Gen Now | July 2022

Page 1

18

GEN

NOW

C-VILLE’s Monthly Guide to Navigating Senior Living Options in Central Virginia

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Personalized, weekday enrichment for adults with dementia or disabilities: Engaging activities Supportive, trained staff Nutritious lunch and snacks Affordable, with scholarships available

July 27 - August 2, 2022 c-ville.com

JABA offers an inclusive community where we fully embrace and value members through activities, socialization, and intergenerational connections— all in a safe and secure environment. And for loved ones, a comprehensive support system so you can go to work, or simply have some time for yourself— with peace of mind.

@cville_culture

Respite & Enrichment Centers

Engaged. Included. Valued.

Call today to schedule a visit. Charlottesville (434) 817-5235 Louisa (540) 500-5961

Jefferson Area Board for Aging jabacares.org


19

ROSEWOOD VILLAGE

CALL TODAY TO LEARN MORE & SCHEDULE YOUR VISIT (434) 205-9465

July 27 - August 2, 2022 c-ville.com

ARE YOU READY TO ENJOY DISCOVERY CLUB SAVINGS

@cville_culture

HOLLYMEAD | 2029 LOCKWOOD DRIVE, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA | GREENBRIER | 500 GREENBRIER DRIVE, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA www.RoseWoodVillage.com | Celebrating 39 Years of Caring | Let’s keep in touch FI/RoseWoodVillage

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Two Awarding Winning Locations in one great place called Charlottesville.


Looking Back, and Moving Forward

20

At Our Lady of Peace, the health and well-being of our residents remains—as always—our top priority. Welcoming new residents! Call today to learn more about the compassionate care, lovely apartments, wonderful amenities, and active, family-oriented lifestyle that makes our community one-of-a-kind. What Residents Are Saying “Here I feel safe, loved, respected, and not alone.” Barbara Allison, Our Lady of Peace Resident

Residential Living • Assisted Living Memory Care • Nursing Care

434-973-1155 our-lady-of-peace.com 751 Hillsdale Dr. | Charlottesville

July 27 - August 2, 2022 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Coordinated Services Management, Inc. Professional Management of Retirement Communities Since 1981

Premier Assisted Living and Memory Care

Call and schedule your tour today!

(434) 985-4481 422 William Mills Dr. | Stanardsville, VA

theharboralf.cc

Follow our community!

small pet friendly

When we get older we tend to think of our childhoods as distant memories that have long since faded in relevance to our current lives. We might laugh and share an anecdote or two with friends, reminisce about a place we visited as a child, but for the most part those memories are tucked away like old photos in a box in the attic. What’s more, when childhood memories do surface, and we feel the pangs of nostalgia, we tend to push it away, or to label ourselves cheesy or sappy. Research, however, suggests you ought to go get that box and dust it off because digging deeper into childhood memories can help with a challenge you’re dealing with, simply make you feel better, and help your children in their own lives. You’re also doing it more often than you think. A study at the School of Psychology at the University of Surrey in England found that people experience bouts of nostalgia at least once a week and that even children as young as 8-years old do this. Teens and young adults in their 20s do it most often as they begin to make the important decisions of their adult lives, and older people do it to gain perspective. Basically, the study found that connecting old memories with your current situation allows you to make sense of your life, and makes you feel less lonely by reminding you of your connection to others and your community. And that doing this can reduce stress and improve your mood. The researchers also found that looking back in profound ways can create positive feelings about the future. Indulging in nostalgia can also help those around you. Researchers found that people who “nostalgize” give to charity more, and that sharing stories with friends, family members, and romantic partners is a strong way to show caring and support. In fact, a growing body of research has shown that sharing our personal stories with children and grandchildren, especially in heartfelt and detailed ways, teaches them to tell stories in more detailed ways (plus, kids love hearing stories about when you were a kid). Later in life

these narrative skills can lead to stronger empathy for others, higher self-esteem, and the ability to better understand complex ideas. But what about bad or traumatic childhood memories? Or just unpleasant ones you don’t want to think about? While severe childhood trauma that hasn’t been dealt with might be cause for seeking professional help, revisiting the stories of our childhood on our own can also be a way to heal ourselves. Since the 1980s, UVA psychologist Tim Wilson has been studying how “editing” the stories we tell ourselves about our lives can improve our emotional health. In a well-known study, Wilson worked with freshmen students who were struggling in school, and found that most of them believed they had “always been bad at school.” What Wilson did was edit that story, and asked them to consider the fact that “everyone fails at first.” The students read stories from other students who at first failed but later succeeded. Wilson found that those students who edited the story in their heads were more likely to stay in school, succeed, and not drop out, compared to a control group who did not get the story-telling prompt. Wilson has also found that this “story-editing” technique can help people with very painful memories, even veterans suffering from PTSD. Basically, we can get stuck thinking about a certain memory in a certain way, and by simply “editing” or changing the story a bit, we can go back and heal ourselves. And the good memories? Personal achievements you are proud of? An act of kindness that helped someone? A memory of someone helping you? Well, the University of Surrey researchers say use them to your advantage, summon them to make yourself feel good, to give yourself some encouragement, and to give yourself an energy boost to face future challenges. So, go on, dust off that old box of photos and get to work.

David McNair handles communications, media relations, and social media efforts for JABA.


21

ANTHOLOGY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

Uplift Your Lifestyle

DURING THE MONTH OF AUGUST We invite you to come and experience the remarkable lifestyle our residents at Anthology of Charlottesville enjoy every day. Embark on a tour of our contemporary community and amazing amenities, and you’ll be entered into a raffle for your chance to win one of two stellar prizes:* Two-night stay at a B&B

Wine-pairing dinner for two at a local winery

*No purchase necessary to win. This will be a socially distanced event. Masks required.

SCHEDULE YOUR TOUR TODAY! 434-218-5102 Continue Your Life Story With Us

343 Archer Ave. / Charlottesville, VA Independent Living / Assisted Living / Memory Care AnthologyCharlottesville.com

July 27 - August 2, 2022 c-ville.com

ANTHOLOGY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

@cville_culture facebook.com/cville.weekly