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Manchester Development Plan 1951, (draft) Report of Survey This report has been digitised by Joe Blakey and Martin Dodge from the Department of Geography, University of Manchester. The digitisation was supported by the Manchester Statistical Society’s Campion Fund. Permission to digitise and release the report under Creative Commons license was kindly granted by Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives, Manchester City Council. (Email: archiveslocalstudies@manchester.gov.uk) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. 6 September 2013.


'

T101 1331

. .~!-P)

WRITTEN ANALYSIS 1

CONTEN i1S

..Li.st Of Ivlaps ~ List of Diagrams List of 'l'abl es Liut e f Apper1di c e ~

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' PAR'l' A : -·------__;._.t--

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·.• .

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...

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...

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· · General Description of Area Physical"·. ., .• Regional I .nportance • .• Historical B a ckg round. and Gr.ovith Fu~cti o ns ' of . the City .• •

:eage · 1 . J

1 2 3

•·

5 5 6

8

. Summary oj' Main Problems Revealed 10 l?..Y...l?.121.'.Y.~- and )'rOJ.?OSals Put FOrYfard ' l

PAflT

c: -

Analysis of Surv ey Information, Problems Revealed and Solution$ rropos~9 .~~~~~~~~~~~~·

c

1.. . L·- nnd . Use ·- ··

- - ~ --: ·--·

C - 2.

Gen e r el

14

A&~ .- QQ.~ __9cr!::~di ti o r~

of_ l~ ~!_ilding~Age Buildings • Condi ti cm of Buildin gs • · .A.nci ent Monwnents . • .· • • Buildings o f . Special Architectural or h istor:i:c a_l Iriteres~ .

of

1'7 •

17

20 21 ·· ·

c

c

4.

C -

5.

• and Redevelopment.

. ~~9J..Q. .finti~L,.;g_ev~lopment

.

A s s est;:;ment. ·of Hou s ing N e e.ds, •. ,• As sessm ent of Hous e Building Capacity lious i:rig Pr ogr a.111ne • • • • ·standaI'ds for Residenti al. Development and Hed ev.8lopment. • • • • Re dev elopment Proposal s • O v~rspill. • .• • •

c -. .6 ·•.

19

23 26

27 30

31 33

35

' :

E:x:is ting Condit iqns and }1iai:i P po);)l ems . '• Present and Future Industrial Structure ·• • •. Pr·oposed Space· st ondards • , • U_J. tima~ e Industrial Req_uirerilents North of Riv er M ers ey • . •. ·. • . J:.ndustr't.al Re qji.irements in Wythenshawe :. Industr•ial Development and Redevelopment up to 1971 · • • •

37 37 39

' 41 43 45

C - '(. · . Q~erql:_fil Development - Central Area of' the

City __,...:..

.

Long Term Pla.I} . . • Developr~.ent up, to 19.71

-.. Ex~sting; Qonditions. · • Fu:ti_+r e 8 pen Space Standards. L OJ).g ':L' erm Op en Space Plan Prqvision of Open Space up to 1971

C - 8 • . .Q.pen Spaces

c -

9.

51

55

.

57 59 63 '67

NitlJ. e~g,1.s:i. General Coal Clay

• •

• • •

• •

70 70 71


T101 1332

.CONTENTS

C - 10. Agriculture b - 11. Qommunications (Roads) Exi~tin g ·Conditions ··'

Page 73 .•

74 76 77 78 81

Def.ects in Present System . .. • Proposals - Ge11.eral ·• Ultimate Hi gh ways Plan .. •. Twenty Yeari Hi ghways Pl an • ·C - 12. · Conirnuii.ic a tions ( c·a1 P a rks and Bus St a tions) ·-·- -- - .. ., Ca r. P a rks .. •. • ., Bus. Stations C - 13. Q_omrnunications ( i1 a ilways_) Existing Condttions • • Future Policy C - 14. Co :tmunications (Air)

88 89 91

c

15. Qomrnunications (Waterway~

92

C -

16. J:?evelopment by Governm ent Departments

1

...

93 93

Service Departments • Non-Service Departments ·.·

··O - 17. Public Utilities .'

c -

18~

Water • • • S e1nerag e ·and Sewage Disposal Gas • Electricity •

95 95 96 97

• • •

Social Services ~·Education)_ Scope of Development Plan • Existin g Conditions • Propos ed School Standard::; pr6visi orial School Propos als Pro grarnrne •

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• •

• •

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C - 19. Social S ervices · (University rui.d Cultural . ~_!)._Cili th e3) .. . Untversi:ty • Cultural Faciliti es • •

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Hospitals • Heal th C~ntres • C - 21. pesi gnat ion§_ C - 22.

84 86

~ro gr amme-~inancial

105

106

108 110

111

and Labour Considerations

.

Pro gr armnin g and General Policy • Financi al and Labour . Considerations Local Authority Housing 1 . Frivate Ent e rprise Housing 2 Central Commerci al Area of City, 3 4 Education •·· University 5 • Open Space 6 . • 7 . Hi ghways ·s Industry . ... Hospitals and Heal th 9 • Development CultuI'al 10~ 11 -S w11!1lary

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... .... ..

..

..

'98 99 100 102 104

.... .

..

.

..

......

... . ..

114 115 116 117 118 . 120 123 124 · 125 126 127 127 128

...


T101 1333

LIST OP MAPS ACCO~iPANYING THE ANALYSIS .

Reference Nuinber ·.

1

.·_1( 1>=l

Land ·use

~ 1( 2)J

Age of Buildings

[ 1( 4} (ii )~l

Net Populati on Density

~VIII( 1).( a)]

Communic at i ons

. . i..VII I( 1) ( b )~

Ro ad and Rail Tr a ffic ·

·L:"_x( 1)_J ·

Cx< 2 artc

Water Supply and Sewerage

3)-: ·

Gas and Electricity Services

LIST OF DIAGR.Al'J.IS ING:iUDED AT END · OF DOCUMENT.

Central Area of Ci ';,y

Diagram No . 1

Ultimate Hi ghway Netwo rk

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1

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or I

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TlOl 1334

2. LIST OF TABLES

.

Table 1

Lands Unsu i tabla for Buildin g

Table 2

Age of' Residential Properties

11.'o.ble 3

Hous ing Surv ey - Re8 i dual Lif'e of nw·e llings I nspect <::d · •

.

Page 15

17

18

Table 4

Population Changes 19 21- 1971

21

Table 5

Rous es at Hct Hes i r1enti al Density g r eater thal1. 24 t o the a c:ee

23

;l'able ·6

Insured Population

38

Tabl e 7

Ex isting Open Spaces

Table 8

Proposed Open Space Standards

Table 9,.

[J 7

60

62

. Proposed DiGtr ib ut i on of Open Spac es

Table 10

Proposed Ult imate Open Space Provi s ions

65

Table 11

Open Space Position a t 1<J71

69

Table 12

Mileages of Public Hi ghways

74

Table 13

Nat ional and Re gional Highways •

76

Table 14

Car Pa1"king Sur vey 1947

84

Table 15

Proposed 3 chool Standards .

'l'abl e 1 6

Hosp itals Controlled by Manchester Hcgional Hos pi to.l Board •

109

I,ist of Sites Designat e d under Sec . 5( 2) of the Tovm and Country Pl ru1ning Act 1947 •

111

Table 18

List of f.l.roas deeaed to be designated lt:1d er Sch edul e 10 of the 1947 Act

112

Table 19

Li st of Wctr D1:.'1.rna ged f:•.I'ea.c.; not deemed to be des i gnated

113

Table 17

• •

101

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I

.,

I

I

I


3. LIST OF APPENDICES

T101 1335 .

.

Appendi x 1

Sumrnar~r

Appe~dix

L and , Use - Ar eas · Primarily . . for . Resid enti al Use

2

of Lan d use

Provisi orial List ~ · Buil dings of. Speci al Ar~hi tec tural or Historical I nteres t

Ap pendi J( · 3 ,

Popula~ion

Appendix 4

Distribution of

Appendix · 5

Plim.ning .standards for Res i dent ial Nei ghbourhood in Redeyel opment

Appendi4 6

Pl:anning St andards for Residential Di?trict in Redevelopment

Appendix 7

Summary : of Res i dential Propert i es Dealt with under Redev el opment Proposals for . Development Pl·an P eriod

Appendix 8

Futur e Industrial Structure and Prop osed Site . Areas -

Ap pend:i,x 9

Suinrnary qf Proposed Industrial Spac e S tandards .

Appendi x 10 ·

Sub- division of Tot.al .Indus trial Standard

Appendix 11

Proposed Indust ri al Zon e s

Appendix

'1~2

Central Conuner ci a l : Area .:. Exi ·s t_ing Users

Appendix 13

Clay \:Vcirkings in City

Appendi x 14

Detai ls of Ul t i mate Road Network ·

Appendix 15

Det ails of 20 year Road Programme

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.,


TlOl

4.

1336

I NTRODUCTION. The Devel opm~nt Plan for the County Bor ough of Manchester hos been prepared i n the form broadly prescribed by the T:Jwn a nd Countr y Pl anning Ac t, 194?, Gnd the Regulations ma.de· .,thereunder . It · c 6nsists pr.i mar.ily of ( n) n To'Vl(n Mop sh:)wing in broad outline the ma in planning propos als for the City as a whole , (b) a Progro.rnm.e Mop showing the propos als which it is expect~d will be i npiemented i n the first five years ond in the succeeding fifteen years , and (c) a Writt en Statement conta ining a description of the propos als shown on the two maps , cl arifying and where necessary amplifying the informati on given in visual· form . ·The Development Plan i s supported by a nd based upon o Report of Survey of which the following Wri tten 1\.nalysis forns o part. Whereas the Written Stntement in the Development Plan is mainly descriptive in char acter , contClining nothing in the na ture of argurJent for or against propos a ~ submitted , this Written ,J\.nolys·is gives the r esults of the survey, e:rn2ines -the relevant proble:os so revealed and explains the principles and methods considered appr opriatG for their sdlution and which a re in fact inc orporated in the Development Plan i tself . The Survey Mops acco!!lpanying this Written Analysis, and which complete the Report of Survey are listGq. on pnge l. · ·· For the mos t pa.rt the survey information has been coBpiled , the results anal ysed , .and the propos al s formul a ted in accordance with the methods recommended in circulars a nd directives issued by the former I·Unistry of Town and Country Planning and subsequently by the t~inistry of Loc a l Governraent end Planning •

..

Wher e circumst ances have a ppear ed to justify some deviation from these r ecommendations, a ppropriate refe~nce i s made in the text to the nethods actually adopted . The Wr itt en Malysis is presented in three main parts . Part A conta ins n general description of the o~ en and pr ovides a broad physical and economic background to the subsequent investigations of the va rious planning natters . Part B gives n brief su:mI'.lnry of the main proble~s nnd the proposals put f orwurd f or their solution. Pnrt C gives the detailed exomination of all aspec t s of the Survey nnd Plnn. It is stressed that this section represent s the ma in source of information in the document , from which the conclusions sUDTnnrised in Part B ore wholly derived .


5.

Tl Ol 1337

Pl\RT ·A

GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF Ji.REA.

_J;>hysical Area

·l. The City of Munchester lies in the southeas t corner of Lancashire at the foot of the Pennines . .It covers 27 , 255 aores in the form of a s~rip .approximately 3i miles wide in its east- west dir ection and 12 niles long in its north- south ,dir:ection.·

Levels

2. The l a nd within the city rises gradual ly f .r,om u gener al leve l of 50 feet A. O.D. along the south- west ·boundary to n .maximum level of over 3 00 feet A. Q.D. in the north- east corner. Beyond the boundaries to the north and east or e the Rossendole Hills and the Pennine c.:-...:.1in reaching al titudes of 2,000 feet, while the upland to the south-east in the direction of Macclesfield rises up to 750 feet •

Rainfall

3. The prevailing winds blow .f rohl the southwest and. the annual rainfall increas es as the hills ore appr oa ched ; over the city it increases from a nininun of less than 30 inches per unnun i n the south to ·40 inches · per anntm1 .in the higher l and along the Mnnche?ter-Middleton boundary.

Rivers .

4. Four riv:e rs drain the or en - the I rk, the Medl ock, the : Irwell and the Mersey. The Irk and the Medlock drain the north and north- east parts of the city respectively 1 the Irwell drains the western boundary whe re the city adjoins .Salford, and the Mersey drains . the south of .·the city including Wythenshawe and the long regul ar pla in between the Mersey and the Medlock .

..

5. On their l engt hs near the city centre the . Irwell , Irk and I,fodlock ure well served with bridges, and are in foot cul verted in places . The northern part of the Irk volley and the eastern e.hd · of ·the Medlock valley ( c,i ayt on ·vale) do however form. nnturnl barriers to conr:.rnnio utions , while the low lying flo od plain of the River Mersey forms o. distinct break between Vlythenshawe and ih0 rest of the city. R q~ional

.,

Importune e .

6. The :i.Eportance of Mon.chester .lies not only in its. own size and population but in its relation to the towns in the surrounding region . Excluding Wythenshnwe, Mano·hest er can b.e considered as the eastern h alf of n· circle of about . four miles radius with its centre at thG confluence of the River '. M~dlock and the River Irwell . 'rhe western half .' the cir cle. is node up of Prestwich, Salford , Swinton and Pendlebury, Stratford and Urmston •

of

?. The whole of the urea within this c i rcle is so co:r.ipletel y . bu:i l t ·Up thut it is d ifficult to tell where one town ends anCi' another begins, so that the central area: of Monche·ster' serves not only the city but also nets as . the f ocnl ~oint for a much l arger and compact urban groupl.!lg.


TlOl 1338

6.

·: · 8 . ·Ta king· a lnrge:r circle o bout the same centre , a lurge number of fringe towns a r e included, all connected by direct r ndi ol roads wi th the re gional centre . To t he north nre l\Iiddlet on, Rochdole anu BLlry, to the north- west Rcdcliffe and · Bolton, to the south- west Sale nnd A.ltrinchom, to the south ... ecist Stockport , to the eas t A2 1~ ton- under- Lyne ar:d Stolybridge , and to the north- eos t Ol dhom . It t.o.s· been estimated thot 4, 000 , 000 '·;eople · live within t:i 20-mile radius of Manchester , and 10 , 250 , 000 people within o 50- mile r adius . 9. For a .l arge number o~· these people Manchester serves as comme rci a l a nd cultural centre , h ousing the· main warehouses , shops , banks , theatres , hospit nls , etc . of the r egion , ond also ~he · Unive ~sity ond Government Regional 0.f fie.es_.

Historic ~ l and Growth . origin . .

10 . Tiie ancient centre of f.Jfr:: nchester was Cum.pfield(now occupied by c nnal basins and r a ilways), but in the Romon . peri od it was moved to the area. adjo i ning the Cathedra l , close to the confluence of the Irk and the I rwoll . In 1650 the town still covGred little more than the area now bounded by the River Irk , Corporation St:;:·qct; St·.MDry ' s Gotc, Blacl(fr_iors Street and the River Irvicll a though Blockfriars Bridge was in existence connecting to Sclford , and Market Str0ct and Deansgote were dcvGloping outwards from this a rea .

Industrial Revolution

11 . . By 1800 the town had expanded to the south- west us fur as the River Medlock , to the south- east as f or GS Whitworth Street Gnd as for north- eGs t us Grectt .l\ncoats Street· ; it r oughly covered what i s now the central area of · the city . A chGnge was also taking pl ace i n the character of the town due to the effects of the industriol r evol ution , and by 1850 D l ar ge number of cotton processing plants . hod been built ' mo inly along the br.rnks of the Rivers r~~k , Irwell · and 1..1cdlock, the rivers providing wat er and acting as drains for indust rial was te . Durin g this period the canGls were constructed , and ~ost of the r a ilways were establish ed • . ' In 1853 .the area of the . city vms about 4 , 500 a cr·e·s . ·.'

Main Ez;?nnsion

12 •. · i.W the indust ria l r ewolution expended itself the city embarked on on era of expcmsion , and ,during the 60 ye Drs fall owing 1853., the oreu covered by the city jJacreused·to almost 22 , 000 . Ge r es , while . tha population of tho ~ity increosGd from 300 , 000 to over 700 , 000 . During this era lfianchest er ' s growing prospori ~Y was reflected in the removal of most of tho old mills a nd facto ri es from the city centre and their replacement by n ew c0.m:r~0 rci a l buildi ngs ond s uch civic buildings ·as the presont Town Hall Ryland ' n Libra ry und the Assize , Courts . Manchester acquired tho ·role not only of the reg i onal centr e but also of the world centre of the cotton trade .

., ' I


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TlOl

7.

1339

13. Highway com..~unications . were improved , particular attention being given to street widening in· the city centre , though improvements l ugged behind actual needs . Most of the city's existing r ail way termini were. established ·between 1860 and 1890, while at the turn of the century the opening of the Msnchester Ship Cnnal gove a further impetus to Ivk~nchester' s commercial ascendancy by creating ci new port whiqh soon become one of the most important in England. 14. This was the·. formative period during which n l arge -. proportion ·;.of the city ' s residential development took pl:ci ce . Although not now acceptable by modern standards , much of this development wns , os a result of a series of byelaws, for in advnnce of ap.y previous housing . Inter Wc.r

Period.

I

L

15. By 1914 Manchester settle'd. down tb a period of relative stability • . A.lth0ugh some fluctuation has token plpce , in the int ervening period , the present population is substantially the same 6s in 1914, and .Gport from the additi on of 5,56? ncres at W;vthenshawe in 1931, no change h as taken place in the boundary of the .City since that time. 16. Although new administrative buildings were built in the city centr e , the octunl pattern was little changed and the most signific ant changes took place outside the central oreo. . The cess ntion of buil·ding during the 1914..:.18 wnr cre!'..1ted a .l ar ge demand for housing which was accentua ted by a gradual decline in family size and consequent increase in .number of families . 17. The housing built dur.in·g the · 20..·years between the two war s was to the open standards reconunended by the Tudor Wolt ers Report (1920) and the greatly increased demnnds for space mude by such housing led to the building up of .most of the lDnd within the city boundaries and us a conse quence to the acquisition of Wythenshnwe . · · 52,000,. houses were built in Mnnchester during "t;he period \ out pf the present · tot al of 202,000 houses ) including . 30, 000 by the Corporation, of which 12,000 were at Wythenshnwe . The o..ctual nl.nnber of houses within the city increased despite the demolition of l arge numbers of slum houses ,undertaken iri o serious a ttenpt to remove all insanitary and sub-standard housing from the city. 18 . During the srun.e period many thous ands of people moved f r om the city, mo~tly t o th~ new suburbs being built on the fringes of the city in Sa~e, Prestwich, Gatl ey . and o~her areas mainly in the south. It i s estl.I!lnted · that during the years 1921-19~9 th~ net l oss in . population, i. e . excess emigration over naturul increase,- . n:r1ounted to 22, 000 persons ' the actual emigrat i ()P. being a.bout· 18, 500 between 1921 and 1931 nnd aboµt 50,000 between 1931 arid 1939.


TlO l 1340

Post 1945

PE:riod .

8.

This dispersal of population created o tremendous demand for transport and to improve commw1icat ions two important new ro.ads , IG.ngswoy f1nd Princess Road, were constructed to serve the new . suburbs . A mm1ber of street widenings were curried out in the city centre - . in particul ar the i.inprove~ent of Connon Street - in an attempt to i mprove traffic conditions , which in the late · thirties were oecoming more and more chaotic as motor traffic increased . 19 .

20 . Since the war the population of the city h as shown s i gns of increasing, and this, coupled with the cessation of house- building during the war and the large amount of resident i al property destr oyed by bombs , has again led to a big demand for housing of all types . The remaining uµd evel6ped .l ands within the city , viz . at :· wythenstinwe and Blackley, and slura clearance drens i n .the inner areas a re now being used fo r houl?ing pur .poses . ··

21 • . '· A significant fe ature of the post 1945

period has .'been the ·-r evised concept'ion of Wythenshnwe as n ne.w and substo..nt-ial ly selfcontainQd satell i te r ather than O.s. n dormitory housing estate . · The remuining l a nds at Wythenshawe (compr ising half .the totcil a rea) have been and ore being developed in ucoordance with a revi sed pl an which envisages a series of residential .neighbourhoods , udequatoly supplied with shops , schools etc . , focussing on o main civic c entr e for which land is reserved . 'l'wo new industrial are[ls hove been com.menced and will , with the pre - war one already substantially developed , CGter for o l a rge number of Wythens howe ' s ultimate 90 ,000 population. The present popul ation is approximc tely 60 ,000. Functions of the City .

i2 .

Though Manchester has . a ·long hi story its present functions a re, os ohown i n the foregoing ··p aragraphs, mainly the product of the industrial ·, r~ifoltition, and its present importance rests on its posit.ion as a commercial nnd industrial centre . . ..;... The number of peo.ple employed .in Administro- 23 . Manchester ·amounts to 60 percent of the tot a l t i ve popul c1tion, a much higher· fi gure than obta ins in Importance the north- west re gion or in ·the . countr y a s o. whole . T.P.is ind·icotes , ns woul d .be expected , that n l arge nuraber ·of people tra vel int o ·the · city to work , · purt i cularly to work in the textile , banking and distributive houses in the centre . 24 . The percentage of workers engaged ~n s~rvice industry ( i . e . cownerce , tronsport etc . ) is high and hos been increas ing - over the past ?O years, indic a ting the· growth of _Munch~ste:i;t s -i :mportance o.s nn o.d:m.inistrative and distributive centre . I n pa rticul ur ~ with the dec:-entro.lis ntion . of Central Government to r egionnl b_ffices, the city now houses the north-west rGgion0l hon d~u~~ters of many government depai'tments' ..•, .

~

I


TlOl

9.

1341 Industrial I:m.po rtance

25. . On the manufacturing side , the city conta ins most types of industry including groups ' of heavy chemic als cind heavy and general engineering industries which have grown during the pa ~t . 30 years at the expense of textile and clothing industries . Many of Ma nchester's indu.strial workers are employed in Trafford Pa rk~ a l arge industrial est ate adjoining the Manchester S~iip Canal in the neighbouring town of Stratford. The est ate covers roughly 1,200 acres and. employs betweem 50,000 and 60,000 workers in predominantly heavy industry. 26. The decline in importance of textiles and n gradual diversific ation of industry served in the '30 ts to : shield M~inchester from the worst

effects of the ttslump." Nenrby towns in northwest Luncashire , which exist solely on cotton, suffered very badly during this period when the textile trade declined.

I

27. Heavy industry inside the city is mainly situated in whnt are now predominantly industri al ureas ndjo-ining the large r uilwny mnrshalling yards- to the north and east of the city centr e . There i s nlso a l ar ge area along the Irk Valley in the north occupied mainly ¡_by the Imperi al Chemical Industrie8 . Light industry, however, with the exception of the Cheetham Hill and Wythenshawe¡ industri al a r eas, is not well grouped and is mixed with older r es.idential properties and f or the most part carried out in old and inadequate buildings . c

Summary of Functions .

From the information given in the foregoing the functions of Manchester may be broadly summarised as follows: -

28.

para~nphs

(a) The administr ative, commercial and distributive centre of the nor th- west region , in particul ar for the cotton trade â&#x20AC;˘ (b) The cultural, university and entertainment centxe for south Lancashire and north Cheshire . (c) /l main centre of heavy industry. ( d) A main port .

I''if3 a result of the construction of the Manchester Ship Canal, 1t~nchester is . the nearest port to a l arge numb er of towns in central England .

(e) A centre of communications for road and r nil traffic, both regional and nat i onal. (f) By the esta blishment of a modern a~rport at Ringwny, as u main centre fo r air transpor~ in the national airways system. (g) A regional centre .for Governm~nt . departments nnd for such public undertakings us gas und elect ricity.


TlOl

10.

1342

...-..

PART" B , _.. SUMMARY OF TIU:-.NAI.N .PROBLEMS REVEALFJ) BY THE' i .:.

•· •I',. . • '

-

I - RESIDENTIAL .

..

: • I ' I

SURVEY hlfD OF Tl iE SOLUTIOI~S . PuT . FORWARD.

. Problems~

'·.

-: · (a) ' Extensive areas Qf mixed use in the · older. parts of the city~

·;'.)::;. _: ; '

'

I•

(b) Cong.e sted and uns atisfactory housing conditions of such dimensions t hat their e limi nation would . tcike upwards -·of 50 years at .t he present r a te of ·house construction. The following figures a re significant :-

(1) App roximately 120,000 dwellings eJdst at net densiti es greater than 24- dwel ling_s per acre . .. . ·f

(2) Approximately 100, 000 dwellings are more than 50 years old, ..

'

; .

i ; •

··"(3) . ~pproximately 80,000 dwellings have

'

· (c)

an estimat[3d resj_ dual life of less than 20 years .

An i mmediately apparent housing need, .a mounting to approximately 87,000 ·dwellings, for t:tie. elimination of existing overcrowding j t he nv oid:mc c ·o f" further uv1.. , l'crowdinc du0 t c ['_ · n.C'.tur.:il -i ncrcaso i n popul n.t;i on, and the r v.p litc--:!W?lt of 1.,,xistins clw;.; llin~s unfit f or habitation by Housing Act s t anda rds .

Spiut;ions. For (a) Predominant uses ultimately intended for existing areas .of mixed ·us e a.re.; indica ted in the Plan • . · .. .

For (b) Long term policy proposed for re s i dential redeveloprirnnt on a n e ighbcurhood and di strict bas is . In principle, the net dens~ty· wli.11 not exceed 90 habitable . . .,. rooms per a cre, equi i/a l ent t o approximatel y ,;".r -22 dwelli ngs pe:r· a cre . ··" r

.

· ····For ( c ) Housing pr ogramme proposed for t,ho next 20 .. ,. years which provides apflrox;Lmat fSly 52, 000 dwellings · against t:he· i mmediate l y apparent need of 87, 000 dwe ~ling~ ~- . T:tµ ~ programme relie ves overcrowding but d.llows for the clearance of only :ab out ·40% of the existing · · : unfit dwellings .


TlOl

1343

,,

11.

Due to shortage of land within the city this programme · necessitates the construction .of approximately37,000 dwellings outs~d~ the ci ty and envisages a total overspill.-.'(planned and voluntary) of about 137,000 persons by 1971. II - INDUSTRY. Problems . (a) Existing industry extensively mixed with re s idential and other non-industrial uses . (b) Unsatisfactory di stribut:i_on of industry i n the city - overweighted in the north and north east with deficiencies in the southern half of th.e-. city . (c) Existing industry generally cramped and working conditions unsatisfactory in many Existing overall industrial space cases . allocation at therate of approximately 2. 55 acres per 1,000 total r es ident. popul ation•

.

Solutions. For (a) Predominant uses ultimately intended for existing areas of mixed use are indicated in the Plan. For (b) Additional industrial are ~s proposed in the · southern part of the city. For (c) Proposals ·for ulti mate industrial areas, in addition to meeting the rociuirements under (a) and (b) aru also intended to secure indu stri al snq,ce sufficient for the needs of the popuiation likely to be accommodated eventually in the proposed residential areas . The proposals provide for the achievernent of a_r1 overall standard of about 5. 2 acres per 1,000 total population. New industri al d8velopment and redist.ribqtion . . of uxisting indus try, expected to take place · during the next 20 years , is lilrn;I.y to improve present indtA;strial spa ce allocation to nbout 3. 6 acres per 1,000 total popul ation. III - CENTRAL AREA. OF TF.E CITY. Problems . (a) Haphazard distribution of principal

commercial uses .

··

(b) Inadequate settings to important buildings.

(c) Congested street system. (d) Lack of .open space . (e) Obsolete 6ou1Llercial premises . (f) RedGvclopment of extensive war damage still outstnnding . ·


TlOl 1344

12 . Solutions . For .. ( a) Sub- zones within which .·it is ultimately int'ended principal uses should be co~1.fined as far ~s· practi .c able 2.re i .n dicated in the .- 1.an. For (b) Long term policy :propos ed for gradual to ( e) redevelopment of central aroa in accordance .with sub-zoning proposals and with detailed schemes tq be prepared frora tiae to time •. For (f) Priority to be given to mclcing good war damage. other than this , no substantial pr.ogress towards the desired improvement of the central area is expected during the 20 year period~ IV - OPEN SPACE. Proble:os . (a) Total open space inadequate . Chil drens playparks, recreational areas , ancnity areas, allotr;wnt s and school playing fi el ds at present provided · at ~ overall rate of about 3. 9 acres per 1,000 population. (b) Value of existing open space . substantially reduced by poor distribution. Open space s ystem is overwei ghted in the north of the city and abbut 700 acres of major pnr ks are too far fron coJ)gcsted areas te ncet day to day requirements . Effe·c ti ve existing rate probably about 3. 0 a cres per 1,000 population . · (c) Inner areas of city virtually devoid of local open space . For about 150,000 persons within 2 nilc ro.dius of Tmm Hall total open space provisions arc a t a rate of about o.4 acres p~r 1,000 population. . -..

Solutions .

For (a} Lo.ng terrti open space schene proposecl in the Plai:i, based on tho p':rovision, for the ul tinato population, of a rc1ininun ove·r all standard of 9. 6 acres ·per 1,000 persons for the open spac8s ~eferred to . For (b ) . In principle the scheme proposes, a and (c) r:iiniaum of 1 . 2 acres per 1,000 population of public open space and 2 . 2 acres ,per 1,000 popul ation of school playing fields ( about 2/3 of statuto ry requirement) to be provided locally as reclevelopr.ient 'takes place; the balance of 6. 2 acres per l ,OOO population to bB provided elsowhere:.·on land unsuitable for bu:Llding, of which there i s sufficient to secure a r eas onable degree of convenience . for the · corn:mni ties S"3rve d. In n ew dovolopnont a.roas the sch8r.ic pr 1.•poses the full pr·ovj_sio:::i of 9. 6 a cres pCJr 1, 000 populntiori.. Hithin or very cl ose to tho r usi d..:mtinl co;'l.!.:.u..nitics . Thi s 1..!ill be subst.::..1:tia.lly L'. chiovoJ by open s po..co

.


TlOl

1345

13. development proposed f'or the next 20 yea.rs but e l s ewhere in the city it is expected that the rate will be raised to only about 5. 6 acr<.::s p01· 1, 000 population by the end · of trds p eri od. Excluding tho 700 acres in the north the effective rute will ge about 4 . 2 acr e s per l, OOO population. For the city a3 <:i whole, the '-:i.ctual and oi'f ecti vc.' rate s will be about 6. 7 ~md 5. 5 acre s per i,ooc p opulntion :::espectj_vely.

_v -

HIGHWAY~~

Probl.01i1S .

----(afL-ack of continuou s r:Lng c:..nd by- pass r oad::: . (b) Genernlly unsa.tl s iactory coru1ections bet1•;·3Vi"':. main radi al ::.i.ppl'O<:H~hes c.md r oad systeE1 irt centr al area. ( c) Extensi v0 fronta c e development on r;;ain r c~..: dn , parti eul;!rly shopping use . ( d) I naciequate c ar :i~ying cupaci ty of certain roads due to l u ck of width . ·rms i s not a fundamer~tal probl01:1 as congesti on i s c uus ed p rimurily by defects in the l ayout of the systea aA a wh ole , i . e . traffic is not di s t :;:i buted to tha b est advantcJ.gc . Solutions . F~-;_:··-(';:) - ui tir.w.te naj or highiv::.i.y networlc pr-_, 1J~1se d i n a.11d (b) the p lan to give an i mpr ove d ring and r,:.:;d..ial sys t en. Fe r (c ) Networlt in.clue.I.es by- p.:lsses whare shopp.i.ng use likely to r emain. 2:!.Sl}Wher e Plan c;nvi sages problom will 0VE·ntu ally be solv od . by re developoent of . ~re ~ s concerned. For (d) Appropri a te wi deninPs .:'\.11!.-LimprovGr:ients of ro~1cl::> retaini:Jd in uf tir.w.te network prc·pv:->c-1 as p :-:rt 0i' long terl:.l hi g bv.'2..YS progrm:1me . Progrcrnme p 1'r ·p · <'ed f'or next 20 ye a rs int en ci.Gd to r el.L eve poin t:::; of wo1·[;t coLge s tion and t o establi sh sub~:;t antiall y the ultimate network, so f r_.r :1s route i s conc erned ~ so that i t !iJ.ttV lnt c~r b o ir.1pro-.:rnd tc> thu desired s t and2rd . ..

Problens .

Y"J: -- - so CI.AL

SEHYI CE~!~

( a ) Scl1ool s - Insufi'i cio.•1t -~ccrn.moda.t ion , obsoh~ te s chool buil dings , uns a tisfa cto:.ry s i tin [~ of schools in r e l Q.tion t o main ron.ds 7 wholly inl'.2. do qu at c p l nyinis f i ~ l ds ~ (b) Cultura l - Lack of cultural mid furthe r educ;_1tton<:d facili ti0s in the city . ( c ) Univ~:.·s ity - Insufficient ::i.ccormnodati .on, mr~ny unsuit 2ble buiJ.dings in u se a s ter,1por <.'. r y expedi ent. 1 (:onge stcd urr ango::tent of buildings and la.ck of 1mivcrsity " atmosphen:/I •. ( d ) Hospi t <.!.l S - 1'13.in IJl' obler:i - i nsufficient accor:rr.todati0n and :poor a rrange!i1ent of buildings in teacr..ing group of hospital~: .

QQ,Mi.Q_n§_ .

For ( a ) Pian incor.rgl et e ~n r e spect of detail ed school inoposa.l s l excer-c in n ew development B.reas ) . . but gener a l pol+ cy prop 0sed for rf? dqivelopr;k:n t, all ows for pr ovisi on~ :;i.s opp9ri;u..ry.i t io;;1 ari sG 7 of fuJl stal.utory scnool facilities ~ Important feature of the Plan is for the . Fto~ (b) establishr1ent , as a lon;; t 1?rill T:1eqsure,. of., c and ud:io:ining cult.1,lrall. tgtiVE;;,rsity _ana hfo ~pi!·a}- . d p r ~ cint s rorminz J.Ja!' Lo 01 a wca.ge o . ~r:;;v~ 1op­ ment cobpri sing open sp~~e and di e:n 1.L ~ cc. bu.ilaings '- ~pac.iously l a i a out ? ending southwards ! ro·Cil.. the central area for a pproxir.1at e ly 11 mil es ~ " r

en


S:l Ol 1346

14 . P.tillT C

AN.l\LYSIS OF SURVEY I NFORI\:ti.TION - :I?RO BLEl!IS REVE.l\LED -

---·-- ·- ..·------ ·--- _t3ot.~:(61'!_[~~BQ;P.9~~1?:!; - --·-- ----- ---- ----

Use · - G~r-er a l . Lond 29 . T.~:'.o Lnnd_ Use Map (I { l) ) h ~.1 s b een prepa red t o show o.s :much deta il c1s the sco l e will permit . A.J_t hcugt. some of t h i G det ciil m.o.y b a unnecesary for the purp ose of the ov e r cill planning bons i der ot i ons asso cia t ed with th e pr epa r ation of the DeYelopmont Pl nn, i t i s c .:ms id<?r ed tha t thi s p a rticul ar flap ahoul d re preG ent as co~pl et e a surn..m.a ry of th e bas ic survey work DS poss ible Dnd thus provide ci :means where by , if necessa ry , the implic at i ons of the broad proposal s put f orwa r d i n the Devel opment Flori- £WY be i nv est i gD t Gd. more closel y .

?art C - 1

Scope of Lewd Use l>Io.p

'30 . Reference to the v a ri ous probleGs eCTe r gi n g from D s tudy of the Lc1nd Uri e 1.1op is i"!lcide i n th0 l nt e r ssct ions of the an nlys i s dG'-1ling with pa rtic ula r aspects of the Pl un , ci.nd defic i encies a nd surpluses.of l and dev oted to s pecifi c us es or e also exnriined in these sections . L.-1nd Use Su:Lr:iary

31 . Appendix 1 sl.l:mraa rise s in br oad ·. ter ms the i nf or n a t i on shown on the Jlup , and d r aws D coEpci rison betwe en the conditions existing o.t th e tira6 Df 3Ur-vey (Dcc c:1ber 1949 ) ond the conditions wh ich it i s est ir.10te d would apply in 1971 .i f the pr o.:;;osDl s put forw or d in the Developnon t Pla n W!re i:mplenen ted . 32 . Append i x 2 surJJ'.lnri sGs the s i gnif i cant l and us es within the o~-- eas devoted prir.lnrily to r es i dent i a l us e ut t he time of survey and o.s estimat·a d fo r 1 9 71 . 33 . It i s ·pointed ou.t 'Ch<J t the backgr ound mcip shows on [.1 re D of hous ing dovelopT.lent a dj a cent · to r es i dentia.l un it No . 37 i n Wythens.hGwe , which has n ot , i n f etc't , been i ncluded as s uch in the land use sillilLlnr y . Th8 r e ns ons ·for this i s that ut the tim.e of survey t his etrea , a lthough i n a n adv:.1 nc ed s t age o f de v e l opment c ont o ined very few oc cup ied dwe l l ings , and i t wos consider ed, that it would bo rni s lecdi ng to show i t as a r es identia l unit existing ct that t Lue . F or purp oses of the sum.na r y the a r e a hcu1 bee n · t h ke~ c~ agricul tur al l ond .

Residenti ol Uni ts • '·

.

I

34. I n c onnection with the r es i dential units , the are a s defined on the Lnnd Use MCT) ar e not n e cessnrily those which i n r espect of either s ize or shape l end themselves tJ ne i ghbourhood t recttraent . ThG c 0Hpl e ti on of ful ly self · · conta ined nei ghbourhoods i fi , except in the c a s e of new develo pr,1ent areas , so f nr nheo..d , t ha t li ttl,e purpose vrnuld b0 se rved by compari ng c ond'it ions nuw nnd f ns es t i£rnted for 1971 . in . spoo ific exist ing r es i dent i nl n r e os which i t ·; is llop'e d will eventucilly f J r n nei ghbourhood uni ts .

I . I


TlOl

1347

;

c.

15.

The redevelopment which a ctually takes place during the next 20 years wil l ~e directed towards the est a blishment of. neighbourhood units , but by the end of the period its effect will be measured mos t realistically in terms of the general i mprovement brought ' a bout in the "loculity rather than in the particular future neighbourhood nrea i .n wh_ich the redevel opment t akes_ place. 35..

The arec1s. shown · on the Land Use Mup a re therefore a·r eas· of · compor nble · existing residential development f or which reliable ·population statistics a.r e ava il able . On the Tov:.µ Map these ureas have in some c ases been adjusted or merged where, at the end of the 20 year period, progress towards the esta blis hment of the ultioote road network will have pro~rided .more pernwnent boundaries t o the residential zones. At the some time, the areas shown on the Town Ma p remain for the most part us "localities~' rather than neighbourhoods . 36.

37. An overlay is provided with the Land Use Map to assist in identifying the boundories of the existing predominantly residentia l areas.

Land Unsuitable for Building

The IJc:nd Use Map indicate;:i areas . c onsidered unsuita ble for building purposes. 'r hese nreos nay be sunmnrised as follows:-

38 .

TABLE I. Reason. for Unsui t abili t:y I

C

.L\.:)0r,:)x i .r.ia t e

M.-..-EG·· in .Acres.

( n ) In use or· has been used

for dispos al waste

or

s urface

470

(b) I n use or has been used

for surface n iner al wo rking3

..•

\ I

.

320

(c) Liable to flooding

860

(d} Unsuita ble contours, inability to drain etc.

780

'rotnl

2,430

· The surface dispos al of wns~e has been or is being carried out in many pl aces throughout the city, the most extensive ureas being those in Clayton Vole, Blackley a nd on the flood pla in of the River Mersey.

39 .

40. Surface mineral working, confined almost entirely to the winning of clay f?r the manufacture of bricks , hns heGn carried out extensively in Manches ter for many years. Approximately 40 ncres of such workings huve t nlrendY been tipped up 55 acr~s are at Eresen being tipped up where the worki.r:gs ~n'!e een. d abandoned and 205 ncres nr e still oeing worKe • Th~ most ~xtensive workings are l ocated i~ ihe Cheethum., Maston, Newton Heath nnd Levens u me ureas .


Tl Ol

16.

1348

41 .. . The. l ctnds路 lia ble to flooding Qre all on the. flood pl ain of the River Mersey which forms a nnt urnl bnrrier between W:ythenshowe Clnd the r est of the cit y . 42~ 路'路

The l ands r e j ected os unf i t for building development due to unsuita ble contours etc ., compris e for the most part l Dnds f alling steepl y to vari ous streams ci nd river s - of whi ch Cl ayton Veile i s the mos t i mport a nt excmpl e - 路or l ands which, e i ther by r enson of exc essive undul ci t ion or the unsta ble nntur e of the sub- soil, would be tot Glly uneconomic al for build ing purposes . Mos t of the l a nd in thi s l otter ca tegory i s loc a ted in the Blackley area in the extr eme north of t he city .

' I


17.

·TlOl

1349

~ART

Age and Condi ticn of Buildings. ------

C -2

.Aee__of Bu.11<i in gs •

i

43. The Age of BLlildings Map (I{2)) summnrises the informntion obt a ined from the bas ic survey, and indic ntes the brood age categories for all buildings in the city.

t.

Residentictl Properties

44 . With regard to residential property this informat ion is omplif ied in the f ollowing t able which gives the opproximLYte number of dwellings in various nge groups .

T.ABLE 2. Age of Residenti al Prop erties.

i

I··

Period in which -~roperty ~uil t

- -·- ' Approx. No. of i 1 Dwellings·~-

1

/ _--~e~or~---=-~50 - ---- - ---l--1_3_, 5_30 j

I

/

r

Between 1850. & ~ B3tween 1870 & 18 79

[~~:~n~-80 I.

31,500

1 -2-1-,-30_0_

& 1889_\

.10,570_ __

I

Between 1890 & 1899

25, 42~----,

I

Between 1900 & 1909

25.,58 0

1···--·- · -·-------··- ------·--

-~~;~~~~;·

[

I

Arter 1920

____________ j

5_.

_,s_g_o____

68 , 850

··! - --·- -·------·- -

l

TOTAL Co~dition

Wnr Domnged Buildings

~

11 I

202,640

of Buildings

45 . ·The Age of Buildings Mop ·i ndicotes . st anding buildings wh ich s uffe r ed s ubst ontinl war d.umoge . S0r.1c of these buildings hove now been wholly or por tinlly r epaired. . The mop does not indic ate t he l oc ution of buildings which hove been demolished compl etely ns u result of . war dama·ge , this information being given on the Land Us e Mnp .


Tl Ol 1350

18 .

n-,rn.llings Ripe for _··. Demolition

The areas of residential property shown on the Age of Buildings MDp as ripe for demolition under the Hous ing Act~ , if demolition were i .mraediately proct·ico ble, comprise the foll owing categories :46 .

Clearance areas alreDdy confirmed where demolition h as not yet been carried out . These ureas a re ver y srirnll and ore of no r.eal signific ance .

(.a..)

(h)

Clearanc e areas repres ented but not yet confirmed , containing about 3 , 100 dwellings .

(c)

Clearance areas in the next pri ority group int ended for represent a tion when circumstances permit , containing Dbout 13,300

Condition of Residentinl Property

J

I

dwellings ~

47 . For the most port the age of residential property gives a r easonable measur e of its c ondition , a nd ref erence to the Age ·:of Buil dings iVIop provides n general picture of the extent nnd locntion of the worst r es identi Dl areas in the city .

The Medica l Officer of Hea lth hos rec ently a deta iled survey of the condition of residenti al property within the areas which it is appa rent wil l require ~xtensive redevelopment . This survey r evea l s that of 79,56 6 dwellings inspected 73 , 948 h a.ve nn est ima ted residua l life of 20 yea r s or less . In addition there nre other pockets of low lif e property di stribut ed throughout the ci ty wh ich have not been inspected in detnil , but wh ich probably contain a further five to ten thousand dwellings wit h a residual life of not .more than 20 years . The information obto ined fr'om the survey is sumn.1::.1 rised in the followin g t a ble :48 .

un de rt ok~~

'11.ABLE 3

Housing Survey

Res i dual Life of Dwellings Inspected .

, - - - - - - - - - - - - - - .- -------·--·------·--!

iL-----·--·-----, Residual · Life - ---

!

O to

'1

5 to 10 years

No . of Dwellings

- - -- - - -- - · - -..,

5 yeo rc:

22, 104

!--- --- ·-- - - - --------·-------~- -1 :

I '

I

31, 4 73

I

5 , 617

·\

\-~~: ~~ ::::--------1----:::::~ --=\ ~---·--j------·---1 j · · -----·- - · ·-·.-

r I

1 i

----·-·-

More thnn 20 years

-·~

, .

1

Total Inspe,cted ----

79,.566

1

J

-I


TlOl 1351

19 .

In 1942 the ~edic al Officer of Health estimated. that about 68 ,000 dwellings in the city were , in the Housing Act sense, unfit for human h a bi t L1t icm . Further deterior ntion, aggr a va.ted by l ack of maintenance , has probably increased this fi gure to nearer 100,000 , included in which would be the ma jority of the dwellings covered by the d路eta iled survey referred to in the la$t paragraph. It is signific c1nt to note that in 1944 it was estima ted that only about 5~; of all houses in the city hod ba ths . 49.

The fore coing information, supplemented by the further inforn+ation on Densities given in Part C-4, provides an indication of the extent to which sub-standard housing conditions now obtain within the city. The resultant planning problem is discussed more fully in Port C-5 of this an alysis deal ing with Residential Development and Redevelopment. 50.

Condition of nonr es identicl.l property

From a study of the

51 .

i\.ge

of Buildings and

Lnnd Use M0:)s it is appnrent that a substantial

number of non-residential properties,particulorly industri al a.nd co:mmercio.l buildings in a.nd nd j a.cent to .the central a rea of the city nre of such ~n age that they must be considered obsolete. 1Uthough ~n ma ny coses extensive internal reconstructi on hos token pla ce , fundamenta.l defects rema in and the buildings still fail to . satisfy modern standards of design and layout . As a part of the bas ic survey, 路 note was tuken of the general condition of non-r es identia l buildings a nd this informa ti on is recorded on 1/1250 Ordnance Sheets . On this basis it is possible to make D general assessment of the residual life of such buildings , but without a full knowl edge of the internal condition, and, in the c ase of industrial nnd commerciul properties ,_ the pl ant nnd equipment housed therein, such nn assessment con only be of a tentative charncter . 52 .

Where non- r es identinl propert ies a re affected , it has been necessary, in considering the broad planning propos:1ls , to rely largely on this genera l informati on , but in the l a ter det ailed investigation o!' particular scher.!es , further inspection of the-properties concerned will be required for n full a ppreciat ion of the financial and economic impliccit ions involved.

53 .

Anci ent Monuments . O!!.J.y three a ncient .m.onura.ents scheduled by the Ministry of Worl:s exist in Manchester. These are indic a ted on the .拢1,.ge of Buildings Map nnd a re as follows:-

54.

( 0)

(b}

( c)

RG.ri.uins of the e nstern wDll of the Romon Fort loc ated ut Costlef ield in the Knott t:~ill o.reo. . The Hanging Bridge loc a ted close to the CDthedra.l. "Ye Olde Well ing'ton Inn11 - Ol_d Shambles , between Victoria Street ond h\' rket Pl ace .


'· ...

65 .~

Tne buildings in t his category, indicated on

.~1~e: · Ag;e of Buildings Ma:p · snd s cheduled in Appendix 3· ·cot11p:ri s e the whole af th o bui1dings in Groups I

an~·r1 of the ·provisional list i ssued by the then MinistI•y of 1'own and Country Plnnning on 2nd . September, 1950 . Al so shovm on the ranp and scheduled in Ai-)pcndix 3 a.re ccrt nin buildings ii1 Group III of the provistonol list whi c h it i s c onsidered might app:t."'.Opl"io.tcl;y- be includ ed in th e .·a ctual ·s.t crtutory List to b:.; issu ed in due course by the itiinistry.

56. No Building Pr eserv at ion Orders a.re in force iJ.1. r espect of nny buildings in I~ill..-richoster , nnd the ·r' oc~rd ing , on the Age of Buildings Map, of tho bu'ildings referred to in the ppcvious paragraph docs not necessarily i mply that the Council int end ~ub.se.q,uently to mal{e such orders in r13spect of al l 01~ ·any of th.es e buildings . The practic ab ility of · r.et aining. many of .t hese buildings will be dependent on the· extent · to which such ret ent i on would adversely af.f ect 'the satisfactory redev elopment of the a rens in which they are situate , and this will only be disclosed by the detaile.d planning still to be undertaken • . 57.. . In particular• , this nppl i es to streets or groups of buildings of speci al value whose preservation as a whol e appears desirable . S everal such streets 811.d groups of buildings nrc in fnct included in Appendi x 3 ru1.d shown on the ;\ge of Buildings . .Map , but no special refer0nce to these which might L·11ply n firr:l intent·ion to preserve, h ns been made .

I

I

, I

· ~·

... \

I

I

- l


Tl Ol 1353

21.

PART CStatis tics

3

P opuJ! at i on

.

.

· F or the purpos e of t h e Devel opment Pl an the popul at i on statist ics and .f or ec as ts provided by t he Regi strar Gen er al · have b een us e d. ·The fol l owi ng t abl e sumraari s es the cha..11ges ond es t imat ed changes i n Manch est er' s civi l i an p opul ati on bet ween t h e y ear s 1921 and 1971. 58.

TABLE 4

_Populati on Change s 1921- 1971_

I

I, ..

PERIOD

1 ;Population a~ t Change sluri ng · Percent ;g;;--·· ; ! e ach end of · . Peri od I! Change duri ng I . . _____Eeri o.d ·-Period ! IBeginn.:. j End I Y. Birt h s i u.:By·-·- -r;s:y-- - -rey- -- ·1 ; i ng . i 1 & Deaths •'1.J..gra- I "Births Mi g- · ! . I I t i on &l ; r atI

I · , .+ , I!I~Lto -t./49 ' ' 490+I 766 0oo+:-35 803 I

I

I

I

I c onsti t \lt ed i l in 1 931) I

l

Mid 1 931 t 0 1.lid 1939 \ Areas as consti t\lt ed ! i n 1 939)

-

.

727~·600 '

+ 10, 668

1947 i J uJ_y 1 971 . Fore c a st

--------- -· i

to!

684, 040

l

' I

.

-

.

••

j

11

1

j

I

II

- 4 9, 868

I I

I+1.-41- 6. 5 I

'

-

l

I

+ • ·-i~n -Def\f"' 5 --! ! •

' 493

I'

Mid 1939 t 0 l 727, 600 1 684, 040 Dec . 1947 I • I I 1

1-~~c.

18

'

I

~ _.;.. ---·---!-

-

I

i

I

l . l ! 766, 800

I

i

-

606, 480

-

+ 21 , 03 7

I I

+ 5 3, 250

.

I '

64, 597

--

. I

+2 . 9 j-

8• 9

I

I+ c 6, 6~ I

de~ob

-13_7,590 I Mig,.

- - - ·· + 7. 81 ( 1 . 0 ) . demob 1( 20. 0) ! Mig. I

The fi gu r es for 197 1 ar e be.sed on the Regi st rar Gen erc..l ' s for ec as t of n atural change i n Manches t er' s civili rul p opul at i on u p to Dec emb er , 1971, and t a.le e a cc ount of the es timat ed .r edi str i buti on of popul at i on withi n the City and of bot h v ol untary and pl anned mi gr ati on. These mat t ers a r e di s cussed more ful l y i n P art C-5 of this annlys i s deal ing wi th Resi dent i al Dev el opment and Red ev el opment , · 59 .

Vol un t a r y t1ii gration

60. It will be n ot ed t hnt dur i ng the int er-war y ear s ( 19 2 1- 1939), although there was a natural i n c r ease i n popul at ion by ~he exc ess of bi rths ov e r deat hs , thi s gain wns mor e t hon offset by a s ubs t ant i al vol untary net outw ar d movement which ws.s part icularl y marked from · 1931 onwards . Thi s wo..s due part ly to the tendency for a gen er nl drift to the South, away from t he eff ects of t he 1931 Qepressi on i n t he staple ind~s tri es of t he North-West , 8Xld pnrtly to the oppor t uniti es c reated by sp eculative buil di ng, for Manchester workers to move into the dormit ory areas ad j oining t he City . The voluntary eraig1•c.ti on shovv-.n for the per iod 1939 to 1947 is on inflnted f i gu~ e r es ul t i !lg P>ora the effe cts of the war , c.md includes service persorJlel who , due t o deat h or other reasons , have not r eturned to Monches t er as civi l i ons .

6 1.

-


TlOl 1354 Population a t time of Survey nnd at end· of . Plan · Period . . .

.. - ..

...·

...,.

... ' ·•

22. 62 . The civilian p0pulation at the ti.me of survey (Dccember,1949) was estimated to amo unt to npproxi.r;rntely ?03, 500 . Tile dist ri b.u ti.on of : thi.s popul9t i on is given in Appendix 4 , which ·s!iPws the population togethe r with ·o.r eo and gross density ·in ench of· the predominanti.y r es.ide·nt i a l a reas indic a ted on, the Land Us.e Map • . . T.tµ.s appendix als_o shows the same i :nf ormation 'Z1s es·ti.m.r.1 ted for July, 1971 , r esul ting from the proposa l s put forward in the Pl an . 63. I~ this Qonnection , it is point ed out that the estimated gross densiti es cpplicable a t 1971 for some of the inner a reas may be lower .thnn those obtaining ultimately, as within these areas , a part from the deliberate redevelopment envisaged , nllownnca hos been mnd e for · the demolition of individual dwellings ond <Yonsequent loss of popul.ntion r esulting from such dwellings being condemned from time to time as unfit for ha bita tion . Post experience shows tha t this procedure results only in small scatter ed clea r ed sites which cannot be redeveloped economically and which must remo.in vacttnt until the area. concerned is dealt with on more comprehensive -lines . Tlt.e 20 year :pr ogr amme allows fo r· the demolition of 7 , 400 such dwellings without r epl acer:i:ent , which roughly represents n future intake in the are ~ s concerned of a bout 13 , 000 per sons •

·-

."

'

.

'

'· .

;-,

',L


TlOl

23 .

1355 PllRT C- 4

Residential Density and Congestion .

64 . A residential density survey undertaken in connection with the preparation of the "City of Manchester Plan 1945" , provides reliable und f a irly detailed information on net densities in terms of dwellings per acre . This information, r evised where necessary, together with the fi gures for the aver age num,ber of persons per house in various parts of ·the City; has been used in com.piling the Net Populat i on Density Map ( 1 ( 4 ) ( i i ) ) •

Net Density

65 . .fir-.. a ccommodation surv ey has not been made and the Net Accommodat ion Density Man (1 (4)(1) ) has not therefore been produced. It.. was considered that the Net Population Density Mup and the Age of Buildings Mo~ themselves reveal ed an obvious problem of congestion and slum condit i ons , f ar l a r ger than any with which it might reasonably be expected the City could dea l during the develop~ent plan period . Moreover the Medical Officer of Health ha s alr eady indicated certai n priorities for slUL1 clearance , which again cover ~ur mo re properties than could possibly be denlt with during the next 20 yea rs . For these reasons, it was felt that the 66 . Net Accommodation Density Map could provide no information on congestion which , for purposes of the first Development Plan, would be of more value thnn that alrea dy uvailnble . The following t cJ ble runplifies the 6? . information shown on the Net Popul a tion Density Map and emphasis~s the extent of the congestion problem which is i.mnedia tely apparent . T/iBLE ~t lmate

- ·- - -

.

I '

.

5.

or _Houses i ~I:§pchester at a Net or more than 24_ t o the acre.

Resi~enti~-

~~~-1~~ ... --- ...

_.

--- -- - ------- - - - - -- - - ------·· - ·-

·· - -·-

Net Density , Approximate : Approximate Nunber 1 Approximate in Hou·s es · Equival'i!nt ,__ ..or . Houses. _ _.___ .! Proportion per I.ere Net Dens! ty , More ; Less · Total ! or Total in Persons ' than i tban I Houses i n . per Acre. i 70 yrs•• 70 yrs. ; I City. I , old; ' old. ! __J.

I

l over t;~ -1 ~1-,000-~ ~~ i 12, 000 ,--~··--- - ! [_~ =-~ -T ;;;;-~ :il~ s,CXX>f ~.CXX> ,~ Over ·48

l-~--""· 42__.+.~~ J ._~_:.

36

-

l fiO

110 - 130

t ___]

1 14,000+~2,600 l ~.~ .506 -~--·--~!'. ------·-··\ ~ 13 ,500

1

19, 000 I 32, 500 i

l~o

j

5g<,.C

!

:• 24 .. 3Q . : 90 _. 110 '! 5 , 300 . 14,200 I 19, 500 l 1 ~. lI 1----------------' ------ --r-~--1-- 1-----r-·---- --·-1 j

;

Totals

I

; 65, 800 . 52, 700 ' 118, 500 . '


l TlOl

24 .

1356 G:~o ss

Density,

68 . Gross Densities nr e given on the Land Use Map in respect of the existing predomint.intly residential nrens ref erred to in Part C- 1 paragraphs (34) to (36) , and s cheduled in Appendix 4 . In calculating gross densities only the more extens ive non-r es identi a l lo.nd uses have been excluded , e . g ., the centra l commercia l area , substontiul industria l a reas , severa l major open spaces and l arge areas of l and unsuitnble for bui_lding . 69 . A study of the g ross dens ities calculated for the inner residential ar eas , and of the sub- division of l and uses within t hese Dr ens gi ven in Appendix 4, show3 _that high overall densities obtfl.i..n ove r s ubs t untia l areas of the city despite the relief a ff ord e~ by the non-residential uses intermi~ with the actual dwellings . 70 . In this connection it is s i gnificnnt t o note that in nr eas 9 to 13 inclusive and 1 6 to 20 i nclusive, which c1 re all within a r adius of 2 ml,les from the Town Hol l, the following conditions obtain : -

Total Net Res i denti al i\.rea

1 , 307 Acres

Total .l\r ea of Primnr y Schools

35

II

Total Area of other Building Us es .

665

II

Tot al Open Spoces (Public Gnd Priva te) Not included ih above a reas O~ia inly Rnilvmys and Vac nnt Land)

Totnl Gross .Ar en Totctl Populotion Overall

N~t

Density

Overall Gross Density路

58 308

a

2 ,373 Acres -151,345 Persons 116 n/ Acre 64

II

;a

This info rmation shows that it .is mainly the are路u occupied. by "other building us es" which detern::ines the v ari ntion 路between net a.no. gross density . These nr -e for the most part industri nl und commerci al uses and not the type of use a.ncill ary to 'h ousing development , so thnt to thi s extent the gross d.ens ity which by reosonable stnndurds is in itself excessive (see paragr a ph 94} is n Jt a.true meas ur,e. of t h e living conditions in these mos t densely popul ated a reas . It i s considered that in r es pect of such ureas n study of net densiti es r evea.l s far more cl ectrly the extent and locntion of the c on gestion problem nnd indic ot es the broad a r eas in which r edevelopment on co~prehensiv e lines is essential, if s ntisfctctory liv ing cond iti ons are to be provid ed . 71 .


TlOl

25.

1357,

I

I ..

It is pointed out tha t the terms "net" and "gross 0 density h ave the meanings ass igned to them in Circul ar No . ~3 {Report of Survey), issued by the Ministry of Town and Country Pl anning in June, 1949, viz: -· Dens i ty is the density per acre of l and occupied solely by n l ayout of dwellings of any type , including the curtil nges of such dwellings , nny small public or private open spaces i ncluded in the layout , und hulf the width of any street on which these l ands abut except Trunk, Class I and Class II roads where onl y 20 feet of the width of such road is included • ~et

.~ros? Densitl us a pplied to existing conditions is simply the density per acre of l and · used predominantly for r esidential purposes , but including mixed uses of a ll types in addition to the actual dwellings. As applied to future development, the mixed uses included in the tot al uren ure only those anc illary to. housing development , e . g ., schools , shops , etc . · (see Append ices 5 ond 6) .


TlOl 1358 ;I?MT

c -

5

Residential

pevelopm~nt

and

ged~v~~Q_~en_t_•. .

.

4~§.~~~m ent-2.f_Ho~sing Need~ .

Determining Factors (

72 . T.:1e four factors de tG:rmining the housing need of the City are QS fol l ows :-

(a)

;

· ( b)

1

• I

Overcr owding Natural chunge in Populotion

. ( c) ··Mi&r at ion (d )

Redevelopment

73 . Fr om the informnt i 'on given on residentia l · densities and c1ge of property it i s·appar ent that , on the bnsis of· crny r easonabl y assessed house building progrcrmme for Manchester , it will tC1ke . upwar ds of 50 yenr·s to r epl nce houses which : :i lrecidy are or which during this pe~i od ure likely to become unfit for hnbitation . The housing need res·ult ing from the clear ance of such dwellings will obviously be affec ted by mi gr ot ion trends and n a tural popul ation changes , but little val ue could be attached to nny fo r ecasts of these changes covering so long a period , and it is therefore i mpr acticable to assess with any accur ac y an ultimat e housing need arising from redevelopment . Consequently it is in fact impra cticable to estimate lvTo.nches ter' s tot:1l housing need or at tempt to suggest when living co.nditi ons are l ikely to be satisfactory thrcughout the Ci ty .

For the purposes o:f the Development PL.in, it is considered sufficient to indicate broadly the hous i rig need which is i:mmedintely etpparent as uffected by migr<:.1t ion and populntion trends capable of reasonably accur ate nssossment on the bas is of the Registrar General ' s forecasts for 1971.

74 .

ImmediDte Hous ing Need

This upparent need C<1l culnted as obh1ining on 1st July, 1951, ma y be expressed ns fo l lows :-

75 .

( a)

q_y_~rc ro~<?::i:_~~

Taken ets the num.ber of etpplicnnts on the Corporation ' s wniting lists who ore sub- tenants . Loco.l Authority Rousing

+ 12 , 800 dvrnllings

Privnte Licence H0using

+ 650 dwellings

- I

I

I

I 1

I


TlOl 1359

27. (.b) Natur al Cl::. o.nt..es in Po':')ul at ion as nn increase of 37 , 000 persons, based on the Reeistrar General's forec a sts for 1947- 71, a djusted i n the light of subsequent known ·c hanges , and for population overspilled dur ing the period . Assumed an aver age of 3 . 75 · persons per dwelling + 9 , 800 dwellings ~uken

{ c) Migrat i on.

A net outward volunt ory movement over the. 20 years of·a~proximutely 20,000 ~e r sons ha~ been assumed. T!!is is r elated to future priva te l icence buildi ng ond is expl.ctined ful ly i n paragr a phs. {81) ond {82) • A housing relief amount ing to 4,600 dwell ings has been t oken as expla ined in paragraph { 83) · · - 4 , 600 dwellings ( d) Redevelopment .

Taken as tho dwellings which the Medical Officer of Health estimated in 1942 as being unfit for human h a bita tion by Housing Act standards. lll3 mentioned in pa r a graph (49) this estima t e may n ow be l ow , but it is sufficient to indic at e the approxima te d i mensions of this particular housing ne·ed as existing a t present . Mos t of the houses to be cl ear ed during the next 20 ye.ors for spec ific· . . prop osal s of a non residential character would be included in thi s ca tegory and no further allowance is mode in this respect . · .+ 68 , 000 dwellings Totul i!nmedintely apparent housing need .86,_§_50_ dwellings • .A.ssessment o.f House Building Capaci t-y- ~ ·· Basic Assumpt ions

II

I.

76. In calcula ting the housing potential of the City for the next 20 years , an allocat ion of dw0ll ings to Manchester h as been assumed , regardless of the f a ct that insufficient l and is a t present avoilnble to the City for the construction of · such dwellings. 77. N'o concrete propos als a.re as yet available for the housing of more thon o small proportion of the over spi ll population , but for the purpose of thiR annlysis it has beem assumed thot further nrrnngements will be mnde for the necessnry overspill development (v:ithin the assll1!1ed . overall nlloc ution) to be undert ake n either by Man chest e r, or on Man.chest er ' s behnlf by some .c.t ller nuthority , utilising, if nec es s ary , part of the present Munchester l abour r es ources likely to be r elensed by the reduct~on in the r ate of house building within the c i ty, r esulting fr om n short age of sites .


-- l

TlOl 136o L0col Authority D•1o ellin~

to be Constructed

29. ?8 . The totul number Of Locnl Authority dwellings to be constructed for Manchester people ' · between the 1st July, 1951 und 1st Ju.ly,19?1 , is estimated us follows : (a)

~.9.9_~~ -..-0-~t h ority

Housing (Assumed 1Uloca tion )

First five years nt a r ate of ~,000 dwellings per year 10 , 000 dwellings Subsequent fifteen yea rs at a r ote of 2,400 dwellings per year 36 , 000 (A 2()7'b increase in · productivity has been nsnumed) ( b)

_Ad ~i tj_onal

Housing o.lready ?!r anged by other authorities By

Cl1eshire County Council ot

n r ate of 30 dwellings per yea.r for five years

Lnnc a shire County Council at a rote of 150 dwellings per yeor for three years -

150

"

By

Total

Privette Licence Dwellings to be Constructed

450 46 , 600 dwellings

?9 . The assumed allocation for priva te lic ence dwellings is as follows: First five years ot a rate of 400 .dwellings per year 2,000 dwellings fifteen years r:t a rat.e of 480 dwellings per year (A 20% increase in productivity has been assumed) Total

S~bsequent

- ? , 200

- 9 , 200 ·dwellings

80 . It will be not ed that this total grea tly exceeds the number of a pplicants on th·e present privnte licence wa i t ing lis t, o.s given in item (a) pnragroph (?5),i . e . ,650 . The demand for private licences is however one wh ich year by year is likely to rema in f nirly const ant and the present wait ing list in no way ref lec~s the . proba ble number of ·this type of dwel1ing required over the 20 years . It hr.1s in f act been nssumed tha t the whol e .of the suggested al locntion will be t olcen up by Manchester people during th i s period.


TlOl 1361

29 .

Voluntary Migration. due to Privote Licence Bt:.ilding

81.

.AJ3 sites f or .only about 3, 400 private

licence dwellings are available'. to the City at present, this assumption implies that the r ema ining 5, 800 dv·:elli ngs will be constructed . i n over spill areas a nd is equi valent to assumi ng o voluntary migration of svme 20,000 persons. The figures published by the Registrar Generctl show that on· Dn .::~nnuol turnove r of approximately 80 , 000 :;or sons , the net outwa rd .movoment from the City during the post three yeDrs has m.10 unted to only about 5.0 pe rsons. This would suggest theit unles s ther e is any outstcnding change in economic conditions , whi ch cc?nnot be foreseen at present , no gener nl voluntary movement out of the City will toke plnce , other then that occasioned by housing needs. For th i s re::.~ son , no nllowance h~rn been made for volunt nry migr at i on during the 20 year period, beyond the 20 , 000 }iersons r eferred t o in the previous pc1rngr uph. 82 .

Housing Relief due to Privnte Licence Building

I~

It is impossible to forecast accurat ely the extent to whi ch the c onst ruction of- priva te licence dwellings will relieve the demand. on Local Authority housing , but for the purpose of this nnnl ysis it hos teen assumed that 5()% of the dwellings to be built would ass ist t he planned housing progrOlillD.e either directly, by ncco:cnmodnting persons who would otherwise require a LocGl Authority dwelling, or indirectly by f r eeing an existing house in the City. In · other words of the 9 , 200 dwellings constructed , 650 will satis fy the present waiting list, and n furthe r 4 , 600 can be further offset against t he over all caloulnted h·o us ing need . ·rhe r emaining 3 , 950 ~re ussumed to be available f'o r persons who, during the 20 ycnrs , will apply spec ifica l ly for this type of dwelling, but who will not possess nn e~r.isting house Drnl whose requirements cnnnot be fo r eseen in tho c·alculuted ho<.is ing need, that is for the most purt, persons n ewly mD rried or about to be mQrried . 8 3.

The housing relief amounting to 4 , 6 00 dwellings i s tho.t given i n item (c) pn.ragrnph (?5) and is , i n effect , the relief as sumed to r Gs ult from the construction of 9 , 200 priva te licence .dwellings nnd f r om. the impl i ed volunta r y migr~-'ltion of approxima tely 20 , 000 ?ersons • 84 .

Ifousing Capacity to be offset ugoinst co.lcul:::ited housing need

Tile total number of dwel~.ings likely to be cvniluble for Monchester pe0ple during the ne~t 20 yenrs on whi ch the c ulcul a tion o~ -the housing "orogrn.mrae and the consequent overspill hus . been based , i s ther efore 46 , 6 00 + 4 , 6-00 + 650 , i. e . 51 , 850 dwellings, against the roughly oal~ul ated immediately appar~nt need of 86 , 650 dwellings .

85 .


Tl Ol

30.

1362

_Hc:i~s ~ng

Gener3l Poli cy

PrograIEEl~~

The proposed housing progrcunm.e i s based . on the ossumpt i on tha t priori t .y must be gi veil to 路 :86 .

( o)

'rhe reli.e f of overcrowding by the eliminati on of ths "s ub- tenant" wa iting lists duri ng the 20 yenr pe r iod .

( b)

The housing of the anticipated natural increase in the population to avoid further overcrowding.

( c)

The hou::::ing of per路sons displocecl from..

individuol houses condemned from time to time a8 unf i t for habitotio~ , and f r om houses demolished to make way for new development of a non-r esidential chorncter. After thes e essential needs hnve been met the ba l ance of dwellings likely to be a voiloble , wi thin the tot~l estimated building co pocity , will be devoted to residential r edevelopment in the slum ar eas . Programme

87 . The ullocotion of dwellings agains t these v ar ious needs may bo expressed as follows :-

(u) Overcrowding Local Authority Housing . I ..

12 , 8 00 dwellings

Private Licence . Housing (se e item ( o ) pa r agraph_ (75)_).'

650

~~~~~91 --~~_?_E_E_32S~-~~ Popul~~ -io~

See item ( b) paragr a ph 9 , 800

( 75)

( b) Individunlly Unfit. Houses Based on recent experi ence ond est~moted nt 370 ~er year ( exclusive of unses likely to occ ur in t he 20 yenr redevelopment CTrons) 7,400 (c) Houses to be Demolished f or路路-NewN id t i.Ql"

on-Res en - - -- ---

D-ev~}:~pm8!1J::-

Mostly cont ained within the 20 yea r r edevelopment a reas . The only signif ic C1nt e~ception is in respect of demolition for high\\"nys work outside the redevelopment 1, 150 or ens (curri ed forward ) 31, 8 00

"


Tl Ol 1363 .

31 .

brought forwnr d (d) _?esidentinl Redevelopment

31, 800 dwellings

The bal ance of the effective housing capacity (51, 8 50) , i.e., the number of new dwellings which c an be us ed to replace slum dwellings delibera tely demolished in redevelopment schemes - 20,050 Total

51,850 dwelli:igs

~~-@g_p rds _f_or !(esl:den_tinl p~_y~). o pment .~e<!_e_ye~~!!len_!;..!

and

New Development. 路

88. ./:1.s at 1st July,1951, the sites remaining nvnilable to Manches ter for the construction of Local Authority dwellings number opproximately 11 , 200.and a re mainly in the undeveloped parts of Wythenshawe, thG Blockley and Ch[lrlestown new development area in north Manchester, and on land in the Bowlee are n within Middleton Municipal Borough but in the ownership of Manche s ter Corpora tion. Det ailed l nyouts have a lready been 路 approved by the City Council for mos t of the development in thes e areas, and in respect of Bowlee, ngreement in principle hos been reached with the. L0ncushire County Council . The ess ential fe ntures of the lnyouts for t he areas within Mci.nchester are shown on the Town Map in the Development Flem ond tho consequent brond l nnd uses applic obl e nt the end of the plan period for these new development ur eas are given in Appendix 2 .

Redevelopment .

89. . No detailed l ayouts hav e been npproved for redevelopment areus however , and the c alculotion of the residential ncco:mmodct ion likely to become nva il nble in pnrticul ur a.re l.ls cons equent upon redevelopment h ns been based on theoretical gross density stnndords . A) pendix 5 shows the s uggested theoretical planning stnnd nrds for n redevelopment neighbourhood of 10,000 pers ons and ADpendix 6 shows the theoretical stund ords for a. district of 50 , 000 persons c omprising five such neighbourhoods .

90 .

Densities

91. These sta.ndflrds nr e based on an overage net accommod ation density of 90 h abit able r ooms per ncre . The City Council hove res olved thot in principle this net densit y should not be exceeded in redevelopment in any port of the Ci ty . 1~.ssuming th nt Loc nl Authority dw el~ings will continue to be built ot on average size upproximotely the so.me as ~h nt a pplicable ~'t the present time,i.e., 4 . 1 habi t able rooms, this net density may be express ed ns 22 dwellings per ~ere .


'

TlOl

32 .

1364

92 . For the purpose of calculciting gross ·. densities it hns been ussumed tha t although the initial tenancy of new dwellings mny be on the baoid of on occupancy r nte of 1 person per h<Jbit<.1bl e room, over a period of' time this occupancy r ote will fnl l . Invest iga tion of well establ ished Cor poration housing development in M.1nchester suggests (tn eventual occupancy r ate of nbout 0 . 82 persons per ha bitable room, equivalent to 3.35 persons per average dwelling . This figu r e h ns been used t o determine the nwaber of dwellings necessury to c:cconmodote u particula r "settled vr :;;opul <:1 t ion fo r any res idential unit . r.rhe nncilla ry .co.rr.Jl!lunal pr ovi sions for a neighbourhood a.nd district , as shown in Appendices 5 and 6 , are rela ted to "settledn populations a nd not to the popul at ions which might initinlly be Dccoraraoda ted in the dwellings provided, if they ware l et to the maximum capa city. It is conside red thnt a possible initinl under- prov ~ sion of coI'.IG'lunnl f cic ilities r asulting from this 9r oc edure shoul d be ac cepted us prefera ble t o the over provision which otherwise would ul tiTacitely cirise . 93 .

Sumo.ary of Density St...-indards for redevel opIaent

The working density s t nnd nrds extra cted from Appendices 5 and 6 ore ns follows :-

94 •.

( u ) Net Residenti nl

_n·e-ri-s1ty- _ fn=:-::-Hn bi tubl e Rooms per Acre

90

90

22

22

74

74

Ha bitable Rooms per Acre

67

57

Dwellings l?er Acre

16

Dwellings per Acre Pers ons per Acre ( ult ir.ir.t t e ) (b) Gross Residenti nl

~~g_~.~~x -~~- : -

Persons p er Acre (ult im~te )

I I

. 5'4

13 . 8

46

.

~

I I \

II I


TlOl 1365

•.

33. ·.

I

95 . It is emphasised thot the gross densities a re maximum ones based on the prov is io.p. of only · .. the limited open sp ace . o.nd school plnying field · f acilities which it . i s considered must be provided a.ctuo.lly within the residential communities concerned • . They ar .e in f act the "dens iti es likely t o be npplicable to the a reo.s to be redeveloped during the next 20 yeors . In principle, however, in c alcula ting r es idential capac i ties , these densities mny only be appli ed t o gross nrens f rom which have been exc lud ed substnntio.l exi sting or potential open spaces s uitr.1ble fo r ·meet ing wholly or in pnrt the balance of open spa ce and school plo.ying field requirements. The octual gross density in any neighbourhood or . ~ist rict will be governed by the amount of such major open space conta ined therein . The detail ed standar ds and proposals in rega rd to open spa ce and school playing fi elds or e expl ained in Ports C - 8 and 0 - 18 .of this a nalys i s respectively. It is a lso pointed out that the gr oss d.ensities do not a ll ow for · major r oads anq special umeni ty treatm~nt for s uch :r oads . Land· .required for this purpose nust be excluded fr om the gross ureas to which the dens iti es a re a pplied. ·Redevelopment Propos a l ~.!. The r edevelopment a r eas proposed ore those containing approxima tely 20 , 050 slwn dwallings ( see item (d) par agr a ph { 8 7)) which i n the opi n ion of th e Med ica l Officer of Henlth should be deal t with first . 96 .

I

I "

I

Gross J.trens

97 . Thes e dwellings nr e conta ined within broadly defined ·a reas , shown on the Program.me Map in the Development ~lan, having a gross ocreoge of a pproxima tely ll55 n.c res. The pre>posed subdivision of this gross are a is os follows:277 acr es

Area intended for industrial use n

if

ft

" " "

"

c o.m.11erc . it' 1

use

occupied by r ni1vmys If

cemeteries

If

ff

177

It

26

"

10

" "

15

int ended for . cultur nl us e u

-

r esidenti al dist rict use Totnl

650 n - ·- 1,1.55 a cres

·-- -·- ·Of the 650 ac res intended for residenti ~l use , a cres will eventually be occupied by mn Jor tr~ ffic

19

roads , leaving 640 ncres to which con be. applied ·t;he gross distri c t density of 13. 6 dwellings per a cre as given in par ogrnph (94).


TlOl

34 .

1366 Return of Dwellings

98 . lulowing for a time l ag of 18 months between demolition and redevelopment the number of dwellings l ikely to be constructed by the 路 . end of the 20 yenr period is :37 x 640 4-.0

x 13.8

= 81?0 dwellings .

99 . Appendix ? summarises the numbers o.nd r es id ual lives of res identi al proper ties which would be cleared under these redevelopment proposal s f r om the gross arens. ref erred to in par agr aph ( 9? ) . 100. It i s ant icipated tha t mos t of the l and mode ava i lable by the clearance of r e$identi al pr opert i es within- the a reas not intended for r es.idential use will be t oken up during :the 20 yea r period . Fur ther ref erence to this matter is made in the sect i ons O_f this Gnalysi s dea ling with the particul ar uses concerned. Mixed Uses

101 . It is emphas i sed that the gros s a r eas r eferred to in pnragraph ( 9?) ore all a r eas of mixed uses conta ining substnntinl nt.n:nbers of industrial a nd commerci ol properties in add ition to the r esidential pr operties schedul ed i n Appendix ? . Although no dGt oiled redevelopment schemes 102 . hove been approved and although i n principl e i t is not i ntended that properties will oe demolished in advance of the termination of their useful lives , many of these non- residential proper ties ore already obsolete and it may reasonably be expected that t hey will be removed during the Developmen~ Ploo period to mC1ke WGY for a ppropri ate new development . This matter is of porticulnr -significonce 103 . in r egar d to the intended residential a rea s . Of the gross area of 640 acr es intended to be redeveloped for this purpose , [1 pprcxima t ely 425 路acres a r e now occupied by dwellings a nd the sites Of demolished dwellings , a nd ~nproxima tely 215 a cres by industry, CO!ilD.erce , shops and other non~ housing users . The theor etical pla nning standards proposed f or r esidential district development suggest that the sub- division of the -640 acres should be a bout 400 ucres for h ousing und 240 a cres for communnl facilities . 104 . On this basis and tak~ng into a ccount the fact tho~ the clearance of srnao of the ?xisting non- residential property should be poss ible . economically the r eby giving add itionnl worki~g space , it i s ' considered thot it will be pr acticable to plan the red evelopment in such n way thnt most of the requisite number of d路well i.~gs cnn be constructed on the lands cleared in the early stages , lenv~ng the les s essent i al communa l facilities to be provided l ntor, on ~ and l argel y occupied by non- resjd ential . proper~ies whose clenr nnce will not be pra.cticable for some c onsideruble time .


Tl Ol 1367

I

Redevelopment a.uring first five years .

~

35 .

1 05 . With regard t o the extent of r edevel opment likely to take place during the fi rs t five years . it i s envis a ged that this will be conf in ed us for us possible to the cleuronce of slum pr oper ty only in the areas intended for residential use,ond only o.r;i. l and intended wholly for housing purposes, wi th n view to ensuring the maximum r etur n of dwellings in the ea rl y stages . Advantage will also be t oken of small s ites already cleared , where the demolition of ~ few stQ!lding houses would result in n compa ct economic housing a r ea becoming avail nble . 106 . No decision hus been n ude on the propor t i on of the tot al housing res ourc es to be devoted to slum clea r amce work , i n the earl y stages of redevelopment . It i s likely however that during the first five yeQrs n ot more than a bout 3,700 new dwellings will be availa ble for the repl a cement of s lum dwellings del iberat ely demolished, thi s figure r esul ting from on Clll oc nt ion increasing progressively fr om about 100 in the fi r st yenr to about 50% of the tota l annua l output in the fifth yea r.

The b.rond areas from which it i s proposed t h e slum pr operty so dealt with would be t oken, are sh own on the Prog ramme Map .

107 .

Overspill by end of 20 year period .

0

P:r:-esent Avnilubi lity of H0using sites .

108 .

Basi s of

109 . The over spill development bt i ll to be arranged , in terms of dwellings , mGy be colculoted simply by deducting from the assumed 20 year alloc a tion of Loc nl Authori ty Dwellings (46 , 000 as 2iven in item {u } pa ragraph (78 )), these 11,200 dwellings fo r which l and is already nv nilable , together with the dwell ings whi cn it is es timate~ can be built on the land made ava ila ble f or housing purposes in ar eas within the city likely to be redeveloped 路within the next 20 years , i . e . 8 , 1'70 dwellings ns given in paragr nph ( 98 ). This . overspill omow;i.ts ther efore t o 26 , 630 dwellings . On cin ass~ption of 3 . 75 persons ns the initia l occupnncy fi gure for such dwellings (averuged over t he 20 years) this r epres ents a n overs pill of'. ci pproximot ely 99 , 700 per sons .

Ov~ r sp ill

Co.lculo.t ion.

'

-stated in par agr aph ( 88 ) suff icient land r ema i ns availa ble to Manchester for the construction of a pproxima tely 11 , 200 Loc al Authority Dwellings of which 3,940 wi ll be outside the City in Bowlee, and which in effect constitute initia l over spill development . .1.t>.;E.


TlOl 1368

36 . 8 UWU<:.1 r y

of Overspill

110. The total estimated overspill for the 20 yea r period may now be expressed as .follows :-

(a)

Planned Overspill

( l)

AlreQdy orron ged by Manchester at Bowlee

( 2)

(3)

(b)

.tiJ,rGcdy a rrnnged by Lnncashire o. nd Cheshire County Councils

_Dwell in~

Persons_

3 , 940

14, 600

600

2 , 300

Still to be n:rranged

26,630 .

Tota l Phmned Overspill .

31,170

99 , 700 116,600

Unplanned Overspill (Voluntary Migration) Due to private lic ence building on sites a ll ocated o.t Bowlee

250

900

Due to private licence building elsewhere (see paragra ph (81 ))

5,600

20 , 000

37 , 220

137,500

Total estima ted overspill from City at 路end of 20 year period

路-.


TlOl 1369

37. PMT C - 6

Industry.

Existing Oonditions ·r.md Ma:in Pro'blems . Distr ibution

Existing 1\Ieo.

111. The present .. distribution of industry in Manchester is shown on the L~nd Use Mop . It will be noted tho.t the mnin industrial a reas are related broadly to the r o.diai r oo.d a nd r ail approaches to the city centre , from t _h e north, north- east o.nd e o.st , particul arly the latter. The l a ck of o.ny substantial industrial ·development in the souther n half of the city is very marked . The mop also r eveals the manner in which industry is mixed wi·th resident i o.l o.nd other development in the inner nreas of the city . It does not, however , give a true measure of the extent of this mixed use , as much .of the industry which ho.s been al lowed to become esta blished in the p ~ st is ca rried out in premis es too sma ll to be shown ~t a scale of 6 inches to 1 mile. 112. _ Including the ind~striul development a lready est a blished in Wythensho.we, the tot al area at present devoted to industry in the city is a bout 1,800 a cres, or a bout 2 . 55 a cres per 1,000 of tot al population. As there i s virtually no unemployment_ in Manchester, o.nd therefore it may be assumed that the employing cc1 po.ci t y of existing industry is sufficient, this present ri llocntion of l nnd, which by any reasona ble plunning stnnda rds is , quite inodequnte, enphas ises the extent to which, for the most part, Manchest er ' s industry is ·. curried out under bndly congest ed conditions .

Plcmning objectives

113. From this very brief examination of the existing industrial conditions the mnin plunning problems to be solved are inrr:ied i nt ely a pparent and Dre : -

"

(a)

The need f or Ql.1 improved overall distribution of industry .

(b)

The need to elirainnte the mixture of industry with residenti al ond oth er uses , prevalent in the inne r a reas of the city.

( c)

The need to provide n mo r e generous alloc nt ion of land f or future industri al purposes so that '.improved working conditions may bo obto.ined .

Present o.nd Future Industrinl Structure •.. -"

" 114. The o.nalysis of the ind us trial ~tr~cture of Manchester i s bnsed l argely on s t nt1st1cs of unemployment insu~crnce boo k~ -~xchanged in recent ·years, a.s provided by the Ministry of Lobour , und on n menora ndum issued by t he Board o~ Trade in J anua ry,1950, denling with the Industri al Structure of Ma nchester County Borough up to 1948.


TlOl 1370

38 .

I nsured Worker s

115 . 1\S stated in paragraph {23 ) t he tota.l nlillber of ins ured worke r s i n Manchester, repr 0sents a bout 60% of the r esident civilian popul a tion . Co~pa rison of thi s with the fi gure of 46% for the North west Region ond 42~~ for GreDt Britc.tin as a whole , emphasises the f act that there i s D s ubstantinl net doily intDke of wo'r kors resident outside the ci ty .

Une.mploymGnt

116 . UnomploymGnt in Manchester has been maint oi nGd over r ecent years a t the l ow level of between 1 and 2% of t he i nsured population and hers thGref ore been ignored in the pres6nt cons ider<.J tions .

Subdivision of insured wor ker s .

Exoninution of the Boord of Trade fi gures ena bl es tha insured popul a tion to be s ub- divided int o the following ca t egories 117 .

TABLE 6 .

INSURED POPULATION .

---

- ----~- --- -------

Enpl oynent Gr oup

Proportion of Insur ed

Proportion of Tota l P.Jpu1L1tion

Popul a ti on ~

Mnnufocturing Industry

- %

43 . 7 6

26.• 27

I ndustry (extractive industry, essent i al services , buildi ng c:nd d0coroting cert ain d i stributive trodes , etc . )

1 6 . 89

10 .13

T:)tol Industry

60 . 65

36 . 40

39 . 35

23 . 60

100.00

60 .00

Non -M~nufacturing

Comm.e r c e, ~dministr a ­

tion, Profcssions , Distributive TTodes , etc . {not considered a.s port of ind us tri c.tl popul ation )

T~; t a l

-·· --·- ---·· -···--- -·-

---...·---·------· -- --·--·--

I

'


TlOl 1371.

39.

Changes in 118. The main source of ~~ploym.ent is provided Industrinl within the Chemi.col, Engineering , Textiles and Str t:.ct~e C1othing indust rial gr oups , cil t hough many other ~ndustries and trndes nre r epr esented t o n lesser ... ,. degree in Manchester's industrial structure. In view of the present uncerta.in na t i onnl and world economic and political situation it is i mpossible t o for~c ast wit h any ac cu~acy the p r obable · industrial str uctur e even 20 years a head . The effects of war or extensive re"'.'arm6:i:nent ore evi denced by the subst antial increase in importance of the Chemic al and Engineering industrie.s in Manch ester, at · the expense of Clothing crnd Text iles, during the late war cind early post war years . 119 . Whether or not such a chc.inge will be mciintoined , r~pe uted , or even reversed in the future i s 0 matter of pure conjecture ; and fo r this reaso.n , together with the foct thGt Manchester i s not wholly dependent on all or ony of the four main i ndustrial gr oups , as shown by the a bsence of unemployment, it has been considered pr efer a ble to project forward the existing industrial structure for the present purposes of industrial planning . · -

I

I I

I

I.

I I

...

II

120 . Appendix 8 sets out in columns2 , 3 and 4 Fut ure Industrial ·the proportions of worki ng and tot al popul at i ons , Structure and the consequent number of persons per 1 , 000 total popul a tion , which he.we been assumed c1s likely.. to be employed in the future , in the various i ndustries listed in column 1 of the : ·Append ix . These fi~ires a llow for a net daily intake of industri al workers r es ident outside the city • .This industrial inta ke represe~ts only about 3% of nll worker s in the city as the bulk of the ·t ot nl intake is comprised of offic e and other nonindustrial workers . 121 • Thi s information provides n basis . upon which con be cnlcul ated the nu...~ber of people l i kel y to be employed in th.G various types of industry, in rela t i on to the estimated future tota·1 populati on at nny particular time . ~roposed

Exist i ng Spa.Ce

nllocntion

Space Stand ar ds .

122 . In connection with the prepa r a tion of the 11 Ci ty of Mo.nchester P!Lnn 1 945" , questionno.ires were, sent out to industri al firms in the ci ty, from which informa tion r el nt ing to the space at pr esent devoted to various i ndust ries was obtnined . 1 23 . This information is given in columrn 5 , 6 and 7 of Append ix .$ , . whi ch show r espectivel y :-

• {a)

The built- up s it e a reas per 1 , 000 wor~ers as governed by the number. of s t or~ ys .1.n the buildings peculiar t o t he va ri ous indus tries .

· ( b)

The proportion of built - up to total s i te o:.cea. .

( c)

The tota.l site area per 1 , 000 wo rkers in the varicus indust ries .

(

,_


Tl Ol l372

--

124. These fiBures, which reflect the over age conditions obtaining within the city, h ove been co:mp<Jred with the figures re1L1ting to the more moder n in,dustri nl l ~ youts in Trafford Pnrk , and also , where .compa rison is poss ible, to figures for similar ·industry in Welwyn Gnrden Cit y . Proposed i ncr enses i n s ite area .

125 . i\.s n res ul t of this investigation , it is considered thnt the fut ure site or eo per 1, 000 -~i;orkers , necess.::::ry to secure ndeq_uate standar ds of d aylighting and ventil a tion nnd to ensure D proper res·erv:. 1 tion of spa ce between buildings, should generally be not l ess than 50% above the site nreo per 1, 000 vrnrkers exist i ng nt pr esent for p:..i r tic·11 ar industr i es . The only except i ons suggested or e in respect of the manufacture of bric!rn , · etc ., where -no increase appe<:rs nee ess nry , and of the chemicol industry ,_ where cJfter consult .:ation with represent<:.1tives of the industry, it was decided tha t a 25% increase woul d be ndequate . Column 8 in Appendix 8 shows these pr oposed site cireas per 1 , 000 employees , _and Column 9 shows the or eos expressed in terms ~f the futu r e site ocreage required for each industry per 1, 000 of the total popul:it ion .

126 .

Overnll Spnce Stund ords

12? . To arrive nt on appropri nte overall space standard i t was cons idered necessary to add to the stand<1rd for rret site area , ullowonce for r oads , recrea tional ·space , expansion and wastage . ~hese ~llowances nr e set out in Appendi x 9 . The overall sta.ndctr d so determined amounts t.J 5 . 21 acr es per 1 , 000 of total popul a tion, for a ll industriol requi r ementn . 128 . I E il.)pendix 10 this over all standard is subdivided to show the overa.11 s t a.nd or ds _considered necess a ry to cover future requirements for Special, General a.nd Li p,.ht industry . Th.ese ore as follows : -

Special Industry - 1 . 45 ocres per 1, 000 of tot al population . General

11

Light

11

Toto.l

- 2 . 38 --·-1·.-38-5 . 21 - - --- --·

II

It

!!

a

II

" " " "

" " 91

n

II

ti

"

ll

!!

Specietl I ndust ries may be br oadly defined·o.s those which in view of the r_:ssocioted a tmospheric pollution, smell or other obnoxi ous features , should be particula rly well sepnrated from nonindustri a l areas . Genero.l Industries comprisG hea vy but non- objectiona.l types of industry , and Light Indust ries , i ncluding the non- manufacturin g industriea , are those which by virtue of their r elative freedom f=om no~se and nuis ance c un nor mally be loca ted in closer pr oximi ty to nonindustriol a r eas .


------

Tl 0.1

------------ - - - - - ( \

41 .

1373

Ul~ imate_ In~':l_~tri al ~_e_q~ irements

North of River

!vie rs~~~

129 . As stated in Part A of this analys i s (par agr aph (21)) it i s i ntended that Wythenshawe . ( i. e . that part of the city south of the Ri ver 路 Mer sey) shall eventually become a self contained scttelli te r ather tha n a dormitory a r en , implying that as fnr as possibl e it shoul d be i ndustrially self supporting ~ The future indust ri al r equirements of Wythenshawe ar e therefo r e dealt with separ atel y .

Application 130. However, at present the industria l of development i n W~7 thenshawe is r elatively smnll , Sta ndards and the space stnndar ds obtaining ar e not reflected in .the annlysis of existing conditions for the city as n whole , as set out in Appendix 8 . To this extent , the proposed future st andards given i n pa r agr aphs (127) ctnd (128 ) .may be taken as relating to the older part of the city north of the River Mer sey, and as representing the degree of improvement in working conditions which is cons i dered to 路oe both desira ble nnd practi ca ble in t hat . part of the city. Popul ation tc be provi ded for.

I I I I

~

131. The tcta l ac r eage which should eventually be avail a ble for indus tri al purposes north of the River Mersey, and for which the long term. zoning proposals shoul d provide , is that which would satisfy these s uggeoted st und nr~ s for the ultimate r esident popul at ion. This population has been t oken as tha t L~kely to exist a t the time of peak overspill, i . e ., when all congested housing conditions will have been el iminated , some 50 year s hence or thereabouts ~ Thi$ is the most realistic figure to use , as Dlthough substantial Dreci.s of more recent uncongested property would st ill not have been redeveloped. Qt th nt ti.me , redevel opment -when it did t ake pl ace would probably be at much the some densities 路 as now exist , and the capacity of these a.rec1s , ol though in some cases theoretically capa ble of being incrensed , would no doubt remain substuntiolly uncha nged . 路 132 . Jui cstimnte of this type must obviousl y be 'a very approximate one, but it provides the only basis upon which ren son~) ble z oning pr opos ols cun be determined.

Ind us t ri ai. zoning .

By tri 0.l Gnd error , the areas p_ropos~d primarily for industria.l use ~orth of the ~iver Mer sey hbve been balanced ngainst the requirements of the popul a ti on which," hD ving_y~ gard ~o all other non- residenti 81 l a nd uses , is estimated as likely to exist in the nrens re.m.n ~ning availa ble for residenti al purpos es a t the time of peak overspi ll .

133 .

J


·42 .

Tl Ol

1374

134 . The selection of the f utur e indus triol .zones hos been undertaken with a view to a chieving the thr ee fund amental obj ectives of industrial pla nning referred to in pn:ngr aph ~~ ~ 3) • . The provision of improved working cond1~1ons i s . dealt w.ith o..utomo..t i cnlly by the pr ocess expla i ned in the l D.st three pci.r ogr nphs but .in ott'.empt ing t o provide f'or on improved future dist ribution ni;d fo r the elimino.tion of ·m ixed uses , the fo l l ovn ng f.c.ct ors hove hDd to be tnl{en i !lto a co ount :(o )

t he extent to whi ch , either by tradition or by rea son of ess enti al na tural f eatures , cortnin indust ri es hove become establ i shed in part iculnr areas •

.(b )

The future dispos i tion of main c or.ununi cnt ions.

( c}

T~e eff ect of the proposed highway network in defining fut ure boundaries for industria l areas ·.

(d )

The r edist ribut i on of . popul a tion within the city.

( e)

The need to s og:tegat e , ns f ur as i s pr actic abl e , the Speci al , Gsner a l and . Li .:)lt categori es of industry· and to · ensur e th e pr o per locat i on of the or~µs .. set aside for thes e ca tego ries in relation to the r es id ential zones . ·

(f)

ThG noed to ensure that additional l and required for future industri <',11 purpos es i s , as f f\ r ns possibl e ·l ewd ·occupi ed by the l east vnluo ble pr operty which it mi ght reo.sonCt bly b e expected would in ony event have to be clear ed i n due course in or der to eliminate congested living' conditions i n tho ci ty .

135 . The i ndust r i a l zones c ctunlly propos ed north of the Rive r Mer sey or e shown.on the Town Ivi<.:p i n the Dev.Glopment Plnn ond in total comprise npproximatel y 2, 2.6 4 ncr e.s . The populat i on estimated f or the tim.e of peok overspill cm.aunts to t.~pproxinw tely 420 , 000 yier sons , i.vho· ·on the basis of 5 . 21 a cre~ per 1 , 000 ~er sons would requ i r e a tot al ind us tria l ocreoge of 2 , 190 ocres . 136 . The VC! rious zones proposed ~1 r e Q.cs cribed in deta il in Appendix 11 and on indication is gi ven of the t ype of i ndust r y (S~ecinl , Gen eral or Lif;ht) which i t i s suggos ted might a ppropriately be onrri ed out i n ench a rea . I I'this c onnection, it is nnprecia t ed thnt in pra ctice such segre&.;\ltion would not be r i gi dl y enforc ed but the !}ropos al s or e put forw nrd ns G guide to industric:l ists nnd to f a cilit a te the determino.tion of f uture pl<.1nning ct.ppl ic Dtions for i ndus tri::1l devel opment . H::<v ing rega rd to this qunl i fic ntion the zoning proposals may be summa ri sed .:.1s f0l lows: -

~

I

- I


TlOl

1375 Theor e tic nl

-Ri9.~~Jre.!llent­

Ac res •

Spec i nl . Industry~

' Gener a l I D dD.stry

Li ght I ndustry . (inc lud ing domestic indust ry) Toto l

611

610

1,081

1,000

5?2

580

2,264 Acres

2 , 190 Ac-:es

Conside r ation is r.1 ls o being given to the probnble . need for s:rnnll purely domestic indust ri c1l zones (reppir gnr nges, build e r s ' ynr ds , small bakeries , etc.), add iti onal to those conta ined within the Light Industrial Zones ref erred to nbove, to serve the out~r residenti al arens in the southern ha lf of th e c ity, The pr ec i se boundari es of su ch zones will be dep endent on s u bsequent det a iled planning and they a r e n ot s h own therefor e on the Town Map . The l ocal i ties unde r consideration are however ns fo ll ows :(n)

Proposed Wi t hington Dist ri ct Centre Ar~a.

(b)

An nr en e.::ist of Princ.ess Roa d to include the existing Princess Rood Bus Depot .

(c)

./ill [lr -en north of Fa llowf i eld Stat i on and

east of Wilms l ow Ro od cont ai ni ng sever al existing we ll estnblished domest ic industries . (d)

.An area close t o Cl1orlton G:i:-~c n a l so

conta ining existing domest i c industries . It i s p o inted ou t that the ricr enge involved in th ese zones· would be r 'elcit i vcly small and would not ma.te::..--iolly a ff ect t h e br ond ha.l nnce between th e ultimate tota.l indust ri al provisions and theoret ic a.l requ irement s given a bove . In.dustric'-1 Require.men t s fo r Wythen shnwe . 13? •. As st nted in pnr ngr <.'L:Ph ·. ( 129) t ·he industrial · requirements for Wyt h enshuwe ~-' re based on the ass umpti on that ultimotely it should be industrinlly sel f suppor ting. In nddition it h ns a lwa ys been · a.pprec i~1ted that the opp.or:tunity exists , nnd should" b e tnken , fo r the provision of idenl working conditions , in keeping with the r el ativ ely s pacious char acter of the Wythenshnwe proj~ct as o whole .

Industri nl Structure

138 . It i s impossible to forecast precisely the size nnd type of the industrial c o.r:i.cerns who wil l evcntunlly be a ttract ed to Wythenstiawe , but for the purpose of determining the o ppropriote acreage to be r eserved, an industri al structure ~o s ass umed · comprising a r nnge of industries con~ i~ered . . n.ppropri nte to Wythonshawe , in qunntit i es sufficient to provide a balctnced male/female empl oyment for the ultimate populntion esti:m.c:ted at 91 , 000 persons . . -.-- -- .. ..- ... -~

OF :


4.4.

T101 1376

139 . I n principle ~he S~e?ial.industri~s and t he heovier General indus~ries includ~d in the structure for the mo..jor port of the ci-ty wer e excluded f r om the suggested W:rthenshawe structure, their loss being compensated for by increased . . provisions of the lighter i~dustries , e . g . , Cl othin& · Electrical Engineering , Food, Drink, etc ., pa rticulc rly suited to \'v~1 thenshuwe . The proportions of the various industr ies were so ndj u~ t ed that t~cy would in total _p~ovide fo~ a working population of about 33 , 200 , i . e . 36. 4A of the res i dent populat ion (s ee Tabl e 6 paragr aph 117) , including having regard to the mole/f emal e employment ratio fo r each industry r epresented , a bout 12 , 30Q females who , on the basis of the present overall r a tio for the city as o whole · ( 377.: femnles) , would be cont a ined i n Wythens howe ' s wor king popul n t~on . SPuce Standar ds

It was considered thot if oppropr i a te spcice stand nrds were used in conjunction with this t heoretica·l ly satisfoctory structure , the land requirements so determined should then be reasqnGbly adequate for the industry actually est ablished iil Wythensh(twe in the future .

1 40 .

141 . In this connection , it wns· cons i dered that the industl'.ial development would be of the trading estnt e typo . A gen er a l increase of 100% on average site area& existing at present in the city for the particular industries concerned was adopted , as against the 500 increase proposed for the r est of tho .city. This was determined ofter investi gating the E:tandords obtaining in established trading estates elsewhere in the country . 142 . On thi s basis the necessary s ite arens were calculated for the nssumed quantities of each industry represented in the theoretical structure , and ullowance wns made for roads , recreat iona l space etc •• In total the l and requirements amountGd to 390 a cr es . · 143 . It will be noted tha t this is equivalent to on overall standard of only 4 . 30 acres per 1 , 000 of total popuiation compared with the 5. 21 a cres per 1 , 000 proposE.d for the remainder of the city, despite the f act thnt o more generous l .'.lnd a.lloc ation hns been ossumed f or the industries in Vf: -:.ti.ensh.'.lwe . This ~} ri ses f r om the f act that tho indus tries excluded from the ·wythenshawe structure .i. e . cher,iicols, hea vy engineering, etc . are thosD which requi~e the fuost ·space , whereas the comperisClting in·c reases ar e f or the most part in respect of indust ries ·such as clothing, light engineering, etc ., which can. be car r ied on in . buildings of several stories , and for·which , in fnct , flatted factor~es ore being cons idered .

·,

. I


TlOl 1377 Industria.l Zoning

45. T~e three i ndustrial orens already a pprove~ as pa.rt of the overall plan for Wyth enshowe are shown on th~ Town M::p and nre as foll ows:-

144.

Shnrston

Industri ~l

Ar.e u

110 Acres

Round thor n

"

108

"

Eoss Nook

11

151

l1

Tota l

369 Ac res.

This tot al is nbout 57; l ess tha n the theoretically c alcula ted requirement , but in view of the necess a.rily empiric a l nature of the assessment no significance can be a ttnched to the discrepancy a.t this stage . At the sa~e time consideration is being given to the temporary r eservation for industrial purposes of D further 93 ac res of l and south of the lVfoss Nook industrinl zone , at least until sufficient experience hos been ga ined to confirra t h e ndequa.cy or otherwise o~ the three zones ulreody appr oved. 145.

In~~st rin~

I

Development a.nd Redevelopment up to 1971

146 . I n reviewing the industri al ~roblem in Ma nchester, it wns imm.edia tely a ppurent that, . ha.ving regard to the likelihood of building re.$trictions r emD ining in force to som.e extent , und to the f act thDt, except in Wythenshawe , l ond for n ew industria l development could for the most pnrt only be made nvnil oble by the clenr unce of ' resid entia.l property, no substanti a l progress c ould be expected during the next 20 year s towards the proper redistribution of industry in the older p ~ rts of the city.

o

I Purpose of Long term I ndust ri al Pl ~rn

For this reason , it was considered desir a ble that the Development Plan in respect of Industry, should outline the br ood l ong term policy which the Corporation intend to adopt in resolving the industria l problem , and indicate the nreas in which indus tria l development would be enc ournged . . . 147.

148 . The changes of use from industrial to non-industri :Jl and vi c e- versa , implied by the Town Mnp , can only b ·e brought r1 bout gradually over a considerable peri od , and i n practice it m.c1y well prove necessary t o a ccelerate or re tard these ch anges uccording to the r el a tive urgency. of l and requirements for the uses involved, as it a rises from time to time. So f ar a.s the next 20 years ure concerned , Objects of ·149. Short Term it is only necessury to ensure that the I ndustrial industrial development and r edi st ribution which does t ake pla ce is directed towards the Planning . a chievement of the ~ong ter~ ~ndustrial plan , a nd a lso that, within the l.µn1ts of a ccuracy possible , the over all plnnn1ng.p~opos a ls allow for ma.king l nnd ava ilable suffi cient.to uccommodnte industry d i splaced from its present loc ution, either volunt nrily or as a r esult of plnnned. redevelopment .


TlOl

46 .

1378

Displace ment of Industry.

Vli th regard to the d.is plac ernent of ind us t r y from Gre as intended for non-industrial use, · · . financial and economic conside r a tions make it most unlikely thct any substantial displacement will toke pla ce in advance of the time when the properties in which the industries a re c a rried out reach the end of the ir useful lives . Except perhnps in isola ted c os es which may occur from time to time , when the remov al of some industri al property is cssenti ol . to the redevel_opment propos a ls , it i s a pparent that before enforcing any desirable redi stribution of industry the Corpora ti on will h ave to wait until the costs of a cquiring industria l sites ond properties and of· meeti ng co:r.ipensn tion cln i.rn:s for disturbance ore at o minimum. In principle this is the brood policy which tho Council intend to a dopt . 150.

For these re nsons the assessment of the industry likely to be disploccd during the next 20 years ccn only be of o very opproxim.<1te n a ture ~ It h os , in f a ct , boon ba sed on the DVo ila ble information r el ctin g to the a pproxim.ote re s i~un l livos of industrial buildings , which as expla ined in Purt C -2 pnr ogr nphs 52 and 53, must in its elf r emcdn subject to confir.mat i on in deta il .

151.

152 .

The os s umpt ions made a re

DB

follows : -

(a )

Thn t industri nl premi ses having on estimcrted r es idua l life of lGss than 20 years , within the nreas to be red evel op0d for nonindustri al purposes durin~ the next 20 years , will , s ubject to c ertain exceptions , all be fiisplnced somet ime during the period .

(b)

That industri a l premises existing elsewhGre in the city in a rens not intended for industry Qnd hDving on estimnted residuul life of los s than 10 year i, . will be displ aced sometime during the 20 year -... .' period, as a result of voluntary action on the pa,rt of the fi rms c·cncerned .

153.

On this bas i s the nrens nrG es tinnted as follO\'V'S :.ti..roa in Acres

(a) Industry d is pl a c e d within 20 year re development nr ens ( b) Industry displ aced voluntarily fr om future non-i ndust ri a l area s els-ewhere in city . · Totnl cstirrwted displn cement up to 1971

l

11

19

3

19

16

4

30

35


. .. ~·

Tl Ol

47 .

1379

.'

'

Note: I tem (Cl) exci.ludes the solid ,.belt of i ndustry loc.a ted alongside the Rochdale Cnno.l in the 1Hles· ~lC', tting . redevelopment · oreo. Although much of this property ht:.H!il Dn ~stimated life of .l ess than .20 yea.rs it is considered that the industry is too concentro,ted and well esto. blished for disp:J,.ocemeni1 to be envisaged d uring the next 20 yerirs , and that by the end of the period the use wi l l remain substantially unchanged •. Land avail abl e for re:.. location of i ndus try.

1 54 . The area. north of the ·River Mersey , which i s· available or is likely to become available dur ing the 20 year period for the re- locat ion of i ndustr y d i splaced , consists of the vacant and cl ear ed sites already ex~sting in hll the future i ndust rial zones · together with the a reas occupied by dwell ings a nd other .non- industrial . buildings locnted in future industrial zones and likely to be demolished. under the 20 yenr redevelopment pr ogrcurune out;Lined in Port -C- 5 . Th ese ureas may be summarised as follows :-

Areas in Acres

Ezis.t i ng vacant nnd cle.ar ed areas

6

Areas to be cleared und&r redevelopment proposals

29

82

1

35

140

4

Total Co.rn.purison of Estimated r oquire.GJ.ents and DVctilctbili ty ,

58

3 _,

15q . In considering the r el ocation ! of industry displaced i~ must be envisaged that ii' progress is to be ·made towards the oc hieli-ement 1 of s atisfac tory working c ondi t l.ons ~ relocat i on should t nke place , wherever pos s ible, · in ncc~rd once with the r eo.ommended futur e spuce standard~ . These imply an ovcrctll increas e on existing iareas of approximately 90% for Special Industrites, 120~ for Genernl Indus tries nnd 125% for Light Industrfes . 156 . On this basis the area requi red' for the relooation of the industry estimated ris likely to be displaced during t he 20 yGctrs ( :~J.':lragruph ( 153) ) , would bG ns follows :-

Specinl Gen<~r al .

8 Acres

66

<>

·Light

" . .'

79

"

.. .


TlOl

48.

1380

These requirements mny be compared w:Lth the estimated avail ability .of l and given in par agr nph ( 154). NE.glecting ~he Spec~ul Industry for which there is n substantia.l mnr gin of snfety·, the estimn.ted avoila bili ty of l and fo r Genernl and Light industry i s in total just adequate to meet the maximum theoretical requirement. The fact thot tnken separ ately the a vailability and requirement for thes e two groups do not compare f ci.vourDbly is unimportant at this s t a.ge .os there must obvious ly be considerable overla.pping ( as mentioned in par agraph (136)), particula rly between the Gener a l a nd Light groups, in the development of the future industrial zones.

· 157,

158. No account hos been token of the industry which, when displaced · as o ~esult of redevelopment, might be relocated out side the city to accom:pGny the over spil l of popul a tion during the 20 yeo.r period esti mnted in Pnrt C-5 as likely to amount to appr oxima tely 137,500 p0rsons . In the absence of firm proposals f or · overspill development it is i mpossibl e to s a y how much overspilling of industry will be prnctico. ble ond .:1t t he present time this ca.n only be c ons idered as a. probable mec1Sure which , to some extent , will r elieve the demand for industri cll sites in the city a.nd provide some margin of s a.f ety i n tho bl't l ance of r equir ements ond ava.ilnbili ty outlined in t,P,e for egoing par a graphs. Industrinl Development during 20 yea.r period Wythensha.we

159 . In addition to th~ redistribution of industry which os explnined in t he foregoing pnr agrophs , mi ght reos onnbly be expected to t ak e plnce nor+,h of t he River Mer sey during the next 20 ye::t rs, it is envi snged that ·the development of the ore ci.s reser ved for industry in Wythenshawe will a l so be compl ete by the end of t he per~.od.

o: the 369 a cres olready re serve~~bout 54 ncres hove already been developed and a further 1 60 a cres enrmnrked, D.a i nly for l nrge concerns engngeci on work of not i onal i m.port nnce , and who th erefore expect to be ubl e to build within the next few years . The extent to which the r emaining 155 ClCr es of industrial l a nd will be cwaila.ble f or the relo'ca.tion of small c6ncer .i1s displaced from the older pa rt of the city cannot be · deter mined Gt present. However .i n this connection it i s c::-iphasisod thci.t thoro is nn urgent need for grente r employing ca pocity in Wythenshnwe to eli1ninote the excess ive amount of tra velling n eces s ary nt present for the bfilk of the ~ esidents . For this reason, providing the industry is of on a ppropri ote type, the Council nre lilcely, 'in the future , to encourage ci.ny f irm, l a r ge or small, who mci.y wi .sh to develop a nd who a r e actually i n n position to do so , regardless of whether or not such d evelopment i s in substitution for industry displaced elsewhere. There are in f act a nllI'.lber of r equests for sites unde r considera t i on nt pres ent , which if s ubs equentl y approved will t Dke up n substanti a l pnrt of the 155 ocres now remaining . 160 .


Tl Ol 1381 Sum.mnr y of policy for industria l redistribution .

161 . Qn this basis it hos been thought preferable not to rely on Wythenshowe ns a source of r el ocntion sites , and ~o this extent the mointnining of u balance between the deraand for nnd the ovuil ubil i ty of industrial sites north of the .River Mersey will be o most i mport ant as pect of pl nnning in the near future . The brond qs se$sment路 given previously suggests tha t no mnjor difficulties should a rise, but it will be necess ary to keep this problem under continuous r eview in order to confirm the validity or. otherwise of the present assumptions. S.i:ould the Council subsequently dec.ide to r ese r ve temporaril y the l a r:d sot...th of t he !/Ioss Nook industrial zone, ns mentioned in pa r agro.ph (145), this would no doubt simplify the industrial redistribut ion problem to n considera ble extent . 162G Att e~t i on is dr own t o one specific proposal which the Corporat i.on h ov e in mind fo r the construction of a new a batt oir and c uttle m路1rket on a site includ ed i n the p=opos ed Newton Hea th industriGl zona and bounded by the former L. M. a nd s . Roilwuy (Ardwick: Bro.nch and Sta.lybridge Lines) , Cenetery Rood and Hul ne Holl L0ne . Most of this site is at p~e 3 ent occupied by o. brickv1orks , t he rema inder being l and nt present unused . Ref erence to this brickworks is made l a ter in Pa rt C-9 par agraph ( 241) .

Pos ition nt 19?1

163 . On the bns is of the forego ing ass essment .路 of industrial developme~t and redistribut ion but ranking no a llowance f or industry which mi ght be overspilled , th e tot al oreQ likel y to be devoted to industry a t 1971 i s esti ma ted npproximotely o.s follows : ~ North of the River Merse y Wythenshawe

1 , 792 Acres 369 Aores

The orea north of the river t okes ucc ount of o proba ble reducti on not previously mentioned resulting from the wo r king out during the period of npproxinntely 56 ncres of exist ing clay workings outs i de proposed indus trial zones . 164 . The appropria t e es tima ted popul ations for 1971 ore approxim<Jtely 515, 000 a nd 91 , 000 r especti7ely, so that t h e l ond allocation would be ut the rote of 3 .5 ncres per 1,000 total popul at i o~ nc~th of the Rive r Mer sey , 4 . 1 acres per 1 , 000 in Wythenshawe , and 3.6 a cr es pe r 1,000 for the city as n whol e .


TlOl 1382

50. 1 65 . I t i s empha sised however thnt by making no a llowance f or the effect of i ndustrinl over spi ll on the net d:i.il.y · intnke of indust ri al . workers , tbese rt1t8s do not g i ve a t r ue m.eus ure of ov e:: :.- a ll ~o ~king c onditions . It is most proba ble that industri a l ovorsp'il l will to some extent l ag behind populat i on overspill so that the i ndust ri a l populotion for which t he ab ove areus· will ac tua1 lly e nt er nay be g.renter than t he present 3 6 . 45 • of resident population . The effectlvo .:>vor o.11 i mp r ovement i n ·working condi tions may therefor e bo ev en leos them the smnll i nror ovement shown b ~r c ompa r ison of the a bov e 19?1 r a tes wit h 'the present r nte of lnnd a ll ocation amo unting to approxi m.ntely 2 . 55 ac r es per 1 ,000 tot ul populntion .

I


T101

1383

PART C .. 7

51 ·. · · Commercial J;>evelopment ... Central ..Ar ea of the Ci w

Long Te rm Plan Scope of De.ve i op men t · Pl a n

i 6·6 .

Th e p r ob l em of r ep l ann i n g the .centra l c omme rcial a r e a .: of t he city :l. s comp a r ab l e t o the pla n nj,n g p r oblem · fo r indu.stry i n t ha t ·qu ite obviously the r edevel opr.nen :t like l y to b e ca rri e d out during the . n ext 20 yea r ~ · wi·l l ; b e o'nl y a ve r y small propo rtion of th.a ~ ne ce ssar ;y;. ·.t o b ring abou t the many i mp r ov emen t s conside r ed d e si r ab l e . Pr opo s a l s ma de i n the p a s t · for the· r ep l an n ing of the centr a l a r ea, in pa rtic ul a r t ho s e c on t a ine d i n . t h e "C ity ot: Marl:che s ter P l an 1945", hri ve a l wa ys b.een r e ga r d ed as e ssentia lly l ong t e r m on e s , but a t the s ame t i me one s which fundnmen t a lly shou l d b e qu i t e pra ct ica b·l e when circums t a nce .s jus t i fy t he i r imp le~e ntn ti o n .

-167 .

· The · Deye l opi::ne nt P l a n, t he r efo re , i n a ddi tion . t o ou t lin i n g ·t he deve l opme n t env i s aged dur ing t l)..e ne xt 20 year s, h a s b een so d r a fted· tha t ,. b y i nd~ ca t­ ing the Rr en s . ge n e r a l ly c ons i de r ed appropr i a te fo r the p rincip a l c omme rcia l use r gr oups, it .~i v e s a · broad guide t o the way i n wh i ch the C.or p.o ra t ion inten d the ce~ tr a l a re a ' shou l d r edev e l op , wi thou t . a ttempt.i ng t o d e f ine t he ' p re cise mo.nner i n wh i ch t he . · . r e d eve l op men t wil l t nke p l a c e . Ba sic li.ssumpti ons

Existing Conditi ons Mi:i.in

Functions of the Plan

.In de t e r mi n i ng t he se· .a ~e a s, t he f u n d amen ta l be e n adopted , . t ha t as Manches t e r i s a r egi ona l c ent re .of c omme rce , it s i mporta n c G a s such i s no t l i ke l y t o be ma t e r i a l lY . .£1.f f'e cted b y a n y r edi s tribu t i on of · p opul a t i on wi .thin t he r egi on . I t ha s t h erefor·e b e e n a ssume d tha t the .fl o or spa ce . p r ovi ded for t h e p rincip a l us e r . gr oups mu s t r emai n a t a l e vel n o t l ess t han t h.a t exist ing a t the p resen t time , despi t e the .f a ct tha t f1. subs t a n tia l de cr ease in p opula ti on is ant i cipa t e d f o r Man c he ste r itse lf.

. 168 .

p rinci~ l e · has

169 . Re f e r en c e t o t he La nd Use Ma p e mp ha s i .s es the f a ct tha t a t p r e s e n t the r e a r e n o clearly def i ned limits t o the a r ea · con t e ining t he c en tra l com.~e rcial u s e s~ Se v e r a l s ubstan tia l we ll e stablished a r e as .exis t , ·.d e vo t ed p r ed omina n t1y t o par ticu l a r c 0mmercia l uses , but . a t the s ame ·time t he r e a r e nume rous o t he r a r eas wh i ch in themselves c on t ai n a va rie ty of c omme r c i a l u s e s n.nd whi ch in ad d i t i on me r ge int o 'the adj o ini n g- r es i de nt i a l a nd i ndu s t ri a l a r eas cin the out skirts of t h e ce n tr a l a r ea , t l).er eby c r e a,_t ing a c onsi de r al: l e prob l em o f mi xe d u3 e . Th e e l i mine. ti on of such condi t i ons mus t obvi .) US:l Y be on e of t he ma i n f unction s of t h e c entra l . a r ea p l a n . 170 . Thi s de sir ~b l e redis tr i but i on of l a nd u ses wi thin the c e ntra l · a r ea wi l l of c ou r s e oniy ;b e brough t ab ou t a s opp or t uni ties a r i se fo r t he dem:ili t i on a n d r ebuil d ing o f ind ivi dua l l,) r op e rti es . 11.s sta t e d in P a rt Q _.- 2 , ·p a r agr aph 52 y many ·c omme rc i a l p r ern i s e s · e x i st .i ,n. the · c entr _a l, a r e a vv-hi ch by mode r n · s t ana.·a.r ds mu p t~ be con side red ob s 01·e t'e, a nd whose 'r ep l a ceme n t by .. P,uild.in g i? :P r cpe rly de signed f o r thei r p a r ti cui a r pur po se wi ll i n i t se lf do much t owa r d s ma iI).t a i n ing the comme rc i a l i mpo rtanc e of t he ci ty . · ·


r5.r~.:..~ ,•. ,~,. ·. . ... .,,

TlOl

~

1384

171. Basical ly~ .. , theref o~ e ,' · the-~ problem ha s been ~o de termine a n area within which the centra l com.mercial u s e s might be confine d in the f uture, whose boundar:ies will . h e clearliY d ef ined .a nd which is ca pable of divisi on L"1 t o·. sub~zo ne s for pa r t i cu,l a r u~er groups, of' a s-ize suff icient ·t o, enabl e the pr e sent ·' floor area to b e ma inta ined in bui ldings p l ann ed on modern 1ine s, wh e n r edeve l op~ent b e come s p r a cticable.

Ce ntral Ar e a Surve y

172. ·D iagr am Nq . l shows the limits of t he a r ea in whi.ch .the ma j ority of the centra l . . comme rcia l u se s a r e conta ine d a t pre s ent. This o.'r ea wa s surve yed .i n .c onnection with the· prepa r a tion of t he "City of · . Manche ste r Pla n 1945" 0-nd the sma lle r u nj_ ts into . which it wa s d ivided for the pur po s e a r e a lso indic o. ted on the di a gram. The principa l uses ·within these units a r e se t out in Append ix ' 12, which a lso ·indicates . the o ve r a ll Floo r Spa ce Index f or each unit.

'

;. .

.,· ..

i

·.,. .. . ,

173. For the pre s ent purp ose of de t e r mining a n outline ·pl a n fo r the centra l a r ea , it was cons ide r ed tha t t h is infor ma tion is suf fi.c ient . Ther e f o re ~a d.eta iled Floor Spa ce Inde x Survey h Rs n o t b een tnade . Approach to Pla nning Problem

The se quence adopted in de t e r mi n ing the out~ line plan was a s f ollows :·

174 •

( a ) The ca lcula tion of the t o tal fl oor a (r'ea r e quire d for the ma-in · cormnercia l use r groups.

(-0) The · s e l e ction, in r e spe ct of l oc a lity, of t he ·sub-zones in the centra l a r ea within which the principal us e s might , mo st appropri a tely and c onve niently b e conc entr a t,ed~ ( c) The d e t e r mination of a pproxima te b ound9. ri e s f or t hese sub-zones so t ha t ( 1) t oge the r the·y will f o rm a .c omp a ct

c Jmmercia l centre l y i ng .with in well d e fined phy s ica l bound ~ri es (2) the t o t a ;i. site a r ea .in ea ch sub-zon e will,. . whe n deve l ope d on .mode r n line s, b e ~uffici e nt t o e n ab l e th~ r e quisite f l 8o r sp a c e t q b e pr ovided; . i.e., th~ t it will be pos si b l e t o maint a in ~ r e a s on a b l e a verege flo or s pa ce · i nde x.

Future Floor .Az:ea s

175 •

With r ega rd t o the f uture fl oor spa c e requir ements, the s e ·a r e ob t Rined f r om the informati on gi ven in App e nd ix 12 . The deta ils of the · existing flQ or s pace a llo ce ti on may be summa rise d unde r the f ~ ll owing three main heading s, which ·· repre s ent the bronQ. u se gr oups d.ea lt with .b y th e Development Plan:· ( a ) Ge ne~ a l Bus ines s Grou~ ;

.

'

Off i ces ••• • •• Off ices and. Wa r ehouses •. ·• Wa r ehou se s. • • ••• • •• Ga r age s •• • • .•

79.94 Acre s

86.52

"

11.18

II

229 .10

II

Minimum fl o8 r area t o b e p r ovided 406.74 Acre s

..


53.

TlOl

1385

(b) Shopping ...

Grou~

...... ...

Houses and Shops Shops . Shop:s with Off ices Shops with warehouses

..

Minimum floor e.rea t o be proy i ded

.

2.25 Acres II 2· .38 66.17 " . 76 .32 "

147.12 Acre s

( c) Civic 1 Cultural a nd S12ecial Grou12 Although the futur e floor space requirements under this heading cannot be properly related to existing conditions, nor can they conveniently be assessed oi1 the basis of a controlling Floor · : Space Index, the present '. f l oor space allocation at least serves as a rough measure of tn~ allowance to be ·made f or these provisions . ' ' ··"'

(1) . Public Buildings, Churches, etc.· 89.62 Acres .•

(2) Theatres, Cinemas , Hotels, Restaurants, Public Houses, etc •. 37.64

"

; '

Sub· 176. In sele cting the general localities approZoning priate for these ma in use groups, account was taken Considera...: of the f ollowi n g f a ctors: t ions and ~roposals (a) The desir ability of ma i ntaining as far as possible uses as s ociated traditionally with certain pa rts · of the city. . · (b) The de sirability of cr ea ting a . clearly defined precinct containing the Cathedral ~nd the adjoining Chetham' s. Hosp.ital. ( c) The desirability ·Of creating a civic zone in the hea rt of the city in which eventually the main Municipal , Judicial a nd Cultural buildings may be loca ted. (d) The nece ssity, on financial grounds, for retaining the pre sent railwaygoods and passenger s~stems in the central area (See Part C - 13) • . . '

(e) The practicability of effecting changes of use, e ven over a long period, as determined by the i ncidence of rela tively new ~evelop~ , men t in various pa r ts of the central area . · ·

277. The main area s a ctua lly sugge sted are shown on the Town Map and a r e conta ined within a propose d centra l area bounded gen er ally by t he proposed inne r ring road. on the north a nd ea st sides, the proposed link roe.d 17/7 on the south side. a nd the city bounda ry (Rive r Irwell ) on the we st side . De via tions from these . bounda ries a r e propo sed to include a sma ll . a rea b e tween Great Duci e Stree t and the Rive r Irwell , a nd the 01,Q.ham Road Rai lwa~ Goods Depot ( a ssociated - with the ma rketing areas), . and to e xclude the· pr edominantly i ndustrial a rea s in Ancoats,' Mayfi e ld and Knott Mi .1 1. :The.s e bounda ries a r e a lso i ndica t ed on Di a gram No . 1. .: '.


54.

Tl Ol 1386

178 The t otal acr eages pr oposed to be devoted to t he . three ma i n user groups includ i ng st r~e ts, bu t e xcluding r ailway land and existing public open space, a re as fo llows :-

357 Ac r es

Gene ral Busi ness Shopping Civic etc ·~ . _

106

83

"

11

T·h ese acreages al low fo r important buildings likely to rema i n but which are not located in the appropriate ma i n sub- zones and whi ch are not shown i n · detai l on the Town Map . .1

Future 179 . ·comparison of these a r eas wi th the estimated Floor minimum f lo or space requir eine n ts gi ven in paragraph Space_ 175 sug·g ests t ··a t the mi n i mum futur e overall f l oor Ind ices space i ndices fo r G~ neral Business and Shopping and a d e - deve ~opment wou ld amqunt t o approximate l y 1 .15 and quacy of -1.4 r espe ctively. These i mpl y an apparent l y land gene r ous allocati on of land 1 even when ·c ons i dered as · al loca-' ove r a ll figur es , but a:t t he s ame time they take no ti ons for acc ount of the t hea tres, hotels, public house s, etc . , Business whic h at pr esen t occupy a bout 37 acre s of f loor and :· ,. ·space (see paragr a ph 175, i tern C( 2) ) . I t is no t Shopping i ntended that such premi ses should be located i n the pr oposed civic· zone, and ai though i t may l a t e r appea r des irable·, i n· the detailed r epl anning of t he centra l a rea, ~o crea te . speci fic en tePtaiTu.~ent sub~zone·s , · i t oni y be as sumed l!tt t hi s sta ge that the va r icus ent ertainmen t · use~ wil l be distr ibuted, as they a r e a t present, t hr oughout the Business and Shopping a re.~ s.•

can

180. On t h is basi s the . mi nimu~ effective ove rall floor space 'ind ices would be increased , a _ccordi ng to t he quanti ty of en t e r t a inment u se i n ea ch· ma in zone, -a nd wou l d probabl y b e. a bou t 1. 25 for> Business and 1 . 5 for Shopping . 18 1. Afte r allow i ng fo r the fP.ct that ·in deta iled planning an a ttempt will be made to provi de add i ti pnal public open space·, · whi ch woul d further incr ease the overall floor space i nd ic es , a nd a l so for the fact thRt some m~ r g i n of s afe ty is desirable, p a r t _icular l y in r espect of Gene r al Busine ss use , where change s i n t he d i str ibution sys tem for vari ous corrnnoditie s mi ght cre a te a n addit i onal unforeseen ;demand f or wa r ehouse ac conµnodat.ion, ·it. i s cons i dered that at th i s stage the broad a l loca t ion of land proposed i n the Develo~ment P l an i s r easonab l e . Civic Use

With r e'gard to Ci vie ·use, it is i n tended that the mai n sub-zone shoul d fo r m a s·tr ip of deve l opment ext ending from St . P eter's Squa r e t o the Rive r Ir we ~ linki ng up the Town Hall and adjo i ning Municipal Buildings wit h tl:;le p r oposed ne w Gour ts or-· Law front ing on to the we~ t e rn l eg of the city cei1tre r oad and the surrounding ·deve l opmen t. I t is fur t her · intended that withi n t h i s zone the~e should ; u lt ima t e l y be .es tabl i shed.. a processiqnal way .extend i ng from the · · p r oposed Law Courts _t o. Albert S cruare arid f'l anked by · buildings of an appr op riate . public or semi-p ublic chara cter. The s i "te .for the Caur.ts of La.w· has ' a lr es.q.y ' been app r oved by .~ the Coun·c il · and is ind ica t ed on the ·'TciWn · Map,. The othe r p roposed ci vie · area cont~ining the Cathedr a l and Chetham ' s· Hospita l is one· ~hich it ~is hoped may in t he · future by ca r e ful deta ~led planni ng of the ad j oi ning a reas, p r ovi de a se t t i ng worthy of these t wo buildi ngs which rdstorica ll y a re pe rhaps tho two mos t i mpor t ant in Manchester . 1 82 .

)


TlOl 1387

'I

55 .

183. As stated in item {c) of parugraph 175 . the actual land re auireiJ.f.) nts . .f or civie usns cannot be measured ac;uinst oxis.t 'ing ·)rovis ~_ ons. · ·At this . ~.tage, the 'loc uti on of ' the ci.vic sub-zonos rs 0f . groute r i nr_portanco them thq, actuo.l n.crea.go .provided. About · 3 5 ac1"8s of tho t otal of 8.3 ucros pro:,:ios o d for civic uso are tal~o n up by e xisting buildings ·wr.J.ch it is :;_nt,ond ; d t o r ota.in, a nd lt is conl?i dor od thut tho balo.nco, in tho pru:;:>osod !!Jain civic sub-zpno' will allow suff'icicnt s c opo for tho futurG c·onstructi.on of th.cl ty:.!,)o of buildings onvisagod.

u

I II

Levol o:Jm nt

u~:i

to 1971

184 •. ··'" .Di.iring . thq,' noxt 20 yoars, it is not anticip1i't r.. . d· ·t h::i.t ' ~. ruch :;,n ·ogrc ss will bo l:mdo towards mont tho d o sirod rcplam.1ing of th::i ccintrc.l aroa, othc1" Expo otc·d thun· t,h o.t arisi:1g from tho redevo l o:,?mont of tho noro extensive :wo.r darmgo d o.r ous, from ·.the conplotion .. of .oorto.in other isol o.t o d ~roj o cts n o•.;1 in hand o r likely. ·to be · comrxincc; d int ho . n.o·a r future, rmny of ·.··· which o.lso r o st:.lt fron .vmr d&:.flgo ~ and fron ·· dovolopnmt wl!ich n.ny be ossible us a result Of slu.i..-i cle 0.r ancc v1i thin tho central.; . arou • Type o;f, ,

Dove lop::.: ·

J . •

Wnr

Dro:io.go d ' '

.

.Aro as

185. With r ogo.rd t o tho · .a.r a as of m~'"tensive war dano.ge, it c ~mnot bo stated !)r.o cise ly whore or to what oxto nt :'.'O building w-111 t nlw ·9l a c0 • No .. c ou.1:iroho11sivo rcdcvolopnont schonos ha.vo yet bGon a.:9_": rov~d ctnd nt tl..i s stngo it c an. unly '.Jo o.ssUUG d thnt dcvol o:g1"10_nt of a. type o.pp r opriato to t:r..a broad· us:. :pr•):."'bsod f or tho n r on conce rned will b.e carrie d cut · ni t ldn tho li!~1i ts of tho f'inancial nnd lab our rosourcos ava~l ab lo.

Thoso co1isido rn.ti ons uro OX8).:1i:1od ·. aoro closely in pur agr t.phs (418) to (420} .in Pt"\rt c .22 which cl 0cJ.s ·with tho ~o y cn:t. ")rtb grannc/ as a . whole • Tho \, e.r c!. ri:..mgcid ar c:as s hown in tho Progror:r10 Mn:p as t b.ose' like ly t o be· :substantially · redeveloped by ),.971, have been dete·rniined .as a result -Of ·thls exruninati on. These' are as follovra :1 86 .

(a } · strangeways (b )' · Market Place ( c ) · Wate r ' St r e et ( incl ud:tng new courts of' Law } · ( d) 3wan Street (e) Shudehill (f ) Piccadilly {g ) Po rtle_nd Strs et·.· (h) Oxford ~trGet ( j) Faulkner Street It · is en:phasized that in r es .pe ct of· thGse ' ~roas, the . P:rograJ.llii1c Map doos not . define ·p recisely · t he extant of the actual devo],. Q"f.)ma nt intondod,. but only indicates tho a:roas 1 ·Jithin.which · re ~building .on · land a lre ady substantiaiJ.y , c l eared ~s o,xpe cto d t o . ·'. ;,.. take p lace. Sp0 cific pr oposals· which the Cdor po ration are cm1sidoring .for t he s e a r eas . 1 nc 1.u e a now ,-, ; v1hole sale marke t in tho Swan Str3ot :·t~rea , a . new e x!.1ibi ti on :1all no rt~:.: of Lj.ve r J;JOOl R~.· i:\d Qoods Depo t ·and partly in the 1 lato r Stroet · aroa 1 ·end.a now l:.ote l in s itl:.."- r t b.8 Market Pl a.ce , Plcoadilly, or .Portlc.nd Str.:'.ot r.,rous .

~ . _;

!


...

TlO;l. ·

Indi;?~:1

·'

56. 187 • . Tho m~j or isol nt od ?ro j o cts, ~t .prose nt in hand which ·~·rc:r.m in t o b o compl e t e d during the ne xt

~~ojocts :. . ·. few ye.ars, a~d t he proposed schemes. e xpected t o be : · . commence d in tho ne ar future, o..ro a s f o llows: ... ln Hund Fre e ·Trudo· ;Hall Royal E~change . College of Te chn ol ogy Exten.s ion .'.:.

Equt table Build_ings - No . 2.2 .St Ann Street· Shops and Offices - New Brown St . and Marke t St.

.

; . ~- "

.

Werneth Chambers - Princess Stree t .

c. w. s ~ Building :... Ibansgate . E:;..'tension to Ma·rshall a nd Snolg rove s ' Premises ., . · st . Ann StrGc t . . :- . Extension t o c. nnd A. J.,1:o des ' Promise s Tib stre e t . , Nnti onal Library fo r tho Blind - Byrom Stree t. "Daily Tole graph" Building - l~ytoun Stree t .

Allowance has been ma de f o r tho s e scheme s in tho assessme nt of building res ources in Pa.rt C - 22, and ~_they are included in the area s s hown on t ho Programme ... 1fap ·as likely to dove lop during tho 20 y e ar period •

: ·;

..

Develop- · .188. I n addition t o the pr obable dcve:lopmc nt rofe :rrmont. · · o d to in the last two paragraphs , land will bec ome after avail able f or de velopment within the ce ntral are a due Slum · to the cleara nce of slum property under the housing Clearprogra.mrce explained in Part C - 5 . Approximately a nee 1 , 190 dwellings are involve d , which, to.get!ier with the site s of dwellings a lready cleared (see Appendix 7), occupy a net area of r ou ghly 50 acres~ It is impossible t o say at t h is stage: how much of' this land, when cleared , will be of a size and ·· shape suit.. .. able for the a ppropriate typos of de velopment , but it .· ' is enyisaged that where p r a cticable , · re - bud.lding vdll take place during t he 20 year pe riod . · Areas of probable development shovm on the Programme Map , ·wh ich do n ot relate t o vvar damage d areas o r individual :p:i;ojt?..cts, are in fact the areas in which the se slum p ro pe.rties are located. A broad all owance f'or this form of development. is made in the ass e ssme nt of ouilding resource·s iri Part C - 22 . ;

189 . AB st~ted . in . pa ragraph 170 many premise s exis t in tho central · area w::J ich by :a odern standa rds are n o longer fit places · or e mpl oynE nt an d wh ich in many cases are quite unsuite d to t he ir p articular purp ose . Tho de moliti on and rebuilding of such pre mises is greatly t o be desired , but from the asse ssment of ·· building resources likely t o be available , it would ·;-· a ppear that very little p r ogre s s will be ma dG in this direction if p rio rity is t o be give n t o .the re :place mc r .t of-war damage • . ·subje ct t o t l1.e ir not be coming structurally unsound , most of the se buildings will .undoubte dly have t o be maintai ne d and ke pt . in use f o r l onge r than t he i .r pre se nt conditi on wou ld justify, and ce rtainly n o s ubstantial improve me nt .in th:~ ce ntral :e,r e a as a whol e can be anticipate d · from this source during the ne xt 20 ye ars.

'bsol e t e D3velopnent

.I . I


T101 1389

E~ 11.

PART C - 8

Open Spaces.

Existing conditions. Categories of Open Space and present · Acreages

190. The µse:ful open space in· the city may be classified under the following headings :Group 1, - Open Space s connected intimately With the daily life Of t h e residential communities , and which . can be considered in terms of a standard r ·o i:ated to a unit of popul ation. Group 2. - Open Spaces ope n to the public, but which are for the bene fit of the cit y as a whole.

~ -!

Group· 3. - Open Spaces not 0pon to the publi c, but which form part of the overall open space patt e rn and which to a limit ed exte nt r educe the demand for. pub lic open ., s~ ace. 191. The . existing provisions in these three g roups are summarised in the following table :T A B I; E:

7,

. Existing Open Space.

Type ot Open Space

Group

North or River Mersey Pop, 658,600

(a) Children's Playpar!cs ( (Public)

- .(

Acres

Negligible

14

o.31

18

. 1.81

65

1,45

. 1,254

1.7e

0,84

232

5,17

784

1, 11

3.25

0,49

14

0, 32

339

o.48

278

0,42

<:fl

2,15

ms

o.53

2,348

3.56

42.2

9.40

2,710

3. 93

(b) Recreattonai Areas (Public) 1,189 -( ·cc) Ornamental Parks and ( · .Amen! ty Areas . ( (Publ~c) 552 (

r

.. ·- (

(d) Allotments (Statutory, Temporary ·c and Private)

i

Acres

4

-

Total for City Pop.; 703,500,

Rate in Acres/1,000

Acres

I

Rate tn . Acres/1,000

South or River Mersey ! Pop. 44, 900

Rate tn Acres/1,000 0.03

·------

.. (

-<(e) ·(

-(.

School Playing "F ields ..

~- ----

(Total -Group I ( f) Central Area

(

.( 2

Fonnal Gardens

(g) Pa~<:way -( (h). Public CemeP,ertes ...... ( ( Total Group 2 (j) ( - (

Playing Fi elds & Sports Grounds

(k) Golt Courses

_fr -(.

6

-

1\v

223

I

229 . 47:3

\

286

(1) l11scellaneous,

3

I

I ncluding Nursory

. ( Gardens ·- ( ( Total Group 3

Total All Groups

58 817

i 3,3:4

'l

I

/

30

/'\.

I\\ /

-

I

~ I\ !

I

\

-

I

/

I

x

/ \

I

I

12

I I

207

I

44

I

1 l

263

/

I

30

~

223

I

l f.

.. . .

\ " ·. ·259

.\ /

I

6

/ '\

/1

x

I \

\ 'I 115__JI' / \ ,l / ,___.__J ___

!'

I

\

I

485

~ 7/-~ T'\ \

493

I i l

! .102 I 1,080 'i

- \!

;. 4, 109

/

x

\,

~7

7

I

I

I

I

\

\ ---·~·


58 .

TlOl

1390

.r

Notes ( 1)

Item (b) includes roughly . 33% of prope rly _laid qut game~ . are.a , the remainder be ing avail.~ble for unorganised, ·games and general r ecre.a t ional use .

{2) · P~ivate. allotments have been incl uded in Item · (d) as mi;lk ing an effective contri but i on t owar d$ the <;:rverall a llotment demand.

,( 3)

'

. ' ,•

';( 4)

I tem (e) includes the whole of the Direct Grant School pi~y ing f i e l ds . Only about ona t hird of. the children i n these s chools are r esident i n Manchester and on this bas i s app roximately 55 acres of the ' 3'75 acr es tot~ S'chool playing fields are in practice not available to Manchester chi"ldren ~ The table takes no account of agricultural ' l and , Qr waste and undeveloped lands' which although they may create b r eaks in the built up areas, do not contribtite towards any specifi c open space need . Some of these are contained in gr een be l t areas which a re refe rred to later .

Distribut - 19 2 . It i s apparent from these f i gures that the ion. exist i ng effectiv e open spaces are insuffic i ent in . overall area. · Eq_ually important perhaps i s the f act . that they are. badl y distri buted, a feature. c l ear .ly . ·· illustrated ·by the Land Use .. Map. 'rhe inner r es i dential a r eas , where overcrowding and the lack of private gardens magn i fy the need, have a negligible s·hare.; and even · s ome of the mo r e open .· subur bs arc singularly defic i ent in public op en space , particularly playing ·t'ields . . · ·· 193 . With re gard to the inner areas, at tent ion is -dr.awn to paragraph ?O which .. summari ses the land uses in the predominantly r esidential units located within a radius of approximately two mi les from the Town Hall. The· total ope n space. (public and private) for a n existing p opulation of ab.out 151,000 persons amounts to ·, 58 acres, i. e . , -a ratG of 0 . 38 acres pe r ·. 1 , 000 persons . . Appendix 2 shows that wit hin ce..rtain indiv idual units the position is evon worse, i n some · cases the open · space provision being virtua lly negligib le. 194 . In the northern part of the city, these . qon:di t ions are reversed and there is in fact a n over p r ovision of op en space . Excluding the areas occup i ed by temporary hous ing, Heaton Park , Bo_ggart Hol e Cl ough and Broadhurst Parle, together accoµnt for about 840 acres of the tot a l .recreational ·.and amenity a r ea g iven in Table ? . Heaton Park itself, must to some e xtent be cons idere d as a regio~al provision and also as contributing towards the immediate demands of the adjacent r eside ntial area,s in Pre stwich, but from Manchester ' s point of viev; it is ' o'hl y of real value as a week-;end ·.park, being too far from the i nner co.n gested areas to assist .i n satisfying the d·ay to day open space demand. Ii,or this reas on the exist ing recreational and amenity acre a ges Which can be conside.red r eally effect ive are certainly substantially less than those shown in Tab l e 7 . ·


TlOl

59.

139i Planning Probl ems~

195. In principle therefore the planI?-ing problem, so far as open space is · concerned, is slinply one of providing mor<:: open space located more conveniently in relation to the residential communities served, · and above all of i nt roducing some reasonable open space ·provisions into the inrier are as of the city. 196.. Within this ge neral objective, it ia of part icular importance that more · children's playparks and school p l aying field faciliti e s be p rovided as early as poss ible. Table 7 empha sise s the fact that except in Wythenshawe the lack of these facilities is e ven more pronounceQ. than the lack of other tYPes of open space . As affecting the interests of Manchester's child population, th is must undoubtedly be conBidered the most se rious aspect of the open space probl em .

I I

! I

Future Open Space Standards. 197. In investigating appropriate future standards for Manchester, only the open spaces in Group 1 (Table 7) have been considered. Central Area formai gardens and parkways (in Group 2) are provisions which cannot be related satisfactorily .to a. ~nit of population; and, although desirab le features Of the ove rall open space pat t ern which should.be introduced wherever possible, they must remain dependent l argely · on conditions. obtaining in the localit.i .e s concerned, as reveal ed by detailed p l anning . With re gard to private open .spaces (Group 3) it is considered that the demand for these , particularly the r ecreational provisions , will always remain r egardles·s of" the availability .of p ublic open space, and it has i n fact been assumed that the well established priv ate game-s areas will be retained as such in the l ong term plan . Basic standards.

198. Bas ic st andard·s .of O. 5, 4. 5 an·d 2 .o acres per 1,000 per•sons are -proposed for Children' s Playparks, Organised Games ari;d. Ornamental Parks respectively. At the same time. these do. not include: for· School Playing Fie 1-ds, and, having regard to th.e pract ica.bili ty of imp l ement ing the standards,. i~ i s not conside r ed that Mancheste r could afford to provide 7 acres per 1,000 population of' publ ic ope'n space in addition to providing school playir+g .fields at the standard prescribed under the i944 Education Act , which is mo r e than twice that accepted immediately prio r to the l ~st war.

Overall Standard.

199 . On this pre - war basis the schoo l p l aying field provis'ion for Manchester' s child popul at ion in . 1962, {as foi·ecast by the Registrar General and as · used in the assessment of ge neral school req_uirements made in Part C - 18) would amount to about 1 . 61 acres per 1,000 -of total population. A comb i ned standard for public open space and 9chool play ing fields is p~oposed for application throughout the city eq_uivalent ·to 7 acres per 1 , 000 p lus this 1.61 acres pe;r 1 , 000 . Together with an. allowance of 1 a.'cre per 1,000 for a.llotments, this g ives a total future standard for the open spaces in Group 1 of 9.61 acres per 1,000 total population.


TlOl

>

'""":. 'l1I"

1392

200 .

60 .

The statutory obligation to meet the P?st - war

s~hoo1 ·_ p laying. f ·ielcl requi.rements ;rnean:;> that in

..'. ; practice, . in : order t o maintain ,this ove ra~l s~ap.dar.d., :. .· -. .... :the 7 . acres per 1 ,000 populat ion f _q r: publ ic . open space mus.t ' be reduced ·by an amount equal to .the; d1~fere:r:ice be-tween the· p re-war and post- war school playing field requirements, the reduction .b~ing made from the public organised games provi s ions . The propo~ed subdivision within the overall standard after this adjustment i s as follows: - . , TA;BLE 8 . :

.

Proposed. Open Space Standqrds.

De tailed standards. · Remainder of City

New De ve l9pme nt Areas I

Type of Ope n Space

Acres per 1 , 000 pop.

Acres per 1 , 000 pop .

o. 5

0 .5

Child.re n ' s Playparks ·Organise d Games

..

..

Ornamental Parks

:

2 . 00

-

'.

1.00

..

>

. . 3 , 95

S·chool Playing. -. Fields. '

!

..

I ~

..

2 . 74

..

2 . 00

.Allotments '

.2 . 16

Total

.

..

1.00 'I

3 , 37

.. 9:, 61,

1

-I

9 . 61

'

Organised 201 . ·The re qu ireme nts for s cho ol p laying fields and Games . the basis up on which they have bee n asse.ssed are explained more f'ully in Part C - 18 . The gr e at e r allocation for . s chool p l ay ing fi e l ds in New Development areas (Wythe n s hawe, Dl ack1ey and Cha rlestown) is to cat e r for the initi ally .higher than av e rage child population in these ar eas , but no corresponding increase s are prop o se d, a lthough · apparently justified, t o cater for the c onse que nt hi gher than average adolescent demand f or public organised g ames f'aciliti os . The standard: gi ven in the Table fo r New Developrrient are as i s in fact low0r than that for the remainde r of the city . -This is due to it· be ing .. conside red p refe rabl e to · maintain a cons tant ove rall standard and accept some initial unde r provis i on of p ublic play ing fields thereby) avoiding t he possibil ity of a s u rplus of ge n 8ral g ames a r eas arising in th e : · ; future when ·time has evened out : the. age· · str>ucture in the New Developme nt a r eas , and whe~ the ope n spac e requireme nt s a r e like l y to be met · mb'st sat i s f a ct orily by a llocat i on s approximating to tn ose now proposed for the r e ma inde r of ·the city• In any C'as e should thi s assumptio n p rove fals e , it will always b.e: .' poss i b l e to meet any genuine addit i on al open space demand on. th o gre en belt". agricultural . l an ds adjacent to the new de v e lopme nt · areas·.

...

. I I


. L1

TlOl

1393

Distribution General Principles

.. (

202 . · ·In investigating the app r opriate distribution · of operi sp a ce s in the city, the primary and obv.i ous consideration h as been the need, both now and in the future, to conse rve building l and as far as possible. In · other . words the dist ribut i on proposals, while directed 'towards the achieveme nt of an effe.ctiye . open space plQ.n, must also · .p rovi de fo r the maximum use being ma~e of a ll e xisting open spaces and all potential ope n spaces in the form of lands unsuitable for building development,

.

203. These principles app l y mainly to t he older parts of the city, as in the . new de ve lopme nt areas the opportunity has · been t aken in the detailed · .. ... · scheme's already approved, to provide an open space . system close ly approaph~.n g tho i ·de al', e v e n though · this h as entailed the us e of :.land v1hi ch c ould otherwise h ave been built upon . :fn these scheme·s "' the bulk of the public open space ·and.. school p l ay,.,.. ing f ields have been ·p r ovided wit:hin or very close to the new neighbourh9ods an~ ·i~ a ccordance with the s tandards g i ve·n in Table :s .. · .· 'Fo'r . the r ema inde r of the city , however, it is first p ropose d that certain essent,ial minimum open spa,c e s s hould be provide d e..Jtually within the re s idential a reas , eve n at ·c~e exi>ense of building l and. These include children s p l ayparks, small ~eighbourhood parks contai ning limit e d recreational facili ·s i e s , and the propo rt'ion of' the tot a l sch ool p l aying i'i elds necess a ry ·fro coyer the .. daily needs of the scLo ols, and which ·should · in. :: ; . · fact be provided adjacent · or very c.2.os e to the . s chool s . Sub'ject to ce rtain c ondit.ioris it is the n accepted that t he balance of the open space c an if ne cessary be loc a t ccl ou,c side tl.o r os ident ial community which it serve s , if by so.: dping the use of further building land i.s avo i de d·.. · 204 .

·. · .

205 . The fo llowing tabl e surr.mari ses. the distribution p roposal s a lrea4y imp l emented in the new development schemes and as i ntende d for the · remairuter of the city.

(

'


Tl Ol

1394 ... TABLE 9 . Proposed Distribution of Open Space . Distr i but ion Proposals I

1

Location

.

New Developmel'l:t

Remainder of City

Acre s/1 , 000

Acr~/1 , 000

Type of Open Space

Children' s Playparks

b

Esse nt i all y

residential community se rved

Within or f'airly clo se to reside nt ial commupity s erved ( imp lying a journey roughly Of not more than 1~ miles ) If necessary, some d i stance away from community se rved, subject to reasonable conveni ence of access .

Or ganised Games .Amenity

Scho.o l Playing F i elds (a) All J;rimary School Playing Fi elds (b) Proportion of other school p l ayi nf fields to be I provi ded adjac e nt t9 s chool.

Within

-

0 •.f),

0.4 0 . 3,

o.4 0.3

'

Neirhoourhood Parks ~a

o. s

•·

0 . 81

o . 65

3 . 1.{x)

1 . 55

Total Essential "Local" open space .

5 . i5

3 . 40

Additional Organised Games

1.76

1 ~7

Additiona l Ornamental Park

..

---

i.·7.

·1 . 0

Allotments add itional ope.n ITotal space to be p rovide d fairly clo se to , if not actually within, residential , comnruhities .

I Balance

!'

games

I

I !

of organised

- ·-

4 . 46

I

1.0

·-·

2 .• 7

--

-

o . 64

Bal ance of O:i:>name ntal. Parks

1~~~~~~~~-~--4----~~~--1--~~~-~

'1

Balance of School Pl aying Fields

ITotal open space whichj may be prov tded some

1 . 17

i

i d i stance from communit Total Open Space

-

·- -------

3 . 51

9 . 61 9 .• 61 Note (x) Not appl ic able in all cases . Some secondary school playing fields in new developme nt areas are located away from the schools but always within easy r each .

-I


TlOl

63.

1395

Long Term Open Space Plan.

I I

206 . A long term open space plan has been determined which in vespect of quantity and distribution substaritia.],.y satisfies the standards given· 2.n Table 9 for the ultimate population of the city·~ As in the case of the assessment of industrial requirements, this population has been assumed as that · likely to exist at the time of peak overspill. The reasons for this assumption are explained in ·Paragraph 131.· · · ·

-

,

Method for 207. The method adopted for the determination of determining this plan was necessarily of .a lengthy and complex plan. nature, and is not explained in detail in this analysis. Briefly the method consisted of ·comparing the ultimate theoretical open space requirements with the availabil ity of existing and potential open spaces (lands unsuitable fo r building) in the ten main sectors into which the city (other than nFJw development a·reas) · would be divided by the proposed ring and radial highways. 208 . From this comparison deficie ncies and surpluses of the various types of open space were calculated for each sector and a scheme of compensation worked out so that s-urpluses in particular sectors could be utilised to make good deficiencies exis ting e·lsewhere, without deviating from the distriQution standards given in Table 9. For the purpose of the scheme~ agricultural l ands on the flood piain of the Rive r Mersey were considered as potential open spaces available for compensation purpo ses tas also were any surpluses of open space likely to exist in Wythenshawe, •Blackley ahd Charle s t own when the new development i s complete. 209 . It is emphasised th'at tl)is scheme . relates only to the balance of open space re quirements over · and above the es sent j_al "lo·cal" p rovisions . . The assumption is made tl1at in .any sect or , where exist. ing a.rid :potential open spaces .· suitable for sueh purposes are in total insufficient to meet the demand for "local 11 open space, the deficiencies will be made good during the normal processes of development, by the utilisation of building land.

Value of Plan.

210. The open space plan determine d in this way must inevitably be of a flexible nature and there can be .no guarantee that surplus open space in any sector could in practice be reserved for the sole use of persons resident in another corresponaingly deficient sector. At ·the same time, the plan . ensures that reasonable open space conditions would exist e ventually throughout the city in respect of both quantity and distribution .

It i s further considered that if, as has been achieved in this . broad plan , the existing and proposed open spaces can be related sa.t is~actorily to the needs of yarticular sectors, then it should be practicable in due course to arrange the detailed planning of the ne i ghbourhoods like ly to. be created eventually within the sectors so that t~ey torn would be adequately served by the same provisions. 2 11.


TlOl

1396

64 .

.

Inportant Features

.

212 . Attention is drawn to the following inportant fea t-µ.r e s of the open space p~an: - . .. ~

(a) The r etention of a ll existing public open spaces .. In ·cnses where de~aile~ :i.~3d~ve ~o_pment proposal s night l a tor r equire, -tne buil ding up of q inor public open spaces, it _is_accepted ~hci. t equivalent -areGs will have to be nado a vailabl e iLrraediate l y in substitution . ~

;.

..

,(b) , ·In p.·r inciple, the· r e t ention of all existing : private sports grounds . (c) The provision of little nore than the e ssential 11 l ocal 11 open spa ce in nost localitie s within a radius of approxina tel y 2 _m iles fr on the Town ~-ia ll, the balGnce being net on l ands qutside this radius.

of '

( d) · Within .the same ra·dius, the provisi;on no a llotne_n ts' other than on occasional pie c~ s of l and which due to size or shape aro unsuitable for any othe r purpose . The _deficiency is made . good on lands locate d as conveniently as possible, but outside the 2 ail e radius • . ..

. The significance of the 2 u ile radius is tha t it broadly represents the liwit of the nost dens e ly built up parts of the city within which, i n adGition to there -be i ng very li ttl e existing open s pace , the re is virtually no waste l and w:"lich could be used for open space purposes . As tho se parts of the city a re .,likely to r edeve lop while the housing shortage is most acute , it would be unrealistic to sugees t that building l a nd coµld be used to an oxtont greater than tha·t r e quired for :the _proposed 11 loca l 11 open space provisions . It is · in fact C\. ccepte d that the future population in the se areas will gener a lly hGvo .to travel greater distances for t he enj oyr.lCnt of ·the ir full open space facilities than will be necessary for people living el sGwhere in tho city .

I

. 213 .

...

·

Ultimate Provisions

214 . · The following table _surma ris os the open space position a s onvisagpd unde r t~o proposed long t e r n plan. The open spa ces de~ lt with are ~hos o in Gr oup 1 (paragraph 190) and the propos ed a creage s and standards nay be compared with those existing at pre s e nt as se t out in Table 7.

#

II I


65. TABLE 10 .

. Prop0sed Ulti,nat~:- Open Space Provis ions . .' . North of River Mersey ~

I

"'

;

Blackley and Charle st ovm Pop~

'

. Tm. of . . Open·-s pace.

28,000

Stand-

j .Acr es ard

/icres 1,000

(a) Children's ·

pt~N~.

;

-

I

.All other Jrre@. Pop .

38i31(i)OO

Total f or City Pop. 502, 000

South of River . Merse3• Pop.

. 91, 00

. StMd· !Standa:.~d in .:.rcJ. in Acres/ . ~Acres/ lier.e s 1 , 000 AD-r::s· 1~· 000

l Stand-

:

. Acres

I .Acres ard if 1,000

-·-

19

0, 68

192

0.50

44

0.48

255

o.51

(b) Eftectiv:e · · · Organtsed G-gj"e s Area Publi.c

88

3. 10

193

2. 12

1315

2,62

(c) Effective Ornrnm(Pt al Parks Public)

"~41

. 2.,. 71

40

1 , 43

673

1. 76

41[

4. 57

· 1128

2.25

42

1.50

395

1. ('3

68

o.-75

505

1. 00

4. 82

12961

J,,38

390

4 , 25

1821

3. 65

5024

10. 05

(a) tilotments · · · Public Priv.ate

t

I 89hool Pleying t·135 Fie lds · . ·

(e)

.

TOT.PJ..i

:

.,

-·-

324 - . 11. 53 ..

Notes :

.

3590 , . 9. 38

1110

12,17

_(1) The populations a re tiioi:;e estimated as like ly to '·e xi st in the µltimat e resi.d.ent :Lal zon es at the time of peak overspill. ( 2) The organised games acreage north of the Rive r Mersey (excluding. Blackle ~: and Charlestown) ·. includes approxi mately GO acres c:f pr_iyate pl.a ;ring :fields (Simon, Christie and Mell and play in~ fields ) ,; These p l ayi ng f i elds· a1•e avail ab le to tee public at a . ;Low rental and therefor e make an e:':'e~tive contri butt6n' t owards the publ~c organised games demand .

•.

(3) The organised garnes· acreage north of· the Rive r Mersey ·coxclud.ing :rnackle y and Charlesto'(ln) includes approximately 9 1 acTes actually loc ated ;immediately soutJ1 of the river, but i.m;er..ded · for the ._ spe cific u sel of person s living on t :!-ie north s i d.e • . This acreage i s :accordingly exclude-d from tb e figu:r;e g ive n for •s outh of the River Mersey . The term 11 eff'ecti ~,-e 11 appl i ed t ·o Organi se d Games a n d Ornamental Park 1?-rOE!-S in T.able 10 implies th~t the corresponding a.ere .a ges c onform to t h e standards of distribut :'. on set out in Table 9 . These 'acreages do · not include the r e creational and ame nity areas in the Northerp Parks which, as expl ained in par.agr aph 194;. , ar·e provisi.o,ns wh ich : ·cannot be cons ide red , e ithe r now or ih the future, as contributing towara.s tbe no'rrnal day.to.day dem:;md· for open space . ·Although :)..o~ate<?- · wit~in the c1~y . boundaries , these :p.a.r~s remain.. as r eg_ional rathe r than city open sp~cc"s . ' r aking into ac~ount t he who l e of this " non-effe ctive'· open space, the total o r g anised ryrunes, and ornamental park~provisions amount to l829 nnd 1308 a cre s .r espo cvively . . 2 15.


66.

TlOl

1398 216 . It is also potnted out that the organis~d games acreage includes all the general r~creation area in existing parks . To what extent it may later appear desirable that such area~ should be prope rly l aid out · cannot be s tated at this stage , but for the p r ese nt purpose they have been considered as potential games areas . 217 . It will be noted that a subs:t;ant ial surplus of ornamental par k facilit i es exist.a in Wythenshawe , due to the p re sence of Wythensh awe ~ark itself and t o the number of small woods and natural amenity features, whi ch it is desired to preserve as part of the Wythenshawe l ayout and which in any case cou1.d n ot be used for other forms of development . Wythenshawe Park is however an open space, readily available to persons living in the r es ide ntial _areas immediately north of the Rive r Me r sey; and cm-, tpis basis, the under p rovision of "e ffective" orname ntal park s shovm in Tabl e 10 for the major part of the city, Which does in fact occur in the Didsbury, :and Wi thington districts, is of no practical significanc~ .

The proposed ultimate open space scheme is Open Space 218 . not s hown comp letely on the Town Map due to limitashown on tions of scale, the nee d to show certain inte rim Town Map uses for lands eventually inte nded for open space, and to the fact that the location of much of the 11 lo cal 11 open sp aces will not be . d.etcrmined unti:L. the redevelopment areas are p l anned . in detail • . In principle the areas shovm as intended for open space purposes a r e :( a ) Existing public open spaces and exi st ing private open spaces to be reta ine d ( except thos e too small to be of signi ficance in the bro ad p l an) . '

', • . I

(b) Proposed open spaces already app roved (Wythenshawe, Bl a ckley and Charl estown) .

I.

·(c) · Lands proposed for conversion into open space , which it is estimated woul d b.e a vailable by 1971. _ ··, ,219 . Lands shovm on the Town Map as .t ip:ping areas are those on which tipping wi l l not have bee n completed by 1971, but whi ch it i s i ntended will subsequently be taken over for ope n space pur p oses . Similarly, clay workings like ly to b e in use b.y 1971 are shown by the appropriate notation although evcntu all}7' intended f .o r open space . Such are as are included in the acreages g iven in Table 10. 220 . With regard to the es·s ential "lo cal" open spaces , it is intended, as stated in paragr aph 209 ., that deficie ng_es will be made good as redeve lopment takes p l a ce and l a n d becomes availabl e . It i s estimated that app roximately 620 a cres of buil ding l and will be requi r ed for this purp o se within the areas likely to be redeveloped by the time of peak overspill. Approx i mately 450 acres of th is will be requ ired for the "local 11 proportion of school p l aying fields; in the form of either the e nl a r geme nt o f areas occupied by existing s chools which it i s i ntended to retain , or the p rovision . of play i ng fields for new schools.


TlO!."

1399

•,

221 . · In addition to the open spaces dealt with in the fore going pa r agraphs , the Town l.lap shows the r eservation of approximately 100 acr~s .. in the Blackley area for a new r.mnicipal ceraetery.

Green · Belt .

222 . In _accordance with the draft Groen Belt Schet1e for the };anchcster Rcg i on 1 included in t he South Lancash ire and north Cheshire Advisory Plan, it is proposed that l ands to the north of Blackley and Charlestm·m and to the south and west of Wythenshawe shall r ema i n as green belts. Certain of the proposed public and. private open spaces are contained vri thin these areas , as shown on the T·own Nap . The renainder of the l a nd is shown on the liap as l and for which no spe cific development is intended , and which is in fact l a r ge ly agricultural in charac.ter and likely to rer:min so, in the future.

Provision of Open Space up to 1971 223. Inprovements in the open space provisions for t he city like ly to be brou~ht ~ bout during the next 20 years raay be considered unde;r the following headings: ·

The iL.1plementa t i on of the agreed open ..spac.e ·proposals for the new devolopL1ent areas · (Wythenshawo, Blackley and Charl e stown) .

(a)

(b) The provision of essential 11 1€)cal" open space s as part of the r edevelopment work unde rtaken over the period. (c) The conversion of agricultura l and waste l ands into public open space elsewhere in the city. 224 . It is anticipated t ha t the devel opment in New Development Wythenshawe, .Blackley and Che.rlestown, including the open spa ce , will .pe substantially completed during the next 20 years. The extent and-location of the new open spaces envisaged is shown on the P.rograrame Ma p, and nore detailed infori:.1a t i on is given -iff:. pa r ag raphs 436 ~o 439 in Part C - 22 which dea l s with the financial and l abour considerations for the Prog ran1me a~ a. whole• . 0

RedevelopmGnt

The "local 11 open .spaces provided , a lthough not shovm in detail; will be within tl:le areas shown on the Prograr,u,1e Eap as likely to redeve lop substantially for residential purposes during the 20 year. period.

225 .


• Tl Ol

68 .-

1400 .

It is estinated that , taking into .e.c? oun~ the sr.:.all amount of open space already existing in these a r ea s, about 90 acres of building l and will be needed for new open .space to s a tisf:iz the 11 local'' . standard recoBLrnnded . Of this 90 ac r es about 60 acres ,Jil l be for "local 11· school pl aying fi el O.s •

226 . .

Najor Open Space s

General School Playing Field Areas .

Allotments .

.........

.

The a sscs suent of how nuch additional major open space night be provided during t he next 20 years is governed l a rgely by the financial r e source s l ikely to r eL1a in available afte r the.· provisi on of the open spaces r eferr ed to in the l ast. two paragraphs . This TJatter is refe rred to in nor e detail in paragraph 440 in Pa rt C 22 and it is in f a ct conside r ed tha t dcvcl oµ1ent , ~a inly for playing fi elds , n ight r ea sonably be e xpected in only two a r ea s, i . e . , tl:e l and s i rn.:ediately south of the Rive r Nc rscy ad joining the we ste rn bounda ry of the city , and in Cl ayton Val e . T~ese n re~s a r c shown on the Progr nr.ne liap .

.227 .

It is a ls o nnticipatod·· that progr e ss will be during the next 20 years i n t he c onve rsion of waste l ands etc ., into c.r ca s for general school play- · ing fie l d purposes , i . e . playi ng fi el ds additional t ~ thos e provided ad j a cent to schools . These a r eas a r e shown on the Progr aooe liap and arc r eferred to in mor e detail in p<:i. r ag r a ph 428 in Pa rt C - 22 . 228 .

n~.de

The provision of additi onal a llotnent areas othe r than,in new dcvo l opnent a r oa s has not been conside r ed in detail a s, a lthough ce rta i n areas a rc shown on the Town Lap a s intended for nllotnonts , the denand for these nay not <.rise i n prn.cticc . Th e proposed sta ndn r d of 1 ~c r o per i, ooo population can only be r egarded a s a provisiori..al. one , and tho futur e e sta blishnent of new ur eas a nd indeed the need to r e t a in existing o. r oa s, will be gove rned e ssentially by the der.mnd w~1ic h a ctua.lly a rise s f-ror.l ·tine t o tine . 229 .

Cenetery 230 . Other open space pr oposals shown on the and Prograr.11J.e l'-~o. p a r e tho new cer.:e t Gry in, the Bl a ckley . Parkway . a r ea r ef .e rred to i n paragraph 221, 2.nC:. the co:'ltinua tion of Princess Pnrkway thr ough Wythonshawe to the southern bounda ry of. tho City . Ui th r cge.rcr to the cer.eter y it i s anticipa toe'. thfl.. t t h is will be brou ght into ~s c duri ng the 20 year period , c l though it . cannot be s~atcd i n wbich part or to what oxtont the l and will be used . "

L

. I


~

'.

TlOl

69.

1401

I· I

231. It is pointed out that, in certain instances, · open .space proposals ' shown on the Programme Map relate to lands which are · also shown as existing: . . . , :. Puhli-c opeq~:· sp.aces on the · Land Use _Map. T:h:i.'s . :4mplies . the~ P,evel9pment of land already acquired and c1.as~ed .a s public open space, but on which no actual wo:rk has : yet bee.n undertaken.

Position

232. As a result of the additional open space which it might reason ably be expected will be created during the next 20 years, as outlined in the foregoing paragraphs, the position by 1971 would be as given in the .following table.

at 1971

TABLE 11. Open Space

Pos~tion

North of River Blackle~ &

Charles oW:n Pop . 33,100 Ty~

·of ·

by 197i.

~iersey

All other areas. Pop. 478,300

. .

South of River Merseg. Pop. 91, 00 .

Rate in Rate in jRate in Jc,res/ kres/ · 1.Acres/ l'cres 1,000 Acres 1,000 . Acres 1,000

qpen Space. ' (a) Children' s

Total for City. Pop. 602,400

yi

jRate .Acres kres 1,000

·

f~~~~s

11

0.33

19

0.05

44

0.49

74

0.12

(b) Effective Recreational Area

70

2.11 . 800

1 .67

193

2.12

1063

1.77

(c) Effective Ornamental Park

14

o.42

378

0.79

39(

4.28

782

1.30

o. 73

293 1

. . 0 . 61

54

0.59

371

0.66

..

rm

(d) tllotments Public Private

24

(e) S9hool Playing Fields , · ·

130

TOTAL

249

Notes:

3·•.93

·504

I

".

1.06

390

4.25

1024'

1.70

4.18

1071

11.73

3314

5.55

. 7.52

1.994

(1) Recreational area in,cluQ.es Simon, Christie and Me11arid , Playing

F·:t~ lds·.

( 2 ) Organised Gam~s ·a nd Amenity acreages exclude . non-effective areas in the northe rn parks · (Approximately 514 a cres · recreat ion ·a nd 180. a cre s a~ nity). - see paragr aphs 19 4. and 215 .

..

,.

( 3) The r e cre.ational acreages north ·or the River Mersey includes 91 a cre s actually locate d South of :the rive r but intended for persons li¥ing on the north s ide. · This . acreage is excf.uded from the figure g ive n for s outh of the rive r. (See a lso Note 3 to Table 10).


70.

TlOl 1402

PART C - 9 .

M:tiner.als

General The onl y .mine ra~s of ·economiq .import:mce whiqh ·are work~d. within the city. are coal and · Exis·tfng bri ck clay. The locations of the present Workfngs ·acti ve co1iieries and clay- wor k ings are shown on the Land Us~e Map No " I(i). · There is in addition a soall number of sand-pits, but . these a r e not in constant operation and are rela tively .u nimportant.

Loc.a tibh bf

:

.' ;

I

I

.

1• • . •

.

·233 ~

·

Coa l :

234.

All the coal mining activiti es within ' the city are under the control of thG National Coal Board (North Western Division) . · There are no open- cast workings. At present there are two collieries; Bra.dfc;>r d Colli e r y , which is s i tuated in .Forge· Lane in the proposed Bradford Ind:o.strial .Area, and Mos ton Colliery, which is situated in St. Mar y 's Road in the propose d New Moston Industrial Area. Moston .

235.

. 1'To coal is.· now mi ned, . at Moston, the

Col_lie~y Colli ery havi ng . been .closed : down· a year ago,

:; !~- .:·- ..

..·, .~:.\ .

and the intention is that the coal in this area shall be mined f r om tho Bradford workings• It .Js antici pated that the . land occupied by the pithea'd ··gear, etc•, ·wil.l e ventually r edevelop !'or general industrial purposes. · ·

Bradf·ord 236 . · Bradford Col l .i ery on the other han¢i., · -. · Colliery has gained in importance during r e cent years , and a co~pr ehonsive .programme for the ' mode rnfs·ation ·of the pi the'ad equipment has been app r oved by the Corporation . The land .. nec es~a ry for this ,scheme is shown on the · 'l'owri. : Map ruid compris es the urea· bounded by the .. · · present colli ery, Mill Street, Ashton New Roa(). and Forge Lane . i · Tipping 237 . The waste mat eri a l r emoved from the mine,.: of Waste is. tipped on land e.t Clayton Vale, which as .. .. , . Material shown on t he Land Use Map i s used ext ensive l y for tipping purposes . The National Coal .... , Board arc consi dering a scheme for re- packing waste materi a l unde rground, but t he extent to which thi s woul d r~du ce the need for tipping : . :,! . . space ·is not yet known . It has been a ssumed that the Nationa l Coal Board ' s land · at Clayton Vale will .remain i n use as a tip for the period of the. Dev elopment Plan . l ·

, . •I

Sub- ..'," 238 • ., . : The1~mining a re a · covers rilost · of north sidence Manche s t er , and a l arge atlount · of coa l r emains t o be won fr om und8rneath built up areas . However,· coal has been mined be low such a re as ±n .the north · of Manchester for a l a r ge nurube r -,.. :Qf year.s , and the effect s ·.of subsidence ha ve ,. · not been 'S<Jl'i ous, partly owing to the cushioning

L

I I

I

. I


71.

TlOl 1403

.effect of the thick bed of boulder , clay whi.~h . Also, since most of ·u nderlies mos·t of the city. the mining takes place below the rising Q:'Ound to . the north arid east of the city, subsidence in these areas· d9es not affect the natural d!·ainage, .which is to . the so~th and west, although local effects may be felt in the regions of the geological faults .which cross the city from north.. west to south- east. In general, . there i s ·no. reason to assUl!le .that the effects of subsidence f rQrn. . the c·ontinued· workl.ng of the Bradford mine wilJ be any more serious in the future than in the past, or that they will have any material s ignificance fro6 a planning point view.

of

Cl aL_

I

Availability of Economic " Deposits

23 9. il. study of the drift geology_ of Manchester shows that most of the city north of tho River Mersey contains thick beds of boulder clay of varying quality, much of which would be suitable for brick making. . However, most of these deposits are covered by urban devel opr1ent - roads , buildings, parks? . etc., and must b.e regarded as .perpetually sterilised. · Huch of the reraaining open land has b~en worked over the pust 150years, and although the initial working may not have removed all the available clay, further extraction has been rendered ti.neconomic by the subsequent tipping up of the land• .

Existing Workings

The only economic deposi.ts of brick clay, therefor e , are thc ..workin,gs and. reserve lands now held by the three firm.s within the city engaged in brick making, and it is the intention of these firms to work out all the clay in their reserves • . The c·o mpletc list of sites worked by the three undert akings is given in 14ppendix 13, whi c:h shows the approximate reserves of each wo rking, and the probable use which the land will have in twenty years tioe. 240,.

·241. All the workings have been the subject of Conflict with other Development Applications under the Town and County Planning Act, 1947, and when these applications land uses were considered careful attention was paid to possible interference with other land uses and other claims for the land. Tu}{ing into a ccount the amount of capital vested in brick-making plant, and al so the fact that tho land appli ed for represents the only brick-clay r eserves in the City, it was decided in every ca~e except one to approve the continued working of clay ; despite , in sono cases, stron ~ conflicting clai ms for other urban development such ~s housing and allotraents . The exceptional case is the working ~t Cemetery Road, Bradford, owned by the Corporation and l eased to a brickmanuf acturing firm. This lease oxpires at the end of 1951 and the question of whether or not it will be renewed is still unde r consi deration, as further extraction of cl ay would pre judice the possible future use of the site for industrial purposes . In particular th0 ·provision of a connection to the adjoining railway would be made extremely difficult.


I

TlOl .

'

·"

72.

1404 Safe'."" ' · : ·2.4 ·2.• : T;he. Totm ·Planning· ·appr.ovaJ, s. were made · guards '! sub'j ec:t to· conditions designed to. minimise t6. :. ' · · · injury to · amenity, and to secure .'t he f"uture l~enity · repabilit·a tion of the sites. In general, · " "i ~ · ·• ·ex·~ept in the workings which are in industrial .. . · · ar~as, the. Winning of brick clay does injure · · · '·._ ..• amenity, but, since it cannot be a p~rmanent us :e ; this factor was not allowed to .. i~f luence the working out Qf substantial· reserves. The Ultiiriate ·conditions of working provide in genera l for Use of ·the tipping Up of the sites, and re-soiling Land · ·.'"and · seeding, within a certain t i me fr oni the · · date of approval. As explained in Part C-8, it is intended . that the l and will then be taken over for open space purposes (again with the of the sites in · industrial areas) • . . exception . . , ·243.· .Al though the exi sting clqy workings will .. ultimately be filled in and the l and re-used, buildings and equipment will remain which coul d continue to operate using clay imported from . Future· ne w si_tes outside the ci.ty . . Th~ Ministry of · of: 'B rick Loca l ·Governmen.t a.hd Plannin·g are ma.king Industry comp·rehensive investigations hito al1 nrlneral . · · resources, · and · will' in· due cour·se be able to ·s uggest · now· work:ip.g areas for the brick industry. ·As a result of this survE;')y it may appe.a r desirable. that existing equipment ·shou .l d remain . in operation at least until the plant is du e for replacement.. At the sn.me time it · is .emphasised that the Cottncil are unlike ly to f ayour such a procedure iri cases where residential ameni ties coul d be affected. "

'

.'.

- I

.

.

·' ·

'(

.

,.

.·:

.. .~

" . ,,


TlOl

..

1405°

r,

.Pii.R~i."

73.

c.: to

...)~ ·:,;.., l·...~ ~·

Agriculture

Location of 244. Agricultural land is shown on the Land Use Agri.c ulturaJ: ~ap \l{i)'. .In . :P~arti. cular., those agricultural Land -._ ·· '· .1 hol)ling·s whic.h · are. ; being considered for other development are:. s·hown· by a · distinctive notation on the map•· .. The three .main ·areas of agricultural · · ·· land are at Wythenshawe in the e:A.rtreme south .of the CitY; ' along .the flood plain of the River Mersey :which separates · Wythenphawe from the rest . · pf ~ahchester, and in Bl?.ckle.Y in .the -extreme north.

245~ · The agricultural . land in · the ·north is undulating, and is used for dairy farming, while ·the flat land at Wythenshawe.· is intensively culifivated by market gardeners. . The remaining agricultural land · in the .. Mersey flood plain is used for dairy farming. · · Future -of 246. Devslopment .undertaken during the past the Industry thirty '·years - following the ·recommendations of the Tudor-Walters Report - has · naturally made extensive inroads into Manchester's agriculture, and the demand for housing land is still not satisfied. As a result of this the agricultural industry has become reTa.:tively unimportant in Manchester. Of the remaining land, by far the ... larger part is being considered for urban develop-· .·: ment, and the Town Map shows :that only small; ·i'ring~ areas of agricultural land will eventually he . left· in the city. The land at Blackley and at Wythenshawe is ~equired substantially for housing purposes, and the remaining land in the Mersey flood plain for open space purposes. I .

Ll~ison ·· with

· the Ministry of Ag~j_culture· and .. Fisheries. ·

I

,

247. ·

::Ln view of Manchester's urgent need for housing sites, the Ministry of Ag~icu1ture and Fisherie.s have not objected . to ·the · development of . the city>s·agricultu;ral ian(i, · b~t hA-V6 asked (a) that productive agricultural holdihgs be left undi~turbe d .for .as .. long as possible b0for? dcvo ~pp ... : ment t akes .. place, and . Cb) that where possible .... , development be planned. so as to .a void. ·severance of .the remaining holdings.· . This . latter point is an ]..mportant one·, since a productive and ·e conomic agricu;ttural holding can. often.· be rendered i:-seless by tne de velopment of only a small part of its area. Botn points raised py the Ministry have ·been tal{en · into. account in the pla~~ng and programrHing Of developm$3nt On Or adjoining . . agricul t~r!il land. · · : ... .

···.

\ I •:.

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~·;


74_.

T101 1406

..

PART C - J.J._

'··

Communica tions . -:- ..

Roads

:....=:=.:;~=.=...o-..~~~~-

..

Exi sting Cop_C!._i ti o~

248~ The Communicat ion.s M.aP !-~i.rr'( I)( a).~i shows ·· · the· present road syst-em in the city . Bas ically · ·t he road patte rn is a rin g and radial one; the radials , which a r e n early all C;L8;ss I roads; being much more cl early defined than t he ring roads . The two most important l engths of ring ro ad a r e (a) · Gr eat Ancoats Street and i ts cont i nu ati ons (A665) at ei ther end, whi ch form part of a potential Inner R L~g Road , and (b) Queens Road ( B6179) Hulme Hall Lane and i ts c ontinuatipn (B6178) which form· part ·of an · I nt ermedi a t e Ring Road. servin g the nort h and east parts . of the city . .I.n addi t i on Vlil br aham Road ( B5093) and Barlow Mo0 r Road ( :B~217 ) act as partial ring ro ads in the sou th. ·

Present Road Pattern

249 . In March , 1951, the mileages of publ ic hi ghways repairable by the inhabitants at l a rge were as foll ows : · TABLE 12 Class i fi ca.tion

..

;

Mileages of Public Hi ghways

Trunk Class Cl ass Clas s Other

r oads I II III roads

Total

Peak flows

.'

• •I

Mileage ., .. NIL ' 57 . 77 33. 40 55. 90 .. 650. 84 797. 9 1 miles

-

250. The Road and Raj.l Tr affic Map !~VIII(I)( b)°-. shows the estima ted 1938 total tr aff~c fl ows during an average evening r ush hour, which' i n Manches t er is betwe.en 5 p . m• . and 6 p. m. The flows in each directi on . du.r ing thi s P.eriod are represent ed <:m the plan by the d i stanc es between the edges of, the ro ad and the thick bl ack lin es , which are dr awn on either s id e of t he r oad , the· scale being one inch to 2, 000 -vehicles . Thus -c;he . s um of the two measurements at any one point on a road r epr esents t he tot al flow i n vehi cles per hour pas t that point at the peak peri od. . Th e information has been c ompiled from the r es ul ts of the 19.38 Mi nistry of Transport traffic .c ensus and from a detailed study of t r affic c on diti ons thr oughout t he city c ar ri ed ou t i n 1941 in connecti on wi th the prepa r e.ti on ·Of the 11 Ci t y of Manchester Plan 1945 11 • The 1941 traffic c ounts wer e adjus t ed to conform with the general l evel of traffic intensiti es obtaining in 1938. 251. Ori gi nal r esearch W3S under taken i n 1944 and 1945 on the worki ng traffi c c apaci ties of . urban roads and junctions of al l t ypes , and t he r esults of t h i s r esearch have been used in analysi ng Manchester ' s traffic probl ems .

L


TlOl 1407

7.5. ·:

.

Exis ting . Road Capaciti es

252. Compa rison of t hese working capa citi es with the 1938 traffic int ens iti es r eveals theoretically the ·ext ent, if an:y, of congest i on on exi st ing · ro ads and shows up tho se r oads or port i ons of roads where c ongcst i on . is likely to a ri se as a r esul t ()f the anticipat ed i n c.r eas e· in traffic above .1938 volur110s •. . From i solat ed :traffic counts taken . r ec ently it i s. appar ent that p r esent traffic volumes are apJ?r oac hii1g cl osely those of 1938, so that the r esults of the · theoretic al · analys i s of c ongest ion may· readily be confirmed by observation . 253. The analysis sho~s that the ro ads theor et ically incapab l e of c a rry ing their p r .es ent traffj_c load are mostly t hos e in th e areas immedi ately. south and eas t . of th e c entral ar ea of the city compris-i ng ( i) the inn er portions of the radial app1~·oaches from t he south~ i . e . L ondon Road (A6) , Upper Br ook St~ eet ( B5221J , Oxfo r d Str eet (A34), C':i,:t;y Road (A5068) and Ches t e r Road (~5 6), and (ii) the cross rout es which a ct as ring and link roads .close to the ce:r:itral area,- i. e ., Whitworth Street (A57), Stretford Road (A5067) and G:reat Ancoats Str eet/Pinmill Brow (A665) . 254. Congestion a l so occurs on the main streets in the heart of t he cit y at mos t times durin g t he day , freQuently reaching seriou s p rop ortions duri ng the mor~ ing and ( part icul arly) the : ev eni ng rush p eri ods . Thi s i s i n c apable of · Quantitative assessm~nt , being the .cumulativ e eff .e ct of many p auses w:P,ich wi l l be r e f err ed to lat er. At the srune t i me , this congestion is -- llggr a v ated substant i ally ~ partic ul arly in th e ev eni ngs by t he condi ti''o ns menti oned i n the p r evi ous par agr aph whi ch virtually represent a belt of' c ongesti on t end i ng to i mpede the ou t war d fl ow of tra ffic from the c entral area.

Isolated points of Cong esti on

,255_. · Bes ides the conges tion and nenr c onge.st i on which occurs i n and around the city' s c entral a r ea, there are l engths o.f ro ad . in the i ntermediat e o.nd outer areas where traffi c congest i on occurs at pe ri ods of peak flow . In th e no rth and east part s of th e city little c ongest i on occurs exc ept on the rin g r oads , wher e it is c aused by narrowing of the carriageway. On the In t~rmedi at. e · Ring Road c ongest i on oc curs on Qu een's Road ( B6179 ) along its appr oaches ~ o Rochdal G Road ; Hulme Hall L ane (.B6178) i s c ongested along its whol e length ( about t hr eeQUart ers of a mil e ) and so i s Potter y L ane ( about one-third of a rn.:Lle) . ' · . 256. In the south ern half of the c i ty c onges ti on · occurs ' a t p"oints along the outer lengths of t he r adial roads . "I-Iyq.e .R oad ( A57 ) i s c ongested or near c ongest ed . ov er most of its l engt h, c ondi t i ons being worst' b etw een Be ll e Vue Str ee,t (B6178) and Mount Road ( B6178 ) where Hyde Road a cts as part of the I ntermedi a t e Ri ng Road . Stockport Road ( A6) i s badl y conges t ed over the short l en gt h adJo i n i ng the s t agger ed junctions wi th Ki1 kmanshulme L ane ( B5221) and Plymouth Grove .( B5221) . On Wilmslo~ Road ( A.34) , which handles large volumes of t r affic, 1


Tl Ol 1408 . :.

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76. 1 ..

c onditi·ons a re bad a l ong narrow lengths .( a) · adjoining Manchester Royal Infirmary , ( b) through Fal-lQwf"i eld . and With ington shopping 6entres , and (c) at Cheadle Brid'ge on the city boundary .

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25-7.· In c ons i·derin g the present · road system arid t raffic c onditions it . i s i mpor tant to note that · eight national or regional h i ghways con v er ge on . or pas s .through the c entral areo., wi th the r esult that much fnter- tovvn o.nd long di s tance traffic, having no b~siness in . the c entral area, contribut es to the l oad on' its main s tr eets and to the subsequent c ongesti on. The following tabl e summarises t hese routes and indicates the p rinci pal roads uti.lis ed ' wi thin the city :-

T.ABLE 1.~! :. ,

.

N.A'.rIONAL .AND REGION.AL HIGHWAYS . ··- - - --·--- - - - - - - - - --

Road 1 Olassi- I fication , '· No. !

. .

Nati onal or Reg ional · Route · .·

I 1•

---·i

Principal Roads in City through • 1Y.hich r oute passes. ._

'

.1

1

I I

I

1---~~~--T,~laekb~-Bury-Man~~:st:; T B~;~-~~-Rd.-O~etha:---1

i Hill Rd.-Gt . Ancoats St.- I . j Devonshire Street. I

~\664 Nati onal and Rccri onal · Routes in the C.i~y

· A 62

! 1

··;

A 57 · A

6

1

A 34

1 Rochdale Rd.-Shudehill1High Street I

I

Hull- Leed.s-Oldham-

: Oldham Rd.-Oldham St .

I

I Mnnchest~r

.

I 1

1 1

~Sheffield-Hyde-Manchester-!

1 , aJ.ford-Liverpool I. London- StockportManchester- ShlfordI Carlislc- Gln.sgow

I

I Stoke- Wilmslow- CheadleManchester

!f.yde Hd. -Whitworth St.j Liverpool Rd.~Regent Ra.1· 1 Stock-Dort Rd.-London Rd. ! Piccooilly, - Market St . i

56

.

i Wilmslow Rd.-Oxford Rd. I

; Ppt e+'. St. - QuD.y Street j

.~

I

Huddersfield-Stal.ybri dge- 1 Ashton Old RoadAshton-,:m mchester l Fairfie ld Street

A635

.

I

Keicrhley- RochdaleMi dCll eton- Manohester

.

Walee- Ohe stor - 1b.nchestcr• i Chester Rd.-DeensgateBury-Blackburn i Bury New Road

'

I

! .

Defec ts in Present System 258. · The conges ted c onditi ons outlined i n the fore se . primaril y f:r>om two c auses : going par agr aphs ."·a.ri .

.( a)

..

( b)

The lack of continuous ririg and by- pass roads to .drain of f and expedi t e the ·p assage of through traffic .

The inadequa cy of c ert ain r ad ial approa c hes to the c entra l area , particul arly those from . the south, due primar•ily t o the l ack Of propel;' c onnc"c.tions . to the ro ad system in the c entr al ar ea,

• I


TlOl 1409

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i.

~

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77.•

259. .Other factors · c ontri but ing ·to.· c on ges tion are· a8 f ollows : (a) · I ndiscriminate parking of v ehicles , par t fcul urly in the c en tral area, which substantially reduc es th e capacity of t he roads c onc ernGd . ( b)

Unlimi.ted vehic ular a cc ess to frontage d ev elopment .

(c)

The clos ~ spaci ng of int ersections and side ac c ess roads .

( d)

The presence of shopping a r eas alongside main roads, with. the consequent conc entrati on of 'p ed0s trians .

260 . F or the mos t part lack of vvidth is not in itself a: p rim e' ca use of c ongest i on on Ivianchester ' s main roads al though~. as s t ·8.t ed in paragraphs 255 · and 256, bottl 'enecks·· dci dc eti·i>· ·On· c ert ain .r out es due · t o sudden narrowir.g of the c a r r iageways. Gen e r ally th ~ main r oads c oul d c a rry far · more traffic than they do if their .. capacity were f ully developed and p r operly used ; ·· that is to say if the fUndamental defects in .l ayout were elim.i nat od so ss to distri bute the lo ad more ev en l y t h r oughou t · the whol e system, and i f the lo ss in effectiv e wi dt h , r esulting from t he conditions r efe rr ed t o in the last paragraph, c ould be r ~du c ed. 261. The highways probl em is not, howev e r, confined's ol e l y t o consi der ations of th e traffi c c a rrying c apacity of the system; and att en tion must be p ai d to road safety matter s and to t he ameri.i ty aspec t. of major h i ghways . In t h i s res pect c onditi ons on many of Manc hes t e r ' s · main ro ads arc uns at i sfactory u...-rid c all fo·r subs.t antial improvement . Unrestric ted frontage development and the exist enc e of wi de single carriageways are . th.e princiff3.l d i ff~cult i es . It i s s i gnifican t to note that of t he 57 , 8 mil es of Cl.ass I r onds in t;he cl ty, onl y 8 . 6 mil es have dual carriagev-l'o.ys , whil.st out of 147. 1 mil es of cl assifiod r oads onl y 9. 8 mil es have dual c ar•ri agcwo.Ys . All Cla s s II r oads in the city have $ingle c ar ri ageways . R_~osals

c

\.

~ Genera~...!

262. It i s i mrnedi&tel y appa r ent that the elimi nation of t he d efec ts in the present road s ystem and the establishment of a fully satisfact ory road netwo r k ·are · incapable of a chi ev ement with in t he next 20 years . . ·. . .

.

.263. Hi ghways pl anning )1as ther8fo re been a matter of determining a 20 year s c;heme of impr.ov ement s and n ew construction~ likely to ·be wi t hin the resourc es of ·the city . and forming a logical s t ep in the creat i on of a desirable ultimate networ k , whil e a t the same time leading t o ih e early e1:1.min ation of t he worst defects in the p~esent system.

j


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Tl Ol 1410 . . J: "!"

,; ..!

'73.

'"

264. The tw enty year · and ult im~t e.: p lans a re explained separately: in the fol low i1?-g parag::aphs, but it is emphasiz ed that they a r e in f a ct int e rdependent and tho.t -.durin g the i nvest i gations they .. have been c ons.i der ed toge t her a::; a sin gle p robl em. . . : · .-g1 timat e Pl Gil 265 . The ul t imo.t e traffic load to be accommo dated . was built up from its const ituent el ~n ents using a basis.the 1938 c ensus f i gures supplemented by informa tion obtained in 1941. This i ndica t ed for each ro ute t he amount of traffic at pre- war'dens i ty t hat woul d continue t o a r i se from ex i sting dev e l opment a nd c ommunic at i ons . These f i gur es ~ i n creased by 40 per c ont in a ccopdanc e wi th . the Minis t .r y of Transport ' s es timat e of u l t i mat e traffic i n cr ease for urban a reas - wer e ad j usted to take ac~ount of changes in the numbers of vehicl es using particul a r ·rout~s which mi ght r eo.sonnbly be exp e ct ed t o r esult from p r oposed use a n d popul a t .ion c hanges i n the city and the regi on. The p r obable eff ect of future n a tion:il und r egional .hi ghways in div e rting l ong distanc e. t~\Jffi c v1o.s -also taken into o.ccoun t . ·

as

Ul t:i,mat e trQffi c l oads

· ··,

·'

266 . A stu.dy .of thi s es timate of t ho volume and direction of the mai n future traf"fic flow c onfirmed the s uitab i lity of the gener a l 11 spid e rs web" r oad pattern and showed the extent to: whic h n ew or im proved r ing and link r oads ri1i ght b e expected to distribut e th e f l ows ; thus det e rmi n i ng the r es i duo..l volumes t o be ac c orrraodn.ted on the vari ous sections of the radi al r oads • .

;

Ultimat ·e. · r oad · · notvrnrl{. · i

26'7. On the be.s i s of t h ese r es ult s the ultir.mte n etworlc I'-o.s · .beon pl ann ed. t o p r ovide t h e most effective rin g r.md r a d i a l or . 11 9pi dcrs we b 11 sys t em . compatible vii t .h th G Gov e rni n g p r c.ct ic a.l consider- · a ti ons . · Al tho,u gh many of the propo s als e r e l ong t crr1.1 ones ~ car e ful a:ttcnt i on h o.s b een paid to th e n eed to mnke the maximu:n use of ex i sting roads , ·and the n cod t ·o avo i cl p roh i bitive c onstruction costs o.nd the d i sturbanc e of impo1 tant prop erti es v11hose o.c g_ui s iti on nli ght . p r esent ser ious f:j.nanc i al prob:).. cr.1s . 1

268. Cons ide r at i on has b een gi ven to the importa nc e of dual carri ageways frorr. a ro ad s nf'ety point of vi ew; nnd· whe r e suc h tr cntment s ecns des irabl e , even though it may not o.ppenr t o be absolut ely n e c ess8.ry on ,tr affic· gr ounds , th e selecti on of r.oo.d ali gnn1ents , both. _n cw and exi s ting , hns been mo.de wi th n vi ew .to ensuri ng t h~t suff ici ent land c oul d be made a v a il able i n t he futur e for thi s pCtrtic ular p urpqs e wi thout unr eas ono.bl e exp cndi tu r e . In deal i ng with thi s aspec t of the pr·oblem a c count hns a l so b een taken of i no.ccura ci es wh ich mny ·be . present i n the for e c as t Of t he future tr n.f fi c pattern dU {? t o changes ih c onditi ons which c.nn.not be f or es een o.t thi s stage . The s cl cot.i on of a l i e;n11ionts t o p r ovid e for futur e roo.d so.fety nnd amcn i ty t!' _eo.tment s~ves a l so, therefo r e , 2s nn i nsuro.nce a.go.inst pos s i bl e futur e wid enings f ound nec essnry on tr.nffi c grounds . •.


TlOl

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14ll

269 . A further point· taken into ·ac c ount i s the ne ed for the major roads to divide the r es i dent i al zones of the city into areas which, in size and s·hape, l end th emselv es t o nei ghbourhood tr eat ment and also , where appl ic able, for the roads to form the boundaries of areas intended for important non residential pur pos es , e . g ., i ndustry and comme r ce; ·

..

270. The proposed ultimate road netwo r k which i s shown i n whol c on the 1rovm Map , i s giv en · diagrammatically in Diagram No.2. and the details are s cheduled j_n Appendix N.o. 14. The scheme envisa ges the c onstruction of approx imately 17 . 2 mil es of new road and the improv ement of 57.3 mil es of existing road.

Notation

Liaison with other Author iti es

Detail& Of the p r oposals

27 1. The system of numbers and letters giv en i n Diagram No .. 2 to the V[;l.ri .o us l'Outes i s one devis ed by the lat e Mo.n chester and Dis trict Regional Planning ·commi ttee w·hen considering highway matters on a regional basis,. It ha8 . been in use for a numb er of years ·and is femili ar to both l:l:i,nistry of Trans port and l ocal govern- · ment offici als i n the Manchest e r Area. So far as Manchester alone i s concerned th e notat i on has no special signi;ficance and i s used purely on the grou.:n ds of c onv$ni enc e . Ring roads · are g iv en l etters , radial roads ·numbers , and link roads a combination of :two numbers, or a letter and a number , r ep resenting the regi onal routes linkcq . 272. :Puring the prepar ation of th e road plan, contac t 'has been r.1aint a in ed with local r epr esent atives oi' the i1.linistr:r of 1.I1r31lsport and with officialG of ad~j oining local authorities to ensure the co - orU.ination of proposals a c tually in Manches t er with those for the Manches ter r egion. I nsu f'ficicnt t i me has been available fo r agreement · at Co~ncil l ev ol , but it i s not anticipated that any. .major diff i cul t i es wi l l aris c .on matters of principl c . 273. The most important f eatur es of this network ar e as follows :-

(a)

The provision of a City Centre Road to form a complete rin g ar ound the admi nistra tiv e . c cntr e of the city. 1

( b)

The prov is ion of a fully effectiv e I nner Ring Road ( U) , t o distribut e traffic betwce11. ·the inn er comrilc rc ial and r es id en ti al are$s .· 'l1 his provides ac c ess in t o · Salford a t its north- wost ern end and to Strctford and Trafford Park a t its s ou tl~-w o ct ern . .GP,,d.. ·

( c)

The pr'ovi s i on of a:J. imp r ov ed an~ extend ed In t err11ediat e Ri ng Ro ad ( C) running between Salford in the north- west a-rid Stockport Road in the south- cast , and serving much of th e city ' s heavy industry.

Ring ... Ro a ds

I. I

I

I

"


Tl Ol 1412

.

\'")\':

( d)

Link'. ·

"( i)

so.

17/7 , a new r .oa d j oini!lg As h ton Old Road ( A57) tci Ch os t 0r . Ro a d (A56) and Regent. Road ( A57) and providing an east ~west by- pass to t~ e c entral area.

Th is road i s in exi s t en c e as '( i i) D/23 . Wilbr aham Ro a d ( B509 3) al on g its southern l ength, and when ext end ed al on g its east e rn : '1 9ngt h it will n+a.t er'i ally irnpro,v:·e: north- so uth c'Cimmuhic a ti on al ong· t he c i t y ' s ea s t em perimet er .

.· .. ' .'

( e)

The p r ovi s i on of impr ov ed conn e ctions t o the City Centr e Road f or radi al s 2 · (Rochda l e Road A664) , 4 ( Ol d4am Road · A6 2) , 11 ( Cor11brid ge Str eet) , 1 2 ( ~rinc es s Road A5 10 3) and 13 (Chorlton Road B2518) . : .

( f)

The p rovi s i on o f a n8w radial r out e ( 11) mad e up s u bs t ant i all y of Camb ridge Str eet Yewtr ce Ro ad and P al a tin e Ro ad ( B5 167~ whtch sho ul d ev ent ually r emov e th e n eed f or Wil ms l ow Road as a ma jor tra f f ic r oute , t h us r ernoving t h r ough traffic f rom the Didsbury , With in gt on, Fallowfi cl d and Rus hol me s hoppi ng areas , and from t h e propos od .Hosp ita l and Univ ersity Pr ecinct s . ·

( g)

The pr ovi s i o:z:i of a ,.b y- pazs f .OP the len gth Of stoclcport Roa'd ( Ap ) betvi eon Crowcroft Park rui d Kirkmanshull1'. e L ane ( B5221) to avoid th e s h ops wrd.ch a r e s .p r ead a l ong this len gtl1 o:f _r oad . ·

Roads

Roads at Wythenshaw e

~

The provi sion . of two link roads : -

Roads .

Ro.dial

~..

(h)

Th e p r ovis i on of on adcqµate int e rnal ro a d n e t work a t Wy th ensh~we .

(j)

Th e p r ovis i on of new and i mpr ov ed a rt e ri a l rou t es to serve ·~vythens haw e inclu di ng : -

(i)

The ext e:;is i on of r adi al 1 2· (Princ ess P arkwcy 11.5 10 3) sou t hwar·ds t o t he ·c':Lty . Ul t i mately wh en c onn ect ed b ound ary. b eyond t he boun c].'ar y t h i s ro a d will p rovide a n r~w f'as t approach to th e cit y. fr om the sou t h .

(ii}

The r e- ali grunent .q:· Al t rin cham Roa.d ( A5 60) at i ts ens t ern e:nd to by - pass thr ou gh tr af ~i c · froT:l res i denti al areas .

(iii}

The c ons tru ct ion of D/ 11 ( Nor t hern By- pass ) whi ch Will connect i n S al .e wi th the Out er Ri ng Road and p r ovi de new ac c ess· to 1.1 r aff ord Park , .

\

(iv) · ·The extens i on of ' r o.di al 11 (P al .a ti ne Road ·;B 5~67 ) as a by-pas s t o Nort hendcn. · ·

I

.I

l I I


Tl Ol 1413

81.

(v)

The extension -wes twards of Ha~~y Lan e t o. provide new a cc ess to the city from B·r o oklands and Sale .

274. More detailed featur es of the proposals are giv en in c olumn (8) Of . Appendix 14. Columns ( 5 ) an d ( 6 ) of .t he . Appen d i x show res.pecti v ely pr· es ent traff ic loads durin g th e p eak hour on the ·various s ecti ons of road and the present t r aff ic c arrying cap a c iti es of th e c arri ageways ov er the same secti ons . Col umn ( 7) . giv e~ estimat ed future peak h our lo ads. ove r the :same -s ec ti ons . · These fi g1,1 r es are to some ext ent · av e raged ov e r the secti ons c oncern ed , so t hat small " bottleneck" l engt hs may not be revealed;. but' tak en to gether, c olumns ( 5 ) and ( 6) indicat e broadly the abilit y of existing highways to accomrnoda t e their presen t traffic l i:Qds , while c olunms ( 6 ) and ( 7) ' .s how b roa dly wh ere improvements will be r e nuired in the f~tu re . 275 . It is pointed ou t ·tha t \;he lo ads and c apacities are for traffic in one d ire c t i on only , nmnely the d ir e cti on Of maximum flow, SO that . the traffic l oads· in column ( 5) correspond to those scal ed on _the s id e of t he ro ad havi ng the great er flow on th e Ho ad and Rail Traffic Map VIII ( I) ( b) • Use of uni - dir ecti on al fl ows i s a continuati on of p r ev i ous p r a c ti. c e , the ea r ly .surv eys and ori gin a l r esearc h r ef e:rar ed t o in · th.? opening paragr aph ha ving b een carried out OI). this. b as is. In.- a: l arge urban a rea, suc h.: as Manches ter, h aving r egul a r and cl early d e fin ed p e ak . flows, it i s more c onvenient to d es ign for.th ese conditi ons. than t o us e 16 or 24- hour fl ows ; whil e the carry ing out of t raffic c ounts on a l a r ge·. s c al e i s obvi olJ,sl y mu c h cheaper Wh en t h e counts arc r es tr i ct ed to the peak flows . Twenty Year Plan 'it76, ·In det erminin g th e extent of t he work l ikely to b e undertaken du'ring th e next 20 years t owards- the completi on of the ultimat e h i ghways plan, the .probable fi nan ci al l iabi l ity of th e Corporat i on v1as taken as the over-riding c onsi derati on . I..t was d ecided , as a working basis -t hat · the d eman d on the r a t e fl.lnd ar ising from l oan c ha r ges on land and wo r ks for s chemes included in th e tw en ty y·ear p lan s h ould not exc eed th e product of an ei ghtpenny rate. 1

277 . The sec on d rnain c onsid eration was the n eed to c onserv e hous ing a ccornmodati on and it was t hought essenti al to ar range the p 1 ogr amrn.e s o that as f a r as possibl e dwel l i n gs would no t . be demol ished in a dvanc e of the. time v1he1, , ·they mi ght b e expected t o be dealt with by pl anned r e d ev el opment . 1

c

278. · Having l;' egard t o t .hes e l .imi t a tions, the obj e ctives to be s ecur ed by th e t wenty year p ro gr ~nrne we r e c ons id er ed to be as follows:-


·.

Tl Ol .

s2.·

1414 Objec tives of 20 - · year pr ogr amme

( a)

The r el ief of specif ic poi nts and a r eas Of p r eGent congest i on .in arid a d j a c ent t o the c entral area ·or the city and a l so on isol ated lengths of roads in the out e r areas .

( b)

Th e provi s i on of an adeg_uat e ma i n r oad sys.t em in Wythens hayve·· as par t of the general devel opment of that a r ua •

.( ·c )

The progr essi ve i mprov ement· of the ma jor r oad network as a whole so t hat its ab i l ity to di stri :but e t r affic may be i n creased to an extent suffici ent to offs et as far as v.oss i bl e the gr owt h of t raffi c anticipated ov er the next 20 years .

279 . The P rogr•arrme Tuiap onl y i nd ic ates the ext ent and stagi ng of new roads proposed fo r the 20 y ear peri od, as these rep r esent speci f ic changes in l and use. Wi denings and imp1,ovements of exist i ng cl ass i:f'i ed roads , ne c essary for the a ch i ev e mGnt of th;e objec t i ves outlin ed in· the las t par agr aph ·ar e not indi c at e d on the Map . Appendix 1 5 summari ses the whole of the 20 year pl an and i ndi cates the main purposes of the indi v i dual proposals . Main f eatur es of 20 year plan ·. ·

280 . The main features. of the :20 year plan a r e as fol lows : . .:. ( a)'

I mprovement to int ernal c ommunic at i ons at Wythenshawe by the .early provi s i on of Westex•n Road , the ext·ens i on ·of Hol lyhedge Road in a westerly dire c t i on and the Civi c Centre Road .

( b) · Improv ement in the first yeaxis of the plari to Mrillchestcr- Wythonshawe c ommuni c ations, Princess Ho ad and Pr i n c ess Parkway ( A5103 ) g iving d i re c t connec t i on between the c entre of the Ci ty and Wyt h enshawe Ci vie C0.n tre .. .

(' c )

'rhe .eetrly relief of e ongest i dn at the approaches to the Ci ty Centr e (es pec i al ly on the sou th side ) and on the i n n er c ross routes (such as Great An c oats Str eet ( A665) , Whi tworth S tr eet ( A57 ) and S tretford Road ( A5067))by (i) the impr ovement in the f i rst years of t he i nner l engths of Roads 10 ~ 11 and 1 2 , and ( ii) th e construction of l i nk road 17/7 and the imp r ovement of the I nner Ring Road.

( d)

The establ ishment , ·at l eas t so far as rout e is c oncerned , of th e t hree i mp ortant ri:ng Pout es - Roads , A, B. .and c. The western sec tion · of the Ci ty Cent r e Road will run part of i ts length on a deck to be c onstructed ov e r the Ri ver. Irwell ,


\.

I

TlOl 1415

.,

. ( e)

I

...

The i~emoval of bottle-necks "iand the improvement of c ongested lengths of road , such improvement involving the temporary use in some c ases of one.way systems . Provis i on is also mad e in the 20 year plan. for the i mprovement of l engths of road which are likely to . bec ome c onges t ed as a result of traffic r edistributi on .

( f)

The cr.ee.t ion of three new routes i nto the city by the ext ension across the City Boundary of Roads 10 , 12 and 13.

( g)

The extension southwards of Kingsway a c ross the Raver Mersey t o connect .wi th a proposed ne..-1 .Cheshire c ounty road. This scheme will greatly rel i eve traffic congestion. i n the adjoining village of Cheadl e through which the present A34 now runs. Traffic through Cheadl e wi ll be furth0r reduced when the proposed Sharston By-pass is connected to its propos ed c onti nuation in Cheshire and Al trincham- Sto ckport :traffic is by•pa.ssed from the village,

281. Reference to App011.dix 15 shOV'i'S that 1 , 911 houses will n eed to be demol i shed dur i ng the c arrying out of the 20 year pl8!1. The appendi x is set out with the schemes in approximately c hronological order, Dnd it wi ll be ·n oted t hat t he schemes included in the ear ly pnrt of the plan are, as far as possible , those not invol vin g the demolition of l on g- life residential property. As t he plnn proc eeds , the residual lif e of r esidential property becomes l ess and l ess , and hence its demolition b ecomes progress ively less impo:i:·tant. On thq bas is of the program~e given in Appendix 15 nnd using these 1950 estimates for tho res i dual life of residential property , it has been c alculated that only 314 houses out of the total of 1 , 911 h ous es wi ll have any effective life loft i ·n them at the time they become due for demol ition under the hi ghway pl an. 282 ~ So far as t he finroicial i mpli cations of the plan arc conc erned, it has been es timated that the net a.emand on the rat es , .in r espGc t of s inking fwid end interest on the cost of land and works,. will incr ease gradually to a maxi mum of 7 . 6 pence in 1971. This fi gure '.i .s b as ed on the assumpti on that the product of a penny rate remains at £25 , 000 ," and th at · t .ho s chemes will attract an ave rage Mini stry of Transport grant amoun t ing to 60% of the g ross cost . The rat e of i nterest on the residue has been taken as ·3-i per cent with r .edempti on pe:.,iods· of 20 years· and 60 ye crs fo r works and land respect iv ely.

I

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Tl Ol 1416

84. PA.RT C - 12 - Comnunications - Car Parks and ~ B-0.s 8=tati ons . - - - - - - - - - - -

283 .

Location of Car Pq.rks and Bus Stations

The locations of existing car parks , and bu s stations are shown in relation to other l and u ses · on the Land Use Map · . ~ I(i) 'l· · They are also shown in relation t o exis·ting ' classified roads arid railwaxs on the Comnunications Map f VIII (i ) ( af1 , and , in r.elation to the transport networ k on the ·Road and Rai l Traffic Map . · [VIII (i ~ (b)'1 . Thi s latter Hap also shows bus t er:t;1i nal po1nts for the principal bus servi ces , a s distinct from actual st ations .

Exis ting Conditions

Car Parks

284. Cons i deration of the car parking probl em has been .confined to that existing in the central area of the city, where the denand .fo r par ki ng facil i ties · i s most acute and where the problem is ·of real plannin ~ si gnificance . The following table sumr1arise s the re sults of a ~ur vey made i n 1947 and i ndicates the eztent to which the demand was met by street parking at that time . .

..

'rABLE 14-o

Parked Vehicles, nidday, 18th April, ·

191+7.

Where parked

of Car s

Tot al

1No.

l

Streets

- I

13, 593 i

Car Par ks and Garages!

809

l

668

Vacant Sites

TOTALS

,

23

____

!5, 070 __ ______ ,.

l Il

967 . 4 ' 560 11 820

I

,

1, 001

691

! 6, 071

--~------·

285. The abandonment of petrol rationing since 1947 has undoubtedly j_ncreascd the par king

demand, . a l t hough some addi t i onci.l re·lief has been obtained by the encl osur e of sor.1e of the vacant war damaged sites to forn six temporary Municipal car parks , with a total tiaximum effective capacity of about 1,300 vehi cles .

286.

The present problen i s agg'.ravatc d by the fact that very few of the large buil dings in the cent r al area provi de any parking f a cilities withi n their own curt ilages , and also by the ~act that raost of the privat e car parks and garages , which have a total pot0nt ial capacity of about 3, 000 vehicles , are inconveni ently s i ted in rel ation t o the main bus i ne·s s areas , and are not fully used during the daytir;1e when conditions are at t heir worst.


85.

Tl Ol

I

1417"

I I

Reference has been made in Part C-11 of ~his . -anal ysis to the contribution made tow~rds t~affic congestion in the central area by kerb parking• I t ts apparent that the present reliance on this form of· parking , to oeet the greater part of the · total doraand, conflicts di rectly with the efforts whi ch are being made for the interim reli ef11 of congesti on, by the introduction of further No Wai ting 11 and 11 Unilateral Wai ting 11 restrictions . Recent progr ess in this direction has only been made possible by the tenporary parking provisions referred to in paragraph (285), esti~ated as the equival ent of approximately seven mi l es of city street parki ng.

287 .

I .

Future Problem and Pol icy • .

I

I I .

I.

288 . Littl e scope r emains however, for the provision of further tempor~ry car parks and it i s of course evident that as the redevelopnent of the blitzed sites progresses, parking capacity will decrease . As a natter of policy, the provision of parking facilities within building curtilages, at least sufficient for the needs of the building, will be an essential feature of new developnent perni tted in the central area, but :thi·s :Will only partially conpensate for the consequent loss of bulk parking capacity. This process, together with the anticipated 289. growth_ in the volur.10 of notor traffic , · nust inevitably increase the dinensions of the car parking problen to be fucod in the foreseeable future . It nay be tha.t ultinately, when the proposed highway network beconos fully effective , the r oduction in the volune of traffic passing through the central area will be such as to allow a substantial a.nount of street parking to take place with less serious effects on traffic conditions than arG ovidonced at present. At tho sano tir.1e no such relief can ba expected for nany years; ~d pos itive action, by tho provision of additional car parking f aci liti es , will be a nost vital aspect of tho overall policy for the r cdevelopnent of tho central area. 290 . A considerable ru~ount of research has been · underta.kon into tho pr:.: . ctic·a bi li ty of various typos of car parks and, so far as can be ascertained at prcrnent , the rJQxir.1Ul:1 use of the baseraent levels of new buildings, tosuthor with the construction of one or r..1ore under eround parks below .. opon sp aoos au ch as Piccadilly, appears to be the nethod nost likely to prove satisfactory. Econonic factors nilita.te against the provision of either nulti- storoy or surf.ace car parks in locations convenient to the na.in business and shopping areas . 291 . No schenes have yet been proposed for either basenent or underground car pa.rks and at this stage tho Devolopnont Plan . includes no spe cific proposals for parking provision s in tho central area. The whole problen will r eceive fur the r consideration howe ver and in particular the possibilities of base@onl parks 7 for general parking additional to that required by tho individual buildings , will be fully explored whon layouts and de signs are prepared for th~ r .odevel.o pDent _.of __th~ .-~ar clan.aged ar eas .


TlOl 1418

86 . duts~de tho central ·area, najor parking problens arise in connectio~ with Bclle· vue ..ZooJ.,ogica1· ga;rdens · and stadiuns and with ·M anchester City's football gr ound. No now . proposals are r~adc , but lands at present used as parking grounds by these organisations are allocated for tho sn.r:.10 pur:p oso in tho Town Map.

292.

'

Bus Stations E~dsting . 293. Thero aro at ~resent only three terninals Conditions in the central ar ea of tho city, which, being off the nain highway, night te consider ed as bus stations. Those nro:-

,.

(a) Parker StrGot Bus Station at · tho rear of Piccadilly gardens • . (b) Stevenson Square Bus Torninal. (c) Lower Mos ley Stroc;t ·Bus ·Stution. Tho first two aro usod nainly by tho Corporation Transport Departnont and the l ast ono, by private transport coupanios operating nediun and long distance services . All other torninc.ls in the central area occupy both footway and carriageway space on highways used by general traffic .

294. . To sone . extent all these tcrninnls

contribute to both local 3.Ild·- ~ general traffic · conge stion in tho contral are·u. The elinination of this source of congestion nust : bo ono of the principle obj ectives of any future bus- opGrating policy, but at the sane time it .is recogni sed that . ocononi c factors). and tho nood to T.1 . aintain . satisfactor y standards of convenience for tho bus-using public, .muy well pr:..)vcmt its full · nchi0vo!.1ont.. · Future Policy

295.

Thc .Purkor Stroet station, which is the principal torninal in tho city, is heavily overloaded at pr0sont and proposals aro being activGl y considered for a solution of the problons presented by thi s station ruld by ·the :genoral operation of bus $Crvicos in the Piccadilly area as a whole • . Tho schones undpr review arc for tho r cnodelling of the station in ·tho Parker Stroot locality or , a1tornativcly 1 for tho coopleto renoval of the station fron tho existing site and its rcestablishr.1e11t oi ther on tho Portland Street war danaged area or on tho :rea,r part of the Piccadilly war _danaged area, us part of the coraprehensive rodGvelopnent scheoos intended· for these areas . Ponding o decision on these alternatives it has not been · possible to include any spocif:Lc proposal in the Dcvolopnent ?lan.

296.

With rogard to tho other existing terninal points, the anticipated .growth in. tho volUL10 of gonor al traffic would Duke it· virtually ·i qpossiblc in tho~ futuro for t .h eso to be roto..ined ~nd 'usE:ld on t ho· present scal e_ . ,As a possible


TlOl 1419

\

I \

I. \

I

..

alternative, consideration has been gi ven to· tho establi shncnt of n series of new sta~ions outside tho proposed ci ty centre r.o_nd on .the po rip~ory of the hain business and shppping ar~a . Suitable si tos 5 like ly to boqomj available i,vi thin thG next 20 years or thoronbout s, have in fact been dcto~­ nincd and could if nGcossary bG r esorvod for this purpose . At tho sane tine tho Transport Dcpc:.. rt ... rJont ar o consi dering proposals for tho noro extensive operation of t hrous h services, which i f succes sful o i ght render nany of the _Gxisting torninal s unnecessary, and consequently reduce tho ncou for the now stations otherwise required in substitution. Firn proposals for new bus stations cannot thorcforo be fo·r uulated until noro experi ence i n tho op ~ ration of through services hu.s boon gained.

297. A furthor point whi ch cannot bo overlooked i s tho possibility of bus servi·.c os being opcr~t ed in tho f'utu~c on a regional or seni- regional basis . If such a policy wcro adopted, the principle of through service s would be further o:xt'e ndod and thi s would undoubtedly have' a considerable influence on tho nunber, size and locution 6f . bus stat~ons and . · t erninals required in t he central area. 2981

In view of those uncertainties it has been consi d0r0d prGfur~blo at this stago not to include any prcposals ' for bus stations in th8 Devclopnunt Plan.


88.

TlOl 1420 PART C - 13.

Communicati ons - Railways

Existing Conditions 299• · Much of Manchester.' s. indus t~i,:3-1 and ; commercia l history · is associat ed. wi tn ti:e ~eve~op­ . "m ~nt of it s railway c ommunic ations , beginning in 1830 with the opening of the fi r st important · route to Liv erpool and leadin r, up to the p r esent compl ex network of railway routes whi?h, with .t he. city as its hub , p rovides connections to all . parts of the country. This syst cm is sho'l/vn on the Land Us e , Communic ations, and .: Road a..'Yl.d Rail Traf'f'ic Maps , the latter giving an indic ation of the volume of . traffic handled a t the various par-rnenger stations in the city.

· 300 , .

Defects in the pres cnt s;ystcm, which from a plruming point of view a.re of real significanc e , are mainly those affoctifig thb . curitral area of the city, and relate to both passenger and frei ght transportation , ..

· 301.

Defects 302, . With r egard . to the pass.·cnger sys,t ~m. the in most s erious defects mc..Y be Gummari~ed as Passenger · follows: System ('e.) A lack of any di rect link between the four main line t er rninals ( Vi ctoria, Exchange London Road nnd Central . Stations ~ other than between th e first tw o. ( b)

A gone ral lack of segregation between

suburban and long disto.nce passenger mov 0ments in the main terminals .

Defects in Freight System

( c)

A lack of effectiv e linkage between the main t i3rminals and tho main city bus stations .

( d)

'l'he inadcQ..uat 0 a.pproach and fa°reconrt arrangements in tho main t ermi nals.

( e)

The unimpressive apponrance of the ste.tion buildings nnd the poor archi t ectural relo.tionship \7i t h other important buildings ~n their vicinity.

( f)

The general inad equacy of station facilities due to cramp ed and obsolete int ornal arrang0men t s .

303. 'l'he wo rst features of the presont goods sys t em arise from tho fact that ei ght principal goods depots , which luck any adequat e inter-depot connections , are c onc c;ntrated ·,vi thin or i ramedi a t el y adjac en t to the central area of the city. This results from r a ilway development having been undertaken in tho past by s ovcrnl separate companies , o.nd also from tho former dependence on horse drawn transport and the i n itial need for the depo"t.s to serve commercial and indus tri a l premi ses form erly located in the c entral a1 ea to an extent substant i ally grcat 0r than that envisaged for the futur e or in fact obtaining a t present. The main effec tG of this conc entration o.r·e: 1


'

89.

TlOl :1· 1421

I I

(a)

I

I

I. I

The extremel y unsightly appear~c e of the goods d~pots when contrasted with more appropriate central area development.

( b)

Tho sterilisation of extens iv e areas of 18Ild which could otherwise be us ed for more s€emly buildings ruid con~ribut e substca1 tio.lly to the improvement of th e c entro.l a r ea.

( c)

The cr ontion of a lar ge volume of h e avY" and slow movin g vehicular tr affic wh ich is a majo r contributory cause of the present traffi c c ong0stion in the central are&.

~µtur_e Poli~

Pr evious Pr•oposals

I

I.

305. Sinc e 1945 , further cons.ul to.tion has tak en p l a ce firstly with the compani es c oncerned ai."'1.d lat er with the Railway Executive of British Railvmys , in wh ich both the op e r a tion al and fin oncial impl ic c.ti onG of these p ropos a ls h ave be on fully exnr:1in ed .

I I Attitude Of Railway Executive

I

I •

II I

304. Considurabl e at t enti on hn.s been given in the pas t to the possibiliti es of remedyi ng some of the defects referred to in t he l ast two paro.~raphs . In the "City . of M3.Ilches ter Plan 1945' s c hG1:ies iivere suggest cd which al though arnb i tious i n chara cter , repres ent ed the onl y effectiv e soluti on to the ro.ilwny p roblem as a whole. A fenture of these proposals, worthy of mention, wa s thnt in resp e ct of the pe..ss enger system they we re int end ed to provid e a seri es of remodelled stntfons o.dequo.t ely linked by surface lines, which would render unnec essary the und e r ground railw :;.y systum for whi ch there appear s to b e no ec onomic justific nti on , but for whi c h there has b een a popular demand recurring periodically ov e r the lo.st fifty yecr s .

<>

306. The outc ome of these c onsulto.tions has been n stat ement by th o Rn ilt:c.y E xe c utive t o the effect tha t al though for the most p art practicable in princ iple from on oper ". ti on al point of view, none of t he pr dpos ::-l ls put forw a rd ( ev en in a modifi Gd fo r m) o.re contcmplnt ud as a ma tter of railvn.i.y policy either in +,he nea r or the foreseeabl e future, ond coulu only be ent urtnined by them on th e; grounds thnt they wor·e n ecessary to conf'orm with plnnning req_uireme:n ts uncl v1ould b e financed by the Planning Authority.

30't. From the p rovi s ionnl estima t es provided by the Ro.ilway Executiv e , which omounted in total to about £11, 000,000 , it bec omes apparent that the Corporat i on could not hop e t o f inanc e all or any of the s cher.ies t hems elves , and t hat t here would in f a ct b e no possibility of 3uch s chemes being impl 0ment e d unl ess [1nd until th e Itn.ilwny Executive recogni sed them ns being essential to their own int er es t s . un<l we re prepur ed to make subs tanti2.l contributi ons t o the expenditure inv olv ed .


...

go •.

TlOl

1422

.~

1~08 .

The Rai lway Ex e cutive ' s present poli cy offers no gr oun ds f or s upp os ing that c i rcumst an c es :wi l l chn:n.ge t o t h i s ext ent and there h as been no op tion for t he Co rporat i on bu t t o nband on t h e pr opos als c·omplet el y at thi s s t t1ge , even thou gh t h is i mpli es t he a cc ep t an c e for an i ndefi n i te peri od of c onditi ons which mus t to some. ext ent adv ersel y a f fe ct the redev el opraent of the c entra l ur ea . .

Gener al P l anni ng P ol icy

309 . · The Dev el opment Pl ro1. ther efo r e incl udes no p roposnls in r espec t of r ailways, and o.11 · other aspe c ts of t he Plon ho.ve been rel at ed to t he exi s ting ro.i lvnw fo.c i 1 i t i cs vJh i ch it i s n ov1 assumed wi l l r emai n s ubstanti el l y unch '..lnged • .

L ondon Roo.d Approac h

3 10 . Att enti on i s drmm t o on e r el o.t i v ely mi nor p r oposal the d0s i1 ab i l i t y of whic h , o..s o. l on g t e r m .meas ur e , i s now r ec e iving furt her c ons i dePat ion by 1 1 t .h e Railway Ex ec utive . l h i s i s a s cheme fo r i mp r oving th e o.ppr onch ar r o.ngeraents to L on don Ro ad Sta ti on , whi ch i f nll owed t o r era2.in i n their pr es ent fo r m wi ll nlmost c e~t ainly r es ul t even t u a ll y i n seri ous c on gest i on o.t the j unc t i on of t he o.pp r oac h with London Road . Thi s probl em would ho.v e been deo.l t with automat i c al l y by t he ori gi nal p roposnl fo r the r ee.li gnmcnt of thfJ s't 3t i on . AB an a lt crn ntive the s cheme under con s i derat i on p 1•ovides for n sec ond r amped e,pproo.ch on the wes t s i de of London Road , . c onnect ed to the exi s ti ng s t at i on fo r ec ourt by o. bri dge ov er that su ch a s cheme would not in on;y e ns e be r o::i.d . und ort'1ken until mos t of the propert y on t he s i t e of the sec ond r omp 11.o.d ou t l i v ed i t s useful l if e and c oul d be oc q.uired o.t a. mi n i mum cost, but i f s u b s eq_uentl y agr eed i n p :c>i n cipl e with the Rai l wny . Ex ec ut i ve , it wi ll be snfegunr dud by the nor mal . p r oc ess of developmen t c ontrol , 1

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1423

-

PART C ... 14 Existing Airports

Future Policy

Ce ntral Air Terninus

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I

- " Com:.unica tions

-

Air

311. Nanchester is .sorv~d by tv~~ ~mni ~ipal .a irports - Hingway n.nd Barton. - T'llG . Barton Ai rport 'is wholly outs ide tho city , loca~e d a~out, sovon Dile s wo st of tho city centre on B:irton l-1oss in tn.o area of Eccl e s J\iunicipal Borough . It is . us8d ;:.m inly by ?hat~~cr and taxi air services ~nd by flying clubs . R1ngway Airport which is by far the nore inportant, is shown on the ~ o~:aunicatir-ms l!ap . It is l occ..tod about e i ght Diles :::out:b_ of t he City centre , r_:a i niy i n ·the areas Of Wilr:slow Urban Di strict c_nc~ BucJ.rJ.ow Rural District, innodia tely south of \lytllcnshc'nvv . A snall porti on, s hown on t hG La.i.1c~ Use Nap is a ctua lly vi thin the Manchester b oundnry . Thi~; 3.i:rport h a s been inprovcd duri ng recent yco.:-s to onnblo it to acconuodate the large ai r craft n0w op-:. ;rn +--ing on the i r._ternn tional air r out2s.

312.

11Jegotia t i ons a re:, in hn.!i.C. -·with the :t-'iinis try of ,·Civil ..:\.vir.:ttioi:. with n view to dct1.;rrlini ng future a irport poi.i cy for Ec-_nche stor . Ponding the r e su l ts of . the s e negotiation~ no proposals can be fornulnted for furthc.c li1provcr:ent or Jxpansior.; oi the airports which night affG ct l~nc'.. e ithsr 'i·ri thil" 'Jr outside the city . No propos~ l s t-!avc thcroforE: boo:c1 i11cluded in the Developnent ' Plan . · ·

313.

It is intenc.'fed that the:: nrcsent central air terninnl, which i s a tenporary pr0fa.b ri ca ted building i n St. Peter's Squ are , should be rep laced as soon as possible by a pE1 r D£:.n cnt building . The site for this torni nnl has not b eon finally · dcter...:_iined but Will b e l o ca ted in t ho inn.or core of tho contral - connc rcial are n. The highway propos2;.ls in the Dovclopnent Plan t a ke account cf ·the;: ncc~d for goeic, road conne ctions between Ringway a nd t he (!ity cc.ntro n.nd. · it can be seen fror :. the Toi,m Eap a nd f!'on . Dic::. 2;rru:: f;; o. 2, that two r oads (Routes l:;L ::-.Yid 12 on the din gran} -- both provi de such connecticns.

Propose d 314. : The Cor pora ti on ha vc rc c ontl~r gi ven consideration Helicopter to -the question of providing hel :i.copter stations wi thin Stations . the csntral area of the city . The r o -are two ·. p ossibilitiest one t o p~ovi de ~ ground station.an~ tho other to provide a station on ·;;ho r oof of a building (whi ch no.y have t o be: strongthLml'd for the purpose ). On current design ~tanC:ard s, an c.rE::.l. 300 f eet . ·s qua r e i s required, er Rl t-:irno.tivcly two aroas a t right angles to each othe r, Gach neasu ring 300 f o .: ;t by 150 fe et . No decision has yot been ro~ched on the type of stn tion t o be ad.o:!_::tea., and :Lnvostiga tions are not sufficiently far adv~nced to or:.nbl o nny spe cific proposa l for a helicopter stati on to be nade in this Devel opn0nt Plan . The ::.1Gcd for on e- is being borne in nind, h owever, so thu t in ·1954 ·;.. by whic'h tirae mul tiengi n e d hcJ.ico.pters sui tabl e for ' operati ng over built u p ar s~ s should be availabl e - no de l a y need occur in bringing helicopter service s into uso in Manchester .

315.

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TlOl 1424

11.2. c

PART _ • 15

CoLmunicu tions - Wa tcrways

The existing wat e rw~ys ~thir; t h o c ity a r e shown on tho La nd Use HGp LI(l)-: ana on the Connunico.tions Nap LVIII(l)(a) ..

316.

!•

Tho f ollo;ing pa ragraphs give a br ~o f de scription of those ·wa t orwr.ys togethe r ·with. suer: infornation a. s is '.'t.vailnbl e at ·tho pro scnt tin0 J...n respect of f u tur G ·policy .

317.

i·io..nches ter s:~'-~-}2 _C<:. i~~--1 ~ . _ 'l'he ~ uppor porti on of this· canarforr.:s fho physical oour.aary be tween Mancheste r and Salf ord a nd no s ection of the canal lies wholly ~vi t'hin Manchester.· The~ principal docks and wha rve s n.r o actu.::i..l ly i!-i tho adj oining ar ca.s of Salford a nd St:t- G.tfor d . Rof c r cn~c to tho ccononic inportance of .this cano..1 has alr eady bee~: rn1dc in Par t A of this an:i.lysis . '.:':.1e l'·.i.nnct.. c stor Ship Canal Conpany at present hr~ ve n o p rop osc:.ls c~ffcc ting tL?-E:l ir property within Uw city , which arc of any plc.nn1ng significanc e .

318 .

319. Br:!- c1g0w~ tc:~~,·~~?21.!.. Tho head of thi s ccmal with its r e qui s i te wharves , basins, depots and warehouse s· is l oca tod in the C2.stl ofi old area lying to the south '.rnst of the city centre . Thi s ce..nn.l is controllec by the Manchester Ship Cn nal Conpuny , who as s tated in the l ast parag r a ph, have no prop osal s of planning significance. 32 0 . Hochdnl 8 C::·.nc..'1.l . This canal enters the city on the c ast side in tl-ie ~fowton Hoa th a r ea and e xtends across the city c onnecting with the Bridgewater Canal i n Castlefield·. Its inport<:.nc o as a trc:1.ffic wn.tc rviay has considera bly di ~·1i nisho d but it r eno.i ns s ubj ec t to the wa;ter right s of c e rta i n i ndustrial c oncerns a nd: " als o servos a s a fe ede r for t he Bri dgGwate r Canal. The Rochda l e Cana l C0n pany is to pronoto a. Parliancntary Bill S8eking to extingui sh navi gc..tional riehts on tho canal. · Such a Bill would no doubt provide tho opportuni ty f or tho cv0ntu9..l culvcrting of c or t nin sections of t;-10 canal with n view to faci litati ng the satisfactory r edove l opnrmt of tho residential ci.reas through wh i ch i t p ~sse s.

321. :i..i~ nchest0r· .?, n·:~...\;:-;~-, -~~un.... . _;_-Lvhi:: C-:t.rtD.1. This canal enters the city on - theco.. st s i de i n the Oponsh a w area and pass es across the city connc.c ting \·ii th the · Rochdale Canal nea r London ~oad St ation . The Stockport branch of this canal ente rs t he· city i n th1:: Gor t on area and connect s with the Dc::.in wa te rway i n the Openshaw area . The nain ·wate rway , and the ·Stockport Branch as far s ou th c. s Gorton Rrdl wn.y Sta tion, n re at pre s e nt open to tra f f ic a l th ough not ext cnsi vcly u sed. · The s e two waterways o..re now controlled direc tly by the North Western Divisi on of the Docks and. Inla n d Wa t e rways ExGcutive , who ore at present c ons i doring the closing of the Stockport Branch . With this end in view, negotiati ons arc proceeding between the Executive and the Corpor8.tion with rogard t o the P·os sibili ty of transferring :tho L:ancho ste r secti on of '.this wa t orwa·y to tho Corporation. 322 . Having r egard to tho fact that the only known proposa l s like ly to affect wate rways i n the future are thens e lve s still subj e ct t o c onfir nn tion, a s e xplained in the l as t two paragraphs, it has not been considered appropriato t in the Dovol opr.iemt Plan, to suggest any va riati on 1·ron the present canal systen or to propose any spe cific a lte rnative uses for l and aow occupied by canals and anc illary c1cvel opnont'.

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93.

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1425

• opment bJ Government . Devel Departm ents

PART C - 16

S ervice Depar tments I

The service hol d ings 'in the City may be summaris ed us follows : 323.

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I I

( a)

Various dr•il l hal l s , barracks and recruiting centr es not shovm in detail on the Land Us c 'f.i:ap .

( b)

Site held by the Royo.l Navy, ad j a c ent to Armstron:-r Whitworth' s Wo rks in Openshaw, used during th~ \'!DI' in connect i on with the manu:f'acture and t es ting of naval · guns. 'i1 his i s 2 hov.n as :Ul indu strial area on t he Land Use L op .

( c)

Land formin g p art of the Mell211d . Playing Fi elds in Gorton, to get her wi t h adjacent l a ncl and lleld by the Enst Lancashir e Ter·ri to!'i al l-..I'my Association for training pur c osos . Th e l and ac tually within the plcying fields i c hel d on lease from the Manchester and ~alford Playing Fields Association until 1956 • .

( d)

An ti-Aircrnft defenc e sites which for s e c u1•it;y- reas ons e..re not indicated on t h e L an d Us e Map .

324. No speci1'ic propos als c.rc contained in the Devel.-pment Pl811 which aff e ct se~vi ce interests i n r espect of it ems ( a) t o ( c) in the l as t paragraph . ':Ji th !"'egar•d to it em ( a) the continu e d us e of existing pr -Jmi ses fo ::."' the time being will not be pr e judiced h.y n.ew dev elopment proposed in th e plon and the l c.nd r ,-;f err c;d t o in item (b) is includ ed n i thin a Dropos ed industrial z one. The l alld r e f err e<J. to i ten (c) , otl., er than t he p prti on on l Jase , is al l.) cat c:d in the Town Map f'or mil i tary p urposes .

in

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325 . I n c om1ecti on wi t h the exist ing AntiAirc:enft d e f cnCl) s i t cu , and '.11.so t h e additional si t cs i7h ich huv <:: h .:~0n provisionally earmarked by t h e War Dcp&rtmcnt, ._1tt c.nti on 11 '-!S be en paid to the re ques t for safcguar•Ji:ag a ppropriat e surrounding areas fr•om :fut u1•e dCVllopment v1hich would advers ·e ly a ff E:c t their o~-:ie£• aJcion al UG O . rrhi 3 Obligation h as he~n met in th ,-; Development ?lan in all but on e i nstanc u, c;,;:;:t nils of which h ave b een c ommunicated t o the Mi n i st ry of I.oc o.l Gqv ernrne:nt and Planning .

Non - S 0rvic e

IJt~p ar tm cnts

386 . As stated i n ?ar•t A of this analys is the nort h - west r cgi or~cl h c aL1q_uart ors of many gov ernment departments :::u'.e nuii i oc nt ed in Man chester and occupy prcmiDGS bot h in the c entral area of t he city and in th e out e r suburban. ur eas ..

327. With in the limita ti ons of s c a l e these premis es ar c shown on the Land Use Map 1 toget her with othe r prRperti es i n which the normal functions of c entral gov ernment are c ar ri ed on, · e . g. p "st offices, food or£icos-> i nland revenu e offic es, etc.


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1426

328. The Minis try of Local Govcrnm Emt and Planning have provided particul ars of al;L such premis es indicating th e c onditi ons und"er· whi ch t he ~· are held . As a r es ult of the examination of this information it i s cons i .dcr ed that no s i gnific ant planni ng difficult i es will aris e where ther e i s an expressed intent ion to c ontinue the.use of partic ul ar premi ses . 329 . With r egard to addi t j. onal development int ended by Government or Government sponsored departments , no proposals have been intimat ed whi ch would materially eff ect t he broad planning proposal i:> . c on t ai ned i n th e Development Plan . T entativ·e schemes whi ch the Ministry of ·works (acting as agents for other departments ) · h ave s t a ted are under c onsiderati on i nvolv e no substantial l and r equ irements ond are ther efore more a matter for fu t ure detail ed planning .· '.i,:'hc schemes wh ich are of a firm nature and for which land will have t o be acquir e d in the near future ara roferr ed to in paragraph (394) of P a rt C - 21 which d eal s with designation for c ompulsory purcho.s e . ;'.·/ . .... •.

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1427

PART C -

17

...

Public Utilities

WATER

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330 .

The supply of water within the city is provided by the 1-ianchester Corpora ti on Water wo rks ~epart:r;:ie~t • This undertaking is fully capabl e of serving all parts of the ci ty and as shovm· on the Water Suppl y and Sewcm;geMap [X( l) J a supply is , in fact, available at present in all area~ except those parts of Wythenshawe yet to t ci e.eve l oped . This -1·/ at2r Supply andSave:i.~e l·iap also indi cates the l arge service .reservoirs and p~rr.~ping stations l ocated i n the c ity . 'I'he p:.:'inc:i ple sources of supply are 'i':1irlrr-;re, Ha·,:o swater and-I;:;r-i_;(_;:!nd::..lo reservoi rs .

331 .

332.

The fu tur e ~up p ly of water for the new . developa.ent proposed in Wythenshawe wil l be a r outine natter involving no works of r>.ny planning significance. I

333 .

I.

With regard to future l and requir·ements for depots, etc ., the Waterworks Departoent are unable, i n view of' the possible re- orga nisati on of the water suppl y industry, to s t ate pr"3c:i_se ly ·wha t the ir denand_? are likel y to be . It is env isaged that existing depots and other preI!lises CJ.t pre sent occl~_pi 13 d by the Departnent will r er.iai n in u_so unti 1 future requi renents can be deternine>d and until t he practicEbility of providing additional sites or r elocating c nrtai n exist i ng depots can be investigate t. n ore closc iy when the areas concerned are plann~ a in de t~il .

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334 .

In' this connection, a tT;ention is drawn to one rrovisionally sugge sted schene of consi derabl e import&.ncc . This is for the fut u re establishment of headquarter pr emises in the area to the north east of the junction be ti.vecn Whit worth Strcc t ':lest and the Chepstuu Stre et portion of the propos e d city centre road . This a rea i s at prese nt occupied mainly by the Co rporr~ t i on Central High~1ays Depot , which it is intended to r e l ocate in the propos ed Ardwick Industrial area . At thic stage however , it ce.nnot be stated when this change of u s e will be br ought about . SEWEHAGE A1TD SEWAGE DISPOSAL_.

335. ·ch e :t:e.11che 2to r Cor pora t i on .:::.re the sewerage au-+:hority for the whole of the c i ty with the exception of a si::. a ll pa1~ t of the B1~o oklan6.s neighbour hood in Wythe::ishawc for which the Sale Corporation are · respon sible .

I I

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As sh0i.·m on t:1e ~-.;<-'- t e :i..~ Supply and S~rage Map, a ll areas with in t he cit y ~ r e sewered e xcept certain undeveloped la:ids i n th0 nc- r·t h of the city, in the Me rsey green belt , a nd i n the southe rn portions of Wythenshawc . No problems of planning significance are envisaged in tho extension of the s ystem to drain the areas proposed fo r n ow dc vclbpment .

336 .

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TlOl 1428

96 .

337.

Apart from the sewage draining into Sale , the discharge from Manchester is treated at the followi ng works:(a) Davyhulme Sewage Wo rks located outside the Ci ty in the Urmston Urban District . (b) Withi ngton Sewage Works - shown 'on the Land Use hap and on t h e Water Supply and Sewerage H~ p .

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(c) Northenden Sewage Works - a l so shown on these maps • . . ·of these the Davyhulne works is the most important

and i t is intended, i f practicable , t o close down the other two .smaller works and di vert the whol e of the flow to Davyhulme . Northenden Works will i n f act be abandoned on compl e tion of a proposed pumping station and is not therefore shown on the Town Map . In the · ca se of the Withing ton wor ks however , j ,t has not yet been e stabli shed that the diversi on is -feasible from an engineering point of vi ew, and for this reason the abandonment of the wo rks is not at t:1is sta:ge i ncluded in the proposa l s pu t forw~r d in the De velopment Pl an . GAS

338 ,

The North We stern Gas Board i s r e s ponsible for the .suppl y of gas wi thin the city . With the exception .of undeve l oped lands and open spaces all parts of the city a r e now served with ga s_,_ as shown on the Gas and ,E,lectrici ty Services Map [X(2 ) and ( 3 ) ] , a nd a f urther supply to areas prop osed f or new deve l opment can be provided from existing plant without major extensi ons or a l te ra tions , '

339 ,

The gas works l ocated within the city a re shown on t he Map and a r e as follows: (a) Bradford Road Gas \'Jorks

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(b ) Rochdal e Road

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(c) Gaythorn

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The first two which it is i ntended will r ema in in use for gas producti on a re l ocated in the Br adford and Irk Valley industrial zones respectively . Gaythorn works is located withi n the proposed central commercial area of the city i n an .area zoned for general busine ss purpose s , but is intended to be retained for ga s storage purposes only~

340.

The Gas Board have intima t ed that they are considering the us e of an area of tipped land on the north side of Bar row Hill Road, Chee t ham, f or" a c entral pipe depot and distri bution centre . No decision has yet been made ori this _proposal however , and pending such de cision the l and, which is u nsuitable for building , has been shown on the Town Map a s a futur e public open spa ce . No other requ·e sts for l and have been made and it i s assumed that for the time being existing depots , etc·.,. will r emain i n us e until future r e quirements can be f or eseen more accurately".

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ELECTRICITY

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341. The responsibility for the generation of electricity for the city tests with the Nor th Western Division or· the Briti-sh Electri city Authori ty , and for the distribution, with the North Western El ectricity Board . As shown on the Ga~ and El ectrici t y Servi ces Map [X( 2 ) and (3) J , a ll areas other than undeveloped lands and open spaces are at pr esent supplied with electricity and no wor ks of planni ng significance are envisaged in t he extension of this s ervice to th<.~ ar8as proposed for new developrwnt . · 342 . T:1e genera ting stations loca t od within the city are shown on the lfap and a re as follows: (a) Stuart Street Sta-':ion ( b) . Di cki nson Str 2ot u

( c) Bloor-: Strr.>. et

II

It i s intended that a ll these stations wil .l r ena i n i n use , .at l eas t ·within tho foreseeab le futur e and whe r eas the Stuart Street Station is locate! in the propos ed Openshaw Industrial zone 1 the other two, whi ch virtually adjoin each other, are in the proposed central co11mercial area a nd nus t at present be accepted as a non- conforning use within a sub- zone intended fo r gene ral business purposes.

343 . \'li th r egard t o uthcr l and :rcquirenents for depots etc • ., no spec ific proposals have been pu t f or ward and it Js as:=mr.~ed that any future requests for l and will be dealt with as natte rs of detail ed planning , i n the nanner al r eady explained for other ser vices • Sites fo r Sub-·stations in both new developnent and redevel opBent area s will bo alloca.ted whore necessary in consultation with th0 Elec trici t:: Unde r t aking , ·a s es sentia l fea tures of any housing, cor;n:iercial or i~us tr ial pr ojects.


Tl Ol 1430

98 •.

PART C - 18

- S o ci~l S ervic es - Education

Scope 01' Development Plan 344 In 1947 the }.,fonches t e r Educati on Committee ·pubiished a provisi onal plan for primary and sec ondary educati on, wh ich was related to the general planni ng proposals for the city as e~- · visaged at th at time . As a r esult of c erta~n conclus i ons r eached after the s ub seg_ucnt r eview or" these general planning matters , undertaken in · c.onn ection · with the pr eparati on of the Development Plan, some r evisi on of t he s chools plan has become n ecessary and is in fact being c arr i ed out at the pr es ent time. 345 . . Pending th e compl et ion of t h i.s revision, it i s not poss i ble t o i nclude i n the Development Plan its elf fu::.1 details of t h1;; s chool plan . In princi pl e, th e sp e cific s chool p roposals wh ich are a ctually s hown ar e t hono which, at t h i s stage, are of a rcas 0nably firr,1 nature and ar e appe r en tly c apable of bei ng implemented wi thi n t he· fores ecable futur e . 11.'he Development· Pl an d oes 1 however, as one of its prima ry objec tives , ensure a sat i s f a ct opy br• oacl r el at i onship b etween educat i onal and oth er• import ant land uses . 'r his has been ach i eved by making· al lo wance for the stat utor•y school Puquir ements in the groos der-sity stancla1. . ds rcc or;]ncnded for resident i al devel opment and r edev elopment, and used in the c u.lc ulat i :n1s of fut ur e resid en t populati ons i n v ariouG ~ar t~ of the qity.

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346 . In addit i on t o tho p r ovisional p l!:Ul for primary and :J E:! c ondary educat i on the Education Committ ee , in 1949 , pubJ. i fJ hed a Scheme of F ur ther Educati on inc orpor a tin t'.: a Pl an for Coun ty Colleges . The proposals c ont !:lined i n this docum en t remain · substantial ly unaffect ed in pr•incipl e by the changes wh ich haV <; ta1<:er p18.ce in gener3l planning pol :Lcy . I n addition t •.i t he adnp t L..tion a"'ld i mprov0rn ent Of ccr•tain exist{n g p r emi r,.es· t hey include fo r th e p rovi sion of 10 CoU11 ty Colleges , new coll eges of Comm erc e M d Art , new colleges fo r Adult Edu c a t i on , and new colnmu.ni ty c :~ntr es in r esid enti al ar ens . The pr eci s e lo.c at i ons of most of thof3 c proposed c oller;0s c onnot be determi ned unti l detail ed c ons id eration i s given to red ev elopment i n thu app ropr.iat e par·tc. of the cit y , and pr•oposals fo:r further ~;duc ati o:r. shown in the Deve:!.opment Pl an are, in fact, only th ose c ornparabl c.: with the propos als included fo r p rimary and secondar y s chools, i . e . t he ones whose impl cmentn.ti on C !_\Il bG fores ecn at t his stage.

It may be stat ed tll.crefo r• e , that with r egard t o education , the D\;vclopme:i.t Plan envisages and mak es b ro ad allov.rance fo r the f utur e provision of full s t atut ory f'o.cil i ti -=:s , but at this stage r emains i n c omplete in :::espect of det ail ed proposals . 347 .


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TlOl 1431

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EXISTING CONDITIOWS . 348 . The exi sting school s wi thin the city a r e shown on the L Md Use Map and may be summarised as follows : -

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187

Primary Schools Secondary Schoois

52

Speci:: :L School s

8

Nurs o:r.y Schools

3

Direct G1 ant Schools -

9

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259

'l'otal

349. T he i nfr) rmat i on giv en on the Land Use Map i s insuffici ent to rev eal the areas in which s c hool a c e orrunodati 0n i s inadeq_uat e . In this c onnecti on IJresent and f utur e defici enci es ( or , in some c ases L~urpl us c s ) only become appar ent aft er a careful study of the exi s ting populations i n par ti cular areas of' t he c ity and of the movement s anticipat ed'. for t hese populati ons . Th i n i s in fact bei n g undertaken in c onne cti on wi th t he r evi s i on of the detail ed s c hool s plan r eferred t o in paragraph ( 3~4 ) .

Main Defects i n Exis ting Sys tem

I •

I n gene1 al , ho'irnv er, the pr•escmt s chool f ac ili ti cs i n ulmos t al l parts bf the city are unsatisfact or y . Th e principal dofects in the syutem are as foll ows :· 350 .

1

(a)

I nadequat e accommod a tion for the number of' chil dr en who of nec ess it y have to attend particul n r· s chool s

( b)

Obo ol e t c s chool b uildings v1hi ch fai l to pr·ov i de ·~ven r e; as onabl e standards of v ent i lation and daylight ing

(c)

I ncorr e ct si t ing of s chools in r el ation "to the houses wh ich th ey serve

( d)

Compl etely i n adequat e p layground and playing f'i cld provis i on.s ( see a l so p a rag raph ( 196) in Part C - 8) ·

( e)

Incorre ct s i ting of s c h ools (incl uding some r ·c lnt iv e l y modern ones ) in rel ati on to t h e ma in h i [';h ways in their vicinity . ~~'his f ::.'"' ~;,~µ ently l eads to conditi ons of c o1m idor 8.bl e danger f or c h ildren approa c h ... i ng and _leaving such s cho ols and in nddi tion crea t es diff icu lty in t he e:icclusi on o:f traffic no i ses· from classrooms .

35 1 . In connec tion with item ( b) in the last paragraph it :ls d f s i ;_;;d:ficanc e to note that the E.ducation Con~ni tt ee .in their 1947 provisional plan , stated that of 248 s c hool buildings then i n use, 14 wof•c mor e than 90 y e ars ol d , 42 more· than 70 years old r.ind only 69. h~d b e en buil t sinc e 1918. "Thi s emphas i ses. the . extent of the r ebu i lding and reconstruction which will be ·nec essary befo r e the City' s schools as a whol e c onforn1 to modern standards. T --

-- 11,,..T"C. •~ ~

ntt• -

TOW~&. C~1

-:-

L fl i 111n'I .• f LA " •.•.. .i l I


TlOl 1432

100. Propos ed School standards As stated in paragraph ( 345) the gross density standards recommended in the Development Plan make allowanc e for school req_uir 3ments in acc.o rdance with the Regulat i ons Prescribing Standards f or School P r emis es 1 9 4 5 , made under S e ction 10 of th e Education Act 1944. 352. ·

0

353. F or thi s purpos e it has b~en found convenient t o expr r:Jss thes c o chool s tandar ds in terms of an overall a creage .p Gr 1,000 of total resid ent population for b oth new .dcv elopmont a..n d red evelopment ar eas . Age--Olass Estimates

354. Using the Rcgist1·ar Gen eral' s for ecast of the civili an population structu r e f or Manchester in 1962, estima tes hav e been made of an av erage number of childr en in e ach age gr oup p er 1,000 tot al population up on which it i s c onsid e red the future s ch ool provisions might appropriat e ly be based. Thes e ar e ·: (a)

For r ed ev elopment ar eas - 1 6 . 1 child r en p er age-clas s pe r 1, 000 t otal populati on of which 3. 5 per 1, 000 ar e Roman Catholics .

( b)

For new d ev el opr.rnnt a r eas - 18 . 3 ch ildren p er a ge clas s pvr 1,000 popul a tion of which 3 . 8 p er 1 , 000 are Roman: Ca tholics.

The hi gh er fi gure adopt ed fO l' riev1 d ev el opment ar e as a ll ows fo r th e initi ally higher t han average child popul a t i on in such ar eas , and r epresents, tn fact the moan b etwoun the 1943 figur e fo r Vvyth errshawe and tha t es timat ed for th e city as a whol e in 19 62. It is int ended t o en s ur e a re as onabl e c ornpr omi s e b ·:tw een w .der - p rovi s i on of s chool f a ciliti es i n the ea.r1y y ears and over provis i on at a l ater dato wh rm tho c~g e s tru ct ur e i s l ilcely to r ev er t to t hat obtaining el sewhe re in t he city. 1

Basic Assumptions

35 5. Further ass ump t i ons made i.n c a lcu l at ing t h e ov er al l s ch ool stnn dards a:c c:, .'.18 f ollows : -

(a)

Maximum cl a.sr:: s iz e for p r i mar;>r s chool s 40 c hi l dren

( b)

Maximum cl ass oize fo r sec on dary s choo ls 30 chil dr en

( c)

Nursery s chool s to he p r ovided at t he rate of on e fo r eac h fo r m entry in t h e i nfant s s chools

( d)

Sec ondary educ nt i on to be sub-divi ded : 75% chil dren i n Mod ern Schools II 11 Gr smmar Sch ool s 15%

10%

( e)

ti

11

T echni cal S chools

In r edev el opment a r eas only part of the p l ay i ng f i el d req~ i rcm ent t o be provid ed · ad jac ent t o the· s chool, wh e r e s hort age of l and makes the f ul l provis i on imp racticable. The p roporti ons adopt ed a r e:-


TlOl

101.

1433

Playing Fields for

Minimum · Proportion adjac ent t o Sc hool Acres

Statutory Req_uirement Acres

I

All adjacent to School

-Pri.tn'3.l''Y Schools

----

-----

r··s~~~;·d:.try s_ c_ h_o_o_1_s_:--- -+-----

1

I

1 For111 Entry 2

II

3

11

I: :

II

I

5

2. 5

9

4. 5

14

8, 0

Asswned 18

12. 0

Assumed 23

12. 0

-'·-----Same basis as

rFurther j Education

for S e c ondary Schools

I

This matter is also referred to in paragraph (204) ::tnd Tabl e 9 of Pai~t C - 8 deali ng with Op ;n Spaces . School St andards

356. 'l' aldn3 these factors into account the numbers o.nd s izes of different types of schools "..nd the appropriate land reQuirements were d'3termined fo:i.~ a theoretical residential unit of 10,000 persons in both class es of development . '11 he resultant s tandarcls are su1nrnaris ed in the f ollowing tabl e : -

I· -

T.9.e.oret 1cal S£t;,?~l ~t~rd~.Jp _!~r!E_ p~ t_,.,.000 ht.al . •2~Y..~h£.n , ---~--New Deiic1oiiiient-A"reas -:- -R.~oµnent Areas

Type or School

1• - ----:---- -- - . I Buildings Ple.y-- ' ! Build& ' ing · Total 1 tngs & Surrounds 1F! elds Sur' j rounds

I

II

I

i Nur:;ery

0.13

Infant

0. 30

Junlor

o.4o

Hodcrn

o. 3a 0,07

l

-

County Colleges

I

to

II t,n;

I

I pro..

I

Vi ded I

. School ~::;

I

I

o. t3 1 0. 30

o,Gs

1.os z.13

0. 10

i 0. 20

I

0. 20

0, 31

0,35

I o.42 ! 0, 05

0. 20

1

1

Colleges for Further Education lncorpomting

' adj. 1

l-

Teclmlc::.l

. - - -.· - - -- .. - - - - ' . PlayPlay- ; tng ; tng ; Total : Fields; Fields 1

I

o, 34 l

... -

I-

I .o. so I.

-

I

1

I

0.06

o. 84

j o. a3

.:-. 17

! 0. 13

0. 15

!

I

0.36

0. 12

I

o.04

flomnn Cathol ics Infant

o. oe

Junior

0. 10

Modern

0.10

I

I 0. 20

I

I.

l o.

16

! o. 4,

o. os j I o.2s l

I I I

o.f!f'I

I 0.11 I 0, 09 II I , - I .. I 0.15 I !

0. 09 •

o.23 o. t7 o. 04. I 0.03

craimnar 0. 02 ; o. oo o. t t 1 0. 02 0. 09 --- -----l-------...._--+-~-----'-----L-.--. ·-· 4e61

TOTALS

-OF .. ~ .:v : . :-: ~ s." -10

cou· i'P r . .. .


TlOl 1434 .

102.

Note : -

Separate Technical Schools and Colleges for Further Education not proposed for Roman Catholics .

T~ese

standards , which represent n et a cr eages , a r e reflec ted in the neighbourhood and district gross density schedules given in Appendices 5 and 6 ,. exc ep t that in these s chedules the land req_uirements for• nursery and infant school s a r e increased by 40% to allow for the relatively greater area of surrounding ro ads , as compared wi th s i te area , than i s likel y to apply in th e case of other much ·larger schools .

Provisional School Proposals 357. On the bas i s of the policy r eferr ed to in paragraph ( 345), it is c ons ider ed that the only speci fic school proposals which can appropriately be included in t h is Development Plan are as follows : (a)

Proposals for the new development areas of Wythenshawe , Blackl ey and Charlestown, which as far as p~acticable, conform to the standards given in Tabl e 15. The sites provi sionally det ermin ed for new s chools in these areas are defin e d on the Town Map, but remain subject to minor alt eration if necessary at a l ater date .

(b)

Proposals for the following two new s chools elsewhere in the city, for whi ch land is already avail able :-

..

(c)

(a)

Roman Catholic Secondary School Victori a P ark

( b)

Roman Catholic Secondary School Nuthurst Road , Most on .

-

I

.l

-

·Negotiations are in hand for the acq_uis 1tion of further land, ad j ac ent to that defined on the Map , to fill ow for the provision of the r eq_u i s it e playing f i elds .Proposals for the rec ons truction of exi sting s chools and the provisi on of new s chools in the areas likely to be r e"developed for res i dential purposes duri ng the next 20 years, where the opportunity should arise e ither to extend exi st ing --school .s it es. or to mak e new sites available , Suc h proposals, which it i s stres sed are of a tentative nature at this stage , are shown, symboli c ally on th e Town Map.

358, l'he proposals. r ef er r <::d to in the last paragraph are t"hose for which s it es are already avail able or fo r v1hi ch it might r easonably be expect ed lc:rid w.ill become ,availc.bl e during the next 20 years . It i s recogni sed that thes e propos-.als wil l in no· way bring about the d es ir ed improvement in. the ,school system as a whole , but at the ·sarne time it is impossi ble to suggest where, or to :v-v.hat ·ex tent, additional land is likely to ~.~come::. avai.labl~ for . new il,QI:i,ool s or for extensions

~

I

. I


TlOl

~.

143~

to existine schools, in t ,nose par t s of the ci·ty :tor v1hich no appreciable !'e~ evelopment is envisaged in the fores eeable futu·re.

\

I

359. Such .additional land cou~d, for.the ~ost part , only be provided by cle aring res id en~ial properties for wilic h no allonance i~ mad~ in the housing policy and programme ( explained in Part C - 5) envisaged for the next 20 years . Some ad justment of this housing policy might later appear justifiab~e, to facilitate thi s procedure, but c er tainly no such assumption can be made at this stage .

I I

I.

360 . There would therefore seem to be no purpose in attempting to detail even tentative school proposals~ when it is apparent that for the most part they are not likely to be implemented until the l ater stages of ru(cvclop::1ent tht:;n it might be expected that more 1.and woUJ. d aut omatico.lly be made avail able. It is considered preferable that tho Development Plan should indicate the proposed development r~ferred to in pnragraph ( 357) and assume that elsewhere in residential ar eas the ex isting schools will for the most part have to remain in use on their present sites for a t least the next 20 year s . In such areas thc:i. cforc the s chool sites shown on the •rovm Lo.p m e the sai.11e as those shown on the .Land Uo e 11'.ap . Existing s chools locat ed in 8.I,'eas i ntended for non- residential pu1 poses are not shown on the Town I,iap , but in practice such schools vJill o.ls o remain in us c un ti.l r endered superf~uous either by the desired predominant non-reside:ntial use t'or the area becoming sufficiently established, or by the thinning out of the population in a dj ac ent residcnti al areas . 1 1

1

School Playing Fields

Alternative Forms of School Development

361. Although no information is gi ven in resp e ct of l ong term proposals for actual school premises, it is pointed out that in c o:rmccti on with the broo.d open spac e plan (Part C - 8); an assessment has been made of ul tirnate land req_uirements for scho.o l plO¥ing fi elds (other thon those adjac ent to s·chools) and, as these can be met on lands unsuitable for .building , app r opriate allocati on h as been made on the r.r own Mo.p. 362. The Town Map prepared on this basis impli es therefore that except in new develop men.t areas; little progress will be made during the next 20 years towards the a chi evement of the r e commend ed spac e standards given in Table 15,particularly in resp e ct of the are.a req_uired for · buildings . It must be stated however, that as a matter of policy, considerat i on is being givert to alternative methods , i n cluding the con.st ructi on of multi - storey schools and the pocsible s i t ing of new schools.outs ide t he city boundari\3s, wh ich might be adopted to accelerate the provision of ex tr a s chool accOiimodation for areas v1h0re tho shortage , both o.t present and as es timated for the future, is the most acute, and where ln.nd for conventi onal s chool development i s obviously not lil<:ely to bec ome av ailable for a considerable period.


104.

TlOl

J.436

363..,. With· :rega rd to Further Educ at ion, th e Development Plan incl udes only two p:oposal~ for County Colleges on. sites al r ea0.Y av a;i. la?l e in Wythenshawe. Consideration i s being given to the si tin.a- of other colleges , but no s chemes are sufficiently far advc.nc ed t ~ war rant their . . inclus ion in the Pl~1 , at this stage . Provision for the Colleg8s of Co,·.:r.1crcc, A1't ~J1d Ad ult Educati on , i s mo.de in the p1"'oposcd Cul tur o.l Precinct , o1 though no det l".il cd s chcr1:cs hav e yet . been approved. Fu1•thcr r efcr0nce to this Precinct ia made in Pa.rt C - 19 . . C o~1r.:w.1 i ty Centres may be r egarded £12 on integral port of aJ1y new r es i dential dev 0lopmcnt or redev el opment p1"'opos al, and it is intended t ho.t they will b e prov i ded as ne c essar y along wi th other cmuaunal facil i ti es anc illary to hous ing projects . For the new development areas of '7ythcnshCtwe , Blackl ey o.nd Charl estown , the p ropos ed corimuni ty c Gnt1"'cs are included in the a1 ea.s s t. own on the Town Mnp for gEmeral Loca l Governr11ent bu i ldings . 1

PROGRALiviE 364. Whereas, for nest.of tho r:w.tters d ealt with in the Development Plan, the 'l'ovm Hap provides some guid e to t he Corpora.ti on ' s 1 ong ter. • policy wi th r egard to broad 1811.d us c , in the c ase of educ nti on , the Town i.;ap, as e:::cpl a ine d in the foregoing paragr nphn , only shows proposals ab out which there is a reason able degr ee of c er t ainty nnd which i t i s in fact c onsid e r ed c ould be impler,iented dur i n g the 20 ye a r peri od .

Thes e ,P roposal s can be r.i.ore readily. appr eciat ed on th e Prof; rar!lr.1c 1:0.:p ,-,-1hich a l so indic ntes t he development like l y to be un.dertaken in th e f i rst 5 years of the period . Proposals for i nd ividual nur.s cr y s chools cu•e not shown on the rno.p due to limi tations of s cal e;. 3 65.

. I

366. It i s pointo·1 ou t thc.t sorae of the d cv elopr,1ent s~1own on the J?r ogr aurJe Map repr esents the complet i on of s ch ools alrG c.dy under c onst ruct i on ·und nlso, i n s one C ClS es , imp li es only a site extensi on wi th no 110\-1 buildin g r!o rk . , 36'7 . The Progrx,11i1c :Hap olso indi c ates the ai~e as wi.1ich it i 9 c onsid ered ;:.li ght be de veloped for gener2l s chool pl o.ying f i old p u1 ::1os es during the 20 yeo.r peri od , in ndditi on to the plny-ing fi elds to be p rovided withi n the s chool s it es defin ed on the map . Ia the c ase of n ew s chool s, 01" school s . to be r et a i ned nnd i mproved , in the 20 year r edcvclopncnt ureas ( sho\m syr:.bolicall y on the r,1ap ), it i s intended that the approp ri ntc 11 loc al 11 p~o portion of pl aying f i elds should be providcn ad j ac ent or v ery close to the s c hools, as land becornes. avail c bl. e , 11. though the need to iJake the i·.iaxlmurn u se , for h ou s ing purposes, of lands cl ear ed in th e early s ta ges may in some instanc es p Pevent this taking plac e until the l o.t~ e r po.rt of the p e riod . 1

Mor e detail ed inforr.iati on in respect of the educ at ion p r ograr.rr11e i s givc-.£1 i n paragraphs ( 42'7) to ( 432) in Part C - 22 whi ch d eal s with finan ci al and l abour c ons id er ati ons for th<:.. p rog r amme as a whole. 368 .

- I


105.

TlOl 1437

PART

c -

19 - Social Services - UniversitY and Cultural Facilit·i es.

UNIVERSITY. · 369 . With the excention of the Faculty of Existing Conditions Technology, which is accommodated in the Qolle ge of Technology located in the central area of· the city, the Victoria University of Manchester comprises the group of buildings shown on the Land Use Map, located mainly bet ween Oxford Road and Cambridge Street about one mile south of the city centre . 370·. · The present ac comrnodat ion and facilities are

insufficient to meet tho greatly increased demand for higher education, and an cxtensi ve progr amme of new building and imp rovement work is anticipated by the. University Author•ities. Considerable progress in :this dire ct ion has in fact been made during the post- war years, but a f'ar large r volume of work still rema ins to be und0rtaken-. Future Proposal s

·In collaboration with the University Authorities, considdration bus been g iven to all future r equ irements, and an outline scheme has been prepared· which envisage s the whole University group, a s a composite unit, spac io us ly laid out to ensure the app rop riat 8 qualities of dignity and quietness which are so consp i <.m ously l acking in the present qeve lo:pment . 371.

The Town Map defines tbe. ne cessary area which it is proposed to reserve for Unive r s ity development. This area extenas on both sides of' Oxford Road as far south as the p roposed Inner Ring Road, and there is an additional ar0a ·3 outh of' this road on the we st side of Oxfor·d Road, intended for halls of re sidence grouped r ound a broad c0ntral campus . 372 .

'

. .. .. .

~

373 . The complete redevelopment of this area as a Unive rsity p r e cinct is of course a long term project and Will be b rought abcut gr adually as l and and buildings become available at a r easonable cost . There is no intentio n of undertaking any substantial cl02,rance of residential p r c,:pe rty within the area u ntil i.t has be come compl ete ly unfit f o r habitation, o r until alternative accommodation can bo provided Without prejudic ing more urgent slum clearance work elsewhere in t he city. 374. At tho same time the University Authorities expect to progre Go at the rate of roughly one new building pe r year· and the area. in which they intend to c oncc:mt rate de ve·lopment during the next 20 years· ~ on the basis of this :pro gramme , is shown .on the · . Programme Map , which also indicat es the de velopment which they anticipate will be substanti ally completed during the next 5 y ears . This area doe s . not c cmtain any apprec i able number of res i d~ ntial :pro:pe r tie s and mos t of the non-residential p.remises· are ..of relative ly poor quality and should present no serious financial obstacle to r edevel opment.

375 . Further r efe r ence to the programme of university de ve l opment is .made in paragraphs 433 to 435 in Part C - 22, de aling with financial o.nd labour considerations fo r the Programme as a. whoJ.e .

l


106 .

Tl Ol

1438 CULTURAL FACILITIES. At the present time the municipal facilities in the city for advanced education and the pursuit of cultural activities are both inadequate in scope, and also wide ly dispersed in buildings generall y unsuited to their purpose .

376.

377. Reference has already been made in Part C - 18 to the p roposals of the Education Committee for Further Education, and in considering the most suitable location for the new premi ses suggested in this scheme, account has been taken of the obvious advantages to be gained from a close relationship between these institutions and the proposed University prec inct .

Prop osal s

It is p ropo sed therefo r e that the area immediately to the north of the University precinct, bounded on the east and west by Brook Street and Higher Cambridge Street r espectively and extending as far as the proposed link road 17/7 (See Diagram No . 2), should be reserved primarily for cultural development. The portions of this area which it is actually . intended to use for cultural and educational buildings are shown on th~ Town Map, which also indicates the intention to redevelop the balance of the ar ea for r es idential pur poses . 378 .

379 . No de t a ile d proposals have been prepared for this cultural area but it is intendeu that it shall contain the Scho ol of Domestic Economy , the School of Commerce, the School of Art, the Institute of Adult Education, and a County College, tog3ther with certain public buildings such as the Mancheste r Museum, a Civic Theatre and Concert Hall, and the p rincipal Municipal Swimming Baths.

Progr amme

..

路Li nk between Cul tur al, Uni versity and ' Medical prec i ncts

380 . It iG impracticable at this stage; to determine which or how many of these buildings ~re like ly to be cons tructed during the next 20 years. No proposals are indicated on the Programme Map except in the case of a small portion of the area occupied mainly by re sidential property , the clearance of which is allowed for in the Housing Progranune set out in Part C - 5. Sufficient land will certainly become available in this area to enable some progress to be made, but it cannot be stated to what extent it will be possible to clear and acquire l ands elsewhere in the proposed precinct , or wh a t priority might be expected in the allocation of publ ic fUnds for development of this type.

It may be conveniently mentioned here that one additional and important factor which has influenced the siting of the cultural area has been the concept ion of a wedge of de velopment, consisting of public 路 open space and dignif路ie d bu ildings s e t in open surroundings, e xtending outwards from the central area of the city in a southerly d irection for a distance of approximately 11 miles . 381.

I

I

a

l


TlOl 1439

107.

382.

This wedge would cot11Ilence i n the south with t he existing Whitworth Park public open space adjoining the prop路o s ed Ecdica l pr e cinct, the need for which is r eferr ed to later i n par ag r aph 386 of Part C - 20 , and which it is intended should be deve l oped on spa cious line s compa rabl e wi th thos e intended for the University Ar ea . The wedge would then continue with the University campus and bu.ildings a lready descri bed , and finally wou:!..d be linl{ed t o ' the central a r ea by the proposed cultural pr e cinct .

383. It is considered that this 11 seni-gr eon11 wedge , which a s n long t e rL'l measure shoul ~ be fully capable of a chievenent , is one of the most important f eatur es of the Plan, and shoulc f orm a r eas onable subs titute for t he unattai ilE'.bl e i dea l of a c ontinuous strip of open s pace extending into the heart of the City.


'

Tl Ol

108 .

14:40

PART C - 20.

Social Servi ces - Health .

384 . There are at present 22 hospitals and a large numbfilr of cl.inics and welfare centres in Manci:iester . Where capable of be ing s hown at a scale of 6 inches · t o 1 mile , these premi ses a re indicated on the Land Use Map . ·

Hosp it als. 385 . Manchester hosoitals are under the .control of two bodies - the United Manchester Hospi tals who govern the teaching group of hcspitals centre d .on and around the Manchester Royal I nf·irmary and the Manchester Re gional Hospital Board, who cont r ol the remaining hosp ital s . Consultations have taken pl ace with both auth orities , and their r espG ctive land requireme nt s have been taken into account and safe guarded by allocation on the Town Map .

United Manches t er Hosp ital s

386 . The three existing hospitals in the United Manchester Hospitals group are as follows :-

Manche ster Royal Infirmary Saint Mo.ry ' s Hospital Royal Eye Hospital

Main Medical Pre cinct

Additional land i s r equired for extens ions t o these hosp i tal s , and fo r the pro vi s·ion of new faciliti es including a new teaching hospital, and nurses' homo . Ult imately, as nhown on tho Town Map , it is intended to form a hospital p rec i nct within the island site bounded by Upper Brook Street , Oxford Place, Oxford Road and the proposed I nne r Ring Road.

Manchester Regi onal Hospi· tal Boa r d

387 . The r emaining hospitals controlled by the Manchester Regional Hospital Board are listed in the ·following Table, wh ich also ind.icates the hospitals for which extra land has been r equested by the Board and allocated on the Town Map . This actually applies to only f ive or tho hOf3pitals , the existing s ites for the rcmainin8 fifteen being conside r ed adequ a te by the Board at t his stage . It has been po i nted out to the Board that th e p roposals for the redevelopment of the central area of the city envi sage the eventual demolition of se ve ral small. and inadequat 8 premises therein and the use of the sites for other purposes . No p roposals have as yet been made, however, for the future repl a cement of such hospitals .

.


I

--·. : ·...~ ..:

109.

T10l 1441

I

·•·.·

I

,:. ......

TABLE 16.

.

·' ·.

: •

List of Hospitals Controlled the Manchester Regional Hospital Board.

by

Remarks

Hospital Manche ster & Salford Hospital for Skin Diseases

In area zoned for Gene ral BuG].ness Purposes

St. Luke's Special Cl inic

In area zoned for Generai·' Business Purposes

Gartside Street Children's Dispensary

Site affe cted by proposed City Cen~re Road

Manchester Hearing Aid · Clinic

Adjoins proposed site fer new Law Courts

Ancoats Hospital

Extra land allocated

Manchester Nor·the rn Hospital

Extra land allocated

Manche ster Victoria.Memorial Jewish Hospital

Extra land allocate d

Crumpsall Hospital Springfield Hospital

l

Adjoining sites . No extra 1 and re qu ire d.

Beech Mount Maternity Home

No ext ra land required

Withington Hosp it al

No e xtra land required

Wythenshawe Hospital Bagul ey Hosp.ital

l

Adjoining sites . Extra land a11·o cated

Manchester Ear Hospital

In area zoned for Cultural Purposes .

Chest Clinic

In area zoned for Univers i ty purposes

Booth Hall (Children's) Hospital

No extra l and re quired

Duchess of York Hospital for Bab i es

No extra land required

~onsall Isolai ion Hosp i tal

No extra land requ ired

Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute

Extra land allocated to form an island site bounded by Oak· Road, Palatine Road, Tatton Grove and Wilmsl ow Road.

0


T101

110 .

14.42

Prop osed Eas tern General Hospital

. ..

Programme

388 . One of the main de fici encies in the hospital sys tem is the absence of any large hospital serv ing t he eastern pa~t of Manchest e r and the smaller towns immediately to the east of the city . 389 . Although no final decision has been made , the Manchester Regional Hospital Board aro considering the use for this purpose of about 33 nc r es of land at Abbey Hey at present occup i ed for the mos t part by Fairfie ld Golf Course . This land h a s therefore been provi s i onally all ocate d for hosp ital purposes on the Town Map . 390 . With re g ard to the p r og ramming o f hosp ital development, tho only definite informat i on p rovided by e i the r of the two bodies referrod to in the forego ing p aragr aphs is i n respe ct of de velopment du ring the first five years in the propo s ed main me d ica l precinct . Th is is shown on the Progrrunme Map . It is anticip at e d that a dditional de v olopmo nt will take place during the remainder of the 20 year period, but i n the ab se nce of r e levant details , no other prop osals arc shown specifically on the Mnp . HEALTH CENTRES.

Proposed Bas is for Provision

391. In addit i on to the hosp itals, he a l th needs are also met by a l arge number of small he alth centres, school clinics, and v~ lfa re centres which are c ontrolled b y the Co r po r at ion. It i s i nte nded in due cour se that these services shou ld be co- ordinat ed and operated from properly de s i gned health ce ntre s . The bas is upon which such c entre s shoul d b e p rovide d in Manche s ter has n ot yet be e n determined, as it may p rove impract icab l e to adopt the standard of one h e alt h centre per 8,000 - 10 , 000 p e rsons recommended by the Socie ty o f Me d ical Offi c E:: rs of Health .

. I

路路-:,,

392 . It i s expected that one p rototype h ealth centre wil l be const ructed in the ne ar future , probab ly i n th e Bagulc y Hal l Ne i ghbourhood, Wythenshawe , and tho e xpe rie nce ga ined in its operation will influe nce t he de s i gn a nd siting of s ub se q_u e nt centre s t hroughout the c ity . 393 . In the abse nce of f irm proposal s , health centres an d clinics ar c not s h own on the Town Map . When actual re q_u i r cme nts are de t e rmined it will gene r ally be p ossib l e t o mak o s i te s available for health centres in new de velopme nt , within the are as shown on t he Town Map as路 inte nd.t::;d f or local . El se whe r e in the- ~. government b uil ding p urp os es . city, thei r l oc ation will be de t ermine d ns a result of subs e q_ue nt de t o. ilcd_pl o.n.~ing a nc the existing clin i c s e tc . as s hown 路' on t he Lane. Uso Mo.p will not necess arily be r e t a ined in t ho future on their p r e s e nt sites .

- I


Tl Ol

111 .

1443 Land t o b e De signa t e d

394 .

Tho l oc::-.t i ons of l a r ds to bo des i gnated i n t h o

D G vo lopr:~o nt Pl o.n o.. s st;_bj oct to conpul sory purcho..~e

undGr Se ction 5 ( 2 ) of t he Tm·m. nnd Country Plaru1i n& .L\ct , 1947 , o..r o i ndi c2.. t . : : d s~ruboli cc.. lly on the Town lw.p , t h o sy.::b ol s cont n i iling n.u.r1ori ca l r of or onc o s to t he i ncli vi duG. l Dosic;nati on Enps , t o n s ca l e of 1/2500 , on wh i ch the pre ci s e bounda rio s of the l .::.nrls 2..r o dc f'in.cd . The l 'lnd.s s o de signo.. t.z.: d o..ro sur.:P.r.ri s od i n the f ollm·Ti i.lg. tc~b l c : ... TABLE 11 List__af__filt...c.s....for __lfilicll.....D.e.si~ i on h aps a r e subwi t_te g, ! Ho:::ar!rn Design..."- ::c10fi 1 -- ..'.L"0c.?.1i t y R8 f or on c G .l'J o • . - -···-- ·- - - -·-t:- -! La nd r e quir ed b y 1 ;Sito of de r e lict ; Ho.nchos t c r Rog i o~m l '. r o..ctor y , ! Ho s pitQl Board fo r Sh erb o:im.e s tre et , j ext onsi ons t o t ho ir;1_·1'"'C' th · "l -r1- · !\1 v ! l1~anchc s tc r Victorin ! licnori nl J ewish ~ Hospi tn l . I

.

I

! La nd r e quir e d by t h e !site s of f ornc r : 2<'.:3 / 551, Wil br c.h an Hi n i s t r v of \for k s l r or Cho~lton Br anch · n oad , j Post Of fi ce . Chorl t ·Jn- ctu:~1 1nc.r c.y .

' I

2

T-

')

·---- ____{_____ ___ - --- - -- - -- -+--- · I

I

~

il<'..C8,;_:t lnnc1 c. t : Lo.ncl. r e quir e d by the I jun c t i oa of l~ini ~~r:y of Wor~cs IIfalli we:ll Lc.nc ; :i: or Linist ry of !r.nc.~ \.Jat c: rl oo RonL1, ! L::i..bou r Off ices .

3

"'·, ·~, .I Cll v

i

t :··:-,n -•···-·"" •

;

t

·- - - -- -- - - ! Si t c of I 1 2.nc'.. r c qti.ir cc:. by tho ! Go v\~ r nricn t l Li n istx·y of ~'lorks IBu ildi ngs , J 1i.l ia I fo r Govor rment i Stroo t , St r o.n go-vro.ys •I Offi c e s. Th e l a.nd is 1 1 n t ·present ho l d on I r c qui si ti on . 1

- -··--- - -- - --!-

+l

i

-·-· ·---5-··---- lSi tc:s of

263/283 ,

I Oxfor d Rone=. , ! CC.or lton- 0~1-

l Mc c:a ,~cl~ . 1 1

i

______ l ____ ---

l Lo.nd r e quired by

· 1-inn c hcsto r Cou nt y Bor ou gh on beha l f of the Uni vor s i t y of 1-: nnchc s t or , who wi sh to o r c c t n Bi ol og i cal Scio nc c Buildi ng on the site .

----- .. Land 395 . Tho Town Iiap a l s o i nc'.ic:::.t e s t ho bounda rie s of •c Q!' t c.L 1 n r o,..,_s of oxtc ns_i V O uar C'.2.e". b C , sch oc'.ul ocI unc'. '-; r dccr.rnd t o So c ti on 1 of tf:c. T ow~tl C\~1c:!. Countr~' Planni ng Act , 1 9"14, be do s i gnn t e d. wh i ch c.. r o t hu subj e ct of c onfirn c C. Do clr:.r n tor y Orc'.c rs r cnC:or i nG tho l c. ncl. wi t h L-1 tl-:.cse .'lr c c.s lio. bl o to c onpul s or :,:· purc!1L'. s c . Unde r Schc c~ulc 1 0 of the Town a nd Country Pla.nni ng 1\.c t 1947, such e..r 0us n r c c1.oc;:ioC'. to b G C1.c sign2. t uC. ll.i:1C.c r 11..hc.: 1947 1',.ct c.s u r c o..s of c onprch on si vo ;~_0vc lop:·.ic nt subj ect t o c onpulsory purcho.s o . Thu :tr c.:'.. s shm·m on t ho Town linp a r e a. s f ollows:·---·

.

___._

-----~------------

..,, •.


Tl Ol

112 .

1444

TABLE 1 8

War Dano.ged Previous Area Reference Ho . ~

1 2 A 2 B

3 4

5 Policy for Desi gnat i on I

Location Liller Street Chee than Hill Stro.ngewnys Knott Lill 1inrket Plc.ce Wo..ter Street

Ar en (Acres)

. '

6. 6 14 . 7 40 . 6

路5.1 7. 3 30 . 4

396 .

As a natter of policy the Corpor ati on hnve considered it desirable tho.t l nnd should not be. designc.. ted i n this Developr.!ent Pl.:tn unless (n) the l und is likely to be o_cquired and

developed within the next 6 yenrs or thereabouts , i . e . within the period pri or to the approval of the first quinquenni a l r e view of the Devel oprrnnt Plo.n

路'

(b) tho propose.l s fo r the l nntl c..re sufficiently far advanced to eno.bl e f ull details of the i ntended dovelop~Je:mt to 0o provided nnd to ennbl e the sitGs involved to be dofi nod preci sely (c ) t he l and cnnnot be c..cqui rod under othe r powe rs .

397 .

Tho applicc..tion of t~is pol icy has r e sulted in only tho ve r y lin i tee~ nunbor of dosignn tions gi vc!l i n Tabl e 17 bei ng consi ~e r od justifi ed at this stc..ge . At the sru:.e tL;.e it is eriphc.sised that prop0s2.ls c.r e envis.:tG oc1 for the next 6.ycars which will undoubtedl y nece ssi t.'.:'.. t o tl:.c conpulsory a.cquisi ti on of other lc..nds , and it i s intonc~ocl th:'- t whon tl1oso schenos o.rc prcpo.rocl. i n Qotnil ~ nd when, having regarc to alternative pm路rcrs which night bo nvnill'..ble , it app ec.r s expec1.i cnt to proceed l1..nl'.cr "':;l:.o Town o.~1d Country Pln:nning Act , 1947 , then tho necosso.ry s i tes will be dosigmtc.::d , ns a J_)rclini:'lnry to purchase , by ncans of aacn~:cnts to this Da vel opoant Plan .

398 .

It will be notcc'. thr. t of tl1e :Li vc G.osigna t i ons, four are i n r espect of r equests r e ce ived fron Govcrnrlont or Goverrn::.ent sponsoroc1 C:opnrtr:o nts [section 5 ( 2 ) b of the Act .J o.nc'. the r o;.:mining ono is i n r e spe ct of tho Cor por2. ti on ' s intl!ntion t_o acquire l o.nd $or tho purpose of sccurine i ts use in tho nannur :proposoc~ "uy the Dcvolopnent Plnn ~ . Section 5 ( 2 ) c (ii)J . ~-

.

-~

Poli cy for Decl aratory Areas

399 ,

In connection wi ~h t ho wc.r ci.ar.mi:;od areas dem:wd. to be c~csignated , ns listcc. in 'l'.::tblo 1 8 , . proposa.ls f or thei r reclovo lopncnt ha vo not yst been prepa路r od i n detail , o..1 thoU,gh it is enviso..gcd th2, t sono. building wil l be undertc.kon within tho noxt 6 year s , It is intondod that when dctQil od proposals a re availo.ble and when acquisition of the whole or any part of an area becoacs necessary c:..nc1 practi co..blc 1 o.ncndocnts to this Devolopncnt Plan, in tho.forn of conprohcnsivc De\rel opnont Area No.ps , will be subnittod o..s tho prolin i nnry to purch['.so .


.TlOl

113.

1445

I -

400 . I t is pointe c~ out th...,_ t the six areas g iven i n Table 18 do not r ep r e s ent n ll the arons of extensi ve war c~aL:ago in the city , of which in totul the r e are thirteen . Tho six nroc..s o.ro r.:orcly tho s o for which Declaratory Orders h o.cl boon coni'iri:1ec~ pr'ior to the con i nr~ i nto force of the 'rown 0.1-:c~ Country Planning Act' 1947 ; and they do not i.1.ocessarily confor n with any order of pri ority. Tho di stinction between tho Docla r a tory Areas· anc~ those f or which no order wa s nade is nn arbitr o.ry one and docs not refl ect the r o l ~t ive dogroo of ·ur gency for tho r occvo l opnent of the area s. The proc ocure r eferred t o i n pnrugr aph 397 will be o.c1..0ptod for tho future c o;:!pulsory purcho.se of G.1 1 or po. rts of tho war do.nagod areas not c1om:.!.Gd t o b o ( o signa.tod , 1•thich nro o.s f ollows:-

War Dn.Eo.god Areas 'for which no De c l a r atory Orde r Confirned - · · · -----·---~ ---·

War Da.t-:i.aged Ar on.

- Prcvio:s Ref. No .

1

1

Location Irk ·Vnllcy

7

Pi ccadilly

8

Portlnnd Street

9

Lonc:on Road

.I ·

l 1·

I II

Ar ea . (Acre s)

52 .3 9.0

8. 9 8.8

10

Dnwson Stro ot

6.5

11

Oxford Stroot

0.5

12

Gooreo Streot

1.2


114 â&#x20AC;˘ .

TlOl

14.46

PART C - 22

Programme - Financial and Labour Con s i de rations.

:

~

..

Programming - General Poli cy . 401. In the preceding sections of thi s analysi s, attention is drawn to the fact that it has been considered appropriate , i n the Development . Plan, to put forward broad proposals for the soluti on of many of the existing planning problems in the full knowle dge that t he i mpl ementation of these proposals cannot pos s ibly be achi eved compl etely within t he n ext 20 year s . Purpos e of 402. The proposals actually included in the 20 Year Development Plan as those l i ke l y to be ProgrrunmeÂŤ implemented du r i ng thi s peri od ar e, i n principle, ones which i t is considered would mal-ce the most effe ctive contribut i on towards the long term s olution of the nain problems, whil6 a t t he same time remedying par t i cul arly serious local defects in .the physical 3.nd social structure of the city.

403.

In determining these proposals, which are s h own on the Prograrnrne Map, the governing considerat ions have been :( a ) The need t o provide the rna.ximu..~ amount of new res i dential accommodati on within the city, c.o mpatible with the establishment of s atisfactory living conditi ons . ( b) The need to avoi d any reduction i n the e xist ing resi denti al capacity of the ci ty other than that occasioned by the cl earance of wholly unfit housing . ( c ) The need to avoid unnecessary dist urbance of commerci al and indu st ri al activities in the city . (d) The need to confine the propos al s to those likely to be withi n tho financi al and labour resource s of the city.

I n r espect of items (a), ( b) and (c) above, t he various factors af'f ecting the devel opment pr oposed for the 20 year period in a physi cal sense, have already been r eferred to in the rel evant precedi ng sections of the analysis. The main purposo of this section is to justify the proposal s in respect of it em( d). Basic Policy.

404. In t his connection, the .primary consi derati on has been one of ensuring that t he t otal volume of r.apital work involved, whether measured in terms of cost or manpower,

â&#x20AC;˘

I


I \

Tl Ol

\

14.47

l I

I II I

I

115.

does not exce~d the output likely to be achieved over the period on t he ass~ption t hat the buildj,n g and civil engineering res?urces available to the city 拢or capital works rema.J..n at approximatel y their pr0sent level . The present output amounts in value to about 拢9 ,000 ,000 per annum.

405 With regard to development expected to be路 Muni cipal und~rtaken or sponsored by the Corporat io~ it has Expenditure . also been necessary to ensure , as f ar as is pr actic able at this s t age , that the expenditure invol ve d is not likely to impose unrea~onable . .demands on the r ate fund . As the general appr oach to the problem referre d to in the last paragraph implies that t ne present rate of munici~al expenditure on actual works 路should r emain substanti ally unchanged~ this consi de r ation is mainly one of land costs as so ciate d with particular proposals. 406.

The major par t of the development with which tho Corpor ation are likely to be concer ned will be, however, either housing or other provisions (including educ.:i.tio;.1) anci llary t o residenti al development ruid redevelopment. Land costs associ ated with this type of wo.r}c are not likely to be h8avy, i n r elation to construction costs, and i n any case, for development of such~a vital nature it seems reasonable to assume t hat they would not be a governing consideration. No atteopt ha.s therefore been m.:i.de to inv'~s tigate l and costs for proposal s of this type .

II

I

407 .

I n certain other instances ; e . g. proposals for major highways :ind the redevelopment of war damaged areas , la_rid costs wi ll assume some i mportance and app r opri ate r ef erence to these matt ers is made later in thi s section.

FINANCIAL AN:) LABOUR CONSI DERATIONS.

408.

In the foll.owing paragraphs the financi al and l.:i.bour considerations are examin ed fo r the 20 year prograr.mie of devGl opment i n respe ct of each maj or a~pect of the plan dealt wi th in the previous section s. of the ai1Qlysis . I I

In view of the impossibility of i sol ating the actual extent and distributi on of manpower engaged on new worl-: in Manchester, ::i.s distinct from the Manche.ste:r roGion, the pr esent output can only . be riieasured in terr.is of !!1onetar y value, of which rough c.ssessments can be r"1ade from licence information , Corporation estim~ t es , etc . The approximate t:J.-.'])endi t ure of building resources impli ed by the prograrnme i s also measured on this basis to facilit c.~te comparison.

409.

~

I

I~ c


116 .

TlOl 14.48

410 . I t is also pointed out that it i s not possible to compare the existing and propos~d volunes of work for all types of developmen-c . Of the present £9,000,000 worth of work per annun mentioned. in par.:igraph lr04 o:qly ~bc;mt £6 , 000,000 can b~ set off c'..?ainst specific fo r ms of development . In ~hese cases individual comparisons ca.~ be DGde) bu~.f?.r the reP-J.aining iterJ.S in_the prog~:;:1Y_1e?_1"t is only possible to ccDpare th8 total.~aiue of work proposed vri tn "tne total poteni::;i nl ve.lue based on the bal~:.nce of £3,000 ,000 per annum now devoted to :uiscellaneous deve lopment ~ 411 . For thosu reasons, together with the fact that no real accuracy can ge achieved in csti112.ti ng so far n11ead, it is stressed that the wliole financial ex:u-_iination of the 20 year progra11ne r.;.ust necessarily be of a very broad nature . It is in no way intended., even for the first 5 years, to p~ovide a firm statenent of future expenditure, and the only purpose of this :malysis is to shm'l that the proposals are in fact re~sonably r8alistic .

(1) Local

~uthority

Housing .

412 . The value of work undertc-..ken in the year 1950/51 amounted to approximatel y £2,800 ,000 inclusive of street works, services, etc. This resulted fron a progressively increasing output which c..t the end of the period approximated to the 2 7 000 dwellings per annue assu;:ied as ~he :rate applicable for the first five years cf the Development Plan period. The rresent rate of expenditure for this· output would ~;.ctuall y anount to about £3,200,000, assu.uing an overall cost per dwGlling of £1,600. Tho housing probre.r:me for tho whole of the 20 year period is based on the r!}ainte."'ance of this average annual value of work, the additional output of houses assuned for the last 15 /ears resalting fron an estir.Ja-~ed 20% ihcrease in productivity within the building industry . On this basis the total value of work for the 20 year ueriod is estinated it £64,ooo ,ooo . 413 . From the inforDa.tion ~:i ven in paragraph 108 i t will be seen that 7,260 dwellings renain to be col!lpleted in WythenshaweJ BL:: ckley and Charlestown wd 3,940 in Bowlee . It is reasonable to a.ssune that tho first group will be completed witrin the first 5 yc~rs, but the extent to which dwellings will be cor:1pleted in Eowlee is large1y dependent on the .J.Vailabili ty of additional housing sites in the inner areas of the city.resulting from redevelopncnt during t!iis period. .As stated i n nn.rat.;raph 106 no decision has yet boen made o~ ths priority to be given to redevelopment in the early years, but


i I

I:·

117.

T101

I

1449

I

assuming the . possible allocation of resources ·-menti oned ih that paragraph it is estimated that ·about 2, 000 dwellings could be constructed. on the cleared sites in the first 5 years. ?n this basis and fron the information given in paragraphs 109 and 110 the :1ousing progra.rm:1e !TiaY be . set :· out as follows :' I Subsequent 15 years First 5 ye~rs Value !Dwellings Location . well~ngs _ 1 Value £ :!:.:.. _ _ ___I\ 0

I

Within the Citl

I

l

(1) Wythenshawe, Blackley and ·Charlestovm (2) Redevelopment

Areas Outsi de the City

! j

1' i

Ii

7,260

11,600,000

2,000

3 ,200,000

6, 170

s ,200,000

740

i,200,000

3,200

4,300,000

' i

I I

( 3) Bowloe

j l

(4) Elsewhere ( stillj to be arranged)

-

l·-·-·· --·---·-

Total

I

I

i

I

il io,ooo

1__26,630

-I

£16,000,0001

·--- ----

36,000

35,500,000 ~48 ,000,000

414. It is emphasise d that, as nentioncd in paragraph 77, thj_ s progr ar.lL1e ns su)TI8S that as the rate of building di rni nishe s within the city and Bowlee, due to shortage of sit es, the labour thereby r e le ased~ which over the 20 year peri od should be capable of vndcrtaking worl: to the . value of £35~ 500 ;000 7 will in fact be utilj.sed for overspill development, either by Man.chester or by the authoriti es in vhose r:trea.s such develop:ruent t aker, place.

(2) Private Enterprise Housing . 415. The uresGnt annual value of private licence housing (400 per annur:1) assuming G.bout £1, 700 per dwelling aBounts to £680 ,000. As in the case of Local . .A.uthori.ty housing, it has been assumed that . this average G.mmal v&lue of work will be maintaine d throughout t he 20 year period. The total estimated value for the period a.L1ounts therefore to £13, 600, 000 •

.416 . For the 9,200 private dwellings which it has been assumed will be constructed during the period (see paragraph 79) approJdmately 3,150 sites are ava~l abl e within the city, 250 in Bowlee~ and 5,800 will have to be found elsewhere . It 1s doubtful whether any ~pp r eciable number of the sites in Bowlee will be t aken up during the first five years and on this basis the prograi:.11ae is as follows :-


TlOl 1450

118. Location

First 5 years ·Dwellings Value £ I

I

Sub$equent 15 years Value Dwellings £-

!

2,000

Within the City

!3,400, 000

1,150

1,630,000

-

250

350,000

-

5,800

s ,220,000

k_3,400,~90

7,200

o.o, 2~0, ooo

'

Outside the Cit! (1) Bowleo

-

(2) Elsewhere (still to . be arranged)

l

Total

! l

2,000

l

I

' The assunption regarding the transfer of labour referred to in paragraph 414 applies also to this programne for priva t e licence housing.

(3)

Cont~al

Commercial Area of the City.

417.

/

From licence informat ion it is l)Sti:·.1at Gd that in the central area of the city work is now being carried out on maj or building proje cts to a value of Qpproximately £1,000,000 per annum . These schemes include the rebuil ding of isola ted war daLJ.uged buildings (e.g. Free Trade Hall, The Royal Exchange, etc. ) and the construction of several new largo buildings (e.g. College of Technology, Labour Exchange etc.). I t is assunod that on completion of lhe se projects, the building re sources concerned will bocome avai labl e for further work of a sinil.::i.r character which it might reasonably be expected would consist I!lainly of the rebuilding of the more extcnsi vc w::ir dar:i.aged ar eas.

/

War Damaged Areas.

418. Fro8 pr eliTiinury layouts prupared, the value of th~ wo1·k in vol vod i ri the redevelopment of those war drunaged areas which are within the proposed cOI:1mercial centre of the city and are alread;y subs tanti ally cleareci., is esti:oated roughly us follows:(a) Strarigeways (b) Market Place ( c) Water Street (including L avr Courts ) ( d) Swan Street ( e) Shudehill

(f) Piccadilly

( g ) Portland Street (h) Oxford Street ( j) Faulkner Stroot

£2 ,300,000 £1,700 ,000 £6,600,000 · £70~ ,o oo £1,200,000 £1, 900,000 £1 , 400 ,000 £300,000 £100,000 ~16,200 , 000

I

. I \


Tl Ol 1451

I-

I I

119. .

. .

·...

~

·419. It is extremely probable that . the comprehensive redevelopment of nos·~ of the wa:::darlaged areas will only be accomplish~d by the Corporation first acqui ·r.ing and clearing the land and then leEJ.sing tt to pr.ospecti ve deve l opers willing to build in accordance with an agr eed iayout . It is cstinated that the co~ts of. a.cquisition in respect of the ~rea~ listed in th~ l o.st puragraph (i . G . for cleared sites.. and standing buildings with little or no r trnidual life) would amount in t otal to approxirna tely.£4,600!)000 . The return on this· outla.y ·which over a pe r i od the Corporation E1i ght expect to rcce i ve by way of gr ound rents? cannot be cOFlputed until det ailGd proposals are propared, but on the nssi.lBption that th0 devclopLlent will be; of a .more open. cha;racter than that which Gxisted previ ously, it seems . likely that even aft or c..llm'ling . for Government gr ants, sone loss woul d be sust a ined. This loss mi ght also be aggravated by delays . between e.cquisition and the titie when the l ands become income producing, due to acquisition being enforced in advance of r equirements , under Section 19 of the Town and Country Planning fl.ct~ 1947 . Several sites lw. vc in f act already had to OG acquired in this way. 420 . In this connection the extent of the Corporation's potenti al f'inaii.ci a l liability al though · incalcuL."'..ble at present, will certainly ho.ve an ir:iportunt influence on the work actually undertaken, and, in the most u~favourn.ble circmastu.nces, may result in some curtailment of th0 de vel opment listed in par ag raph Lrl8 . Howeve r·, as the value of the actual work i npltoa by thes_e schep.rns ap pea rs to be well within that wlLi.ch r.iight be expecte d over the 20 year·period, it has not been thought necessary to anticipate such difficulties at this stage and the Developn~nt Plan does in fact propose the substantial completion of a ll the a r eas mentione d. 42L . The cor:1pletion of rnaj or works at present in hand and tho implementation of specific proposals which are of a fnirly firi;1 n nture ( as given in paragrap h 167 of Part C. - 7 ) arc estimated to involve work to tho value of approximatel y £500,000 and £2,100 , 000 respectively . . · 1+22 . With .·regard to the development likely to take place on land r,1ade vacal'lt by slum: -clearance during thG 20 year· period it is itipossibl0, (as expl a ined in paragraph 188 ), to envis age the ext.ent or ty-pe : of such development with a~y certainty. However, it is necessary t o make sonc allowance for this fo.:tture of the jJrograrn.i.ue , <..md for- this purpose it is,assuned that deve l opment mi ght be practicable on 75~~ of the a1~ea likely to becor::ie avail able . Using a flo or spaco index of 2 1 thv developnent of say 37 acres for general warehouse and office purposes would involve ::tpproximatel y £4, 500,000 worth of work.


Tl Ol 1452

120. 423 In +otal therefore the value of wor k i mpii ed byvthe 20 year pr ogr.amme for the central ar ea is as f ollows :Redevel opment of War Pamaged Areas £16,200 , 000 Other outst andi ng work and £2 , 600, 000 i sol ated projects £4, 500,000 De vel opment after s l un clearru1ce £23 , 300 ,000 424. . I n view of the very approxioa~e ~ature of the esti mates, comparison between this votal and ·.the .£20,000,000 wor th of wor k ·which oi~ht be expected if the present ~~te of CA"Pendit~re wer o :o.ai ntained, sugge sts tha t.. the progrru.me is not an unreasonabl e one .

i.

, t,•

425. Wi th regnrd to development likel y to take place i n the first five years, only tho.follmving projects can bo considered to be at a s~age suffi ciently rar advanced to w2r rant their incl usion i n the progr;.mr.ic for this pGri od. (a) Outstandi ng Work .

(1) Royal Exchange (2 ) College of Tochnol ogy Ext ens ion (3) Free. Trade Hall

(b) Other Pronosal3 . (4) 3q_uitabl e Buil dings and No . 22 St • .h.n nes Street . (5) Shops rui d Offices - New Br own Stre et and l-iar ket St . (6 ) Woolworths (within Market Place War Danagcd Axoa ) • (7 ) Werneth Chambe rs - Princess Street . (8 ) Law Courts (within Wat er St . War Dru:io.god ;~rea - conr,icnconent only) . These projects would probably not account for r.iorc than about £ 1 , 500 , 000 worth of work, whe1·eas, on'the basis of tho present output it might be e xp ected that approximately £5,000,000 worth of work could be: undortalrnn in the first 5 yen.rs . It is inpossible however to say at this stage where or to wha t extent thi s apparunt balance in building potential will b o utilise d and only the above projects are shown on the Progrannne Map for tho first 5 years stage.

(4) Education. 426 . Work on new schools end oajor oxtonsions to existing school s i s at prGsent being carried out to tho value of approxinatC1ly £750 ,000 per annum.

4-27 . The basis u pon which tho school proposals speci fically included in the 20 ycur progr Q.DD.e hnvc been deterninod is explained in Part C - 18. These proposals, referred to in paragraph 357 and indicated on thL Pro__; r 2.'.:illO Map may be su.raoari sed . as follows :-


l

I l

I

I

TlOl;_~~~~~~~~~~-,-~1~21~·:__~~~-r~~~~~~ 145.) \ Subs equent 15 Fir st 5 ye ars years Des cription Estinate No . Estinate No. £

l

I-

~-~--~~~~~~~- ~~~-

I

2 F . E. Prinar y Schools Special Schools 2 F. E. Secondary Schools 3 F. E. Secondary School s County Coll eges Prioary (120 places ) (completi on) · 2 F.E. Priuary School s ( conpleti on) 3 F. E. S ec ond~ry School s (compl etion) Playing Fields adjacent to above schools

Wythenshawe

l+) -)

"l) I 6) i 1)

il

4~

I

1, 880,000

.

I

i)

I

i62

I I

3)

2 F.E. Prinary School s

3 F. E. Secondar y Schools 6 F. E. Secondary Schools

1)

(conpleti pn) 3 F. E. Secondary School s (conpletion) Playing· ·Fields adj a.cent to above school s and to existing schools

1)

1) )

3 F. E. Priuary Schools

I I

)

-)

81, 000 j ac~~sl I

870,ooo l

I I I

I

l

1

I

) 1) I

44,ooo

15 1

I

I

i ! I

3 F.E. Prir.mry Schools 2 F. E. Secondary Schcols , 3 .t'n • J.:J-::;' e Secondary School s

I

Il l

( b) New

I

4 F. E. Secondar y Schcols Localu proporti on of playing fields to abov~ school s

s,ooo

i

acresl

I

F.E. Prinary ScFiools

130,000

.

I

88 i acre s!

R~Q_e~<;;lopr.fent. A~§_f;_s_

!

! 5)

4) 1) 1) 1) ) ) ) 1)

600,000

I

1

!jacres 60 1 ,

I

Elsewher e in City

3 F. E. Secondary School s Playing fields t o above Total

27,000

.

I I

2 F.E. PrinD.ry Schools

11

Il

750, 000

) -)

) -)

Inp r· ovenent~

1

I

1)

I

I

I

Blackley and Charlestovm.

(a)

2) 1) - ) 2)

1

acres!

_2Q_ye ar

£

-~~-+-~~::__~-~~~-t-~.-:..::...~~- -

1

l

l+ 3.cr es i

130,000 2,000

I

! j

I 1 2

!acres I £3 ' 007' 000 i

i I I

35,000

130 , 000 l,ooo £1,681,000

_J


TlOl 1454

122.

The pr opos al s shown on t he Progr ~e Map for t he provision of general school playing f~el d areas may be summarised as fo l l ows :-

428.

Des cription

1 Appr ox.

\ Estimate

' Area \· (Acr es )

£

l

'

Fir st

5

year s_~

.(a) Land i runedi atel y south of River Mer s ey and wes t of Princ ess Road

I

31

(b) Land east and we st of Pri n ces s Road i mmedi ately north of Ri ver Mer sey

I

42

Subse qu ent ·15 year s

i

(c) La.r.d in green belt north of River Hersey (d) Land in gr een bel t on southern f r i nge of Wythenshawe .. ( e) Fairy Lane Disused BTickworks (f) Ardwick Cenetery (g) Si dney Road and Bankfi eld Str eet (west of Boegart Eole Clough)

! i

I 1 50 I I 'i

I

I I I lI

50 14

5 11

) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) ) )

)300,000

(k) Clayton Val e

27

(1) Noston Brook

. 9

) ) ) ) ) ) ) )

17

)

'6

. (h) Blackley New Road (j) Lily Lano - Church Lane Brickwor ks

( m) Longford Road Bri ckwor ks

Total

·--

6

368

)

£337 ,000

I n the case of i te1Js ( c) , ( e ) and (k) the boundari es of the a r eas ar e not shown in detail on the PrograI.Jme hap as they for m par t of larger areas, intended for both public open space and s chool playing f i eld devel opment, but for which no layou ts have yet been pr epared. On the Progr anne Map these l arger ar eas are shown conpl ete , but wb,ere applicable an i ndi cation is gi von that onl y the school pl aying fields within them are likely to be conpleted during the 20 years . j I

: ;

429.

I t wi ll be apparent that the total value of the proposals s ct out in the last two par agraphs is wel l within th0 value of work which could be carried out on the basis of the present r ate of annual expen ditur e . The proposed schools and playing fields in total aDount to £5, 025, 000 worth of work whereas , u sing the f i gur e of £7 50,000 per year as given i n paragr aph 426, £15',ooo , ooo of work ni ght be expected.

• I


TlOl

1455 430 . ~o this extent therefore, the pr oposals ·actually contained in the 20 year Programme are not r epr esGntative of either the probable availabili ty of buil ding resources for school work, or in f act the probable sp8nding capacity of t ho Education Committee .

'

.

431 .

However, i t has already been stated that these proposals ar a in no way exhaustive, being only thoso which can be foreseen at the present time . As stated in paragraph 362, the r e i s an urgent need for extra school facilities i n parts of thE: city not covered by tho above programme, and oxpendituro of both financial and building rGsources will certainly be incurrod in meeting this demand, if rn~cossary, by school dov0lop::_iont of nn u..11conv.::ntional t ypo . Mor eover, although no specific proposals crui bo put forward , it is ruiticipated t hat several now buildi ngs for further oducution will be constructod duri nb the 20 year period in the proposed cultural :pr0cinct, which mi ght well involve upwards of £1,000,000 worth of work.

432. Having rogard to the se matters it is . considered that tho progr runme of school devel opment actually proposGd, wbilo of apparently meagre pr oportions , i s ·in f~ct a realistic one , in that i t allows a substantial rn:-i..rgin of potenti al expcnili.turo to cover dc;velonmont which cannot be deturr,1 ined at this stage, but ·which wi ll almost certainly h&.v0 to.. be undertaken some t ime during the 2o·ve:c:r P "'r;c)(1.!,; . J

·-

....,,~

. · --:· ...

( 5) . Uni.varsity Devolo1)DGnt . .

.

433 . ·.: ]ixtensions carried out rc~cntly by t he

Univers i ty have involved work to tho value of approximately £1 50 , 000 por annun. . .At th.e . ~w.:).e t i ne the Uni vorsi ti, with t ho approval · of ·· the Univers ity Grants Co:mrn.itt e c~ u.ro antici p:1ting .. the undcrtn..~ing .of one naj9r schorno p0r year i n . the future, the value of which may vG..ry between· £200,00Q and £600 , 000 • hs suning therefore, an a verage annual value of work amounting t .o. £400 , 000 1 tho University E;Xpect to complete . · £8,000,000 of work . within the proposed Uni versi ty precinct durihg tho next 20 years . ..,

434.

During tho i'irst 5 years recently a:cqu.ired sites will be d.Gvoloped ond projects alr.eady ~n hand compl eted as foll.ows :· .' J: " ' ... Compl..eticn of Dental Hospit al . . , . -. . , :· · Completion of Electrical Engineering Building Part of Arts Buil ding Extension Jirts Library Extension Part of Biological Science Building (in Designa tion. 11,.rea Ho . 5) · Unions Buil.dings It i s estimated that these projects will involve approxinately £2, 000,000 worth of work.


124.

Tl Ol

1456

435 • . The above projects, together with the area in which the development for the subsequent 15 years is cxpe.cted to take pl ace, a re i ndi .cated on .the Progranne Map .

(6) Open Space .

436 .

So far .as the utilisation of labour r esources is concerned, th0 open space proposals are of little signific.:uice, as although of consi derabl e i mportance. fron a plannin·g point of view, the futur8 provision of now open space is not likely to obtain high priority in tho all ocation of publ ic funds for capital works..

437 .

The f act that expenditure on opon space provisions is likely to be linitod does however eraphasise the need for a r e alistic open spaco progranine .

438 .

At the present tino about £21,000 worth of work per annum i s being undcrtal'.:cn on new open space provisions and this fi~uro hQs been use d for purposes of conparison with tho value of wo r k i mplied by the progr ru~Jc .

439.

The open space proposals included in the programme and indicate d on t hG Proeram:ic Map may be SU!l1rlarisoa. in the following tal:3l es :(Certain future public opon spaces in Wythcnshawe, s hovm on tho Town I•fap , arc not includc;d in thi s :p:r:ogramne as they consist of woods and copses which will not necessitate any c..ppr0ci.:.bl o anount of work . ) fype or Open Space

~laeklay and ~ Charlestown I

(b) Organised Games (c)

Ornanental Parks

6

40 23

(d) Allotments

~

3

)

~

77,c'GO !> 1·)))

6

'. ) ) )

-

I

Total r1rst 5 years

77

£77,000 i

8

-~ub~e;uent (a) Cllildren 1s Playparks (bJ ( c)

(d)

Organised Gemes Ornamental Parks

Allotments

Total - SUbsequent 15 years Total t or 20 year period

100

113

32

i

I !

! i li'.6 , 0CO ;

Fifteen

-

Ye~rs.

I iz

; a

·>

) )

;

i> I 1> : 150 j)ll6, 000 p 6 .

)

I

215, 000 I

! I ! I

40

14

11

;)

I)

8

l

I

85

!>

j

47

I)

i 290

1

I

£21,000

i)

I)

I

. )

-

I

269

£21s, ooo J 73

~::1.16 ,000 ; 171

346

!£292, 000 I 8l

u22, ooo 1n

I

I)

I i

I I I i

!

i)

; jl ) )

i

l

I)

1 s jDev. or iEx!sV- I ) 6~ 000 :1ng ! ) 21,000 I) !> !open 1 .) !> 68 1> ispace ) ') 1

) 1 ,) :)

I

i

I

4--~-4'~~~+-~-+-~~~

I

f.! rst Five 'Years. (a ) Children's Playparks

I

IElsev.here in City !Total Total Wythenshawe ,__ Area Estimate Area Est1oatei · i Arca !Est imate '(Acres) 6: (Acres) i Area 1Est1ma.t e , (Acres) I £ r; (Acres) ' £ j '

I

'

)130, 000 : I

)

·

133

I ! 43 I

I

030, 000 j 513

A.461,000

I051, ooo !s9a

£.565, 000

I

- I


TlOl . 1458 (8) I ndustry . ,

. .

444. · It . has not been possible to . detGrraine · the present ratG of capital expen~ ti.:-re on ~ew i ndustrial developraent, although i~ i s appaient ·that .it represents a substantial proportio~ of the £3,000,000 worth of work per annuri, which a s . stated in paragraph 410 cannot be a ccounted for in detail. 445.

It is equally i flposs ible to estimate with any real accuracy the probable value of work undertaken in thG future on industrial expansi on and development . The Prograr.1L1G Map shows the areas in which it is co~siderG d new indust rial devel opnent could be carried out during the 20 year period; but, in view of the uncert ain economic pos iti on, the extent to which these s ites will actually be developed nust be a matter of pure conjecture .

446 .

However, assuming that all tho available land i s developed, the total va.l u e of work is estimated as follows :-

North of River Nersey. 179 acres (paragraph 154) 32 acres (L.battoir site - pa ragraph 162)

211 acres taken at averagcmte of £42,000 per acres £8 , 862 ~000 South of River

~ersey .

315 acres (paragraph 160 ) taken ~t £33 , 000 per acre = £10 ,395,000 .£1 9_).?57 ' 000 All that can be sai d in relation t o this estioate i s that the present value of new industrial development i s certainly more than £1 ,000,000 per annum, and on this basis a Dinimum of . £20 ,000,000 worth of work ni ght b e expected over 20 year s . . To this extent the development of the areas shovm on the Progr arri.me Map would appear to be an econon ic possibility .

447 .

Irrespecti .:ve of whether thi s value of new work was undertaken or not , it seens r en.sonD.ble to suppose that the l a r ger industrial concerns established in the city will naintain a policy of improvement and reconstruction within their pr esent boundaries . The denand on industrial building resourcGs likely to ari se fro:u1 this source is wholly inc apable of estination and can only be _c onsidered as p<1rt of the miscellaneous developoent to be off set against the balance · · · of building potential r erJ.aininc afte r other cormitLlents have been net .


T10l . 1459

ltl+8 With r egard to industrial buil9-i~g. ~ikely to take place during the next 5 yea~ s, it J_S certainl y envi saged that progress wi~l bq,._raade in the Wythenshawe industrial zones , bu-c at the present t ime the devel?iment of ~nl¥_ about 100 acres can be forcsocn wivh any certai1~ty . ._There i s no information available to suggest the or de r in which the rcnaining areas .will be . devel oped. It is unlikely that any appreciable ru;iount.of~ industri al redistribution will ta}rn place in t.he inner areas of the city during the 5 year peri od in view of the emphasi s which will be pl aced on t he clearance and re development of purely housing areas .

449.

I

,

For these reasons it is considered that the inclusion of what could only be a speculative 5 .year i ndustrial progrru-nrae would in f act be misleading, and no industri·a1 proposals other than those i n Wythensha\y-e referred to in the last ·.· paragraph ar e indicated on the Progrru-ill!le Map fo~ . the first ) years . The value of the work involved in the de velop~ent in Wythenshawe is estimated to amount to about £3 , 300,000 .

(9) Hospitals

ano

Health.

450.

As stated in paragraph 390 of Part C - 20 .· the two bodies associated wi th Hospital development are unable to indicate their future prograDLle except for a proposal to develop the site of the former · · Union C::hapel within the proposed :tvicdical Precinct. Thls i ·s estimate d to involve about £450, 000 worth of work , spread over the next four·or five years and is according ly shown on the Prograr.me Map .

451. · Additional worl'>. will undoubtedly be undertaken on .hospital and health centre dovelopnent , but nust be considered as one of the mi scellaneous i tems which cannot be justified in detail.

_ (10)

Cultural Precinct .

452.

li..s already stated in parag::- aph 380 of Part C - 19 no s·pocific proposals are indicated on the Progrru!JDe .Map for ci vie or educational development within the proposed Cultural Precinct. The value of wo r k lik ely to be undert aken i n t his area cannot be estir.1atcd at :present and i s considered, in the overall asse-ssnont , as a miscellaneous item.

I •

l1-53 . .h.ttention is drawn however to the reference nadc in paragraph 431, indicating the e conomic possib"Llity of constructing several colleges for further education-in t hi s area, without exceeding the r esources likely to be available for new educational development .


..

Tl Ol

.:

128.

1460

) ~· .

. (11) ·Summary. 454.

From the information given in the foregoing paragraphs it is now possible to make an overall a&scssment of the expenditure of financi al and labour resources. impl ied by the programme .This information is surnmarised in the following tables for the 20 year progr amme a s a whole and for the first 5 years programme. Using conversion factors supplied by the Ministry of Local Government and Pl anning, the volumes of work- proposed for particular types of development are expressed in terms of manpower as well as cost .

20 Year Programme. Value of work 1 Potential value of implied by specific ,. work on basis of · · Type of proposals included , present rate of Developtlent in the Programme. expenditure - where can able of calculati on £ Man £ ! Man ----------+---~------l-·-Y_e_a_r_s-i-------~j years Local Authority Housing 64,ooQ,ooo 64,ooo 61+,ooo,ooo 64,ooo

13,600,000

13, 600

13, 600,000

13,600

23,300,000

26,000

20,000,000

22, 200

Education

5,025,000

5,000

15, 000,000

15,ooo

University

8, 000,000

s , ooo

3, 000,.000

3,000

Open Space

565,000

560

420,000

420

1+,4-10 , 000

4,220

Private Enterprise Housi ng Commerci al and Civic Development in Central Area . .

Highways

l) 1)

Industry

19, 300,000

)Balance of

Ho.spi tal s and H~alth

450,000

Cultural Miscellaneous Deve lop~ent of no najor pl anning significance

18,600 ) Residual

• I

) ) ) )

) 63 ,980 ,000 ) 63, 980 ) 510 )

I~

)

) ) ) )

)£1,000

,)

) Based )on

) per )man year .

- I

)

·----- -- - - - --r-------+----+------+-....;_____ Totals

£138, 650,000 140,490 i£180,ooo,ooo 182, 200


I

lc:9.

TlOl 1461

I

It will be seen fro~·.1 these figures that out of the total £180,000,000· wo:r:th · of work wh.~ ch might reasonably be expected over the nex"L 20 years , assuining the naintenancP of the present output, £41, 350,000 worth is not accounted for by tne programme . Offset against this balance hov:e.ver would be the nany itens of ne-w development ior which it h:;:. s not be en possible to include firm propo sals , e . g . additional s chools , remodelling of existing indu stry~ cultural and c~i vie builcli.ngs , hospJtals, shops , comLJ.una.l facilities in r i;;sidential a r eas 1 publi c utilities, e tc ., and also the miscellaneour. types of development which, as well as being indotcfiaina te, are of no broad pl nnning si gnifico.nce and consequently a re not dealt with Jn the Devel opment Plan.

I

I. I

·--------~---- --- ·-·-----,- ---·-- ··--------- ----·- - ·-

Type of Development

...

:i:..

i

Nan

I

i

16,000,000 116 ,000

i6,ooo,ooo i6,ooo I

I

3,400, 000

i 3,1+00

3,400 ,000

3,400

Comraerci a l and Civic Developnent in Central .Area

1,500,000

1,670

5' 000' 000

5' 550

2,900

Uni va rs ity

3,044,ooo 2,000, 000

3, 750 750

Open Space

ioi+,ooo

100

3, 750,000 750,000 io 5,ooo

Highways

918,000

880

Industry

3,300,000

Hospit3.ls and Heal th

I

lf-50, 000

2,000

~

3, 200 ) .

510 ) 15, 99 5, 000 )

Cultura l Miscellaneous ·- · - - - - · -·- - - - -·-' - - - ----- - - - -·Totals £30 ,716,000 30, 660

L

ioo

I~16, 000

) Residual 1>Based on ) Balance of I1 £1 , 000

)

I

Years

--~~-

Private Enterpri s e Housing

Educa tion

Man

£

I Years

-'-~-~---~~-1-~~~-~-...1--=-=-==~~~~-

Lo cal Authority Housing

··-·-·

: Value of wor:'1: i Potential value cf j 1.r.1plic d by speGificl work on b nsi s of ·p~oposals included present rate of in programme e.xpendi ture - wher e capable of ~alculation

1

per mun

.l year.

11

' )

!~.5,000,0~5,550

Of the ap;parcnt balance of £14 284,ooo worth of work, :probably about £5,000 ,000 would be absorbGd '?Y development j_n the central area of the city and in both new und e.xistiag industri al areas for whieh it has been considerod i1:1practicablo to ~uggest <:-n:r f:i.rr;1 progrC1LW1e for even the next 5 yea rs. I he r cr.:ininder n ust be offset against the niscella neous types of developn0nt a lready referred to.


Tl Ol

1462

liPPENDIX 1 _Su.mrnc'!I'y of Lruid Us e J;rca in 11.crcs

At tine of Survey

L md Us e

11, 640

Net nreD. f or Residential Use (wit hi\). are as pci mDril y f or r e sidentiri.1 use}

1

12,442

+.l· i i

~~----------~ ----~---~----~---~-+---

2

At the e nd of t he Pl cJl P eriod(1971)

-----··

--+·~~---·~-

1, 800

Jirea primnrily f or Indu stri eJ. Use

2, 1 61

-'-·- '""---- - - - - ---·- - -- - - - -·----!---____;L_··-"·0--1---- ·- - 1, 073

3

Reilweys end RQJ.lwcy L an d

4

Wat erway s (docks, inland wat er vm"s , vmarves , depots CJJ.d)lo.nd f or use" vrith such wut ervruys

183

183

. ____....___,________ .___________ ___...__ _ __ ·'7 --+----- - ·-· 190

Jire a pi;: i rn..."IX'i ly for general busine.ss use (office s and vrarehoase::;) for t he c ity a s a whol e

5

·70

Ar.·eD. prim.c.,;.~ily f or shopping use in city c entre or mo.in di strict c entre

6

240

220

247

21

78

__._..;,.+-~---------------·------+----·~~~1-4------~ 7 J.'iJ:e o. f or $POu ps of buildings for civ ic,

c~utural

or other s pecial uses

~-+--·-------....----------------1------·~o~g~-~-------~kt:eo.. for Educ ati on al Purpos es i na l ud i ng sc hoo 1 p l eyi ng f i el d s

8

Pub li c Open Space

9

(n) (b)

t

I I

10 !Open

I

I

!

rte ere at i onal i'l!'e a ~ther pu blyc Op0n space

all types

Spa~e

n ot open to the Public

11

P.riv at e p l aying f i el ds (i n.eludi ng golf c ourses)

(b)

Allotment s (Statutory and Pri~rrte)

(c)

Public cerret eries - --

1 , 569

- 038

1,151

978

972

339 223

3 71

Note :-

4, 843

----1--- ·- - --- -

___ ___. __

Total

31 9

- - - ---4·- ---- -·--· l and ,

- - -- - ·.........

+----::-=

. j

I

·-

.

1,254

Other areas includ ing agricultural wust e l and , i sol o..ted are as of r e sidential an~ s~opping use , isol ated pub l i c ,1 7, 734 l)u~ldings , I~d (CQVGr e d py wa ter \ o-cher than i n 4 } a.bove ) ,

'--- r--

I~

l

( n.)

1 - - . -...- -- - - - - -· -- --

I

1 , 606

· :l.8

I I I

762

j.

27, 255

27,255

The acr eages given for ·the end of the Plan peri od d o not necessari ly agre e wi th the areas shovm on the Town Map. are computed f rom th0 LD.nd Use 1Tap as

an~nded

They

by the chunges

of u se resulting f rom devel opment mid redevelopment expec ted to tnkC; pl.:-..cG in the 20 year period ancl as shown on t he Prog.!'.'amne Map .


Tl Ol 1464

APPENDIX 3 . She et 1. Provi sion~~~is t of Build i ng s of Speci a l A~chite c tura l

or Hi s t or.ical I

I n t~~.1

Group I of Mi n is t ry of Town a nd Countr y Pr ov i s i~.1}_8.l L.i st ..

P lann i ng ' ~

Ca t hedra l Church of St . Ma r y s Hosp ~- t a l St. Ann ' s Church , St . Ann 1 s Square Hea t on Hall, Hea ton Park Chethe.~ i

St 6 J ame s' Chur ch , Di dsbury .· Bagul ey Hall The Templ e , Heaton Park Mai n Ent rance Ga t e and Lodges , Hea ton Par k Smi thy Lodge , Rea t on Par kColonnade nea r La ke in Heat on Par k St . Wilf. r i d 1 s Church , Nor t henden . 4 Newall Green Fa rm House · .. P a r rs wood·Hou se , Didsbury - Pee l Hall - ~o ~the n Et che lls Bridge of Approa ch - Pee l Hall To wn Hal l , Albert Squa r e Nq . 46 & 48 Ardwick Gr ~ o n South Clayton Hall, Ashton New Ro ad Nos $ 25- 31 , Byrom St r ee t, Cent ra l Area N 0 s • 3 8- 44 9 IP " ti " Moor Cottage, Grange La ne , Did sbury 11 Bee ch Cot t a ge 9 " " Cottage at r ea r of Moor Cottage , Di dsbury Ryla nd s Lib r a ry, Deansga t e No r th Hou se ; Ford Lan e Entrance Lodges , Regi stra r' s House and Mo rtuary Chape l Ardwick Ceme t e ry Nos . 2- 6, Green Stre0 t - Cent r a l Area Chorl ton Town Ha ll - Grosvenor Square Nos. 41- 47, Hi ghe r Ardwi ck Nos . 51- 75, Higher Ardwi ck No . 35, Ki ng St r ee t - Centra l hrea Bank of England - Ki n g Stree t ~ Centra l Ar ea Manchester Arms Hote l - No . 50, Long Mil l gate - Cent r a l Ar ea Hough End Hal l - Maulde t h Roa d , Chor lton Ci t y Art Ga ll ery - Mosley Stree t - Centra l Ar ea Portico Libra ry and Lloyds Bank - Mo s l ey Str ee t - Cen t ra l .Ar ea Wi ll i ams Dea c ons Bank - Mosl ey Street - Centra l Ar ea Sincl ai r ' s Oyste r Bar - Ol d Shambl es - Central Area N0c 84, Plymouth Grove , Chorl ton- on- Medl ock ( Mrs . Ga skell ' s house ) Wa tts Warehouse - Po rtland Stree t - Centr a l Area Athenaeum - Pr i n c ess Stree t - Centra l Area County Court - Quay Stree t - Oen t r a l Are8. Wi l liaras Dea cons Bank - St . Ann Str ee t - Centra l Area No . 25, St . ~nn Str ee t - Centra l Ar ea Nos . 8, 8a ·& 10 to 24 , St ~ J ohn ' s Stree t - Centra l Area Nos. 1 1-25 , S t& John ' s Str ee t - Cen tra l Are~ Sl a d e Hall - Sla de La n e No . 54-60 , U:ppGr Broo l<. Str ee t - Chorl ton- on- Medlo ck Di dsbury Training Co l l ege .- Wilmslow Ro1'!.d Broome Ho u se - Wilmslow Road , Di d sbury Platt Hall, Wilmslow Road - Rusholme Wyt h e n shawe Hall .J


I~i5

.

.APPENDIX 3 .

She~t

2.

Group III - Suggested

I nc~usions

Dower House Cottage - Hea t on Park Chamber Hall - Northen Etchells Kenworthy Hall " " Knob Hall Bar low Hall - Chorlton- cum- Har dy Brookdale Hall - Brookdale Park Gatehouse a nd Bell Turret to St. Clement's Church - Chorlton Higginbottom Farm House ~ Chorlton Green 11 Green ' s Farm House " 11 11 Ivy Farm House No . 3-7 Grea t John Street - Centr a l Area Nâ&#x20AC;˘. 32-36, Greek Stree t - Chorlton- on- Medlo ck 1 11 11 ' Ito . 24- 66, Grosvenor Street, No . 74- 82, Grosvenor Str ee t~ Chorlton- on- Medlo ck 11 11 No . 73- 83 , Gro s venor Stree t, " Hough Hall - Mos t on Fri ends' Mee t i ng House - Moun~ Stree t - Central Area Nos . 2 & 4, Swinton Grove - Cho~lton- on-Tu1e dlock . Thr ee War ehouses - wes t of Queens Hotel - . Portland Stree t Central Ar ea Poundswick Hall - Northe n Etche lls 11 North Poundsw ick rr Municip a l School of Comme rce - Princess Stree t - Central Area Rose Cottage - Ringway Road - H8yhead No . 62, Roy l e Green , Northenden "Old Rove r s Re t urn" Public House - 1 2 , Shudehill Centra l Area No . 62, Upper Brook Stree t - Chorlton - on- Medlock


TlOl

1466

APPENDIX 4

Di ntribution of Populo..ti on

At Ti me of Survey Index No. cf .Arec.. on L.'.'nd Use M.'.'.p

I

~e a

:

' I

j

823

789 698

i

3

4 5 6 7 10

024 303 433

1 94

147 540 21G 233 223

8

9 12 11 13 14 15 16 21 17 18

19 20

22 23

24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

340

471 320 246 252 200 203 240 325 763 417 436 560 636 1442 509 2097 1393

215 297 H-0 421

32

33 34 35

730

36 37

1.

; 18, 704 17,74.-5 . 1 4, 570 I 3b, 403 ' 18 , 769 22, 475 12,542 1 11 , 731 19. 545 I 13, 095 11,897 8 , 285 I 31,083 25 , 049 1 5,7Go 13 , 085 i 19, 711

I I

I

lI

,.

I • 1 1'

I

16, 424 15 , 613 9, 659 20, 4 73 29,484 24, 145 21, 041

I

6,~18

I !

54,169 35 ,192 19, 995 58 591 30' 378 4 : 500 5 ,.535 2 007

8~ 015

19, 750 4 , 900 202

280 241

Gr o~ s

I Den SJ. ty

1,

2

I ndex · No. on : i'f:!'eQ ~ovm 1. in Mo..p 1 Acres 1

!'

I

in jPopul c:tion Acres

1

At the e nd (of toe Plc.n Pe riod 1971 )

I

i

1 _J__.+--·-~---+---! 22 . i.3 1 ! 667 i 13, 629 20. 4 .

22 . 3 20. G 42 . B G1• g 52. 0 64. 5 79, 8 36. 2 GO. 0 51 . 0 37, 1 91 . 4 5-1. s

53.1 78 . 2

82, 1 77. o 40 , 0

63. o 38. 8

57. 9

•lB. ·1·

11. 5 l 85 . 1 ,1 24. 4 09. 2 tj 28 , 0 21. 8 I 20, 9 18 . e 13, 6 19, o

I I

Gross Density

I

49. 2

I

PopuL.-,tion

27, 0 17. 5

0. 84

I ,.

)

I I

I

2 3 4 o 6 · )7/10 ) 8 ) 9/12 11

13

11, 606 I 325 . 805 I 303 I 419 I, 297

I

I

540 3 95

I

237 336 414 320 3U9

1 1 .

I~1G/21 1s l 14

j

l

I 17/181I . 19 20 22 23 24

I

25

I 26

27 28 29 30 31 32 33

I 34 I!

35

36 37

I I

i

I

I

360 219 312.

780 400

433 560 G35

1442 509 I 2097 i 1393 • 438 1 310 1 307

I

I !

323

1030 310 540

33 ,120 5 550

31 ~ 016

I I

15 , 454

18, 507 1 4 , 211

20. 6 17. 0 38. 5 51 .. 0 44. 1

47. 8

17. 317 12 ,713 6 ,184 21 , 841 14, 588 12,564 18 , 717

32.0 32. 2 26. 0

11,762 5 285 14: 667 27, 964 19, 55 4 18,146 5 687 45: 206 31 , 180 17, 715

32. 6

51 912

26~ 914 13,000 7,600 G 900

9~ 600 28 , 900 9, 000 16,000

65 . 0

35 .. 2 39. 2 46. 9 24.1

47.0

35 ~ 8

48. 8 41 , 9 10. 1 71 . 2 21. 6 34. 8

24.7 19. 3 30. 0

24. 5 22. 4 29.7 27. 8 29. 0

29. 6

l

1--~--~ · ---+------1-----4-~~----+-------+-----

II

Populati on i n cr e w:; not I I

!.

I

i ncl uded i n crens \ ri ly f or pcim.,_

6,760

re s i dent i cl us e , e . g. in busine ss I

I ~

CJ."'€0.S

I

I

I

I

I -

I

4, 077

··----~--+-----1-' ---+----+i---r--------- -

•roto.l Popu1c~tion

I i

7o3 , 5oo

! - 1 , 1I ! . I

606, 480

- -·


TlOl

APPENDIX 5

1467

:PJ_@g_:i:ng St:-i.J.1cl:?.r .:i_3 f or r: ?cs i den t i u l N,;:; i ghbour h ood ~f ..JQ i OQQ_ F or~911~_j.B.._g_~_s1_9.v c_l op m en t Ar e as

1. Assumed dvrn1 lings c onst ruct ed at av e r age s i z e of ·1.1 h ab it abl e rooms • 2. Assume d ult i ma t e occup o..ncy r a t e o f o. 82 p ers ons p e r h obi t a bl e r e am, i . e . 3 ~ 3 5 p ers on s p e r dw el ling . t~ ··-L and - -·-Us ---·-·

P r ovis i ons

Coi,r.mni t~r C: un t r c Branch Librc,ry E eo.lth S u b -C cn t :c 0 Shon" - ~ L--·· ·~1i ':l i- 1·1· ·-.1) _ >=> l l1 .L " ex t en;:; i on)

Churc h es , h ulls etc . Public Houses Shops - Sub- Ccn t1 us ( mi n imura) ti II 11 ( ext en::; i on ) Dwe llings Nu r s c ry Schoolo I nfants School s J un i or S c llool 3 Childr en ' s Pl ci.yp r'.rks Ne i ghb ourhoo d P ar ks Or geni s 8 d G::i..mes Orn nrnentn l P n.rkB Al l otments 1

I

'

I •

1 03 16

3. 00 o . 5o 1. 50 4 . Lj,0 2 . 14

'7 14 7 2985

5 . 0Q 5 .34 1 . 87 0 . 93 135. 60

1 1

1. 1±0

3 1 1

( a )~

(

2 . 80 7 . 00 5 .00 7 . 00

:

-

1 83 . -18

=

Net Res i d enti a l Dc:ns i ty i n Hci. bi t o.bl c Rooms pe: r o.cr• e " " '' " Dwel1ini.£S per ncr c 11 " " ( Ult h rnt u) i n P e r sons per oc r e Ma x i r.mm Gr oss Den s i ty in H8.bit nbl c Rooms pen~ n cP e 11 " " i n Dw e1lin.zs p er ncr e II II II ( Ul t imc t o ) in Per sons per ~er e

= =

= = =

Not e

----ra)

90 22 7{ 67 16 54

Ac1d 1 ti o~1 1:'.l op 1an GT>ac c mny b e provi ded wi thi n :.1 c i g h bour ilGo d r.; i f GUit :--..b l c ex i s tin g or p otenti a l open sp ~~c e 1 ( l sn d urw ui tabl c-; :i::·oi-· b uil r:ting) i s c.vnil o.bl e . r ota l r e c1uir e r11en.t s ~:s f ollo;·1r:; : -

o.cr es :1.7. 0

Al l ot nwn t s

II

10 . 0

1:..ctual gros s d.:.;ns i t i os 'f!Ou l d b e o.d j u s t e d a ccording ly·.


1'1 0 1

APPENDI X 6 Sheet 1.

1468

Pl annin g St andards for a Residential District of 50, 000 ill__Redeye l Q.2_L~g!'_ . ~~oas . 1 . Assumed dwcl 1ings constructed at average size of 4 .1 habitabl e r ooms . <

I

I

2 . Assumed ulti w1to occupa.ncy r ate of 0. 82 persons per

hab i t able r oom, i . o . 3. 35 persons pe r Land Use .

Within 5 Nc i ghbo~~hood~颅 Community Contras Br anch Li braries Health Sub- Centr e Nei ghbourhood 路Shops ll

It

(Extonsion)

Chu rchos , ot c. Publi c Houses DwellJngs Nurser y School s I nf ant Schools Junior S c hool ~ Nei ghbourhood Par ks Childr en ' s Pluypar ks Organised Game s Ornamental Parks Allot ment s

I

I. I

l. I

Provision Acres .

1\J o.

~ .4

15. 00 2 . 00

235

31. 35 15. 35

115

35 14,925

15 5 5

6.oo

25.00 26. 70 678. 40 7. 00 14. 00 35.00

35. 00

(

(a) (

(

Dis t r i ct Cen t r e Di stri ct Hall Mai n Libr ary Mai n Hoal th Cent re Cinemas Publ ic Be.t hs Di stri ct Shopping

1 1

2

1 100

11

50

''-!-

1

Gener a}. Di~tr~ct Re qui r 01:10nt s _ Domesti c Indus try Addi tion al Or ganise C. Go.nes Ornanental Parks Modern School s Gramnar Schools路 Technical Coll Ggcs County College s R. C. School s Cinemas

?.:'OT .AL ACRE.A.GE

( (

(a)

-

:

7. 00 5'17 50 11 . 75 11 . 00 . 7. 85 34. 10

2 . 00 2 1 . 50 1 (a) (

PuJ,J.:t c B.::i.ths

Balance of School Pl a.yinr; Fields

25. 00

3 . 00 1 . 00 4 . oo 2.00 2. 00 10 . 00 5. 00 4- . 20 2. 50 2. 50

1

( Sxtensi on ) Publi c Houses Poli ce Station and Fir0 St ation Petrol Stations and Car Par ks 11

dwe llin~ .

-.

路 -- - --~

1084 . 70


Tl9-l

14o9 APPENDIX 6 Sheet 2.

= 90

Net Residentia l Density in Habitable Rooms per acre II

II

II

II

II

II

in Dwellings per acre (Ultimate ) in pe rsons per acre

MaY..ii:.mu Gross Dens ity, in Habitable Rooms pe r a cre

=

22

=

74

=

57

ll

II'

It

in Dwellings per a cre

= 13. 8

ll

ll

II

(Ultimat e ) i n Persons per acre

-· 46

Notes (a),: Additional open s paces ruJ.cl balance of school playing fiel ds not l ocated adjacent to schools may be provided wi thin neighbourhoods or district area if suit able exi sting or pot enti a l open spa ce (land unsui t able for building) is 2.va.ilabl e .

Total

re qu i roncnts for five nei ghbourhoods as follows :Organised Gar.1es

117.0 acres

Orn a.Illont a l Parks

85.0

It

Allotr.1ent s

50.0

II

Ba l ance of S chool Playing Fi e l ds 58.25 acros

I

I I

• I

Actual · gross den si ties woul d be adj u s t0d a ccordingly . (b)'. Maj or Roads and Parkways not i ncluded •

.I I


--·-··--·---

·------·-·--

! 1

0- 5 ; 5- ::..o : 10-15 115- 20 : 20 + : l i

l

i

I i

.(_

3o

'

650 1

I

.

-

4:1266

I

!

i

-

17 'J

12

:I

.,

3

l

I

'

+-

.

1

I

i

:

:

8n..,

-

l

- ! -

c::.

I

I

I

. I 12,69815 7552 l 1,503 i 1 90

I

!

I

i

:

i

{

-

87

-

19

I

i

·,

'

1

-

14, 789

154

1 ,184

'

~

I

'

i !

j

I

I

-

I

I

26, 617

-

19, 055

234

2 9 114

I i

:

!I

I

I

I

I

L_____;_________j_ __~_·________ I _____ j_ -ri

!

- !

.

I

ij

1

.

! ,

.

I

l

I

28 1 1 3

'

j

I

1

!4 c:'.'.-4 l 1'"'3

8), -9 45 I

I

I

139 !

i

80

15

.

986 1· 1 3 8

:

930

1

'

I

177

I

'

TO'.rALS. . J: 1 , 155 . 6~551 ! 1 23 ~ 20 , 066 --==-=-==--=·-'~=-- •=.,..=--- ---~=-=--~-===----=-=--=-=-l =- ..:-=..~=-=--===o==...-:-0--...:.--==-'====..==~-b:- :.......,.._·--"=-'--=--=-==--="==--~ - - - -=-~--~- -

·:

-- -- --·------·-;·n~e iii~gs ______ _

·--·-_I ___

-

8, 170

8,170

NIL

NIL

i-----27;-I -;,~~;5- -r -2~~~~T-~~r 349 ;-· -~.; ;--;7 I --;.-~~;-1-5:2c;~---+--,l-·N;·~

Dere:!..ict !

Dcmo li sh,~ d ·-=-=

cemete~~ -~ ~-e _______ ---~-- _J: --~-------- r l ____________ _.JI__ _____..J_____. .

o ccup i ed by and i n t ended i'or Rai lway and

Int ended f o r Re siden t i a l Us e

Intend ed fo r Cultural Us e

Intended f o r Comme rc e

Int ended for I n dustry ---

Gr o s s ·

I Acrea ge .

I,

1 ---- ---·-·---,~ . -- - - ---~ : -----. --- --~

1

----

·

1 To t al .rotal 1 r epl a c ed by ;Occupi ed i Dw8llings 1 e nd of' 20 1DHel ling s i and Si t e s l y ear pe r i od .

-R~~i·d~~~i --·iir~ ---~-Years :-~-- ---·

!

DFALT WITH DURI NG DEVELOPMENT PLAN PERIOD

_v.r~m~n _-~P? VF;: LQ£l~N~_ ..Plt.Q_ro~~ .~§.

2 •.. __ §.ill~.M\_BY _ QJ:i' _REl)ID~1ITlAL__?RQf ERTIES

·1- - --·-· --·-- -- - ~~~~~~~~-d- co~~~~;_-;~~--

-----· -----·---

APPENDIX

Redevel opment Ar ea. - - - - --·-------- ·- ---

TlOl 14 70

~.

l•

j>< h.:i

IH

,t:J

I~

lt?-J

h :J

l:i:o

:'l:J

______


11 1422

"

u

ac~ ea8 c

other

@

.. .

1 a cr e p er 1,00 0 empl oyees i n

...

5~o

I

. ..

m anuf a cturi q~

.. .

... ...

. ..

...

indus t r y

. .. ...

... ...

.. .

.. .

...

...

Total a c r eage requir ed for i~dustry p~l.:"._1,000 of ultima te popul ation inc luding a ll a l l owances

of gross e;cre age for l and u nfit for dev e lopment

...

... ...

Gro ss ecr eage r equired per lj 000 of u ltimate i)opuletion

20·J r5 f net si t e Bcreage for industrial expansi on

Recreatj_onal spa ce

...

requir ed for a ll industry

It

for manufacturing indu stry

To t al n et sit e

II

ucr~age

12i" of n e t s it e a cre age for roads

1;

Net site

...

...

~

.. ...

• .•

. ... .. . 2.

98205

~~

0 . 24789

4. 95794

0. 71140

0. 26270

·o. 42684

3. 557

0 . 57495

TOTAL· INDUSTRIAL SPACE STANDA:@S (incl ud i ng . a llowances )

P:GH THOUSAND OF TOTAL RESI DEN1.1IAL POPULATI ON

_e~r:J·~RY OF "fROP?SED

I~

;•

I

~··

le

I 1:-J

~~ .


....,

.

"

TlOl

ffiQWED

1473 1

Industrial Zone ·

Blackley

I

2

-

Gener al Loc~ti~~---1 -Ac~ag;-,;;,a: r;;,-~;iption and BoWldaries of porti on intende a for Spec ial Indus try

I

- -··

e

I

--·- ·-·- --

5

--- ----1-- - . . - --------·--

-.

6 -~

licreage nnd Des~ipti on .Acr e age and De scription of Por tion Intende d for J_l or Por tion I nte nde d f or ~neral Ind~ustry__ -----~_?ht In~lustry k~ ·=S--+--fbres_ j ~

Total Aren. of Zone _1,cre s

I

North Wc $t Manchester Bounded roughlv by Bl ackle y New Ron.d.,

The whol e zone

..Market~ St r e et , Slook Road~ River Irk an d t he Crumpsail Hospital

New 1roston

·4

3

.

.AP.EIDIDIX 11.

INDUS TRI AL ZOl'@:t

213

I - l

NJL

!

The whole zone

NIL

North e n.st 1~ohester .Bounded by ~t . Mory s Ro o.d, Nuthur st Rona. ruid the f orx:-e r L . :M. & s.

I

NIL

-

213

I

50

I

50

NIL

Rail way

Chee tham

West :Mruichc ster Bounded bv Gre at Duci c St reet , Wat erloo Rorul the proposed Int errrcd i at e Ring_ Road, t l:J,e ·for~r L . M. &

·s. ~Railwa.z

\BUt"J

Line) _and the proposed ,inner Ring Hoad

I.:i;k vaiiey \ North)

I.:i;k Val:J_ey \South)

NJL

NIL

. ·

West Ma.ric . hes t er Boundec1 "Qy t he fo~r L. M. & s . Ra ilway. lBu_ry Li ne -' t he proposrl Inner R:mg R0 ad, \I eber St r eet , CoJ:lyhurst Road, t he Chee t ham and Col l yh ur s t r ail wey c onnecting 'l ine ; Sand Street, and VaUxhall Str eet . West lilaPches t er. Bounde d £Y the for)r L. M. & s. Railway BuryLine D~ton Street" irtles Street, Rochdale Road a.rid the propose d I n.nor Ring Road

.

The

whole zone

2 78

278

I I The whole z one

NIL

41

41

NIL

~

~

?< i-:-1-'

• The whol e zone

NIL

71

71

NIL

(f.l

[ ct

~

carri ed forvrnrd

f

213

162

278

-- _.,;_•_.....

653

' I-'


TlOl

1474:i_ Industrial Zone

---------Old.ham Road

Collyhurst

Nevrton F,eu.th

2

......

Acr eage and Description of Portion Intended f or Special I ndustry

Genoral Location and Boundaries

--

--'-·

brought forward North east 1funches ter. Bounded r ogghly by the forrrer L. 11. )& s, Rn.ilway (Hollinwood Line , s~. Mar-y 1 s Road, · Loston . Drook, the City boundary, Oldham Ron.d, nnd the pi:-oposed Interiredia te Ring Roa.a _

Acreage and Description of Porti on Intended f or Light Industry

1 ~~s

1--

1 The whole zone

I

I

I

Bounded by Oldham Road, the forroor I J;,. M. 8: S . Rn.ilwn.y I lStalybridgc Line nnd .(lrdwicl<: Br anc h!' Line ) c.nd the proposed Intern:cdia tc Ring Ro ad

I

52

91

23

Bounded by t he forrrer L. M. & ~ . Railway ( l\rdwick Branch and S:t.:\lyb ridge Lines) , Cemetery l Road, hnd the , proposed I nt er- 1 Dfediate Rin~ R~n.d ~ilhattoir Site)

NIL

i

7

7

32

1 91

..-

23

-~

I

i

265

g

1:1:>

I

I

I u:i

107

The vrhole zone

I-' I-'

91

NIL

The whole zone

Oldham Road, I'en 1.cros Lone, nnd the forirer L.l!i. s. Railway Staj.ybri dge

653

Q

Tune}

I

I.Acre s 1278

<l-

1 NIL

-----

·!!> Total Are a of ii Zone !j -A;;-;~-- - I.~

NIL

1

Central :Manchester . I Bounde d by the proposed Oldhom ! Road diversion the c.mnl nrm ! north of PolDna Street, the i Rochdnle Cam.l z. nnd the proposed j Inner Ring Rc.10..U. I Also b ounded by Poll.::ird Street, 1 the Trure Street Ins ti tut ion and t he ad.joining flats, and tre proposed Inner R:L"lg Road, carried f orwar d

.

6

5

·--------·-·----------------

llcreage and Descript i on of Portion Intend ed for General Industry

NIL

I

New Gross

i~s

NIL

North Manchester Bounded 'Qy t ho formar L .11. & s. ) Railway l Dldhrun Road Goods Line , Collyhurst Str eet ~ Oldham Road, n.nd Dsbor ne Strec~ North cast Manchester. Bo unded by Oldham Road, Ten Acr es Lane, Ce1mter y Ron.d, ~"1.d the proposed Intermediate Ring Road

4

3

383

317

1 -965 .I .


~

TlOl

1475 l

2

3

0

L'1dustrinl.+ - - - Gcner n.l L ca.~ion zone and Boundori e s -

-

.

-- -

4

fiercugc . Md Des cript i onof Porti on I ntended far Speci~ Industry

·· - - - ----

-· i

II ~re?_

I

br oug..lit f orwc..rd East 11.?Jlchester. , Lotmcled b;y Br n.ufo::i;d Roa9-, t nc nropos0d m t Grr:Y.>rl:Luto Ring Ro a.a, As..11.t on ?-iew H.orul ::mcl Bcsvr.ick Street ·

Bra.a.ford

l Openshn.w

I

Bounde d by tho , i f o:;-.ror L 1M. ,, & . s. Rt:.il wo..y +1.ra.·) ·; ick f Br nnch ..ui..'1.0 , i 1l"e pr-01?9sed . 1 .mtcr nr:cuc..t;c Ri n e! E.o~~ nnd lillht on

!

l ie,:.;

3.'.l.s t l1Ia nchestcr . Bounded by Phi l iJ:.s Pork, B0J'.lk St r 0ct, li.shton . ~·cy1 Ron.cl, Ci ty Bound::-c yt the H~~l;. ~ogh. Hou'3J..Il8 Est ate ' oui.sn. S"trect' .Hs ht on Ol d Ro cil i end. ~he }"!l'.'oposed I nt cr nx:,diatc Rm g B.oo..u

255

.tux vl

Bou.rnlcd by C'ross S.tr00t , the !•i..1!1.<?h.... stor nnrl

l

!

Or c.;Ytreo I Lano~ the Cl~·ton : Br oox , t he l1 1fonchc s tcr nnd Asht on- under-Lyne! Onnnl , ilsht on 'Ol d! Ikoo, end tho J pr oposed Inter 1 v[tncl ,

_

2;;,5

L

; 3&') B.o-...mcled py Br cilforG. -!_{oD:_d, t 11c f 9r ;ioor 11• ~•1. & S . Rru.lvrn.y 75 _i lrr~'.ri ck Br anch !:iinc , li.sht on l'"lew - o .2.<1. c.nd Be swi ck Stre;ct

Bounded iJy Ph i l ips Po.rk, B ~k S t ., . i~~1ton New Ruc.d, '?rcy -~o~mJ.::a:·l,

I I

i:;hc Hign .Leen fiousing E ~tato , Or nbtrce Lu..'1.c, the !&::i..'1.ch:.:stcr M d iJ.Sht ·Jn- 1_intler- j Lvnc Gnntl. · Cr oss Stre et ['._"1(~ the µ- ur.x.'.scd j I nter mea i a.tc 1 Ri nF Rc<:td. Af.so b ounded by t he M..n..11.c h e;stcr :md Lshton- undor-

1

~~~;;~hok,

1

Lou.isn. Street & ilshton Ole. Road.

I 6ll

--

--

+

6

Tow- ·--- ·· of' Zone

f >;:en.

- - ,----- ·llcre s _

- - ·· ··-- ----··-·

!

.pcr e s

~

I 31t I

!

965

NIL

1 G6

I ~

NIL

.tl2

I

-36 7

I

I

I l

I

if

j

l

:::s

p.. ,....

I

I j

Ij

I

II

i

Descri~ti-;;-~

cf Porti on I nt end.ea far Light Indust ry

- ---·-- ------,---- - --- ·--, - ----1I ilcro~ : 1

I

medi ate Ring Roadl

corri c d farwnr d

j fcr; ;ge . ~d

1

1

.ii

~ish-Co!1-uncl~r-L,ync

91

1..creage . n."ld ~scri.2tion of Portion Ini:;ended. for General Industry

5

I 570

i i

l><

~

II

Cf).

g

3~1,493 I ~ I

-

-

·· ·

(l)·

ct

I I


TlOl 1476

2

3

Genercl -Loc ation: nnd Boundories

i'!Creage n.~d Description of · Portion Intondea for

1

Inc1ustrio.l Zone

Special Industry m

broueht forwnrd Knott Mill

e rl cruiion to_ }?rincc::ia' nd., the p r opc. :;ed Link ' 1~0. td l'// 7 , Cheatei>

Mnyfielc.l

ln c oc:.ts

~-.nd

Central !Yh.'1.chester. 3 c un clod row~l-.1v by tho Londcn Ron.d Stn.ti cn x 1d its rail o.ppro[!.chcs, Storo Street , t he proposc:d Inner Rine; Rot.el, Centro.I }J,_·'.nohcsto:r BomiJ ed -by the gr oposocl Inner :r?.inB Rcn.cJ._, the :i: or ')"'x.:r L. :M. & S . Rn.iJ.wny \:CVInin Line i tJ1e uroposcc1 Link Road 7/7,

715htcn Old Road, the proposed I nte:ci!ediate Rine; Rot.id. nnd Hyde ~-?.oc.d_, excluainr~ tfie l and

i

I

i

!,

I

The whol e zone

l

133

I:

p: I-'

I-'

I

(fl

!

133

I

g

1: .•

j

I

NIL

The whole z one

:r-r.uj

28

I

20

I

I

I

lt:J

§ •

I NIL

, !>-

x

i , 498 I

l

I

I

I I

I I

NIL

j

ifil

-

I

I'

'

The wh ole z one

l l

52

5-2

I

'

I I

I NIL

The whol e z one

occupied oy Bri tish ..H.nilvro.ys and tho /iravtlck Cemeter y cnTI"i c d forward

!317

II

I

Iinconts Goods Stat10n1 r.n~ the pr.op osed Link H.oua 17/7

lird1vick

570

I

the City Bounda ry.

Ccnt.'.::.l M.."mchc stor Bounded by Lendon- Ro:.-il Dcvminq S trcGt, 1.rdwi cf.: Grcc!l . North, · M.:mor Street , the px:-ouosed mo.jar h i ghwa;y r cp1o.ci n g J1ppL~~S~r~ot , the f orrrer L . M. & s • .t{.mlw8.y, 1byfiel d Sto.tion , Dnd Fo.irfiold Str0ct

!

I

NIL

6

iicreEtgc ruid Descri;ti~enge and Descrip~-, - Tot~l of Portion Intended for of Porti on Intend.ea. for f;re a of General Indus~ I Light Industr~ ·Zone __ Acres I · ! licre s licres

i lI

Ccntrnl 1hnchdster. B~:mnck: d by ~h~ ili vt::r; ~~11, tno · f c<emer 1i.S .J . & Ji.iiailwo.y mi.cl. r~c<.1(LS l in0 into Salfor cl , :.~ed l.c c !~ St _ ,. tho -::~·opo c. < ,,: .,.

Rd.,

1 J~:~S

t

5

4

204

2C4

NIL

-

935

611

---

369

l , 9l5

·-

-~ fi -·


TlOl

1477 1

l

2

llidu stri ul Zone - -·----·--···- -- -

·I I

Gorton

I

Gen~;al

i:,;;,aticn and Boundo.ri es --

I

brought for wor a.

3

kre~e ond Descr iption of Portion Intended far s.~_cial Industr~ - -

I East W.ianchester. Bounded by the pro osed

5

/>crenge and Descripti on of Portion L'ltendea for General :rn~~---·-

j.Acx-J!]l_

I

t

L-rit orrediate Ring ~oad._, Hyde Road, . the -propose9. hi~nvray D/231 ·- th~former l:i • N'( h . . Ro.ilway Garton Li ne/?. Railway Street,. oxn~r Street! Booth Street , Garton Lcinel. t .1e fcrn-m- L .. M. & S. .::me1. L . & Ii. E. Rnilwn.y (1bnche~ter and . ]ja.}rfield Br cmch) , Der by Street, Cr ossley Street, Gorton Lcme , the R. C. Chur ch and Schools

4

.

611 I

I#••II

6

.4crenge and Descr ipti on of Por tion Intend.ad f or _ 2i ght In_di..i .stz:;y-___ _

I.Ac"Y'~S

935

1

l1 _

Total kren. of' _Zone-·- ···.Acr es l,915

369

'I

I

J

j

NIL

146

I1he whol e zone

~IL

146

i

l

Md the farn"Br L . & N.E.

Railway, ruid excluding land occup3-ed by B;riti sh ·~ailwo.ys Hulme

Longsight

Centr a l Manchester, Bounded by t he ~oposed I nner . Ring Roo.d.i Br eyshn.w Street, nncl Moss Lane East Contro.J. Manchester . Bounded 9Y: ~he_ for~er L .M. & Railwny CMmn Linc )? f,£yde Road, St ow:cll Stree"t;, !for th .. Ro ncl nnd i t s continuation nor th of KirkmMshulrre Lane, and Struil~_y Grovc 1 o xcludi.n,g t he Bell Vue Doxn nnd Cnr · Pork

NIL

i

-

l

NJL

I

-

I

The whole zone

l

10

I

·10

~

'D

§

s. NIL

l

-

I

NII:

I

-

Pi

I

The whole · zone

I I

41

I

411~· I-'

I-'

Cll ~

(!)

Chorlton

Sou th West Manchester. BoLmded by Manchester Road, the far100r Cheshire Lines Railway, o.nd Wilbru..hrun Rond

c ro:Tiod forward

NIL

I

-

I

611 I

NJL

I

-+-+ t

1

I

-

i,001

I I

(!)

I I ._ _ ..____ _- -.a.----

The whole zone

19

i

439

. 19

I

2,131

·c+

l;n -·-·


1!98 l

Industrial Zone

-------------·--

2

Gencrltl Locl'..tion nnd Boundnries

3

.Ar:rc nge Dnd Description of Portion Intended for 1 ...._ ~pecial Industry ·

I

Didsbury

South East :M anchester. Bounded by the forrrer L. :M. & s . Rnilwlfy, the pron"Jsed highwa,y No., 9 lStockport Roa.a.)., and the Ci tv Boundo:cy. lUso bounded by ~ho proposed highw8Y D/23 , the Ci t'IJ Boundm-y, Brrclow Ron.d, and Mount Rond. Also b ounded by Broom Lone, Hi ghf'ield Roo.d, illld the f orrer L. & N. E. Railway

___

I

brought f orwnrd Ievenshulme

4

··i--

.Acreage ond Description· of Portion Intended for Gener al Industri·

Jii:...res

Total Arci:. of · :x;.. Zone 'D

krenge nnd Description of Portion Intended for Li ght Indust!X_.._ __

ilcrcs

--··· §

.Ac.res

.Ac.res

2,131

439

i.001

s 11

6

5

I-' I-'

NIL

NIL

The whol e zone

95

95

(f.l ~

CD

(i)

c+ _ O'l -

NIL

NIL

The ·w hole zone

7

7

~nstitu~c)

South Manchester Locn.t ed in tile trian_glc fcrrrcd by Kin.gston Il.oc.d, Vfilmslor.; Ron.cl and Parrs Wood Road South

l'TJL

NIL

The whole zone

13

13

Eurnage

Sout h East :Manchester. Bounded by Bur:-n~e Lane, Lane End Road, and the Ci tv Bowi.dary ~

NJL

NIL

The whole zone

18

18

dsbury

~

0

Scuth 1b..n.chestcr. Loco.~cd in the b:'io..n.!!'.le f orrred by tnc former L . M. & s . Railway, Didsb!:JrY Rccreo.tion GrolIDd, n...11d Wilmslow Roo.c1

hi.rle

p,...,.

i-

! ·Total north of River l1iersey

6ll

I

11, 081

I I

572

+------!

! ,__- - -'-- - -· = =-==±==±= - = = = = ==='====

... ~-------

--

- -

-·-

- ---

2, 264


~

TlOl

1479 2

1

Industrial Zone

~~~~---;~~ Sharston

Roundt horn

Moss Nook

General Location and Boundaries

Llrcago

4

and soription of Portion Intendea for

.Acreage and Description of Portion Intended for General IndustryI

.Acres

ilcres

D . e

Speci~ Indust~{

Wvthenshawe. Boun&ed by the Roundwood Housing E$tate, Longley Lane, nnd the ~oposed Shnrston Bye-pass \liJ.trinchrunRoad and diversion)

NIL

Wvthenshawe . Located within the area bounclcd by Altrincham Road, West ern Road, the 311gUley SanE'..torium, n:ncl the Ci ty Boundary

HIL

Wvthensho.we. Locn.t cd in t he e;ostern purt of the ru:-ea bounded by the proposed Civic Centre Ro:U1 the propgsed Styal Roo.d diversion, and Ringvroy Road. Also loc ~ted withi n the orea bounded by the pr:-oposed Stya}. Road diversion, tho forirer L.M. & S,. Railway, n...11d the City boundn:cy

3

~I I

~I . • l )

No Seg:rc~ation Intende

5 -------

6

------··-

and Description l Total of Portion Intended for ; krea of Li ht IndustrL_ __ ~ · ~-Qg~----·· __ .

Acre~e

I

I.Acres

~

I

I

110

I

108

I

J

'

NIL

' '

151

J

'

'I

1

iI

;i,..

I

Tot al for Wythenshawe

'I -=--===1~k ! i I

369

P-:

~

i

l

'(/).

j

I I

CD (I)

ct-

..

'I


------ -路-

---

'.C J...Cn

1480

CENTRAL

COMNERC~.L

AREA.

AF'PWDIX 12.


TlOl

__14~1_______ ______

------

I

USER

::.:..:.-=--=-~= ·

.

~-----------.------SECTION A I B -.::=--=-=

.= . ::.o:::..-'

Floor area : · -~ n-a cres- · ' Nil

I

·

1

1or Fl oors

-

.

Nil

Nil

E

F

. -

-

G ./

H

1

Nt~-

_1.56

I

N11

_o~~_r_c::_~----·WAREHO!EES

_.

o.~~.iW- .:__

_:-_ _ __ _::___

Average N \or !loors

~-90

'Floor Area

-

1

l.oo I -

-

-_..02

&5

,

-:i.40_~~

__

tiNU

Jl~'!§-+

·IAverage No

~Ao!_2!F.A.

IPercentage

j ""••• N

o. 55 2.,6'0:

1___:_

1! -

.

3. 90. . 3. 30 •.

l . t..'O

I o.16

I

J 0. 4'0:; I

2.30

0.6~

I

~::_~1

NU

-

1 !1 i.oo

-

- -=o::..-:-=i=::...--·1

Nil __ _~1

!

7

8

Nt~--l~~~--- _1~11

1

OU'I'ER

NU _

I

'

'

! -

-

-

-

,

1 1 -

1-

1

FOR I =

iK

;

..:::..::....::...--7--=

p

I '

~----1 ~

-=-+:__- ._

ct

I. oo__

_e~ i ~,,,_ ,~-17_ -~

_!,_1-' !1... _1 o.70

I

!

I

I

• ~~ . J~_r:. '!':___ _ r

.-

t

!

""1--· ,

I

i

'!,<or< :.:12,00:_ [ .

2.1~7

,

.

,

,

I

i

~

;13.'!3 / 1.os___ !

Ii

,

17.<_,~:

j

"10

..2:1 .

'"'I_!-""''

1..os

;

~DO_ ~~ _l:•_~Jr~~- ~_".", . "'-~"'-'· ~"!"e9· ~

"-~-'~,,. j"'-6'. ! "'-"' __ L.ll7_J

.

'

l __.._.~ . _..,:o_.

1 _..,,.,

1~70._!)6_~133 ~2~_12'."' F rs2_77_I_,·"Lk~-,151l.l<l__j!·I ~·-"0--

i : I' I: .l ~·'>' '.15.""-'I ~"'.'~01% i s.~.r'.![20_._61%J2ll.G<li'.]_45.9f;j_'f'49.!W-~ 3.~i~42.0~;1~?EJI6.~24.36'J.; I 3l. 9CV L 27.~-~ l ~ 1 I

z.sa,;

I~

-~~"_:_

-f'~oo J 1.10 : ~~""-i-

l.(l_~-1-7.4~_,.7_, _ j "'-~§

1~6"'

o.,20';0

Nt~_J

.

;

.

,

'

I

.

I

I

I

I

.

;.

1

-~~~~~: wn~~-rr;~~~~I~;; i-;tl'--;~: j-iii~- ·:::j~~;- ~+-t: i~: i ~:- I ~: ;i.:::;l~:~ ;-~; !,:::;~ ~:~: :::~-:~~ i~~ I :~a-st: lrt:~~ :·?ercen~~~ ·- -··--r ·--- ___ _. _-· ---·-----r-----J- ·- t· ·-·t ··---~---· .:· -~1 -.:. ---i--·--·i-· ~+--··----1----t- --;------r-- l-----..·-.fl ·-- · -- ·

.

ACCOM!10DATION

,

.

!Average No~ 1 i or n oors g 1.l.04 ;

-

I

-

4.30

··-- ---

1

j ,

-

' ·- -- -__ _._ __,__ -----------.---L- .- ••- -·-----··-- . ---··-·

I

"1~~56'~JI -7.!ii.'.¥.l~~~-~~~..§·O?'i:E.§!3Z~_j~.~~k9.!.~. , zy.'E'.:i o.491~11s.995< j _ . -·-· . ! I 1

I

I

1

11

, .1. 30 ,ll.90 4. 40 I 4. 50 4.10 i 4.20 I 4.50 \1 ~ ----Kl. -- -·---...----..J... O---- ..... ---·---- - - -- - -- -11 r-<>

-

-- -- ------- - - ....

- ...

4.~5-~---ii 4. 23 : z.w i 4. 60 • 2.32 -l-----·.... J., ___ '

-

o

- ---- - ------- --

...._ -

-----

1

_

,

!

I 5.00 !2.'17

I ; l.95

;

!

. 1 4 19 JL 2._::jl_.~ 4. 6_

.....1--L - - _ _ __,__ -

AND A~

i

·1

1

~I

I

-u

-l-:-.1-- _-_ --=-·· f-:·--l-:....l1-:___ . ------ I1.-~!.2~• ~- - .~:g

_4.J21 l,<i 3.~o_.~lCl_

26 •

FOR

·===~==--=-t · ----- :--A~_ I 6

'

1. .

I 1.00

--1--=t=---

!

TOTAL

l .! . . I~ . I !· _J_l. 7<>: j'"-14l'1:1s.32f. I s.175'. [ l.6s-J_~,a;, 0.2:1'• 1_1.74"1.,~1.1.,,,!·- 5.02_'..:.il

~.

t

-r~~::o:~ ~~ !- 3.20_ _ ..~_Ts."' _s.oo ~-""" ~ _!Jn •ore..L o,:gi ,j 1<.2CJ__f I i.n

WAREHOUSES

_

l , ---·-

ij TOTAL

~.10 -=. ,1. 20. 4.0~_:_j_3.60 -~~4 ·: 3. 90 ! -~~2.80 I 4.15 3. 00 I 2·~076 f 2.9~+~~~~-3~- - , _ 3• 76 -,-· 1 • _ · i I I I!·12.•6 11:i.04 · . , ~ ~ 1 '·1 119'_<:"_ 3'7.E __ 7264 o. :ig . l_Nn _l 0.134 o. 77__L ''-.31_ '2 •_""__ o. oo J I < __, _ ! I I " I : r I "2.77': 9. 1$ "'"7$1_ 1.15" .. 10. "": I 3.72>' 12.22.; i !20.&!f, Ir1. l·""'' :_o. re; s.zr,_ : os,, -

1

_____ _

•I

1-~' ,,,,.,,_ 16. ~LI""'~T

I;_n_a_ore_s__ 3.30 Percentage

AND SHOPS

I

--p--f~~!1' 1---l ----!_' .'._'._E ~-__"._-'EA L :, INNER ! 2 I 3 : 4 I5

1 ~~~~~~--r:~1~

·

l.OO

..

K

:

!Ili~:- --- - ,~~~~r ~.~-T 1.._,,_--r~-~~ ~,. 73_ wrTH I-or T.!..!~· . ?:4.~ 0'.:.: . j.!-1.~_j !.?•rn.:_ '~ 9.~: :w.!..~7% io._?Ef- . § ·~.:.~~·9~~~--_ I I ' Percentage

I

'

! NU

0.11

1

I

IJ

--~--=- ~=~-- -=-::.~=,.r==~--~ 4 ~ i:i EA -1-.I

=-..;.:-=.

D v'

r~~.1\verege 'J'.~~~!'<~-No j___"':____ .1-- _:-___ _::_·---~-~lei~ Percentage

SHOPS

~

-------- ---·------- - -.,,.--- ---r,----.....-;:,· - ..

J\ R E A

IN !! ER

c

·- · - -- -·---- ·----- --·----··


---- -- - - - · - - -

,..

Tl Ol

1482

- -·- ··------ - ---- --··-·--- -- -·-

-----------··· - r - ···------ T- -----------IN -N-ER--A-REA USER

1-- -------t -a-· -1-·13··---~·-c-···- :- -o-·T-E--,- --F---!-·a ·~--i·"H-····-j·-- -j--·-;·K--;' 1

SECTICN -- - . -- -- -----~·1=-.. . ,._,_: . . .,,,-.:-.,.~: ·.~--=---

.;

.i

I

I__o_~..!~~~~~-:+~ Percentage t

V J;.6J

.1

I

i

L.

-

--- --- - --- - - - ----- --r---· - - - - --· ;I O UT E R A R E A ;, Total I! To 1-- i---1 2-~--;-·-;- ~-- -:- ;-; ·~---:·-,~·-;·--;- ~ t or !1 ror~ner

Total

--1ror

I Imer • Area

'

1

:;

I

. 1

,

!

'

,

.

1

'

1

. -=-~""-- ., _,+.=-..:.=-""·-'-t•-=---="·" '= 1-==~=----1--=---.::-r=~-,d-=- ·· .,_.,. ., --71~=.,..,_.,.,,._i==-==-~I=""'-''""·~ __,,__..,.._,_,ir·-= - -= :: ·:t-=·=·.-.J::o~, -=-=,,~:-:,_,,=-..:..--=y:c-:. -:.:. ..:.:.-...·-..·.--:-:. ·--~"

1

3. 7W: __

1

:

:

,. Out e-

l'A

..

'1and outer

=··:;..=·=!=-- ;:·--=--~- rea -=~~~--=-==-o:---=-,,.. :

!7~QO j. ~1-~--t..-~119_ .~.!.~-~--2~25 !,-~-gp l ~§§... _§?'!§?J l_s_.D_s__~l~?~ L~.!.~.~ Q-1§_ L7.92_ll:~9.9j__ o. ~1~.?-~f2~37_ lj __ ..'.!~.!~ -·· ~ ' I · I 'i . ' 1 • ~ , _., . 1 l

. --.. -·-- I i~~~~r!~_, .o~ ~L _9..!.~ ... 1·_ 4~..Sl'~ . .L~-~

OF~lt"'l:'C! !'

'

l

~-9~J -i- "'~~?'}:. [ l<:_-:?~J ·~l!7Z- !_0.5~ 0~~·2u~-f 10.~~ :1~~·_581-~ 1::~~~-~~ 7~7_6;:_ ~-2• 00'~~ _io.155~ __o·~: !lZ. ~~~ ~ ~~~-1.33'~~ .. L~~~9Z-l ~~'"_J ____~~~~ __ _ ·

"l

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r< ·

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1

o •

rl

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1 Average NO.i ' : . I . i ! : I ! r , tt ------- -- -- - _J_~!_~oors _J 4.4~ ~~-1-~-~-J_s. ~-~~~~~--l- 4·~-~~·-~_;_:~10 _L4~-~-l 3•2\?_L_4.l~_J J.l~-;~-~~1~. p~~-e~-i-!•3?__~~!.1~_j_-~20 -~--3.2?__;__1.9~- ~ -~~~1 ~11 .i -4.10 . ___ Fl oor Area ~ I i ! I ' · ! ! I -~· 1.1:_~- 3. cx1 •i__:·~~J~~~--J_l_?.-1~' ·! _in . ac~s. __ ~~~---1--Ni~--~--~ ~ N1l_ _t Ni~--'---' l l.~~~ Ni _l ~.11_·1 o. z.1 ~ _l _ Z.?~___j__?~~--~~O~l__ 1.57_+~-~~~~ 1 .. ; . i Per centago i f J ,.I .I . . ~: _, !i ,.. 4, •~ ._ . ~ 1f GARAGES I-~~ T· F~~~:.- 1 : _ _ J __:.... _:_ ;._~?E': ~_9_-9J5.> - _ ---t-o·~-~~- ~-~~J_ 1.zs~ ~ ~_:i~ 0 i: c. 4<o;= :-o!!...~S~~~i--z.1a-J 1 - _ _11.gz, ; s._~o-1 ~·39'A- l.~~-- -·-:l:.·~ ... 1 Avere.oe No,; f ·I ·. I ; I ! !! ! 1 • '1 I 1 _or g,:?_o~ __L.::____;__:-____ 1___:-_ _ _ _ _-___r-=-~-~g_;_!-..-90 -_:___ --~--1:!_~~_ 1._9·JJ_~.9~_L__l.!Q~J ..l!~- -~1..!20~- ..~~s __ :_~.67-_ - .. J . 1:!o~Z. ~1.00 • l . 3s :· 1. 26 ii i.36

'-+ I

-

I

1

------------l,. ;

"

' ~ l oor. al""...a. '~

T I

• '

I

-+------· :

I

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I

I

I

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I

.1

I

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• ..

I

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I

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1

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I1'

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+--=-

'

:,

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:

1

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..

"

·::-·-· -·--:r--.,

Un__ac~~ ~ c.~2 .,. ~1-~ . ·--! N~l___ -~ -~~-- .l .!-0? _: __3~~ -1-~~ .;. ~!11 . 1 .N~l --L~~-? _1-~~~J. . s_.~~-- ;~ -~·_07__;~-5~___'._l_o~~~ ;_2?~~ .j ~-~ l_:'.3~~~ ~-~~1- ! ~~J -~2~_._'".'.9 _t_131.31 i : I I i .! ! . ! :: , : l :i 1- or T._F. A. ~p.2?·~- ~- _- _ :. _-: ·I - . I. i?·~~-~~ l:f•... 2.'l·l[~ .. -: ..... L..-:. . __!_7. &-0] ~!~-~!: __2. ~2.J--?· 9~J _:1-0E;,;1 ~-~~'F , • :ri-6~!.'.~ ..!~ ~q;~§_s.rn:~;-~!~~- !.!.~!c~:...~~~-4~- )_ 15.6~ 1 i i : : i ' ' ; I ~ I _________ _ _~:. !.~?~~--i ~~c+ : . . _~--- - -· ---L s.~~-~-~-~~9..:__ :_ ____t_~---!- 3·~-3.~+ 3. oo -~-~~~--J._3.3'7 ti _2.!_~:-0~~-'. --~~?-L~~-- ; 2. 40__ ~:_z.05 ~~ j- z.oo___ .__ _ 1I ; I I ! TOTAL FLOOR AREAS ; i ; I I i ~ ' ' .. I ; I ·

INDUS'ffil AL

1

1 _

l Parcent3ge ~

1

I

t

Average No

I

1

1

I

1!

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I

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r

I

,

I

I

1

1

r: __ .::

r,

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I

j.

I

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i

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1

!

~'!'"") - -~. - J 9, 63 .. l°"' 62 " 23._56 - i"""'.'T"' 7<l _J _.:_£2.\'332''" --~~ 2ib00 ,_':'!.4J.-~·-~-+'":-~_}".".7<J ~16. 7<J. J"'•07 -L"" 09 ;_51. 56__5';•2'7--~~'."'. t9£.~-'L"4~22_Av_F::~~---~~~·- ~ -~O?~~---- -- -t~-~~-J_ ~~~~--- l-- ~~~- i-~-~? ~-s~l~~.9-~-~-~~ ~-~~-+ z.~--1-~~1-+~~-*-~-~ ~~-_i ~:~__ }__~~~9-1-~·5.? 1--~~-~-;-~-~?__j_~o~ ~ - ~-~~~-~--~2- ~ ---~~~ -­ ~~~-s_:m AREl\~_Li~~~re~)- ..r·7~~-:_3.05 12.so_-1.-:4.·70 ~ 10.20 !19. 30 :30.50 ~3.60 -+16. 54 !10. 00 :19.25 !~=·10 ii_~~:_;4z._cc 100.sc- !-3:_._su_ -~ 29•.~o :.:7.3-· ~-~~~-~- j _27· 5: rt~64--~I-· 624:~--FLOOR SPACE INDI(,'ES :: 1.613 : z.se ' 1. eo ; z.os ~ Z.2.4 ! l. 45 : Z.06 I Z. lG ! 1.27 l l.09 ' 1.79 :i J.,, 03 : 1.47 ' 1.52 '. 1.30 : o. 96 ' z.zo ~ o. ss : o. 65 i 0.10 ,: 1. 14 I! 1.35 . - - - - _! !n

:

. .,

I

.I

_'.;

- - "----.,=""-''-==--=-=----=:-··"·=-=:--..:-:.·,·""-;: .,- ··-~~--=·--.·c-. -.· o-::::~..:.-:-: :.-::~~=--:--""'=·c'.c..c~:±=-..=."----'-='··==-=·'·-·~=·-=,--,"'··.-·-- ··- ·--0-=:-~7~-:::·"'-·::c.::..::.:.~--:-·.,--"".::.-.:::...· -:-...• ··c:-:-...7.=::=.,,;i.•-.:-:.:·.··-:-:-:j'''-·'·-=·==--==="""-"':::::-.::::-::.-:....:-<=~::.-· ·-=r-=--=~~~~o-,-,.--f--.:-...:.=-::=.··-=--· .> ; -o ' -0

:~

..... i>< .o

,f

f9

... I

,o 0

1 ; ·:


TlOl

1483

CLAY \'OIKINGS Ii:T Undertaking

V. lliggins &: Son

Bcmru:ks -----

Site

Broughton St. Cheetbalu. Nor th St. Cheetham.

Charles to;.m Rd. S~..ackoJ.iffe

Moston Brick Co,

!'1ti!!CEES~R.

5 years

I ndustry

Approxi mately :reserves

2),94

Industr-,y

Reserves 'WOrked out. Works supp lied wi t.."1. clt'if f rom Shac101.iff Q Green. When the works o.rc demolished, tho clcy now underno.c th ".d ll givo further 5 years res erves t o Broughton St. Wor ks .

19. 44

School J?lcying Fi ol cls

Up to

C:roCG:'l.

15 years

reserves .

The Corporation under

a.greo1:iont to take over

__ _ ---·-·--· ·----- __ .--·-·--··--··-------------·-·------the s~-~-~-~~-~~;p u~._·--····· _ Lane, School Workod c.ut . Part of'

Lizy

.Hos to:&~

Pl8Y'ing

t ho workings o.djoinir.g

Fiolds

the works have been t i pped wi th shale but no pormission has been granted for t!~e re-use of this sh-3.10 •

Chw.·cl-"! Leno , Hosi;or..

21.50

Public Open

Space

-·-·-- ...·-- ------------- ·...·-- - --· Messrs. J & A. Jackson

'I'en Acros Lar..o , Newton

ITcat h

33.90

Public Open Gpa.co & Clevr Worki na

Up t o 40 years :reserves .

2'.). 45

Opim Spec-o or

If workill8 were co::-:.tinued,

I

I

I

t

I

II

I

Cooetc1·y Ed.

B:::adford.

I ndustr.r

I

Pi !'.l' !30.nk Lane ,

50

C-}:P •

~1-gb.t.

Tll~ fir~ is u.""ld.or agreement t o tip up worked out land.

t hor o are apprad;.mat el y

15 y ears

r eser ves (See para. (24.1).).

& SJ.cy Wor)d:;.,g

Up to 50 yee.rs ·r esorves . Leri.cl t ri.11 be tipped a.s i t is worked out. Up to

Op e::. S pc.co

Nel strop Rd.. Le'Ten.shulu.o .

6o.74

Cley-

Lo11f;for cl 11d.

17.Z/

Open Space

Chorlton.

J\pp!'oxi.rnately l4 yce:rs r eserves . .l\n adrj oi d.q; site has beon wo:::kod out e;ncl tipped.

Workir.g

50 yoors reser ves . k.nd will be tippocl a.s it i ::; worke d out.

Pre»i ous worki ngs now t ippoc., and the works

der eli ct.

The 'WOrks

could not func~ion a gei n ,.r.i.thout seri ous detriment t o amerJ.ty.


- - ---- --- -----

Tl Ol 1484

--- ~---- --- - -·--- .- ---- ----··

· \ Reference on Di agram No. 2. 1 1

R

d

oa

·--i

R ad Purpose of 0

I

i

i

Section

!

,

I

·

-

<;/~1---k:.maJ_ -;~~-c~c~ti;,~titd~--;,;,;: 0•

j ~istJ:.."1.g

C - B

l B ,

_ Road No. 2

,

1~

I

jci

line of Cheethrun Hi~l ~cad . _ . Existing l i ne of Car'porat1 0."l Street .

I

i __- .-__· -

I

-

1B 1 1

c

-

1

I

'

and High s~.;rect

800

i '. r'

RaCli<ll road connecti."1.g City Boundary Exist:L'1g l ine of Lightbtr.vne Chadderton t o - 4 Rorul ood Tharp Road Ma nchester via Ol dham •t Road

I

i

I 1404 max. !I

II

line of Shudehill

I

j

l

I Exisj;:!Jlp;

f'rom_ ______

- .

!development north of Manchester

i'

840

The: nsm road vlil+ by ... pass the 1shopping c entre L"1. Che-otnam Village

j

1 025

!

I I

1404

1

720

I

900

861

450

I.

720

951

520

-

II

1192

!

1

I

A

Remnrks

I ?1 JI'-7~)min-j !--~Incr;~;;-in fu~~-.;flow

I

!Radial r oad c om1ectL-rig ty Bmm dat'y j Exist:L"lg line cf Rochdale . Rochdale and i C Road l :Mi ddleton t o Mnnchester via Bl ackle1r ,C - B - 1 Existing line of Rochdale " II I' R00.d

I

Road No. 3

lli~ ·~)

Existing Mida.iot;;;,to Leice ster iRoad: !'Road ! . , : .._ . Lc1c esi:;er Rd. j ~ng~h of new Road between - C 11'f:!..daJ.eton RC?asl ~md Ch~ettiam , Ih l l Rend_,. Joi ning en sting l Cheetham rtill Road down to j Queen's Rood

liriddl eton to ' Manchester. via Cheetham Hill

.APPENDIX i 4.

DET.AILS OF -ULTIMATE RO.AD NETWORK. ---·-· Loads and Capacities are for Descri ption -one direction onl y • Present ,. Present ~stimatedj Traffi c Capacity 'Ultimate . ( Load (T . P. H.) ( Load l

-~

-

l

720 min. ! 1450 mnxo t._ !

813

480

720

I

550

280

624 min. ,-

480

i

!

, , -- ,

..

- - . --

.

I

I I

. I---

i."1. fut ure !~l'ow · f'r om devel opment n orth of Manchest er

! Incr ease

!Thi s r oad termino.tes at j junction on Oldhrun Road

I !

-I

'

I Ii I

a

'T'

'i ~

.~ ·~

(fl

l ~r

1;


TlOl

___14:_8_5-

j

Ref er ence on Diagram No. 2.

(l) '

I

l

Put-pose of Road

(2)

R~ad N;:--4--- --,I Radial;;~d

. : 1

Section

:

(3)

~ --

I.

I

,

(4)

l I-

'

l

700

1

650

C - Butler St.1Exi s t i ng line of Oldham Road I.f r om Queen 1 s Road t o Butler ; IStre et ·

j

j

1 1

j ·

(6)

lI

1496

j

14g)

I

,

I

(7}

j

1303

j

·

Remarks

y I!Ever B .

.i

l

~

!{"-

(s). ·_

-1c. - ~·:

1;

1

I

1422

I

i New r oad f r om Gt . in c oat s

1Street

I~e lo'

1040

:Butler St. - · lNew r oad fr om But l er Street · it o Gt . J;ncoat s Street 1B

917

to Da l e Stree t

: Exi s t i ng l ine of Ever y St . between Ashton Nevr Road and Gt. lnco~ts 1 Stree t I Radi al r ond c onnec t i ng I Ci ty Boundary ! Exis ting line of i;shton Old 1 lishtom t o Munches ter I - C Road i yia OP.:m shaw and I .iirdwick ,C - B j' Existing line of l.s hton Old j Road ? adi a.l r oad c onne cting ! Ci tv Boundary! Exis ting line of Hyde Road I. Hyde to Maru::hest er. : - D/25 I ! i D/23 - C Exi sti..'1.g l~e of Jtrde Road

l

(5)

of Oldhrun Road .

RD.di al r oad c onnec ting City Bound8ry j Exi s ting line of iJShton 1.shton t o Uanche s t er , - C jNew Road ... v i a Droylsden and . -. Cl~yt on C - Ever y St . 1Exi st in& linb of' Ashton , . I New Roaa .

l

R6ad No. 8

Des cription

Bound~y7:E;~ti~~-linc

tB - A

Road No. 7

I

:

: I

Road No. 6

1

!o>

~ -- ~

I

c onnecting-7ci ty Oldham t o Manchester - C

!

I

I

Loads and Capacities are far one direction only. - - --jPresent Pre sent !Estimated Traffic G~acity jUltimate ( LoD.d (. 1r. P. H. J 1 (Load Peak.. I Pe ek Hour} I Hour) Ii

I I

61 0

780

791

430

624

502

St . -

New Road will defle-o t traffi c fr om

I

the c onge s t ed 9hopping l engt h of . . Oldham Street ~ at pre s ent one way) j in t he Central i'i!'ea

j By- p as s

.kre a adjoining thi s l engt h has b een r edevel oped and l Dnd f or widening has been . r e served ·

269

470

I

663

536

470

I

663"

3 77

5 00

I

720

!

1000

920

I

720

i

1025

i

f or Ol dham Street

i n flow due t o IIrReduction edi s tribution of t r affi c

l

Short len~th of new r oad at Ci t y Botmdary o r emove dangerous bend. Roa d f uncti ons as ~t of Inter mediate Ring oad. at pre s ent over part of thi s section •


-- ----- ----- - ---

- -----

TlOl

1486-----;------------- - - -, on R~ f erenc~ D i agram o. 2• 1

o

II, .

Section

1

Radial r oad connecting . C - :;3 Hyde t o lfunch ~ ester B - 17/7

Ij 17/7 Road No. 9

I I I

· Descri ption

,

h

Loads and Capacities are f or one direction only. Pr-eser_it 1 Iresei;it ! Est~ma.ted Traffic 1 Ga~ci ty IUltimate Load {"\ .P.H.) ( l oad

I(

Pe~

Remarlr..s

Pe~

-l-i 3 ) ____ -+-. .:---:-~~-----·-- ____ti -~- - r-·.J~L-r ~c----f----·----(sJ_ ---------- . - '-·.- ~I I

--~ · _:__~~)___ ___ s

-·- -- <12.__ .R ad N0

Purpose of Road

-,

A

, Ex~ sti..'l'lg l J.ne of IflJde Road 1 !: Existing l ines of· Hyde Road, Ardwick Gr een South a'tld !Downi ng Street

.

j D/23

Cr0\•1croft Park Crov1croft Park - B

B - 8

1. )\ ol.

I

700

·

675

718

1000

i

900

1320

l 1

Stockp~t

:Exist'L'lg line of Stockport ;!{cad

I !

Bad b ottl eneck at present along"· · Downing Street. · ·

!

1 312

1215

II

I

1065

11 38

1The short l ength cf new r oad will

l

860

I

1040

1404

l

I ·

I

1'

1

.. ·'·,.: ·.

765

1

II

~..-.

· · .

Ne~r road will by- pi;i.ss t he·, Longsight

1265

shopping centre winch stretches ,...··: along Stockport Road between · Plym0uth ·Grove and Slade Iane

!'

.. ·:·<'.

. ,;

· 1

1

790 :.'

..

IrL'tl~oas~ in. futl)re f l ow due to edi stribut i on

1693

i

'

.

by- pass Levenshulme shopping centre · ..

I

l

1060

._

1 .

'I

i

l New_ r oad along l:ine of Hanu.lton R_qrui .between Crowcroft Rord and j Plymouth Grove; existing line of Stockport Road Ibetween. PlYIDOuth Grove nnd J;nner Ring Road... · lDevonshi:fe St.) Existing line of Stockport Road betvreen Inner. Ring Road and Hyde Road

I

j

jExisting line of London Road 1060 line c;:if : 1020 ,Road vn.:th sI?-~'t . lcmg i:;h 01 I' inew road ad.Jollll.ng D/23 . I

)3oundaryjExistil}~

adi al road connecting City !Stockport to 1'Uinchester - D/23

I

l

Stoc~or·t

Rorul farms 3 - way junction VJi t h Hyde Road at Ardwick Green

817

.[

; ··

'

~

~..,."

tj

~ I-'

If'-

• m ...... Ci)

c:;

c+ c,,


TlOl

JA8.z_____ ___

-------r

Loads and Oapaci ties are for 1 one direction 1 Prei:;~nt Present Estimated Traff'ic jO(apacit1 Ultimate Load ..V.P.H. } ( Lo ad ( Peak__ Peak I 1

I

Reference on Dia gram No.2.

I

Section

Pm-pose of Road

!Radial ro~d connectin~-.-1· c i t y : WilmslO\'r and t he sou tfi. - 14 to Manchester

:1 No. 10

'l Nmv bridge over Ri ver Merse y j con necting to Cheshire r oad

§Yste m; exi s t ing line of ' Ki ng sway

I

14 - D/23

' Existi ng line of Kingsway

I Hour}

}, - 17/7 17/ 7 - A

1

j

Road No. 11

I

I Existi ng

I

,.

780

1

I. I I

980

I

Radial r i;ad c onnecting Ci tz Boundary j New Road as diversi on of . Gatleyi. i';orthendo__r1 I - _6/ 8 I exis t i ng Styol Road fr om Ci ty ~ and _S • ..t!i. Wythen s h awe_ . Boundary . to . Civi<? Centre , t o 1·Janchester. It i Ron.d; exist~g line of Styal ;' cre ate s n. ne w s outhern Road from Civie Centre Rona l r ~~i al r ou t e i n t o t he ; to .Alt rincho.m Road; she.rt J Ci vy . I lengt h of new r oad as . I , diver sion of c~istin~ongley I . I 1 ; L~e ~om .Altrmchrun oad to 1 16/8 lSharst on By- pass

j

I

I

·I

1 860

(7)

I 1766 1

l; 1404

!I

I

,

I

1404

I

~ines of Birchfi el ds ! 8 90 Ron.d mid .tinson Road . I EJ..'i. sti ng line of Br ook Stree t 1 1090 ,-

Existing line of Princess Stre e t

Hour)

LJ_e)

.

!D/23 - 3

I

t---1?> I

,

I l

I

180 0

l

I 10 34

1145

i

900

849

2462

600

·

I i

j

! -

1 !

j

i

1 i

-

II I

;

I !

-

18

Remarks

! ~!~

.• ___ _ (a) ___ _ _--- - - --1 ~

! Tucre as~ in. fut ure fl ov1. due t o !r edistribu t i on of- traffic and n ew develoP-roent in Nor t h i Che shire . Wi ll by~filss bad I bottl en eck in Che e• _

I~ 1_c-11H'

••

I, aOneway system t o form r ow:id-ab o'l;lt ~ t j unction of King sway, Birchfi & ..... s

I

Road and :Mosel ey Road.

i

!

I~

I

I

Descr i p tion

(4)

(3)

(2)

(1)

I

i~

This r o ad ha s Ipenk hour's .

-

n. 4 to 1 f l ow at

P;:irt of t hi s section i s one-way a t pres~nt

1 -only I

.

'

I One- way only _exit f r om Ci -ty ataffi

-

I pl,"e sent . Reaist r i b ution <,?f tr 0 1·will ~nab le t»ro-way vrorld.ng to be _brougn t back. . Thi s .se ction i i:; partl y in 9heshirc ... nnd skirts t he e astern perimeter cI , Wythen shn.we . · It pl,"OVi des access i fr om north nnd south t o ~he Wythen shavrc s.E. Tudustrial lrrea .

!

I

I

j

!

·


r-

I~s

·--- - ·-Re :fere nce on Di agram No. 2.

'

Ii I

·-·- - - - - - i - - - - - - - r-- - - - - - - - i · r - - - - - - - - - - ; - -- - - - - - - - Se ction

Purpose of Road

il;~(~~.-11--~-----JL______

I.

I

Remarks

.I,

I

continued

Description

Loads and Capacities are for one direction only. Present I Pre sent Esti mated Traf:fic l Gn~ac~ty Ult imate (~~ \V: P.• H.J I (~~ Hour} . I Hour} 6

_..;..__ ( 3) _____ 16/8 - D/11

.

J_. _______._\4~- ·~--- -·-- -··Nmv r oo..d as di ver s i on to

existing Longley LDne· l ine of existing Longiey Lane i'rom r ail way bri dge to ShDr st an Road; new road mid bri d ge across R. 1brs~y f r om Sharston Rorui to Palatine Road.

,__\~~-+- ~--t ~o---1 I

I: 410

14 - D/23

Existing line of Palatine Road; short length of nevr rorul; existing line of Yev1 Tree Road from Withington Villnge to Wi lbraham Road

410

I I

Thi ;len-;;th(

I Northenden

:~ r9~

;J;- passes

md will· ·t~ e traffi c 1whi ch now passes through the j shopping centre.

·1 I

I

Exi sting line of Pala.tine Road

,

!I

!

D/ll - 14

D/23 - B

i

®O 663

I 'I I I

768 907

, Thi s sccfi on wi ll f orm an

I alternative route to the Ci ty t o I Wi lmslow Road, and will by- pc.ss ! Withington shopping centre . I

977

.E xi.stmg li.11e of Yew_ Tree Road; new road fl•om Yew Tree Road to Inner :r?.ing Road.

iI

.

I

Thi s section wi ll :form by- pass to Hospit al Ilrecinct. ..

I

B - l7/7

Existing line of Cambridge Street

435

I

624

17/7 - A

Existing line of Ca.ml:xr:-idgo Street

435

I

624

l I

777

Thi s section will f orin n .by-pas~ to t he University precinct.

t

577

Short of new r ou.d a s new, approach t o City Centre Road ·. 8 ~

I

Ii I

len~th

I-'

. If>.

Cf.)

g (!)

c+

.

tJ1


TlOl __l:~_ 9 -

.- - - - ---··- · -

Reference on Diagram No. 2

_

(1)

Road No. 12

I

-+l

Purpose of Road

i j

Section

De scription

Ii

(2)

!

(3)

(4)

IRadinl r oute connect- , City Boundary Nev.r road for which land i s ing Yfythenshawe to - 16/8 reserved from City Boundary llbnchester; \'Then ex- 1 ·t o .Altrinchrun Road. tended bcy'oncl the City Baupdar.'f t.o 'i'fot ling I Street 1..A. 5GJ will 1 form n ew r oute into t he City f rom the south. Exis ting line of !Tincess 16/8 - D/11 Pnrkway D/11 - 14

j Exi~ting

14 - D/23

I

D/23 - B

B - 17/7

17/ 7 - A

Loads and Capacitie s are for one direction only. Present Present Estimated Traffic QapQ,cit;y Ultimate Load lV.P.H.J Load

(

Tu~ Hour)

I

(5)

I

(6)

-

l

-

7~0

(s)

(7) 1420

future flow made u_p of traffic diverted from A 56 and tro.ffic from North Cheshire with increzrent f or future new deve lopment in this area.

. I

~ • c::i

. ::;,·

\~

1; I

Increase in future flow due.. to incre ased t hro1!,gh traffic and comple tion of wythenshawe

2250

1496

e

t;:1

~~) Hour

I

~,__,

develop~nt.

line of Princess

740

~xist ing line of Princess Road Existinb line of B.~ ince ss Rand; existing line of Br aysha:.v Street Ne'.v road from Br ayshaw Street to :Madlock street

840

Rona.

Remarks

Exis ting lines of· Medlock Street and Albion Street

650

I ''

1496

1 953

i

1496

1427

I

I

720 mi.11.

i I

11 20

I I

1~20

1015

I

The existing r ou te t errollio.tes at Breyshavr Street, a.."1.d the c onnections from here to the City Centre xcc poor.

I


Tl Ol

1490 ,

Purpose of Rood

Rof er ence on Di agram No. 2.

Rood No. 13

.. .

Se~tion

I

(2)

I .

Rn.dio.1 route conhect- jCity Bmmdary ing South Chorlton t o . - 14 Mnnchester; when extended b cypncl t he City Boundory to Sale 14 - D/23 and Br ook:lnnas will farm a .n e\7 r oute into the City from the se are as, thus helpi ng to :i;-elieve A56 .

I

B - 17/ 7

Loads anc;l Cap~cit ies nre f ar one direction on • Present P.r:esent ' Estimated Traffic IG@acity j Ulti mate (Load ( V.P. H.J I Load Peak_. (Peak_

. .

Desar:-ipt1on

.

.

1

' - --+---: ·_(3)__ ____ + _ -

D/23 - B

\

.

· 1·

I

Road No. 14

II .

(1)

- -- ---·

I· I

-, . ___

Hour)

(Q__-~. - - --

(5)

I New ori dge over Mersey ond

-

j Existing ·

line of 1huldeth

I to

Wi t hing ton Road; cxist:i.!1g i lino of Withington Ro.:td . f'rom !fauldeth Road t o 1Wilbr .cllam Rand. Existing line of Wi thington Rood with sl1ort length of - new r oad as new approach 1 to Inner Ring Roa.a.

,.

260

I

I I

I_f!)_

Hour}

(6) .

, new roQ.d connecting t o i exi sting Hnrdy Lane . 1. Ron.d fr om Bro:-low Moor Road

.

663 min.

1

!' · I

700

I.

1

I

I 944

650

road to Chester Rood/Dawson Street

.I

Partl y a r n.dio.l r oute I 10 - 11 c onnecting Chorlt on i t o 1lmchester; and , portJ.y n. link r out e I 11 - 12 connecting Chorlton t o Di dsbury nnd di stributing traffic .i n South Mznche.s ter. 112 - 13

II

13 - D/23

Existing lines of School Lnne , Ifurdmru.1 Street and Barlow· 1Ioor Road. Existing line of Bnrlow :Moor Road betvreen Palatine Rorul and Princess Road. Existing line of Barlow Moor Road betv1een Princes s Road nnd Mauldeth Road. Exi sting lino of BtirlOW' Moor Road between Mauldeth Road and Wilbraham Road.

I

I.

!Il1!1.

Existing line of Chorlton

f'r~ro

fl ow B;ooklnnds a.11d adjoining . .:rreas . :· ·.

1

(-?=20)

Rand; new r c"1d f'rom Stretford

Fut~e

505

I 663

:.- (8) .

Il

: 1

3 70

·Remarks

380

663

393

380

663

481

600

663

824

l

The terminal point of this r orul forms a five- wn,y; junction with Roads 16 end 11/7• .Acce ss to the Qi ty Centre i~ via Road 16 lCb.E:ste-r RoaclJ .

: In_;olves the -widening· of School . · j~

I Lai1e Railway Bridge .

E.~., ·· ~ I-' ,p.

CJ.l

660

663

1000

gc

1;


TlOl

---r

~491

1

R ~f erence on

Din.gram No.

21I

Put-pose of Road

. _ __{1L _______ ,__ Road No. 14 cont:inusd

Road No. 16

I

fil_

1. .

:Radial route connecting Chester, Al..trincham and Sale to :Manchester.

. . Section . (0)

D/23 - B ··

j'

. . Description (4)

·

.

Existing lines of Bc'.lI'low Moor Rooo, and Upper Charlton Road. ·

City Boundary!Existing line of Chester Road. l 'T - · 7 Existi.."lg lines of Chester 17/7 - A Road and Castl efield Viaduct .

Loads and Capacities are ·far one direction only. Present · Present Estimo.ted Traffic q~_pacity Ulti.Ir.n.te (Load (Y;P.H.J ( Load .

t~ (5)

I

550

Tu~~

(6)

(7)

663

600

·

740

740

1346

780

765

14 98

Road No. 19

Radial route c onnect- j City Boundary, Exis ting lines of Bu:cy- New Road and Ducie Street. ing Bury to Manchester - B 1 · · via J?.r:estvr.i.ch. 1

630

624

City Centre Road.

Ring road circiini;, 2 - 8 the central are a . It will assist the circulation of traffic in the centre and in I 8 - ll adjoining are as , and will ~ovide a convenient "by- pass for through tr a.ffio, thus hel ping t o r eli eve conge stion.

Exis ting lines of Cannon, Church and Dale Streets.

500

780 . I ll43

Existing lines of Partlnnd Street and Chepstow Street; shar-t l ength of new road j_oining Ch~pstow Street and Whitrrorth Sb:'eet West.

860

1 540

I 1143

Ex:isting lines of Whitworth Street West. Existing, line of De ansgate between .'m i tworth Street West and Li verpool Roadi new r oad frQm Deansgate to 1'<ew Bailey st. along line of Lower B:yrom Street.

870

1540

616

I

11 - 16 16 - New

~~~~l)St.

I

304

915

I~ ,_:.; Remorks

t~? 'Z

8

tl

~ '

I

f-' ,..:~

Cs)

·

This seetion contains a weak railway bridge whiclf n.lso forms a bot tleneck. Section . terminat~ in f ive-way juncti on with :aoads 15 and B. 1\ccess to City Centre i s via Road 13 or Road B.

('~

•·

('

0

c~

,0)

Reduced flow in future due to r edist ribution of traffic . The provision of thi s length at adequ ate standard will relieve c ongestion in Market Street. '.Lhe l en gt h of new road includes n. new 1:ridge over t he Rochdale Canal · in conj't.Lnction vtith the improvem:i~ts to the ~orthern end of CaniOridge St r ett lRoad 11) , this cre ates a new point of access to the Central Area from tlow -south. _This sect i on together with the , ' following one forms a r e lief rond far DeDnsgate.

-<


--- -

-

-- -

--

-

-

- ---

'£101 1492

M•r·--·-·----------:-·------·- - - - - . 1

T'"I

I

!

St. - 2

Roaa. continued Rin.g road to dist ribute traffic between inner ooJillll3rcial and r e s i dential area3 and to give i1~ov0d access fr om these areas to Salford in the north, and Stretford a"YJ.d Trafford Park in t he south-west.

Inner Ring Road B.

1 - 6

6 - 8

I s- 13 I

Int errrec1iate Ring Road

o.

jR. Irwell existing line of 1cateaton St.

City Boundary Nevr r oad bet vre<;in R. Irwell -·l and _Cl:1..eethrun Hill Road.

I Ring r on.d to distribute trcffic b e t we en the northern and c astern ·. interrnedia te areas which includes much of the city ~ s ll:1dustryt and to give improved. 1 acC0$S fr om t .h ese . areas to Salford in the north-west~ and Stockport in tne south- east.

(4)

I

I EXis ting lines of Chee tham !Hill Roful, Miller Street, Swan Street and Grc a.t .Ancoats Street.

l(

1 -r---_:--,- 1-- I

~l- --- --·--·l---J.?J.---~-··- Ne~ Baile;-T~ew Road ~m;ig ~ine r::f Ci ty Centre ·( 3)

Hour}

l

(5)

1

-

;

Hour)

J,020 . (.mnx.)

l

I

j!

I

1 - 4

. ) road to form app:-oach lnew to the I ntermediate Ring Rorul - Rochdale Road junction. n~w

.,

728

I

14~ (Max~) J,154

450\1'tiii.J

. !

l ·

\:nuuc. )

' ! 118 7

j

I

New road fr om Hyde Road t o Withingt on Road with the exception of n short l engt h along . the line of M:oss L~ne · West. . ..

1

I

I

,

-the d1 . • -. ____ . R. Tr1nell; half wid'.Ch .of the nevr r orul )-v ill be · _in Salfar.c;l. ·_ .

~ides

a clearly defined-r .oute into Salford.

ru~d the Inner Ring Road j_oi n ~tween Corpar at~on ~treet m;id I fuw Bridge Stree t, t14s l eng th peing I along b:ndge a.cross Vi ctori a ! Stati on . · . !' Thi s secti on inc iuaes a dif'ficult · j b.ric1ge wi dening on PL.Tl ·Mi.1.1 Brow. 1 Road 2 1

1034

1 This length provi des ·a j:n:'operly'

.defined· route through tI1is pm-t of · traffi c from Stretfard Road . The r~n1te ·-vril:i:_--._ continue - iiito Stretfor.c1.

I

1 the city; it will relieve some

1

'

'

I 624

· (s)

i

! :1-70

:

In~ol~es

732

J

-

1

Existinc:r line s of · Pin lJ:i.11 Br ow and Chnncery Lane; new r oad fr om ·chn.ncery L rine t o Hyde Road. . . ·

I IRoad, Existine line of Queen s wi th length of

1

I

Remarks

j

(7)

(6)

City Bm.mdro:.-y l Nevr l'.-oi:i.d fr om Salfqr-¢1 . . ·. boundary to Cheethrun Hill - ·· l RoaP,~ partly along the line of ~~izabeth Street.

·

l

JEst~mated

Description

Section

Purpose of Road

Refer ence on Dia.gr-am No. 2.

-r -

Load and Cai:iacit ies are for one directi on o~--Prese!J.'t ! Pl:esei::t · Traffic I G..~pacity !Ultimate i Load ~ \ v·.p. H. J Loud I ( Pe ale.. ' Peak..

. ·j ~ffi

584

I 920

· . The ~ esent junction of Road C with Road 2 has poor line and level and vd,11...be by- passed. The by- pass" will also avoid the Col l yhurst shopping centre.

I,t...

18 ~ H

I

l~ 1 ::;'

'(T.•

I( I,,._

t

~

' . ,.


TlOl

1493

I Loads

Reference on Diagr;-run No. 2.

Purpose of Road 1·

II

•'

. _(}:i _____ intermedi a.te Road C

R.

·c~:inood~

L_._ _j_2_L_

Description

Section t

I

t

I

I- · ill _J_

'

I

I

.

.

4 - 8

(4)

and Capacities-~e i~ ...£~- d:br'e~tion ~~·------ j nt i Present 'Estimated l fie G~..P~Oi ty Ultimate ad t v• J.: • H. J ( Load . (Pe Pe

~

j Ho~

I

I

l j

620

, I

I

I -

-

i

Ring road by- pas sing Mnnche ster on the north and east s i de; this road c onnects t he fringe tm<ms on these(side s of the t own ;:)tookport, .bshton OlcThnm, Radcl itfe1 e tc.) a..YJ.d vri.11 keep r e gional inter-town traffi c out of the city.

2 - 23

! lvfai..'1ly new r on.d fr om I Middlet on Road at ·t he

. City Boundcry, j oining the existing Vic toria Avenue En.st j ust i east of Rochdole Road.

I•

I

250

1

1

!I

I i

I•

l

.

·

··

·

_ ·

.

·

I

I

8 23

j'

1496

I

.

~-, .

-1-'

,f§

This section contains a nunib':lr o:i.~ · railway and canal bridge s which c twill re quire widening. The nevr ·I-' j r oad south of Pottery ~ene . ~) . provides a cl e arly defined · l route t o the s out h D!ld willR d j r e lieve cong~stion . on: Hyde on • -· The Intermedi at e Ring Road serve .., o.s a by-pass t o the Central Are a far north b ound tr¢'fic along . Stoc~ort Road. (A6) t and. by having I tha Road C-A6 · Junction so . f ~ ·f f south, ~uch trDf'fic is ,taken to . the radiol r oad· soon after . en eri n g

·

I

I.

I

' t;.!'

,

1

·

'I

1 360

1

1

I.

I I

I

1

-

I

Outer Rir1g Road ·D.

6 24

j

I

I

Ho~

.I

~~--~-~---U2--.-k-------(~---------------·-·-·-

Existing line of Hulme Hall Lane,.t new road along the line__ l of h ill St . ·, bvti;reen ~lllme .HaJJJ LOJ?-e ?'1Ci k?n.ton Old Road; ' exis t ing line of Pottery Lane, new road f rom Pottery fame to : Hyde Ro~d. New Roau. from Hyde Road to North Road; existing line I of North Road with short . l ength of n ew ro~d t o give l, adeq_uate connection to I Sto6kpart Road.

I

8 - 9

1

1

I

·. r

I

!

Remarks ·

~00~

707

. ' ' The new ron.d will pass

to thed n orth of existing and ·p ropose 1 deve l oprrent «ma thus keep t lyouf'.> 1 trnffic out of the r esidential: M e as. By providing _tJ:i.is Vn~wt . ,, r oud. ins t e aa of retaim.ng i c ar J -· Avenue a -better conne cti on -tR t~e proponcd East-Wc9t Nationol ou c i s obtained.

I

I

I

r

I The r e sponsibility for this road r ests pr:-irnarily with t h0

Only very short l engths of this Road fall within the l'vbnchester boundaries. adjoining c ounty author iti es. ,

I!

I I

I

I


TlOl 1494 ·---·*

Reference on Di agram No.2.

__, __(!}___ Road 17/7

, .. .

I

J ·

Ptlrpose of Road

Description

Section

I

. (3) -

~Link road connecting 17 (City Boundary) Ashton Old Road to 16 Regent Roc.d. It distributes traffic south of the Centrol kren -in the r egion bet-ween the City !16 - 12 Oentre Road and the ·Inner Ring R.oad.1 -- and also acts as a bypass for east-west .. traffic -whi ch might I 12 - 8 otharvrise traverse the city centre. _8 - 7 17/7 will relieve congestion . ill

_· _Jg)

Loads and Capa.cities are f or .>.r I one direction only. ___J P.r'esent J fresent ·Estimated Traffic G~acit;y Ultimate Load l' .P.H.) (Load · Peak.. ( Peak. . I Hour} ! Hour}

__ c.1)__

I

_

l

!

1

__i_J9L ___,~6) !

Eicis.ting line of' E~lesmere . 4-00 Street and Dawson Stt-eet, vn ·t;h j . short l ength of new road nt : eastern end ·to form new . · l approach to five ·.w.y junction.

(7)

702

ll30

Il Extensi on

I i

. f'rom Princess

Road .t o L0..'19-on Road.·

I

I

I

! New Road fr om London Road to

II

.Ashton Old Road.

ond Stre tf ard Rc;>ad.

Road 9/D/23

Link r oru:l connecting . Kil)gsvmy (D/23)

l _to

StockOart

-1Road, ·giving p. convenient c onnection be.;tween Route 10 md the eastern inner· areas of the city. Road :D/23

250

Existing line of Sln.d.e Lane between Kingsway and the proposed cliversion of ' Stockport Road.

D/23 - 9

Link road connecting City Boundarvl Existing line·s of Edge Lnn.e - 12 I and Wilbrcii.cm Road. Stretfard and . Chorlton to Burn~ge , 10 12 Existing lines of Wilbraham i.e. running east.:. .R oad and 1vbseley _Road. v.rest on its southern len~h; and connect8 Existing line of Kingsway ing ·.ournage and I lQ f'rom Moseley Road to Slade South Manchester t o Lane; new r o.:ld from Slade Gorton, Clayton ro1d Lrui.e t o Hyde Roaa.Fnilswarth,

872

This road act~ as bmmdary betvreen residentinl areas ond inner c ommeroi al md industrial

Iare as.

4.-67

I I

I

I -.

'. ~

I

1;

I

I§?

I

I I-'

II . ,. ·..

l I

(8)

I

..

320

702

350

740

.1)91

:- . 325

·74-0

I _557

v

1

- -- -- -

I

1032

! I

I

Whitworth Street

I

I

·

~w r oad from Chester Road to frincess .Road Extensi~.

INevi road

Remarks

1

-1 I

-

' 104q

s

l ~1-

I-'


TlOl

_1422_ ____ _ -----~-Reference on · Diagr-am No. 2.

___Jll_ _ Road 10/23 continued

----- --- - ---·---- - --·j

·'

} ·· Section

Pur-po.se ·of Road

·•

(2)

Description

. j-' . .I I

.

1 (3) ---1-- ---

i. e. running north..:. south along its eastern length. The eastern l ength provides a ring· · road between the · Intermediate and Outer Ring _Roads. Soln3 of this length falls outside the city boi.mdary.

1

Link road connecting Altrincham to

Exis ting line s of Water Stree t :.:md Liverpool Road.

City B9i.md~y :Exis t ing line of .Altrincham ..:. 12 ~Wes tt j Ro~ from City Boi.mda.ry t o j .. iPrince s s Park'n ay. 12 - City

[ Exi s t ing line of Altrinchrun (East . Road from Prince ss · Pm-kway o Sharston Road; funew r oad. _ Shars t on By-pass f'rom h ars t o!). Road to ·ty Boundm:-y. Ci tY Boundary j New road f orm:ing northern - 12 boundary to Northern Moor Ne i ghbout:'hood, be tween Cit y Boundary 1Parkway. to Princess

1Boundary

Link r oa.Cj. connecting

Roa~ll lPalatine

J_ (5)

.

-~>

New r oad f'rom Hyde Road to Oldham Road.

I~

If;;; I~

! Ho~

J i ~~Lii 1

(s)

-

------

----1:0

This l engt h necessitates crossing__t he Medlock at Clayton-Vale.

583

J

,

I

16/8

D/11

_-d

I~

Remarks

II

Link r oad. conne cting J 17 (City) Regent Road~ Salford Boundary to the City uentre 1A Ro ad~ .

Stock!>art vi a

(4)

-

j;;-

I

Ho~

j8 - 4

17/A

Wythenpha•~·

Loads and Capa.cities are for one direction onlv. Present i Present j Estimated Traffic c(~paci t;y U1timate (~ad V:·P .H.J 1 (~oad

Road ·just north of Nort lenden t o the Outer Ring Road in Sale, west of the ci t;y; f CEms a northern! 12 - 11 gy-pass far I Yfytflenshawe a.'1d . ~ ovides a n ew r oute via the Outer Ring Road t o Traffaz:d. Park and the West.

270

624

460

360

450

536

300

1496

6 30

l

I

New road f onning northern boi.mdwy t o Northenden f:c o m Princess Road and ' Palatine Road.

'

By- pass t o congested built-up areas in Cheadle and Gatley.

·- I 659

360 .

If c;

1 ct-

1~


TlOl

1496 .

Reference on Diagram No.2.

Purpose of Road

(1) · - r (2) ·- - - -~ll- - (3) . _.. Ri::ulinl ad connectin Civic Brownley Road Ro:::l.Cl 11 {Longley LDneY Cen tre Road to the Wyj;hcnshaw.e Civic Cen tre. ~-- -----

Hollyhedge Road

Link r oad providing ca.st- west c onnection between the

Wythenshawe nei gh-

Descript i on

Section

i~------· -- (4) 1Existin length of Sharston 1Roa d be~woen Longley Lane

I ond r ai l way

bridge. New . r oad j oini ng Sharston Road ' to Br ownley Road. Existing Brovmley Roa.a.. ~

11 - 12

Existing Hollyhedge Road.

12 - Western Road

New road.

. I

T

Loads and Capacities are for one dire ction only. Present 'I Present Estimated Traffic G@acit;y Ultimate Load I ('T.P.H.J ( Load ( Pe~. 1 Peak_, Hour} l Hour)

IL (5)

r -

I~

1

I ! I

1 (~) _ _ J~(7)~~~

-

I

Remarks

(8)

I

iI

I j

b ourhoods.

Civic Centre Rqad

Link r oo.d c onnecting Wythensh...'1.we Ci vie Centre t o Roods 11 and 12.

11 - 1 2

1Jainly new rorul.

Poundswick

Link r oad connecting Br ovml cv Road-Civic Centre Roa.dl mid forming norvh-wes t b oundm-y to Wythenshawe Civic Centre.

Br ownley Road Civic Centre Road.

New r oad and impi;:-ovement to existing Poundswick

Connection from Altrinchom Road t o vre stern Wvthenshn.we and t he \fest.

16/8 - Ci ty b oundary

Lnne

Wes tern Road

Lru1e.

~

~ ~

8 New r oad.

~

1-.J

•I :.

(t)

::;"'

c(.;

c-:-

I- ' \'

I'


., TlOl

.k

1497

DETAILS .

'

--

-

~---

Civic Centr e Wythenshuwe

Ro ~d,

:: r:

DESCRIPTION OF WORK

SBCTION IN VIHICH \ilORK IS I NCLUDED (Dfog rrun No .2)

ROAD

OF 20 YEAR PROGRAfilME FIRST FIVE YEARS.

-~~lP~~ .J5-

: :

Estima t ed Resi dual Life in 1950 j 1 Under i 5-iO- 10:15 , 15=2"0-,-o\rer___

Road 11 - Road 12 to Stya l Rocd

Roo.d 12 - to Ror.d

New Roa d

.

j

~~'est ernl

-

-

j -

-

City Bounda ry Road 1 6/s

17 /7 -

Road 12

Road

Road 12

Road B - Roud A.

City Centro Roa d J~ '.

Road A.

Road 10 - l<oad 11

I -

I-

I!

1

Nen r oad. One-quarter mile south of Hollyhcdge Roa.d t o Al t rinchcrn Rottd

I

Widening Albi on Strc;ct

.' -

Ne\. ro~d

from BrDf shQ1. Street t o Duko Stroot ono-'17o.y system Duk e Stroot to Albion St reet

i Ono-vo.y

. ,

I

I -

I

I

I: 36

1 !

Il

system l Stroot, Bridgo\~·c..tcr' c1i.rried forw.".'.r d

I -

1·· -

j

!j

I

-

I

i_ ___ 4 : 36 l 6o

-------------~----- -------.--·-----~-~-----·-·""---

--

~~

--·---·--

- I i I ! I

Woodhouse Pa r k Nei ghbour hood . Provides east - we::;t ncc ess to Wythenshawc Ci vic Centre

1

-

l ·-

1I

-

-

I

-

1

-

i

l

.

I- -

_

East-west accoss for the new B:tgulcy Hal 1 a nd lTc•:all Green Noighbourhood

'1

••

II

j Chc..--pstm;iStrcot

60

I

FOR THE PIDPOSAL.

j !forthorn boundar y and by- pass fo r

,

I- - -

l'TcTI Roa.d

I

V!cstern Roo.d

RE.i~SONS

--------·---~ ·5 ye~~s :': , years~ years,_ 1

Hollyhodg e Road

---1

~ FSIDENTIAL P.OOPERTIES AFFECTED ------·~-- ·------1

I

l -

j

l ·---+-·-- -}-- ------~

-- .:.;_____- ----··;

Conn ection tc :\ltrincham Read .llld '7cst from \lythcnshewc Removes one of tho City 1 s nor st bott lenecks . \7ill g i Yo dil·oct connecti on to Ci ty from i·iythc nshLmo

·>< f-.J ,\JI

~

Us e of e x i sting streets in onorray system to remove bottlen eck .

! · ·------·-- · ----····--'·-- ---

1.

~

'~

•H

I <D

• (!)

i

c+

:.....

- ·-----·-··--------


TlOl

--

J.198 --·~---------~-

- ·-··

I

! SECTIOb

ro,;n

IN WHICH ! womc IS INCLUDED {Dingram ~o.2') . ..

DFSCRIPI'ION OF WORK

I

I

-lloud 12

..

;

Tio~d

llond

16/s

Lpproc chos to junction of noa d A <.'.Ild :Uoo.d 11

l

Road 10 - Tio<:td 11

'

I

I to Nol. '1'1r?t~~, Chepstm:- s.~rcct \mit-.. orth Street .. est,

I

i1~.~luding a n o" co.~rcl bridge

n u.. ro r,d ;:i.s c;xtcn sion t o Cc.i..1bridgc Strc.et. i".'idcning of School L:n c Bridt:o a nd C'.pproc.ch

Roa d 8 - Tioo.d

i~ond

11

Civic Centre Ro['.d City Boun do.r y

Ne\." r o r.d o.s di v o1·sion of oxisti ne Sty~l Ro~d

Ro~ tl

\"lidm ing Upp or Br ook Stroot froc Grosv enor Street t o Plymouth Grove

17/7 -

:ili)['.d B

Norr road from. London Ron.c1 to Che s t e r Ror.cd

Totnls: Houses nffected in first f ive yeaxs

·-

, (J, .;

- . -··-

~ h' • (1 ...

:('. 1-; : c.+ :

~~ ·

t:;

,{\) H

•• · :><'

·--·--

----·...... -·-

....

I-'

.....

v.

1 Connection f r om '.'lythc n sha\."C Civic Centre c.n d adj oini ng dcvoloprnont to Centre; of ~~'Ulc h o s t or.

I

I !

En..'1bl c ·:;hit1·:or th Stroot l:Jost to b e brought into uso c,s· tho sol,lthor n l ongt!:.. of tho City Centro I?oud, nnd p rovidus 0.11 c..ddi t i onnl southorn r n di f\l connoctien to the City Centr e .

;j 1

!'

Tho t.:il..dcning of this bridge U Q.S in h a nd o.t the outbr cc.k of -rrr r. It ui.11 r emedy n do.ngcr ous bottl cn ocl: n.nd g i ve i mp r oved o.cccss frou Bc.rl m-:- Hoar Rd t o Kings\7r'.Y. This link r o ::.d ':'i 11 r elieve 1;.'hi t 't"'orth · Stroot c..nd St r etf ord Ror-.d o.nd divert tro.ffic f r or.1 th..:: City Centro.

I

17/7

16

60

36

·-

REASONS FOR THE PROWSAL

>H'.stimot cd Rosidua.l Life in 19.50 1.LO-l) 1 1.5-~Cfl~ ·aver ' .5 yca rr.; lycnrs II yours 1I 20 yours

I brought f orwnr d I Nu~ road; provision of one f I ci:-.rri<i.gc;rrny on ly

Rond

Road 10

-

......~~~-~~~~~~-+~~~-

j

r.:o:.d 14

PROFERrn:s .i.FF.EDT~ -

~+-~~~~~

: Civic Centro Ro::-.d

lice.cl 11 City Contra

.RESIBmLJL

I 112

5

1

Acces s to n ow i ndustr ic.l <tr cn

I

2

II I

I

11

I

This schcnc Ti 11 rc..lia;u conge stion on . ~ l in.portnnt r n di a l r ond

1

I

. I I i 5o T-:;6 l -... J. I

I 2

I

i

1------I

1

.


TlOl

1499

PJ:TAILS OF 20 YEAR PIDG~ FINAL FIFTEEN YEARS RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES AFFECTED ! -- -:-,· -- -- ------ - - --··--- ·--~·-·-- ---· · I Estimated Residual Life i~ . 12..LQ Under 1 5-10 . 1 0-1 5 115-20 Over I 5 y e ars j years 1 yea r s yeors 1 20 years

I

I· SECTION

:OO IJ)

I N V.'HICH WRK IS INCLUDED (Diag ram No.2)

t.

,.,..,.

. I Inner Ring Road Bl Ro ud 2 - Road

Widening Hu:i.me l!ull ·Lan e One-wa y system using .Mill Street Eil?!ld Gr ey Marc wne ':'li.th short l ength of conn ecting . rot~d; Wi..dehing ' Pottery·· L<-tne.

Widening Miller Street, n nrrow nortions of Greci.t J.ncoats~ Street and diversi on and m a ening -of Pin 1Cill . I Bro"'• l Neu Ro ad .. · .

7

I Roa d D/11

. Road 11 - . City Boundary

Roild

18

82

.. 7

11

7

19