros entry fee into Greece, Customs (or Customer) wished us a good stay and that was that. Paxoi’s claim to fame is their olive oil and it is said that Harrod’s only stock oil from here. Motoring between Levkas and Megasini was very pretty and there were several ‘Sound’ like bays in the south of Megasini which we motored around before anchoring in a bay called Makro Nisopoula. Swimming was now compulsory and the water was beautiful. In the meantime Graeme was busy practising his Greek on all who would listen and with his strong ‘Strine’ accent, it was often not a pretty conversation. Cephalonia was a beautiful interlude; for those of you who have seen Captain Corelli’s Mandolin, this is where it was filmed. We were in a bay called Ay Eufimia and after talking to some other yachties, went ashore and hired two motorbikes to tour the island. Bob got a 125cc two-wheeler and Graeme and I had a quad nanna bike. It was great fun as we traversed most of the island. We visited the Robola Co-op Winery and during a tasting asked for their best wine assuming it would be a red but were told that we could not taste it as it was too expensive but we could buy it. We stocked up with two of their best, two rose and two whites plus some other little treats, stowed them in our seats and packs and continued on our merry way. Later that evening while having just a few drinks on shore we asked if the taverna had our special wine because we thought it might be good to try it. Yes, they did, but explained that it wasn’t cold to which of course we replied that in Australia and New Zealand, we don’t drink our reds cold and after very many puzzled looks were told but it’s a white wine (in a black bottle)!! We finally got over that when I announced to the boys that it was time to think about tea and pronounced the time to puzzled looks from the locals and the Poms – we were still on Croatia time! They all got quite a laugh out of us and many drinks later we could see the funny side too (a ‘you had to be there’ situation). The boys were not feeling too good the next morning and it was slow going as we made our way to a beautiful anchorage at the bottom of Ithaca called Ay Andreas for a lunch pick and then on to Vathi for the night. The Corinth Canal was calling so we headed for Patras in the Gulf of Patras on the north-west of the Peloponnisos Peninsula. We went straight into the marina and paid our 50 Euros for two nights. We also had to get a DEKPA (A Traffic Document valid for 50 ports of call that should be presented


turkey on Jemmaroo to Port Police to stamp on entering and leaving each port – Ed.) The Dekpa situation was not yet finished however – we had a receipt but no book as this had to be issued by the Port Authority – talk about a long winded process. We locked the boat and set off in a hire car for Olympia, the site of the original Olympics, and while taking in the sights were greeted with “G’day Graeme”. It was Paul and Judy Yarwood from Phantom who were on a cruise and doing one of the side trips offered – a very small world. Up and down the mountains we drove and across the Peninsula to Tripoli and then Nafplio on the south east coast. It was a beautiful old town with a castle and a fort on a little island offshore. We did the usual two streets back for a restaurant and had a great meal and drinks and then while wandering back to the hotel were shouted drinks at another restaurant – a good night. We decided to drive across the Corinth Canal to get a feel for it and were over it before we realized – blink and you would miss it. We paid our toll and drove back, a bit slower this time in order to get a couple of photos. The guide book told us all about a funicular railway from the coast to a ski resort in the mountains and we thought this sounded like a good trip. We finally found the town and the railway station to discover it only ran on weekends and it was only Wednesday. We drove up instead – a long way on very windy roads for a cup of coffee! After another stop we arrived at the western entrance to the Corinth Canal about 12.45pm on 29 May and went through at 1.30pm in company with a 62’ Contest, a beautiful Dutch built yacht. We paid our fee on the eastern end of the Canal and both set sail for Aegina where we anchored off as the marina and sea wall were full. Deciding to give Athens we anchored in a bay on the mainland called Sounion on the south east tip of the peninsula. On the top of the cape is a Temple of Poseidon from 444BC – very picturesque. Lots of boats came in and as the night progressed we found out why – it got quite blowy. From here we sailed into the North Cyclades to an island called Kea for a lunch pick, and at the local taverna inspected all the pots on the stove and chose our meal – delicious. We anchored for the night at Ormos Filiodha on the island of Nithos Kithnos. Serifos in the Middle Cyclades was our next destination and after a good but rare sail, we anchored at Livadhi. It was a beautiful anchorage with the ‘hora’ on the hill above the bay (the capital). We caught the local bus up and it was quite exciting as it negotiated all the switchbacks. It was a very old town with very few and mainly very old residents. We visited the island of Sifnos before having a great sail to Naxos. A little too good as it turned out – we were often doing over 12 knots and first the headsail furling line broke and while setting up a jury rig for it, the headsail flogged a bit and eventually it tore down the seam near the UV protection strip – 30 knots and the sail flogging everywhere – not pretty. We finally got it sorted and dropped anchor off Naxos about 2pm. We had planned to hire a car to tour the island but the best laid plans do go awry. The wind would not let up and we were unable to take the sail off so

we stayed on board and hunkered down. The wind had dropped sufficiently the next morning to replace the No 1 with the No 3 and dinghy into town. It was a lovely spot and we were sorry to have to leave so quickly but we had commitments – we had forgotten the cruising rule again – don’t make commitments. We had a great sail to Mykonos, the No 3 worked a treat and we dropped anchor in the southern bay of Ormos Ornos and caught a taxi into the main town of Mykonos. It is a very interesting, cosmopolitan, expensive little town and there were three cruise ships in town. We wandered around and eventually had dinner at a restaurant on the waterfront in an area called Little Venice. There were three Aussie boats anchored around us in the bay, the most we saw at any one time, and after chatting with a couple of them we moved and dropped the pick outside where we had dinner in order to have breakfast – very spekky. The island of Andros was next and in Batsi where we anchored there were more tavernas per head of population than I have ever seen; there was even a Koala Restaurant. The tourist places are doing it pretty tough in the Med as people are just not travelling and there would often be twenty tavernas for twenty customers. We were having a guest on board – a Greek friend of Bob’s whom he met when cruising through Tonga. We anchored off Rafina, a town on the mainland, to wait for Ari’s bus from Thessaloniki and, after picking him up, anchored off the island of Xero. Our next passage was between the mainland and the long island of Evia. You pass under a large suspension bridge that joins the two and a bit further north you have to go through an opening bridge which is only 25 metres long. Kanithos is the town on the mainland side and Khalkis is on the Evia side. We paid our bridge dues and waited to be called to go through. The bridge is only opened during the night and the time is determined by the tide as it comes from both directions and you have to wait for it to ebb. We finally received our call at 3.15am and they opened the bridge and we passed through at 3.30am in line with four other boats. We anchored in a bay on the northern side to have a good sleep. Most of the bays on this side of the passage were too deep to anchor in so we kept going to a bay called Ormos Yiali. It was still quite deep but it was calm so all was fine. After crossing Stenon Trikeri we called into a bay called Ayia Kiriaki where we tied up to the sea wall. We were having lunch at a nearby taverna and watched in horror as the wake from a large ferry miles away eventually worked its way into the bay and Jemmaroo had a merry dance on the sea wall. We had fendered extensively and all was okay but it didn’t look good so we finished our lunch and left to find a secure anchorage for the night. We find anchoring off to be best as it is the more pleasant and safer option in that you can swim and it ensures no damage on sea walls, etc. ...continued page 16

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croatia to turkey on Jemmaroo In Platania the boys had an adventure with Ouzo – very sore heads the next morning – will they ever learn. Next we anchored at Skiathos off the main town and dinghied into the Old Port area. It was great fun and we found a restaurant that Bob had been to seven years ago called the Mediterraneo Restaurant and the same waitress was also there. Our resident Greek, Ari, left us here and we made our way to Skopelos. This time we did the “anchor, back up and tie to a tree trick” in a long skinny bay called Panormou. The water was warm and clear, (in June/July mostly 25/26 degrees), and swimming was definitely compulsory. On going ashore we found the local bus and instead of motoring/sailing around to the town of Skopelos we caught the bus and saw a bit of the local countryside along the way. Time was getting tight so we made our way to the mainland to the middle of the three peninsulas in the north east of Greece called the Halkidiki Peninsula. We moored at Nea Marmaras at a marina finger; not very flash but with power and water included, it was definitely the right price – NIL. Here we hired a car and set off inland and west to an area called Meterora where there is the most awe-inspiring, fantastic setting of monasteries built on top of towering rock formations. We stayed at an adjacent town of Kalkiri and did a drive-past of the monasteries before having dinner at a great little taverna looking over the rocks. The next morning we toured the monasteries. The guys climbed up and down to two of them but I opted for one, the Transfiguration. It was the largest of the monasteries and had museums etc within. It was absolutely incredible and an area not to be missed on a trip to Greece. Time was awasting and we were due to pick up fellow Club member Dick Fidock at the Thessaloniki airport. We found that and Dick okay but managed to get thoroughly lost on our way back to Nea Marmara. We had dinner at a taverna on the beach about 100 metres from the boat and gave Dick time to have a good rest. Bob and I went grocery shopping and were entranced by the local butcher as he cut out the fillet of beef for us and then proceeded to bone out some chicken breasts – what an artisan.

We anchored overnight at a bay called Porto Koufo and the next day at Ormos Sikias, a bay with a long sandy beach. It was a three or four swim day but we are slowly learning that if the weather is such that this is what you feel like, then there is a weather change not far away and at about 10pm we started to roll and we were treated to a lightning and thunder show. We up-anchored at about 5am and moved to the other side of the bay to get a bit of sleep and when we eventually ventured outside the bay discovered it was still pretty horrible out there so we back tracked to Porto Koufo where things were much quieter. Once Dick left us (see Dick’s article pg 19 –Ed.) we left the west coast of the Gallipoli Peninsula to travel up the Dardenelles so after a motor past to look at the actual size of Anzac Cove from sea and then to Suvla Bay, we finally anchored at the Turkish town of Gelibolu (Gallipoli) in its northern bay. Together with Geoff Boettcher and Gus Weir who had joined us at Cannakale, we went ashore and caught the local bus into the centre of town and once again, the boys did not learn. The Sea of Marmara beckoned and we spent the next night at Turkeli on the west coast of an island called Avsa Adasi. It is a town catering to the Turkish tourist seemingly from Istanbul as there did not appear to be many foreigners around. We had a bit of a motor around the area with a lunch pick at Pasalimani on Pasalman Adasi and then approached the southern mainland coast in the Sea of Marmara. We poked our nose into one small fishing harbour before deciding it was a bit shallow and went another twoand-a-half miles to a harbour called Cakilkoy. The Pilot described it as a fishing harbour and that the natives were friendly and we would be able to find a spot to fit in. Fortunately the area within the sea wall was large, with huge steel fishing boats five and six deep and at all angles, so we dropped our pick in the middle of the remaining water. It must have looked quite odd to the locals but I don’t think they get too many visitors anyway. There was a wedding in progress on shore so we all went in for a look and a glass of tea – yes, tea. It was a very traditional country fishing village, and there was not a beer or wine in sight, so we made do!

Photos by Gay Footer

On the sea wall at Ayia Kiriaki

Temple to Poseidon, Sounion 16

Old lady at the ‘hora’

Greek fisher


From here we went to Bueyuekcekmece; what a contrast! It might have been a fishing village 30 years ago but today it is an outer suburb of Istanbul with parks and restaurants around the foreshore. We dinghied in and had a great lunch and a much smaller quiet dinner on shore. Geoff and Gus were flying out of Istanbul on 1 July so we made our way into the Bosphurous and did a motor up under the two suspension bridges to have a good look at the city from the sea. It was a fascinating motor with shipping going everywhere and approximately 100 merchant ships at anchor waiting. We pulled into our berth at Atakoy Marina where Jemmaroo is staying for the month of July at about 4pm on 30 June and proceeded to go through all the formalities. We were all a bit too tired to go sightseeing and have a big night out so we just found a restaurant near the marina and Bob, Geoff, Gus, Graeme and I had our last night together. Graeme and I flew out of Istanbul on 2 July leaving Bob in charge and we will hear about his land adventures in Bulgaria and Romania when we return in August. It was a wonderful adventure but somehow we seemed to be always rushing. It is hard to recognize from afar the distances involved and when you make commitments, you must keep going. We found that allowing 20nm per day is a reasonably comfortable pace. It is a great way to see the Mediterranean and I would urge those who can, to do this while you can, as you never know what is around the corner. Gay Footer

rmen

An Albanian stowaway

Monastery at Meteora

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The Blue Mosque, Istanbul, from the sea


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G

ay and Graeme Footer have their lovely 54 foot Jemmaroo in the Med and in July travelled from Greece into Turkey to visit the Gallipoli Peninsular where the ANZAC legend was forged in

1915.

POIGNANT MEMORIES OF ANZAC COVE

On board with them was long-time travelling bos’n Bob Culbert, a very experienced yachtie from New Zealand who had to deal with three raucous Vietnam vets, Graeme (Tankee), Geoff (Grunt) Boettcher, Gus (Dropshort) Weir, a close friend of Geoff’s, and myself. I joined Gay and Graeme at Thessaloniki after the usual 30 hour hop from Adelaide and with Bob, we had a glorious week travelling along the northern coast of Greece and into Turkey to meet Geoff and Gus in Cannakele in the Dardenelles. Jemmaroo is a Jeanneau fully equipped and set up immaculately by Graeme and Gay as a very comfortable and fast cruising yacht easily handled by two. My wife Helen had surprised me with my birthday present of tickets for the trip and with such comfort, how could we not have a memorable trip. Greece was very quiet in the little ports and islands we entered. The economy of Greece has been seriously affected by the downturn in tourism and often the cruising yachts appeared to be the only visitors. This however made our time less frenetic and led to days of sunshine, swimming, dining and of course a little drinking. One of the highlights was our trip to the Akti Peninsular which has existed for ten centuries as a world to itself. Peopled only by a holy community of about 2000 monks over twenty monasteries, some very large, the area for centuries has been banned to all except males and over the twenty miles of the rugged land are dotted the monasteries and sole hermit monk dwellings seemingly perched in the most inaccessible places. At the seaward end is Mount Athos, 7000 feet high and visible for many miles. Our introduction to Anzac was at the island of Limnos (Greek) where the invasion forces were assembled in the huge harbour of Moudhrou. This island became a staging port for sending supplies to the peninsular and evacuating the wounded to Egypt. The Allied War Cemetery maintained by the Australian War Graves Commission records many headstones of men as young as twenty who died after being taken from the mainland. From Limnos, we leisurely travelled along the Gallipoli peninsular, around Cape Helles into the Dardenelles to Cannakale at the Narrows where the British Navy had tried to bombard the forts and had to withdraw with some losses. Winston Churchill conceived the plan for the land invasion of the Gallipoli Peninsular and, while hindsight is a wonderful gift, one came away from Turkey with mixed views of the effectiveness of the whole operation. Here we picked up Geoff and Gus and, before leaving, did a side trip to the site of Troy from Homeric fame. Graeme’s intention was to anchor off Anzac Cove and land at dawn but the weather prevented this on the day and we met our guide at a small harbour not far from the Cove. The day left us all with poignant memories of the huge sacrifices of our Anzacs and the sometimes blind decisions which lost so many lives. Those who saw the film “Gallipoli” will remember the action at the Nek, where 600 of our boys were lost in an area about the size of four tennis courts. Almost 9000 Anzacs died from the action with close to 3000 at Lone Pine and we can never cease to admire the courage of the Australians and New Zealanders in their first serious fighting in the First World War. Ann Bone, an Adelaide friend of Gay and Graeme’s, made some Anzac Biscuits which she cryovacced and sent along with them so we nibbled on these while at Anzac Cove. The guide even had one and it made it all so much more personal and a lovely touch. I left Jemmaroo after the tour and returned after a few days in Istambul; a wonderful historic city of 22 million, tours such as the Bosphurous at sunset, the Topkapi Castle, home of the Sultans for centuries, and the Grand Bazaar with 4000 shops and willing and fun Turks who love to barter. My thanks to Graeme and Gay (who is really the Admiral) for happy times and lots of laughs. My admiration for Bob Culbert, the lone New Zealander who kept his end up in the face of at times some rough treatment from the Aussie crew. Dick Fidock 19


social Activities Association

Cheese and wine Tasting: A celebration of passion, art and science

F

ridays nights at the club are a whole new experience. One Friday night which we all enjoyed recently was the “Cheese and Wine Tasting” Kim Richards a noted Cheese Master and judge enthralled us with his tales about the different cheeses, its history and most of all the taste. We had a selection of the soft, from single to triple creams, the hard, the fruity and the blue. SA has many local cheese factories and we are “up there” with the worlds best. Try the Central Market for the different varieties. Our own Mario supplied the wines from behind our bar to sip with the cheese and bikkies. I came away with a “loved that one but not sure about this”, much the same as 54 members who attended. It was a great night of nibbling and sipping, so if you would like to sample the same, look for the date in June 2010. The raffle from the night raised $400. Some interesting tips : 1

Serving Cheese: With the exception of fresh cheeses, which should be kept cold until serving time, you should let cheeses get to room temperature before serving. The warmer temperature brings out the flavour of the cheese. Try not to cut too much – smaller pieces of leftover cheese will dry out faster when returned to the refrigerator. Tired of trying a new cheese at your local cheese shop, only to purchase a wedge, put it in your refrigerator, and never have it taste the same again? Keep in a covered container in your refrigerator on a clean, dry, lightly crumpled paper towel or two, leaving a little breathing room. Similar cheeses can be stored together as long as they don’t touch. You can use plastic webbing, or the mats they use to roll up sushi, to stack in layers and still allow airspace. Left over cheese (or bulk buy) can be frozen in plastic. To thaw, remove from freezer to fridge in the plastic bag, and leave for 24 hours. Best Cheeses to Freeze: Camembert, Cheddar, Edam, Mozzarella, Muenster, Parmesan, Port du Salut, Provolone, Romano, and Swiss. Blue Cheese will retain its flavour, but become crumbly. Soft cheeses should be frozen once they reach the desired ripeness. Preparing for Freezing: Hard and semi-hard cheeses can be grated, sliced or cut into blocks for freezing. Hard cheese grates well when it’s frozen2. Sandra Richards, Social Activities Association 1 Australian Specialist Cheesemakers’ Association, www.australiancheese.org 2 www.wikihow.com/Store-Cheese-Successfully-at-Home

Commo

T

he one formal function the club holds each year certainly proved to be a very classy affair. The entrance to the function room was shrouded with black organza giving the feel of entering into a Bedouin tent. Silk banners were strung across the ceiling with their beautiful colours echoed in the table decorations below. Strings of sequins, bells and beads adorned the candelabra set on silk squares again decorated with gold bells and sequins. Each table also had a colourful centerpiece of an embroidered camel which added to the effect of the room. Guests were presented to the Mayor, Mr. Gary Johanson1 and his wife Vicky, Commodore Peter Page and wife Barbara, President John Gerard and wife Sue, Flag Officers Chris Morphett and Rob Sellick with their respective wives Rosalie and Jayne. The Social Activities Committee got into the spirit of the night by dressing to theme, as did Mario Cataldi, Terry Denham and Vlad Humeniuk. With the formality of the speeches underway, John Gerard introduced Peter Page to the floor for one last speech. This was a very poignant moment as it was one of Peter’s last as our Commodore. Then at last, the moment we had been waiting for; the Arabesque Belly Dancers were breathtaking in the way they presented themselves. Starting at the entrance of the function room they spent some time dancing at each table so that everybody had the opportunity to see them practice their art close up. After a couple of routines, the girls ‘invited’ Peter Page and John Gerard to the floor as their dancing partners. The girls had the men tied up with their silk scarves which entertained the crowd to no end. Even the mayor was not spared! Somewhat reluctantly, the men returned to their seats to watch the remainder of the show. The dancers were absolutely spectacular – they kept the guests totally spellbound for the 20 minutes they were on stage. Particular recognition goes to Dorian and his staff for the brilliant menu provided. I heard many, many fantastic comments about the meal and my own entrée of Moroccan Chicken with Avocado, Fattouche2 and Pomegranate Molasses was stunning! Well done also to Michelle and the waiting staff for swift service to all 140 guests and also to Mario and the bar staff; fantastic job - thank you. I believe the club is very fortunate to have a wonderful team of staff that is so professional; this was certainly reflected at the Commodores Dinner. Another highlight of the night was the reappearance of the Queens of Clean. Once again, the generosity of the guests was staggering with $1085 being raised for the Flotilla for Kids. Luckily for the Committee, the winner of this year’s raffle was not Stuart Marshall and his 50ft Kiama but a slightly smaller Beneteau 34, Shiraz from the Royal South Australian Yacht Squadron. Shiraz is owned by Stephen and Sharon Bone who were delighted that one of their crew, Malcolm Cleggett, bought the winning raffle ticket; well done. The Queens will be cleaning Shiraz at the main pontoon by the walkway at an appointed time before Open Day; stay tuned for further details. The ‘other’ raffle for the night was held a little later with special appearance by Leica Theodore; many thanks to Port river Marine Service and Leica for driving this raffle, your assistance was much appreciated. The main prize, a very large camel (same as the table decorations but much bigger) was won by none other than Craig Evans. In typical Craig style, he immediately put it to auction. Bidding was fiercely intense towards the end. Craig Westlake was pipped at the post by Marty Heffernan who insisted the camel he won was to stay at the Evans’ house for 12 months; sorry Craig, you were meant to have that camel! The band ‘A Train’ was very, very good and appealed particularly to the people present; we most certainly would recommend them for similar functions. It was a wonderful night enjoyed by all. I would like to thank, not only the hard working committee but also Vlad Humeniuk and Marty Heffernan for tying the silk fabric exactly where Pam Humeniuk pointed her whip ….. oops finger! Finally, of particular note is the fine, quality work Trevor Paynter has consistently provided for our functions; thank you Trevor and also Tom Tymons for producing invitations of such high quality. Jacq Heffernan, Chair Social Activities Association Editor’s Note of Port Adelaide Enfield 2Salad made using Arabic bread 1Mayor

20


dore’s Dinner

John Gerard and Peter Page getting tied up

Even the Mayor got in on the act

Peter Page relishing the moment

Queens of Clean Pam and raflle winner Malcolm Cleggett

Committee and partners

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AUCKLAND BOUND! A

fter a significant refit G-Wizz has commenced a new chapter as a short-handed racer and skipper Greg Patten has a long-term goal of competing in the 2011 Melbourne to Osaka race. In preparation for this significant ocean race Greg and Jeremy Barnes expect to depart from the CYCSA in September and set a non-stop two-handed record from Adelaide to Auckland. “No one has ever attempted it before” says Greg “and the course will enable us to gain valuable experience in sailing Southern Ocean swells and navigating the East Australian current.”

An added challenge for the G-Wizz record attempt is that the World Sailing Speed Record Council only records fully-crewed attempts of this nature. Greg and Jeremy will have to work extremely hard to minimise their elapsed time, as a fully-crewed yacht could legitimately challenge the G-Wizz time sometime in the future; an entirely different concept to long ocean passage double-handed racing, where all yachts are crewed by the same number of people.

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Most likely the route will see G-Wizz heading through Bass Strait and the Tasman Sea before rounding the northern tip of New Zealand and travelling down the east coast of the North Island to Auckland. Greg’s enthusiasm for sailing on his new-look Wizzer is undeniable “In setting the record we hope to provide a ratified benchmark so that other yachts may attempt to better the time in the future” he said. “Our aim at the moment is to arrive in Auckland by late September which will allow us to compete in their annual Coastal Classic, a legendary race down to the Bay of Islands; last year more than 230 yachts started that race but only 30 finished so that should be a challenge as well!”

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Some of the Wizzer’s regular crew, including Greg’s son Heath, will expand crew numbers when they join the two-handers in New Zealand for a stint of local racing, before bringing the Murray Inglis home. It is anticipated that G-Wizz will arrive back in Adelaide prior to the commencement of our summer racing season.

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22


The Great Treasure Hunt

O

ur winter Boating Friday was held on July 17 at the CYCSA. The title of ‘The Great Treasure Hunt’ attracted much interest and our highest ever attendance was achieved. On the night, 80 meals were served, much to the delight of the organisers. A fine buffet meal was enjoyed by all. Our speaker Paul Lunn enthralled us all with the story of a real life treasure hunt. Paul is a South Australian identity in the diving industry, through his involvement with The Adelaide Skin Diving Centre in the 1980s and 90s and has held positions with many diving bodies. His greatest tale to tell however was of a Spanish galleon wrecked and sunk on 2nd of June 1690. Try pronouncing the name of the ship Nuestra Senora Del Pilar De Saragosa Y Santiago: that’s a feat in itself. Paul spoke for nearly one hour on how he risked everything he owns on probably the greatest treasure hunt ever. We heard of monsoons, financial ruin, international court battles, an unfortunate death and disappointment: the story still has no ending. After the break Paul spent a little time telling of his latest business venture ‘SharkShield’. Then he and business partner and partner in treasure hunting, John Bent answered questions on their great quest. A great night was had, and money once again was raised for the Marine Academy through our regular raffle. This time a mini treasure chest of wine and chocolate was raffled. After a syndicate from the bar staff won the first prize, it was fantastic to see it re-donated and auctioned off to the highest bidder. Thanks to Mario and the crew for this generosity. Thank you also to Michelle and the chef for a great night. Our next Boating Friday is to be on October 23 and is titled ‘Get Started Racing’ with speaker Stuart Ross. Winter has been quiet for the Marine Academy, as other interests take hold, but a lot has been happening. Initiatives include the design of a Boating Safety Course where we can examine for the SA State Boating Licence; a Coxswains Training Program facilitated through the Club, and the recruitment of instructors to take over many instructing roles this coming season. All these foci will assist us to grow the Academy into the future.

Speaker Paul Lunn and business partner, John Bent answered questions on their great quest.

I look forward to a very busy summer on the water and around the club and hope to see you at the CYCSA soon. Brett Yardley, Marine Academy Coordinator

cruising Association

see back o f address c a r r ier for ca su rvey

F

ollowing the recent Associations Annual General Meeting a new committee has been elected to the Cruising Association Keith Degenhardt (Deputy Chair), Robert Perrin (Secretary), Martyn Heffernan (Treasurer), Terry Denham, Roger Flint, Michelle Manton, Anja Richards, Phil Richards and Len Stephens. We have a full and enthusiastic committee and are looking forward to many cruising events over the summer ahead. Every long weekend we will have at least one organised cruise to some destination and often more than one departure time. There are no fees for the Cruising Association, just be involved, we welcome both power and sail boat owners.

other members with like interests; come and make your self known. Please note we have both sailing and power boat members at our functions. This year we will be organising Sunday activity cruises weather permitting on barbecue weekends to encourage members to get out there and enjoy themselves and their boat. The second Saturday of December, that is the 12th will be the CYCSA Christmas function when we will be combining with the Social Committee and are looking forward to a special event.

We are looking forward to increasing our on water activities and encouraging members to get out there. We will have a pre-departure meeting so that any members can introduce themselves and get any information they may need.

We are putting together a member survey to give members the opportunity to make suggestions and look forward to your input.

We will be having monthly barbecues in the club barbecue area on the second Saturday of the month commencing September 12th and look forward to seeing many members there. These are casual bring your own food and drink events and are an excellent opportunity to meet

Good Cruising. John Sibly, Chair Cruising Association

23


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24


Club Calendar October – December Dates

Club Events

Cruising Assoc.

Fishing Assoc. Social Act. Assoc. Racing Assoc.

3/10/09 Saturday Cruise Port Vincent/Dinner 4/10/09 Sunday Group A. depart Friday Night 5/10/09 Monday Labour Day Public Holiday Group B. depart Saturday 9/10/09 Friday 10/10/09 Saturday Saturday BBQ Club Inshore Series Race 1, 2 11/10/09 Sunday Sunday Challenge 16/10/09 Friday Mouse Cup 17/10/09 Saturday Offshore Series Race 1 Orontes Coaster Series Race 1 Combined IRC Race 1 18/10/09 Sunday 21/10/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 1 22/10/09 Thursday 23/10/09 Friday Boating Friday Ladies Friday Twilight Series Race 1 24/10/09 Saturday Competent Crew Course Fishing Competition Club Inshore Series Race 3, 4 Queen of the Gulf Race 1, 2 Commodore’s Shield Race 1 SA IRC Championships Race 1, 2 Combined IRC Race 2, 3 25/10/09 Sunday Competent Crew Course 28/10/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 2 29/10/09 Thursday 30/10/09 Friday Offshore Series Race 2 Haystack Is SA IRC Championships Race 3 31/10/09 Saturday Coaster Series Race 2 1/11/09 Sunday 4/11/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 3 7/11/09 Saturday Safety & Sea Survival Course 8/11/09 Sunday Safety & Sea Survival Course Environmental Sunday & SS 11/11/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 4 14/11/09 Saturday Club Opening Day 18/11/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 5 20/11/09 Friday Boating Showcase 21/11/09 Saturday Club Inshore Series Race 5, 6 Premier’s Cup Regatta Race 1, 2 J24 Southern Cross Cup Race 1, 2 SA IRC Championships Race 4, 5 Combined IRC Race 4, 5 22/11/09 Sunday Club Inshore Series Race 7, 8 Premier’s Cup Regatta Race3, 4 J24 Southern Cross Cup Race 3, 4 23/11/09 Monday 25/11/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 6 26/11/09 Thursday 27/11/09 Friday Ladies Friday Twilight Series Race 2 Sydnet to Hobart Dinner 28/11/09 Saturday Club Inshore Series Race 9 SA IRC Championships Race 6 Combined IRC Race 6 29/11/09 Sunday 2/12/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 7 3/12/09 Thursday 5/12/09 Saturday Offshore Series Race 3 Mac/Sound Coaster Series Race 3 6/12/09 Sunday Kids Christmas Party 9/12/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 8 10/12/09 Thursday 11/12/09 Friday Ladies Friday Twilight Series Race 3 12/12/09 Saturday Club Inshore Series Race 10 Commodore’s Shield Race 2 Club Christmas Party 13/12/09 Sunday 16/12/09 Wednesday Twilight Series pre-Christmas Race 9 25/12/09 Friday Christmas Day 26/12/09 Saturday Cruise to Kangaroo Island 27/12/09 Sunday via Cutter Patch or Wirrina 28/12/09 Monday Proclamation Day 29/12/09 Tuesday 30/12/09 Wednesday 31/12/09 Thursday New Year’s Eve, Island Beach 1/01/10 Friday New Year’s Day Ballast Head Regatta 2/01/10 Saturday Cruise to Robe, Port Fairy or Port Lincoln 25


Cruising the South Pacific

with the Island Cruising Association

ndrea and I sailed our 48 foot steel Van de Stadt yacht Diomedea amongst the islands of the South Pacific during the winter of 2008. After leaving Sydney to cross the Tasman Sea in April, Diomedea arrived in Opua in the Bay of Islands where we met John and Lyn Martin, directors of the Island Cruising Association. We had joined the ICA so that we could participate in a rally from New Zealand to Tonga in May. We were provided with a wealth of information and support prior to departure from Opua, including seminars on weather, safety, passage making, boat preparation and so forth. Membership of ICA also provided significant discounts on chandlery and other purchases. Our clearance out of New Zealand was made very easy and quick. Duty free food, alcohol and fuel purchases were facilitated. We arrived in Tonga some six days later and anchored at the beautiful Pangaimotu Island near the capital of Tonga. All clearing in procedures were done very speedily on the island as opposed to having to tie up to the filthy, rough and rat infested docks of the harbour. The ICA had organised for the officials to come to us. A series of social events allowed us to begin establishing friendships that would last for the next six months and some of them for much longer. We also soon learned of the skill base available in the fleet of 20 yachts, giving us a sense of security should things go pear shaped. Cruising through the archipelago of Tonga was done independently for all participants but the option of meeting up at various anchorages was always available if desired. There was no fixed agenda when “in country”. Real insider advice pertaining to the islands was given during chart marking sessions As we had to meet friends in Fiji, we left Tonga independently and what had now become the Pacific Circuit Rally followed us about a week later. In Savusavu, the rally organisers gave us a one hour practical on how to do “sevusevu” with local chiefs in the villages we were to visit. Highly entertaining and useful. We eventually regrouped with the rally at Musket Cove in western Fiji in July in preparation for the passage to Vanuatu.

Our week at Musket Cove was marvellous with organised and impromptu social events. Group activities such as scuba diving became easily achievable. Customs clearance was again smoothed with the ICA bringing out the relevant officials to the island, sparing us the considerable bother of having to sail back to the mainland. Diomedea sailed to the island of Tanna in Vanuatu. Here, entry was streamlined by officials coming to Port Resolution rather than us spending a ghastly day bouncing in the tray of a 4WD across the island. We then had a marvellous cruise the length of Vanuatu, sporadically meeting rally boats at delightful tradewind anchorages. The jewel in the crown of ICA organisation was yet to reveal itself however. With the rally increased to 39 boats, we departed Port Vila for the island of Ouvea 180nm away in the French Loyalty group of New Caledonia. Ouvea is not a clearance port but for us it all happened and we could stay at this, the most beautiful of all South Pacific destinations. Normally cruisers have to go to the capital Noumea, 2-3 days away. Those wishing to cruise Ouvea and nearby islands then have to make the return trip. Alas, our stay in French waters was limited and time came for Diomedea to return to Australia. We said our farewells to our friends and had an easy five day passage from Noumea to Coffs Harbour, arriving in early October. Those that remained in New Caledonia cruised around the Grand Terre and then down to Ile de Pins before heading for either New Zealand or Australia. The leg to New Zealand was an “All Points” rally with cash/goods prizes at the end. The mix of yachts in the rally was interesting. About half were New Zealand registered. Of these, most were just having six months off but some were using the rally as a springboard into their world circumnavigation. Of the other half, a few were from Australia. The rest were from all over the world, having arrived in NZ as part of their ongoing circumnavigation. Boats from the UK, Europe and the US were well represented.

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Would I go with Island Cruising Association again in the future? Absolutely. Was it cost effective? Beyond doubt. Was it fun? You bet.

David and Andrea McKay are medical practitioners based in Sydney. Diomedea is their second yacht and has previously done trips to Lord Howe Island, Flinders Island in Bass Strait, along the coast as far as the Whitsundays, as well as competing in the 2005 Sydney to Hobart race.

Whilst one could do this entire cruise independently, Andrea and I felt that the Cruise in Company method worked particularly well. At an organisational level, a great deal of time and angst was saved. Costs were reduced in many areas. Advice and support was readily available and made many things achievable for us, being relative novices to cruising in these waters. Personally, I learned a great deal from John and Lyn, as well as from other rally participants. The camaraderie was fantastic. One night Diomedea came into Havannah Harbour after a 75nm leg to windward in 25 knot winds. Rather to our surprise, a dinghy from one of the rally boats quickly appeared at our stern, and we were whisked over for a BBQ that was already in progress: the perfect coda1 for a hard day’s sailing. We partied until late before a good sleep. Would I go with Island Cruising Association again in the future? Absolutely. Was it cost effective? Beyond doubt. Was it fun? You bet. Details about ICA can be found at: www.islandcruising.co.nz See our blog for some pictures from our trip: www.sailblogs.com/member/diomedea/ David McKay DavidLMcKay@bigpond.com Editor’s Note: 1Coda from a Latin word meaning “tail,” refers not only to the conclusion of a musical composition but also to an ending in general

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CYCSA FEEs for 2009/2010 Membership Subscriptions Senior Pt Vincent Senior (Absentee) Member Member (Absentee) Racing (includes RPF) Intermediate Junior Racing Participation fee Fishing Assocation fee Entrance

$692 $620 $352 $386 $197 $386 $214 $63 $87 $22 $420

All fees are inclusive of GST Members have the option to pay by monthly direct debit transactions Pro rata fees are applicable if you join after 1 September 2009 Included within Racing Participation Fee is membership of the Racing Association NB This fee is non refundable and cannot be pro rated

Maintenance Fees Marina Berths (Pt Vincent) 10 metre twin 12 metre single 12 metre twin 14 metre single 15 metre single 16 metre single 18 metre single 20 metre single 24 metre ‘T’ head 24 metre single 30 metre single

$1,191 $1,711 $1,595 $2,006 $2,127 $2,235 $2,571 $2,803 $3,069 $3,344 $4,181

Maintenance Fees

Slipping Fees

Marina Berths (North Haven) 8 metre single $1,380 8 metre twin $1,271 10 metre single $1,682 10 metre twin $1,541 11 metre twin $1,678 12 metre single $1,962 12 metre twin $1,820 13 metre single $2,145 13 metre twin $1,921 14 metre single $2,297 15 metre single $2,436 16 metre single $2,598 17 metre single $2,741 18 metre single $2,896 20 metre single $3,201 21 metre single $3,352 22 metre single $3,500 23 metre single $3,653 24 metre single $3,745 25 metre single $3,895 27 metre single $4,192 30 metre single $4,725 35 metre single $5,548

Cradle Lift & Back Small $120 Medium $220 Large $315

Hardstanding Berths (North Haven) 9 metre hardstand $918 10 metre hardstand $1,162 12 metre hardstand $1,449

Daily Rate $29 $42 $52

Wash Off Fees (within 1 hour) Small $115 Med/Large $145 Environmental Levy Gernie Hire

$20

$46

Use Slip Space on Own Cradle $40/week Club Permanent Cradle

$10/day

Sundry Charges Launch and retrieve vessels on hardstand $72.60 each way Slip and wash off: • Move vessel from marina to slip $57 • Labour to wash off bottom of vessel $80/hour • Return Vessel to berth $57 • Towing $100 each way • Hourly rate for any vessel which cannot be started promptly (eg flat battery, no keys etc) $80 Note – all slipping charges are inclusive of GST Replacement Gate Cards

$33

Annual Boat Ramp Pass CYCSA member

$120

Sail Storage • single rack $280 • double rack $560 • triple rack $845

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1

Crossword 3 Crossword 3 2 3 Crossword 33

2

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6

6 6

8

3

9

9

10

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14 14

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22

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30

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18

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Across Across

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37

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40

Down Down

Down

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27

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11

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Answers to crossword that appeared in Groundswell June 2009

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1. Large anchor only in emergency 1. Large used only in emergency 1. Large anchor used onlyanchor inused emergency to cold 2. Exposure to cold 2. Exposure 2. toExposure cold 3. to Allow a freely linea to feed freelyfreely 3.feed Allow line to feed 3. Allow a line 5. Speed measure 5. Speed measure 5. Speed measure Disturbed waterwater 6. Disturbed 6. Disturbed6. water 7. Steering station 7. Steering station 7. Steering station 10. Wise movemove 10. Wise 10. Wise move 12.watch Graveyard watchwatch 12. Graveyard 12. Graveyard 13. Moves over top oftop water 13. of Moves of water 13. Moves over top waterover 15. Popular fun and food Club 15. Popular fun foodatday at Club 15. Popular fun and food day at and Clubday 17. Twin hulled vessel 17. Twin hulled vessel 17. Twin hulled vessel 18. Attract attention in an emergency 18.toAttract attention in an emergency 18. Attract attention in300 an megahertz emergency 22. 30 22. 30 tocall 300 megahertz 22. 30 to 30023. megahertz Distress 23. Distress 23. Distress 25. callSteers boat call 25. Steers 25. Steers boat 27. Holds downboat the boom 27. Holds 27. Holds down the boom down the boom 28. Fuel 28. Fuel 28. Fuel 30. Water ….. 30. Water ….. detection system 30. Water ….. 32. Electromagnetic 32. Electromagnetic system 32. Electromagnetic detection system 33. Away from direction ofdetection wind Away 35.direction A33. light spar 33. Away from offrom winddirection of wind 37. Direction towards 35. A light spar which current is flowing 35. A light spar 37. Direction towards 37. Direction towards which current is which flowingcurrent is flowing

Answers to appear in the next edition of Groundswell. Puzzle questions and answer contributions are welcome from readers. Please send to Groundswell editors via the Club office – email reception@cycsa.com.au 1

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1.1.Lazarette - ….. space Lazarette - …..storage storage space arette - ….. storage space 2.2.For Forhoisting hoistingsails sails hoisting sails 4.4.Jammed Jammed mmed 6.6.Movement water Movement through water vement through water through 8.8.Directly Directly - ….Astern Astern ectly aft - …. Astern aftaft- …. 9.9.Dinghy Dinghy mooringline line ghy mooring line mooring 11. Speed over 11. ground Speed overthe theground ground eed over the 14. western (2)(2) 14.Club's Club's westernbase base b's western base (2) 16. Lifejacket jacket 16. Lifejacket Total 19.boat Totallength lengthofofboat boat al length19. of 20. Sail material 20.Cleaning Sail material material21. up Club on ............. Sunday 21. Cleaning up Club on ............. Sunday aning up24. Club on Sunday On the............. beam 24.Measures On the beam the beam 26. distances on charts 26.Make Measures distances asures distances on charts 29. of boat engine on charts 29. Makestaple of boat ke of boat engine 31. F36’s dietengine – French …. 31. F36’s staple ’s staple34. diet – French ….diet – French …. Compass direction 34.Fasten Compass direction mpass direction 36. sheets 36.Part Fasten sheets ten sheets 38. of the standing rigging 38.An Part oflady theofstanding t of the standing rigging 39. old the Clubrigging - ….. Jane 39. AnClub old lady the Club - ….. Jane Stormsail old lady 40. of the - …..ofJane etc 40.Ropes Stormsail rmsail 41.

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Berths for sale or lease FOR SALE Marina Berth 8 metre twin: 10 metre single: 10 metre twin: 11 metre twin: 12 metre single: 12 metre twin: 13 metre single: 14 metre single: 15 metre single: 16 metre single: 20 metre single:

C05, F01 A07 A14, A23, A31, F04, F18 A41 D26, D33 D27, E13, E26 D01 A46, C28 B22, B31, B35, B36 B18 K06 (Marina West)

$66,000 $100,000 from $63,000 $75,000 from $110,000 from $85,000 $150,000 from $170,000 from $150,000 $205,000 $240,000

Hardstanding Berths  9 metre: 10 metre: 12 metre:

18, 25, 52, 54, 60, 71, 73, 83 from $6,000 33, 133, 134, 140, 144, 146 from $7,500 111, 115, 127 $10,000

FOR LEASE Marina East Berths 8 metre twin: 10 metre twin: 11 metre single: 12 metre single: 12 metre twin: 13 metre single 14 metre single 15 metre single: 16 metre single: 18 metre single:

C05, C10 available for sub-lease A14, A28, F30 (available for sub-lease) C14 E22 D38, E12, E15, E26* D01* C28, C29, C30, C31 A47, B22, B36 B18* (B19 available from Dec 09 for 12 mths) B04

Marina West Berths Note: All berths in the Marina West development are single berths 12 metre: M05 15 metre: M08 17 metre: J04, J10, J13, J14, J18, J19, J20 18 metre: M10 20 metre: K01, K02, K05, K07, K08 22 metre: K18 30 metre: K16

Hardstanding Berths 9 metre: 10 metre:

50, 65, 70, 83* 130, 133, 139

For up-to-date information on all sales and leasing, log on to the Club website www.cycsa.com.au or contact Jenny Krogdahl for sales or Laura Cowley for leasing at the CYCSA office on 8248 4222. As per the Marina Berth Agreement, a 10% commission is payable by the vendor on all berth sales. As of 22 October 2007 Board meeting - If you are selling your berth and buying a berth of equal or greater value then your berth sale may be subject to a 5% commission payable to the Club (in lieu of 10%). This will be at the discretion of Management. The sale and purchase must be effected on the same day.

PORT VINCENT For berth leasing at Port Vincent please contact Rob Marner (Port Vincent Marina Manager) on 0414 611 110.

CYCSA Port Vincent leasing rates

For berth leasing overnight, weekly and during offpeak times, the Club will lease out berths with the owners agreement, at the owner’s rates below. O/night Weekly Off-peak weekly 10mt $25 $125 $60 12m $30 $150 $80 14ms $40 $200 $110 15ms $45 $225 $125 18ms $55 $275 $145 20ms $60 $300 $160 22ms $65 $325 $175 24ms $70 $350 $190 30ms $80 $400 $200

FOR SALE

Port Vincent Berths 12mt: 12ms: 14ms: 15ms: 20ms: (*also for

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C60 B25, C48, C68 D70, D71, D73 D83, D84, D85, D86, D87, D89 A12, B35 sale)

$42,000 from $49,000 from $70,000 from $50,000 $200,000


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Groundswell Magazine September 2009