C-VILLE Weekly | September 7 - 13, 2022

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FOR THE WIN VOL. 31 NO. 36 n SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2022

WWW.C-VILL E.COM

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Parents and drivers weigh in on school bus shortage PAGE 14

An award-winning poet takes her talent to the memoir PAGE 25

YEARS OF REAL ESTATE

CHARLOTTESVILLE , FLUVANNA, GREENE, MADISON, NELSON, ALBEMARLE LOUISA, ORANGE, AUGUSTA

Find Your

Sweet Spot

IN ORANGE COUN BY CARLA HUCKABEE

TY

INSIDE

JOHN ROBINSON

SEPTEMBER 7 – 13, 2022 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

Tony Elliott has high hopes as UVA's new head football coach


September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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Red Blend Blending Workshop Wednesday, September 21, 6PM

A hands-on workshop where you get to be the winemaker! You will be guided in the wine blending process by our winemaking team and then compete to have your red blend showcased in a limited bottling. Teams will submit their blends to a panel of judges and will find out at the end of the event which team's blend was picked as the winning blend. The limited bottling will be available to wine club members as well as the winning team later this year. Participants must be 21+

FREE FOR WINE CLUB MEMBERS

eastwoodfarmandwinery.com/club

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EXCLUSIVE WINES, FREE & DISCOUNTED EVENTS, 1/2 PRICE GLASSES DURING HAPPY HOUR, 10% OFF IN OUR TASTING ROOMS & ONLINE

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

Join the wine club today!


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Just Announced!

THIS SEPTEMBER Sep 8, 9, 15

The Virginia Chamber Music Foundation Presents: THE 23RD ANNUAL CHARLOTTESVILLE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL Sep 9 FREE

Sep 9

Light House Studio Board of Directors Presents: 21ST ANNUAL YOUTH FILM FESTIVAL

Sep 11

Paramount Presents: JOHNNY MATHIS - THE VOICE OF ROMANCE TOUR

Sep 16

Paramount Presents: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE - KOBIE BOYKINS, EXPLORING MARS

Sep 18

Paramount at the Movies Presents: THE ARTIST (2011) [PG] ONLY 25¢!

Sep 23

Paramount Presents: 25TH ANNUAL MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL

Sep 24

Paramount Presents: WHITNEY CUMMINGS - TOUCH ME TOUR

TICKETS AT THEPARAMOUNT.NET THANK YOU TO OUR GENEROUS SPONSORS

Lynn & Kenny Brown • Carrie Douglass & Fernando Operé ∙ Pam & Frank Edmonds • Chris & Brad Eure • Janna & David Gies • Elizabeth & Joe LeVaca • Julie & Geoff Montross · Susie Morris

215 East Main Street, Charlottesville, VA | 434.979.1333 | theparamount.net

THE 21ST ANNUAL

YOUTH FILM FESTIVAL

SAVE THE DATE! 9.9.22

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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Corporate Sponsorship Opportunities

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

PRODUCER

DIRECTOR

$10,000

$5,000

$2,500

• Name on Vinegar Hill Theatre marquee • Opportunity to display corporate collateral • Logo on invitation and our poster • 10 tickets to YFF • Name credit on-screen during event • Acknowledgment at the event and in program • Acknowledgment on our website with a link to your company’s site • Acknowledgment on-screen at select Vinegar Hill Theatre screenings • Additional sponsorship acknowledgment for Adrenaline Film Project

• Opportunity to display corporate collateral • Logo on our invitation and poster • 8 tickets to YFF • Name credit on-screen during event • Acknowledgment at the event and in program • Acknowledgment on our website with a link to your company’s site • Acknowledgment on-screen at select Vinegar Hill Theatre screenings • Additional sponsorship acknowledgment for Adrenaline Film Project

• Opportunity to display corporate collateral • Logo on invitation and our poster • 6 tickets to YFF • Name credit on-screen during event • Acknowledgment at the event and in program • Acknowledgment on our website with a link to your company's site • Acknowledgment on-screen at select Vinegar Hill Theatre screenings

CINEMATOGRAPHER $1,000 • Name on invitation and logo on our poster • Name on YFF poster • 4 tickets to YFF • Name credit on-screen during event • Acknowledgment at the event and in program • Acknowledgment on our website with a link to your company’s site

EDITOR $500 • 4 tickets to YFF • Name Credit on-screen during event • Acknowledgement at the event and in the program • Acknowledgement on our website with a link to your company's site

Young people telling stories through filmmaking


5 34TH SEASON

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cavalier futures radio show

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

uva fan headquarters


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Hang Out...

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

V.34, No. 36

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 www.c-ville.com

JOHN ROBINSON

Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

EDITORIAL EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Richard DiCicco richard@c-ville.com

FEATURE 16

Field of dreams Tony Elliott takes the reins as Cavs’ new football coach. NEWS

11

13 Pedestrian deaths mount on unsafe-to-cross county roads. 14 How some kids are getting to school sans buses. 15 Crozet woman is fundraising for others with disabilities.

CULTURE

CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Eshaan Sarup

32 Sudoku

CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Amelia Delphos, Matt Dhillon, Carol Diggs, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Will Ham, Erika Howsare, Justin Humphreys, Kristin O’Donoghue, Lisa Provence, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Julia Stumbaugh, Courteney Stuart, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

33 Crossword

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

34 Free Will Astrology

ART DIRECTOR Max March max@c-ville.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

27 EatDrinkCville: A few things your local bar tenders want you to know.

CLASSIFIED 35

23

25 The Works: Prof and poet, Kiki Petrosino has the Bright stuff.

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

ADVERTISING

Real Estate Weekly Page 39

advertising@c-ville.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Gabby Kirk (434) 373-2136 gabby@c-ville.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Annick Canevet annick@c-ville.com, Lisa C. Hurdle classyexec@c-ville.com, Brittany Keller brittany@c-ville.com

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman REAL ESTATE WEEKLY Beth Wood (434) 373-0999 beth@c-ville.com PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

BUSINESS

Inside. Outside. Home.

2022 SUMMER

e Bring in thth beauty wiell Cole Burr

splash!

Making a

transforming owners on am Three home dscape into their dre ed lan lud an existing backyard—pools inc

ht s in the lig ont loft let taging YS A Belm s for home-s ct tip al BETTER DA tic ac oje SELL? Pr ardwalk pr READY TO m wins bo Y Local fir BEACH DA

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on stands now!

PUBLISHER Anna Harrison anna@c-ville.com CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Debbie Miller debbie@c-ville.com A/R SPECIALIST Nanci Winter (434) 373-0429 CIRCULATION MANAGER Billy Dempsey circulation@c-ville.com

C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle, and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2022 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R Virginia Press Association


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ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL

JEFFERSONTHEATER.COM

THESOUTHERNCVILLE.COM

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

AMANDA SHIRES

September 8

WITH HONEY HARPER

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BUTCHER BROWN BIG BAND

FT. TENNISHU AND R4ND4ZZO BIGB4ND ALBUM RELEASE PARTY WITH CHARLES OWEN TRIO

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WITH RAMONA MARTINEZ AND SOPHIE GAULT

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

THE NUDE PARTY WITH PEARL CHARLES

9.28.22

JUST ANNOUNCED!

09-18| YOLA WITH JAC ROSS 09-19| FOZZY WITH NO RESOLVE AND GFM 09-20| THE AFGHAN WHIGS

OCTOBER 26-ON SALE FRIDAY

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WITH PINK MOUNTAINTOPS

09-21| PUP WITH PALE HOUND AND THE OBGMS 09-22| THE DIP WITH OH HE DEAD 09-25| LOST DOG STREET BAND WITH SPECIAL GUESTS THE LOCAL HONEYS

09-30| JUKEBOX THE GHOST WITH COROOK 10-05| TAI VERDES: HDTV TOUR 10-06| ST. LUCIA WITH CAROLINE KINGSBURY 10-12| STEREOLAB WITH SUPPORT FROM

WITH BENDIGO FLETCHER

WITH ERIN & THE WILDFIRE

with Langhorne Slim

09-21 | JOHN CRAIGIE

WITH SPECIAL GUEST MAYA DE VITRY

09-23 | DALE & THE ZDUBS / FEELFREE

OCTOBER 9

BENEFITTING THE CHARLOTTESVILLE FREE CLINIC

ON SALE FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 9 AT 10 A.M.

10-19| CALEXICO WITH ADA LEA 10-20| ZOSO– THE ULTIMATE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE PRESENTED BY 97.5 3WV 10-21| PJ MORTON WATCH THE SUN TOUR WITH SPECIAL GUEST DJ ARIE SPINS

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WITH GRADY SPENCER & THE WORK

An Evening With The Flaming Lips

October 18 TICKETS:

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PRESENTED BY 106.1 THE CORNER 10-27 | STRAY FOSSA

WITH FILMS ON SONG AND YARD SALE

EAT AT THE SOUTHERN CAFÉ look for our daily specials!

café opens 2 hours prior to performances RENT THE SOUTHERN! (434) 977-5590 or

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10-22| THE CADILLAC THREE 10-23| BRENT COBB & HAYES CARLL GETTIN’ TOGETHER 10-25| TWIDDLE WITH OF GOOD NATURE 10-26| WHITNEY 10-27| BADFISH 10-28| ANDY FRASCO & THE UN

WITH SPACE KOI AND SOUWA CREAM

09-24 | DRAG BONANZA ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY 09-28 | CALIFORNIA BLUEGRASS REUNION FT. BILL EVANS, DAROL ANGER, JOHN REISCHMAN PRESENTED BY WTJU 09-29 | VISTA KICKS 09-30 | DYLAN LEBLANC 10-01 | THE DISTRICTS WITH ALICIA BLUE 10-04 | BLACK JOE LEWIS & THE HONEYBEARS/CEDRIC BURNSIDE 10-05 | SIERRA HULL WITH LINDSAY LOU 10-07 | PARKER MILLSAP 10-09 | JILL ANDREWS / CLEM SNIDE 10-11 | THE LIL SMOKIES 10-13 | THE STEWS WITH HAPPY LANDING 10-19 | KITCHEN DWELLERS/DANIEL DONATO: GALAXY GRASS X COSMIC COUNTRY FALL TOUR 10-21 | WILL OVERMAN

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

FIEVEL IS GLAUQUE

PRESENTED BY 91.1 WTJU 10-13| WARREN ZEIDERS WITH BEN BURGESS PRESENTED BY 92.7 C-VILLE COUNTRY 10-15| THE LEGWARMERS: THE ULTIMATE 80’S TRIBUTE BAND PRESENTED BY GENERATIONS 102.3 10-18| MADISON CUNNINGHAM

09-16 | AVI KAPLAN WITH TAYLOR ASHTON 09-17 | THE HEAVY HEAVY


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THIS WEEK

Hello, Charlottesville! Thank you for reading C-VILLE Weekly. As we were putting this issue together, we realized we had somehow ended up with multiple (fascinating) Q&As: one with new UVA football coach Tony Elliott (p. 16), another with author Kiki Petrosino (p. 25), and still one more with local bartenders (p. 27). So, welcome to the Q&A issue! In honor of that unintentional theme, I’ve decided to make my weekly letter a Q&A as well. What are some of your favorite things to do in Charlottesville as a new resident? I feel like I spend a lot of time walking and eating, which I guess help to offset one another. But some of

9.7.22

the best experiences I’ve had have been in the town’s many bookshops. I love browsing the art sections for gallery booklets. How does living in a smaller college town versus the big city feel? College

towns can feel like giant clocks sometimes, operating on the ebb and flow of students semester to semester. Parts of Richmond can have a similar pattern, too, but student haunts can be pretty loud and rowdy. I notice that Charlottesville likes to get to bed on time! What’s your favorite machine at Decades Arcade? There are so many incredible cabs there! I think Zaxxon was the one I was most excited to play, but I played the Atari Star Wars game there for the first time and the smooth vector graphics and wacky flight controller absolutely blew my mind. So that might be my favorite.—Richard DiCicco

We do have a lot in common. But we wouldn't have known about each other if we didn't talk and have that conversation.

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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SCAN TO SIGN UP

—— Carlos Rodriguez One Small Step Participant

Do you feel misunderstood by people who have different beliefs than you? Let’s talk! UVA’S Karsh Institute of Democracy and StoryCorps invite you to take ONE SMALL STEP One Small Step is an opportunity to bridge divides by recording a meaningful conversation with a fellow community member who has a different perspective than you. Over 150 people have already shared their stories, and you can too!

onesmallstep.virginia.edu

onesmallstep.virginia.edu


9

Bryan Strickland, CFP® Financial Advisor CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Professional Susan Wilkinson, MBA, CFP®, CDFA Founder, Managing Partner CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Professional Tom Antonelli, CFA® Financial Advisor Chartered Financial Analyst® Kirsten Ashbaugh Financial Advisor | Financial Planner Manager of Strategic Planning & Training Frank Flaschenriem Director of Operations and Technology, Research & Analytics Jacquelyn Nasca, MS Accredited Financial Counselor®/AFC Financial Coaching and Budgeting Specialist

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Securities offered through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. Investment advice offered through Private Advisor Group, a registered investment advisor. Private Advisor Group and Wilkinson Wealth Management are separate entities from LPL Financial.

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“He does not represent UVA and he certainly does not represent the Commonwealth.”

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­—The Democratic Party of Virginia, calling for Bert Ellis to resign from the UVA Board of Visitors, after a Cavalier Daily article revealed that Ellis brought a eugenicist to speak at the school as a student in 1975

NEWS Police kill fugitive A multi-jurisdictional U.S. Marshals Task Force, including an Albemarle County police officer, shot and killed 60-year-old Andrew Ainsworth, who was wanted for a federal probation violation, in Albemarle County the night of August 29. Police say they located Ainsworth—whose most recent address was in Omaha, Nebraska—while he was driving eastbound on the U.S. 250 bypass and tried to initiate a traffic stop, but he “attempted to evade them,” according to an ACPD press release. Police chased Ainsworth until he crashed on the Fontaine Avenue ramp to the Route 29 bypass. As police approached his car, Ainsworth fired a gun at them. Three officers returned fire, and Ainsworth died at the scene. Per protocol, Virginia State Police is investigating the shooting.

The Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA is hoping to raise over $17,000 to replace life-saving equipment, including a fluid pump, scale, and pulse oximeter, reports CBS19. Visit caspca. org to donate to the animal shelter.

M

An attorney for the City of Charlottesville says former police chief RaShall Brackney’s lawsuit does not prove she was discriminated against based on her sex and gender.

reported last year—influenced his decision. In press conferences, Brackney’s attorney has emphasized that the PBA survey was commissioned shortly after Brackney had disbanded the SWAT team and disciplined multiple officers for misconduct. However, Corrigan claimed in the court filing that, though city officials supported Brackney’s decision to dismantle the SWAT team, the former chief never addressed the department morale issues brought up by the anonymous surveys. When Boyles asked the former chief to craft a plan to fix these issues, Brackney first told him she did not need a plan, then later asked him what should be in the plan. (Brackney disputes these claims, ac-

cording to The Washington Post.) After learning that multiple CPD leaders—at least 10, Boyles claimed in a Daily Progress op-ed last September—planned to leave their positions, Boyles soon fired the chief, wrote Corrigan. Brackney’s attorney Charles Tucker asserts that the court filing shows “the law is on our side.” “[The city] had an opportunity to file an answer to our complaint where they could have either admitted or denied allegations, all of which we have factual evidence to support,” he told The Washington Post. “Instead, they’ve filed a motion to dismiss, basically saying that even if our assertions are true, we have no case.”

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ore than two months after former police chief RaShall Brackney filed a $10 million lawsuit against the City of Charlottesville—and 10 current and former city officials—alleging she was wrongfully terminated based on her sex and gender, the city has asked a federal judge to dismiss the suit. According to The Washington Post, the city’s attorney David Corrigan claimed in a court filing submitted on August 30 that thencity manager Chip Boyles terminated Brackney, the city’s first Black police chief, “to ensure the viability” of the CPD, which was plagued with “chaos and upheaval” under her leadership. “The imminent threat of departures of important CPD leaders [and] the ongoing strained relationship between Brackney, City leadership, and community stakeholders” also fueled Boyles’ decision, Corrigan wrote. He argued that Brackney’s suit does not prove the city discriminated against her based on her sex and gender, and it should be dismissed. In her lawsuit, Brackney accuses the city of firing her in retaliation against her efforts to reform the CPD, including disbanding the SWAT team, ending the department’s relationship with the Jefferson Area Drug Enforcement Task Force, and disciplining and firing officers for severe misconduct. She claims two defendants created an internal survey of officers to elicit negative responses about her, and other defendants later used the survey results to get her fired. In addition to listing the city as a defendant in her suit, Brackney also lists Boyles; current and former City Council members Lloyd Snook, Sena Magill, and Heather Hill; Mike Wells, president of the Police Benevolent Association; Bellamy Brown, former chair of the Police Civilian Review Board; former assistant police chief Jim Mooney; current acting Police Chief Tito Durette; City Attorney Lisa Roberts; and former city communications director Brian Wheeler. When questioned about Brackney’s firing last September, Boyles admitted that the CPD’s survey—as well as the Police Benevolent Association’s survey, in which most survey respondents criticized Brackney’s leadership and reform efforts, C-VILLE

@cville_weekly

Pain doctor sentenced Albemarle County pain doctor Mark Dean was sentenced to 40 years in prison last week for sexually assaulting a female patient—however, all but 12 years and 10 months were suspended, reports the Daily Progress. In April, the 54-year-old was found guilty of inserting his fingers into a patient’s vagina without her consent at an appointment in 2017. Dean has been charged with sexually assaulting multiple female patients between 2011 and 2017, and will go to trial again in October.

City asks judge to throw out Brackney lawsuit

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

Dollars for dogs (and cats)

PAGE 15

EZE AMOS

IN BRIEF

Bus stop


12

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ITY MINORH T N O M S BUSINES SEPT 9

Minority Business Alliance 10th Anniversary Celebration Gala 7:00 - 11:00 PM

The Club at Glenmore, 1750 Piper Way

SEPT 13

Meet our 4-Legged Friends Self-Guided Farm Tour - Tack Sale Food Truck & Vendors

Starting Your Business 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM Online Workshop

SEPT 15

Fem Founder Financing 1:00 - 2:30 PM

Northside Library, 705 Rio Rd W Hybrid

Black Business Expo

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SEPT 24

10:00 AM - 7:00 PM

SEPT 28

IX Art Park, 522 2nd St SE

Resource Fair

12:00 - 4:00 PM City Space, 100 5th St NE

SEPT 29 Siva Thiagarajah, MD — “Dr. T” Maternal-Fetal Medicine • High-risk obstetric consultation • Obstetric ultrasounds - pregnancy confirmation, first trimester screens, fetal anatomy ultrasounds, 3D ultrasounds, fetal ECHOs Gynecology • Routine preventive care - well woman exams, pap smears, breast exams, labwork • Gynecologic care - STD/STI and UTI diagnosis and treatment; vulvar/vaginal disorders; menopause/perimenopause care • Contraception - oral contraceptive pills, Nexplanon, IUDs, Depo-provera • Pelvic ultrasounds

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NEWS

13

Pedestrian unfriendly Albemarle’s deadly urban ring By Lisa Provence

SARAH PEASLEE

N

Will Davis, right, with his brother Alex Davis, a couple of weeks before his death.

worst, says McDermott, is U.S. 29 from the city limit at Hydraulic to Hollymead. “Currently there are only two designated pedestrian crossings,” he says. “Drive on 29 any day, you’re going to see pedestrians dash across four or five lanes to the median.” He says, “I consider that our most unsafe corridor for pedestrians.” One option Albemarle’s Board of Supervisors likes a lot is photo speed cameras, which warns drivers, snaps pictures of speeders, and sends a ticket in the mail, but that may be a long-shot in photo-ticketingaverse Virginia. “It’s very effective,” says Supervisor Bea LaPisto-Kirtley. “To me it seems like a nobrainer. We have to use technology because we don’t have the people to enforce speed limits.” Photo speed cameras are at the top of the board’s legislative agenda, she says. Delegate Rob Bell carried a photo speed camera bill in this year’s General Assembly, but he says it was geared toward two-lane rural roads where it’s unsafe for police to ticket safely. That bill died in subcommittee.

WEDNESDAY

9.28.2022

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Cameras have been used to target redlight-runners and school-bus-passers, notes Bell, but the “idea of the presumption of guilt and mailed tickets is not something generally done in Virginia.” And when a bill fails 10-0, “I’m not planning to bring it back,” he says. Albemarle is looking at other ways to make crossing multi-lane thoroughfares safer, says McDermott. Pedestrian crossings are in design for Richmond Road at Route 20/Stony Point Road and at Rolkin Road. The 250 Access Management Project would close the center lane used for both right and left turns, which LaPisto-Kirtley

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featuring

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KEVIN MCDERMOTT, ALBEMARLE DIRECTOR OF PLANNING

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MEALS ON WHEELS NEW ANNUAL FUNDRAISER

“The sidewalk system is inadequate and that’s why we’ve ended up with a road not safe to walk along.”

September 7 –13, 2022 c-ville.com

early a year ago in the early hours of September 13, 2021, Sarah Peaslee got the knock on the door no parent ever wants to hear. A police officer told her that her son, 29-year-old Will Davis, had been struck by a motorcycle crossing Richmond Road—U.S. 250 east—and died instantly. “Will was coming home from a friend,” she says. Will, the grandson of Charlottesville Observer founder Kay Peaslee, was staying with his mother at Carriage Hill on Pantops, and she acknowledges he jaywalked. “He was jaywalking because it’s frustrating to try to cross.” Richmond Road is not the only Albemarle County road built to move cars, not pedestrians, and eight pedestrians have died on county roads since 2016, compared to the five deaths in Charlottesville’s city limits over the past 10 years. Through the ’80s and ’90s, “the flow of vehicles was considered more important than pedestrians,” says Kevin McDermott, Albemarle’s director of planning. At U.S. 250 on Pantops, “we had eliminated all of the opportunities for pedestrians to cross from the [Rivanna] river to I-64. The sidewalk system is inadequate and that’s why we’ve ended up with a road not safe to walk along or to cross.” Five-lane Richmond Road is notorious for late-night speeding, says Peaslee. While the speed of the BMW motorcycle that struck Davis has not been determined, after it hit him, it totaled a parked Mercedes at the dealership there and its driver, Robert Nikodem, was hospitalized for weeks, she adds. Nikodem has been charged with driving under the influence. Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Lawton Tufts declined to comment on the case, and says the investigation is ongoing. C-VILLE was unable to reach Nikodem. While Richmond Road has seen two pedestrian fatalities in the past two years, it’s not the deadliest road in the county. The

dubs the “suicide lane,” and put in a median. The project should be ready for public feedback in spring 2023, with construction two years after that, says McDermott. The recent federal infrastructure bill offers a Reconnecting Communities grant, dedicated to those areas—often African American—that previously were cut off from economic opportunities by transportation infrastructure. The county is applying for a grant, says McDermott, to “identify places we want to enhance safety.” Plans for U.S. 29 include a pedestrian bridge north of Hydraulic at Zan Road, and an at-grade crossing south of the Hydraulic intersection, he says. And unlike in the past, when adding more lanes was often a solution to traffic woes, “We don’t do any major transportation projects without a major pedestrian component,” McDermott says. Albemarle traditionally has a higher number of traffic fatalities than the city, and county police are using public outreach, public education, and targeted enforcement to address dangerous behaviors by all road users, says county spokesperson Emily Kilroy. With the shortage of school bus drivers and more children walking to school, pedestrian safety is an even bigger concern. Police posted a ped safety graphic on social media to lay out the best practices for walking, especially on roads without sidewalks or crosswalks. Will Davis was “quite adventurous,” a big biker and walker who was interested in community permaculture, mushrooms, and music, says his mother. His family describes him with the phrase, “Where there’s a Will, there’s a way.” Peaslee may be channeling her son in her efforts to prevent such accidents with safer crossings and attention to speeding and drinking. “I’d like his memory to live on as a safe crossing so that this doesn’t keep happening.” She sighs. “It’s just so slow to get anything done.”


NEWS

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Bus-ted Driver shortage causes scramble to school By Courteney Stuart courteney@c-ville.com

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Courteney Stuart is the host of “Charlottes­ ville Right Now” on WINA. You can hear interviews about the school bus driver shortage at wina.com.

SKYCLAD AERIAL

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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xpanded walk zones. Double bus routes. Delayed student arrivals. The bus driver shortage in Albemarle and Charlottesville is creating challenges for schools, drivers, kids, and parents. “It’s an inconvenience,” says Teresa Green, a mother of two students at Charlottesville High School. Green and her family live in the Fry’s Spring neighborhood, and both her kids rode a bus to public school until the driver shortage changed that in the 2020-21 school year. “My son did bike a couple of times to Buford, but I was always worried,” says Green, who has now arranged a carpool for her kids—a neighbor drives them in the morning and she or her husband do afternoon pickup. This summer, in response to the severe driver shortage, Charlottesville City Schools announced a plan to address the problem: expanded walk zones of varying distances, depending on student age, as well as “walking school buses,” in which students would be led by an adult on foot. But even though Green’s neighborhood is far beyond acceptable walking distance at 4.4 miles, including a long stretch on Fifth Street, only one of her children was offered a seat on a bus. She declined it. “What if there’s a parent out there who doesn’t have a car or who doesn’t have access or whatever?” she says. “I don’t want to take somebody else’s seat because we don’t really have a way of knowing if there’s kids who have more needs than my kids.” Charlottesville Schools Superintendent Royal Gurley says that’s an issue the administration considered. “Some of our most vulnerable students can potentially be impacted by this, meaning that

on inclement weather days, they can’t just jump in the car with mom and come to school because the car doesn’t exist,” he says, noting that community partners have offered rainy day transportation and assistance. Albemarle County is also dealing with a severe school bus driver shortage, and since much of the area is too rural for students to walk, spokesperson Phil Giaramita says many parents are driving and forming carpools to ease the burden. “We began last year with about 8,000 students requesting bus service. And it turns out that about 5,000 students actually rode our buses,” he says. Both Gurley and Giaramita say the pandemic exacerbated the already developing shortage, and Albemarle school bus driver Earl Smith agrees. He estimates about 75 percent of the Albemarle drivers were retirees doing the job for the benefits. “Suddenly you’ve got this pandemic starting and nobody knows if you’re going to live or die,” he says. “Why would they stay?” Smith, who took the job so he’d have time in the middle of the day to care for his ailing mother, is hoping that some of the school system’s recruitment efforts, including higher pay and immediate employment start times, will help fill the empty driver spots. Recruiting single parents, who can bring their kids on the bus, and other people who need a job that leaves their midday free also helps. “Making it look like a cooler job,” he says. “When you say to somebody, ‘Come drive a bus,’ they go, ‘Oh my God, I can’t keep up with them kids.’” He laughs. “It’s not that hard to put up with these kids, I swear.”

At the start of the school year, Charlottesville had just nine bus drivers. Full staffing is 40.


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NEWS

TOUCH-A-TRUCK A FREE EVENT FOR FAMILIES

TRISTAN WILLIAMS

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24, 2022 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

India Sims is raising money to make her lifelong dream of owning her own business come true.

Beauty for all Cosmetologist wants to open a spa for other disabled people By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

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Rain or Shine

Gordonsville’s 10th Annual

FRIED CHICKEN FESTIVAL OCTOBER 1ST, 2022 • 11 A.M. - 5 P.M.

AT THE GORDONSVILLE FIRE COMPANY FAIR GROUNDS Featuring: • Fried chicken & pie cook-off contests • Artisan crafters • Wine garden • 5th Annual 5K Race & 2nd Annual 1K Race

Join us in this celebration of Gordonsville’s history and heritage! Visit www.townofgordonsville.org or www.visitorangevirginia.com

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Gordonsville is famous for its fried chicken and the heritage of local African-American women, known as “waiter carriers,” who brought platters of the delicacy to rail passengers during the 19th century. In 1869, a local newspaper editor named the village the “Chicken-Leg Centre of the Universe.”

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“We are normal. We’re not a liability. We have dreams. We have a life.” INDIA SIMS

Join us to see fire trucks, police cars, construction vehicles, and more! Free shirts for all kids. Other activities include face painting, ice cream, a bouncy house, and more!

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

t 10 months old, India Sims was sent to the hospital for a chronic ear infection. A doctor decided to give Sims a spinal tap to help diagnose the infection—but inserted the needle into the wrong part of her back. She soon became partially paralyzed, and suffered from constant fevers and seizures. Over the next decade, Sims, who was born and raised in Crozet, had over 30 surgeries. Though doctors tried to restore the use of the lower half of her body, her legs and feet were permanently paralyzed. Her family tried to sue the doctor, but were unable to find a lawyer to take their case. “While I was having surgeries, I dreamed [of] two things: becoming a singer because I used to sing a lot, and I always wanted to own my own shop,” says Sims, a 37-yearold mother of two. “I wanted to be a hairstylist, a massage therapist, an esthetician.” Now, Sims, a licensed cosmetologist, is working to bring her dream to fruition. By next year, she wants to open her own Charlottesville spa, called NrUnique-Brokenimagination, for disabled people who “want to enjoy a luxury life and not have to worry about certain accommodations,” she says. Sims plans to hire other disabled cosmetologists, and offer a variety of services, including hair, nails, massages, and waxing. Sims says she faced numerous challenges on her path to becoming a cosmetologist. While a high school student, she says teachers tried to prevent her from enrolling in the cosmetology program at Charlottesville-Albemarle Technical Education Center. However, with help from her mother and an advocate, Simms was eventually able to graduate from the program. She then worked to gain more ex-

perience in her field, but often faced difficulties getting hired, or was fired shortly after starting a job—because she was in a wheelchair, she says. “I would go work for someone. They would love my work and what I can do, but after a while when customers started rolling in, I would come in and they would set my stuff outside and [say], ‘We no longer want your services here. It takes too much space for your chair,’” says Sims. “I’m tired [of] people telling me I have the job, and I’m sitting around waiting on them, and they’re telling me, ‘Oh, we decided to go with another candidate,’ after they’ve told me they’ve hired me,” she adds. Sims was inspired to fully pursue her lifelong dream after meeting award-winning artist Mary J. Blige in February. Sims had posted a TikTok video, which included Blige’s song “Good Morning, Gorgeous.” Sims’ account, @1uniquechairgirl, has over 300,000 followers, and features videos about Sims’ life as a disabled person—and that video caught Blige’s attention. Soon, she was invited to have a virtual conversation with the singer on “Good Morning America.” “[Blige] was the one that was like, ‘India, you are important. I see you [and] what you’re trying to do—do it,’” says Sims. Sims is currently working to raise $100,000 on GoFundMe for her spa. On October 8, she will also host a pajama party fundraiser at Vault Virginia. Tickets ($20) can be purchased by contacting Sims at iadbuttercup85@gmail.com. After opening her spa, Sims hopes to franchise the business, allowing other disabled people to own additional locations. “I just want people to wake up and [know], ‘We are normal. We’re not a liability. We have dreams. We have a life. We have to work just like everybody else,” says Sims.

UNIVERSITY BAPTIST CHURCH 1223 W MAIN ST


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Tony Elliott, the Cavaliers’ new head football coach, comes to UVA after more than a decade at Clemson University, where he helped lead the Tigers to two national championships.


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September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

Game changer JOHN ROBINSON

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New UVA football coach Tony Elliott hits the Grounds running BY JACK KEAVENY


September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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very new season offers a clean slate—and the opportunity to dream big. The UVA football faithful are dreaming especially big this year, with the arrival of new head coach Tony Elliott. Leaving last season’s disappointing 6-6 record behind them, the Cavaliers and their fans are optimistic about Elliott, who plans to bring a newfound level of achievement and excellence to the UVA gridiron. Elliott began his football career in 1999 as a walkon wide receiver at Clemson University, earning first-team All-ACC academic honors. He left an engineering career in 2006 to become a football coach at South Carolina State, and then spent three seasons at Furman University before returning to Clemson in 2011. There, he worked his way up the coaching ranks to become the team’s assistant head coach and offensive coordinator, helping lead the Tigers to two national championships in 2016 and 2018. Along with his leadership and championship experience, Elliott brings a new offensive coordinator, Desmond Kitchings, as well as defensive coordinator John Rudzinksi to UVA’s football staff. The Cav’s offense, led by star quarterback Brennan Armstrong, looks to continue the success it found last season, when it finished third in the country in total yards per game and 21st in points per game. The big question for this team remains the defense, which allowed 31.8 points per game last year. Undaunted by a challenge, Elliott, who overcame a difficult childhood, including family separation, the death of his mother in a car accident when he was 9, and time without a permanent home, names faith and sports as two grounding forces in his life. He spoke to C-VILLE via Zoom about why Virginia’s a good fit for him, how to create a winning football environment, and the joys of getting dirty on a four-wheeler. C-VILLE Weekly: With your experience as both an assistant coach and offensive coordinator at Clemson, it’s no surprise that you garnered interest from other schools. Why did you feel that Virginia was the best fit for you? Tony Elliott: I felt Virginia was the best fit because it matched the profile that I set forth, about three or four years before, of the school that I would want to transition to. It started with high academics, and that was important because at the end of the day, education is the most important thing. Football is prevalent in a guy’s life at this point, but long-term, education is the key, and to have an institution like Virginia and the brand recognition from an academic standpoint, and just the overall quality of the educational experience that you receive here was important for me. An opportunity to build something the way that I wanted to build it and not necessarily have to be influenced by a bunch of external forces. The opportunity to play in a competitive conference that

JOHN ROBINSON

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UVA football began the Tony Elliott era with a 34-17 win over the University of Richmond.

sets you up to have a chance to compete on a national level. Those were the big things, and the thing that sealed the deal was just the relationship that I was able to establish, as quickly as I was, with [UVA Athletic Director] Carla [Williams]. When you go through the interview process, it’s very difficult to kind of foster a relationship, but there was an instant connection between Carla and myself. Coming from Clemson, coaching under Dabo Swinney, what did you learn from him in regards to building a strong team culture and creating a winning environment? You have to be very intentional in what you’re doing and you have to put actions behind your words. It can’t just be bulletin-board material, it can’t just be pictures on the wall, you gotta be able to feel the message, see the message whenever you step into that environment, and ultimately, your culture that you create is what’s either going to take you to the top, or it’s gonna hinder you from going forward. Everybody wants to win games, but sometimes wins can be a false indicator of what the true climate is within your locker room and within your program. The key is just to focus on making sure you have a solid foundation based off the right things and build from there. Clemson has consistently had highly ranked recruiting classes over the past decade. What did you learn from your time there about the recruiting process, and how do you plan to apply that knowledge at UVA? I think that UVA’s recruiting is a little bit different than Clemson’s, just because of the academic pro-

file. Clemson—that’s where I got my degree, and it’s a great institution—but at Virginia, I think there’s some different parameters that you have to make sure you evaluate to be successful because things are structured a little different here. To start, you gotta make sure that they fit the profile—and what Coach Swinney was able to do at Clemson was pretty remarkable, he was actually able to change that profile to where you wanna be more selective in the guys and pay attention to the whole person, not just the athletic pieces, so that’s what I take away and I think that fits here at UVA. Also, making sure you recruit locally. The more times guys can be on campus—as we say “on Grounds” here at UVA—the more invested they’re going to be, and what you’re looking for is high character, high academic guys, that are good football players, but more importantly, they love to play football and they’re invested. I think if you get that, the rankings will take care of themselves because the culture and the guys that you do recruit are gonna recruit for you in the future and continue to allow you to sustain the high rankings that Clemson has had. UVA has had a difficult time in recent years establishing a strong running game. What’s your plan, given your past experience and success in this area? It’s risk-reward. You have to stay committed to it. There’s gonna be some times where it may not appear to be successful but you gotta look at the totality of it: What is the commitment level? It’s not just the statistics on the sheet, and also what are some of the unintended benefits of things that get overlooked.


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I think he’s physically in a position where he could contribute as a freshman. I think Houston Curry, down the road, the other offensive lineman is gonna be a really good player. Xavier Brown has done a good job, Terrell Jones, on the D-line, I think we hit a home run on him. I think he’s got a very high ceiling. We may not see it this year, just because of the depth that we added on the D-line with the grad transfers but I think that by the end of his career, we’re gonna look back and say “we got a steal right there.” I’m trying to think of the other guys. [Sean] Wilson, he’s got a big long body, more developed than Lavel [Davis Jr.] as a freshman, just physically, so I’m excited about him. I think Bracey, Steve Bracey, is gonna be a good player for us at linebacker. You guys have a tough stretch of games later on in the season going against Miami, UNC, and Pitt. How do you typically prepare a team for a difficult stretch like that? It starts with the mindset that you attack fall camp with, and understand that every game is a season in itself. You have to play every game like it’s the biggest game of the season, and know that there are no easy games, there are no off games. You cannot play to an opponent, you cannot play to a situation. You have to respect every single game and if we can develop that mindset, then every game, all 12 games, is gonna be a tough stretch because we know that on any given Saturday, any opponent that we play is capable of coming out with the victory.

Everyone is excited to watch UVA’s high-powered offense, but what can you tell us about the way the defense looked in camp? The defense looks a lot different than in the spring, with the addition of the four grad transfers along the defensive line. That’s been huge, they’ve added competition. [Ben] Smiley’s really emerged and developed as a guy that’s been in the program, but hadn’t had a whole lot of production and now you’re seeing him start to emerge. [Aaron] Faumui and Jahmeer Carter, he was just a younger guy that’s really taking his nutrition seriously, he’s in the best shape he’s ever been in, so I feel like we got more depth on the D-line, which will help protect the back end. We got some guys on the back end that are coming off of injury that gotta get themselves game-ready, so they’re gonna need to be protected. I feel good about our linebacking core, I think we got some talent at the linebacking core but it’s just gonna be a function of how quickly can these guys gel as a unit, because we have some talent in spots but we gotta be able to mesh it all together so we can become a unit that can get a stop when we need to get a stop.

Are there any standout freshmen who you expect to make an impact right away? I think McKale Boley will do that on the offensive line. He’s been a guy that’s really showing that he loves to compete, he’s a fast learner. He came in with good size on him and good development. Still would benefit from a year in the weight room, but

“You have to put actions behind your words. It can’t just be bulletin-board material, it can’t just be pictures on the wall.” TONY ELLIOTT, UVA HEAD FOOTBALL COACH

Do you have any hobbies or interests outside of football? Yeah, I say I like to get dirty, so I don’t mind riding side-by-sides and four-wheelers. My boys like dirt bikes. I don’t fish, I don’t hunt—I do love baseball. In the offseason, I get to spend a lot of time watching my boys play baseball. I’m a homebody, so if I’ve got a couple hours, I don’t mind just sitting on the couch and watching a good movie and getting away for a little bit. Are there any places in Charlottesville that you’ve taken a particular liking to? The Local has some really good food, I’ve been there. Unfortunately, because of the way the recruiting calendar is and the way my schedule is, a lot of times when I do venture out into the city it’s because of a recruiting function, so I haven’t had a chance to visit everywhere. All I really know is 250 and 29. I know how to get to Crozet and back, and I know how to get to Stonefield and back, and that’s about it as of right now.

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Another big question for this team is the relative inexperience of the offensive line after losing all five starters from last season. How confident are you in that unit? I’ve been pleasantly surprised and pleased with the rate at which they’ve improved during the spring and fall camp. The addition of [John Paul] Flores—he’s a guy that played a lot of football at Dartmouth, so even though he’s a new starter for us, he’s started a bunch of games, so he plugs in there. [Derek] Devine has been here for a while, hasn’t played a ton, but he’s got a lot of experience just being an older guy with practice, so he won’t be overwhelmed. That’s gonna allow [Johnathan] Leech, once he comes back, he’s another guy that is a veteran, just was behind other players so we got some pieces that we feel like can generate leadership that we need up front. They’ve got some veteran experience from a practice standpoint, and just being around the program. They have to gain some game experience, but I feel good with having three guys that got some age to them, so to speak. Then we got Logan Taylor who is as talented as any young guy I’ve been around, he just has to develop—and he was injured in the spring—so I think we’re gonna have a good nucleus

of guys, we just gotta keep them healthy and again, take the lumps of learning. But I think before it’s all said and done, they have a chance to gel together as a starting five and give us a chance to compete.

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

Your play-action game may increase because of your commitment to run the football, even though your production may not be stellar on the stat sheet, your commitment to run the ball forces the defense to be honest. So even though your rush game may be down, but your commitment to being consistent and sticking with it pays dividends in other areas—your screen game can improve, your play-action shots can improve, so the other things that complement and come off of your game will be able to improve as well.

Do you have any opinions on the current direction of college football as a whole, with the recent changes to transfer rules and conference realignments? My general opinions are that there are good intentions from the NCAA in the direction that they’re going, trying to allow for resources to be provided to student athletes. I do have reservations, just as anybody would about how you provide those resources to young people. It’s great that they’re making opportunities, but I think there should be just a little bit of structure, and some consistency too. I think we’re in a stage now where it’s constantly changing, and I think all of us, in our lives, are looking for a little more structure, a little more discipline, a little more routine.


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September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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NOW ENROLLING Fall 2022 Group and 1-on-1 Classes

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Albemarle | Charlottesville | Spring Creek


SATURDAY 9/10

FRIDAY 9/9

TAKE IT LIKE AMANDA

FILM STARS

FRIDAY 9/9

66 R E A S O N S T O S T E P O U T T H I S W E E K

PAGE 24

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There’s nothing like listening to the strumming of an acoustic guitar on a warm, late-summer evening. But fingerstyle guitarist Tyler Burkhardt does more than just strum—he creates the sound of an entire band by hitting, tapping, slapping, and thumping the body and strings of his guitar. A Chesterfield native who now lives in Charlottesville, Burkhardt puts his own unique spin on songs like “Crazy” by Gnarls Barkley and “Talk” by Coldplay, showcasing his versatility with a guitar. Free, 7pm. The Garage, 100 E. Jefferson St. thegaragecville.com

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SEPTEMBER REVERIES

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

Award-winning singersongwriter Amanda Shires is doing things her own way. Take It Like A Man, her seventh studio album, is a fearless confessional in the form of 10 intimate songs that offer musings on what it’s really like to turn 40. Grounded by Shires’ sultry voice and virtuoso fiddling, something she’s lent to collaborators John Prine and hubby Jason Isbell, the record features songs like the sex-positive “Bad Behavior” and the title track “Take It Like A Man,” which ends with the clever play on words, “I know I can take it like Amanda.” Says Shires: “You can try and do what they say and take it like a man and show that you can withstand anything. But truly, you can only take it like yourself.” $27-149, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com

Behold the future of movies at Light House Studio’s 21st Annual Youth Film Festival. A celebration of the art of storytelling, the fest supports the org’s annual budget and offers a first-time viewing experience of 22 short films created by 90 student filmmakers in the past year. Get your blood pumping with a ghastly zombie chase, and be moved by beats from a selection of music videos written and performed by residents of juvenile detention centers. There’s a selection of documentaries, as well as hardhitting films that tackle important issues such as tobacco use, climate change, and the pursuit of social justice. $14-102.50, 7:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. lighthousestudio.org

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CULTURE

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CULTURE THIS WEEK

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Wednesday 9/7 music Beleza Duo. Funkalicious samba soul. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com The Wavelength. A midweek music boost. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskeyjarcville.com Wednesday Night Karaoke. Jen DeVille hosts this weekly song party. Free, 9pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. rapturerestaurant.com

Farmers in the Park. Local farmers with seasonal produce and meats, cut and potted flowers, baked goods, hot meals, value-added products, prepared food, and crafts. Free, 3pm. Farmers in the Park, 300 Meade Ave. charlottesville.gov

High Contrast: Streets of Fire. A mercenary is hired to rescue his ex-girlfriend, a singer who has been kidnapped by a motorcycle gang. $8-10, 8pm. Violet Crown Cinema, 200 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. violetcrown.com

etc.

Music Bingo. Win prizes and enjoy food from Arepas on Wheels. Free, 6pm. Potter’s Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potters craftcider.com

Thursday 9/8 music Berto and Vincent. Wild gypsy rumba and Latin guitar. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com

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Charlottesville Chamber Music Festival. Grammy Award-winning violinist James Ehnes, pianist Andrew Armstrong, and cellist Raphael Bell open the festival. Free-$25, 7:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. cvillechamber music.org Dropping Julia. The Front Porch hosts this riverside concert with sassy, funky, dreamy rock band Dropping Julia, and opening act Small Town Rodeo. $12-15, 5pm. Rivanna River Company, 1538 E. High St. frontporch cville.org

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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Karan Casey Trio. The Irish folk singer Karan Casey has released 11 albums to date. $2025, 7:30pm. The Haven, 112 W. Market St. blueridgeirishmusic.org

Plan on!

A month-bymonth guide to the big day PAGE 24

HERE COME THE BRIDES SPRING 2022 ISSUE ON STANDS NOW!

Pretty Super sippers

Red, white, and sparkling: crowd-pleasing local wines

party Laying it out

Three ways to raise your tabletop game

Do it up

LEVEL 10 takes your reception to new heights

Friday 9/9 music Boxed Lunch. Sip on wine and enjoy live music. Free, 6pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glass housewinery.com Charlottesville Chamber Music Festival. A free, one-hour community concert. Free, 12:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. cvillechambermusic.org Fridays After Five: Cougar Beatrice. With Runawayz. Free, 5:30pm. Ting Pavilion, 700 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. tingpavilion.com Anthony Semiao. Enjoy live music and munch on oysters. Free, 5pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwood farmandwinery.com Margo Cilker. For the last seven years, the Eastern Oregon songwriter has split her time between the road and various outposts across the world. $15-17, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesouthern cville.com Travis Elliott. The singer-songwriter performs live. Free, 5:30pm. Potter’s Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potterscraftcider.com

words CreativeMornings. A breakfast lecture series for the creative community. Free, 8:30am. Online. creativemornings.com

Lee Brice. The Nashville-based songwriter performs live, with openers Michael Ray and Jackson Dean. $40.50-70.50, 7pm. Ting Pavilion, 700 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. tingpavilion.com

Kiki Petrosino—Bright: A Memoir. Celebrate the release of Petrosino’s first full-length essay collection of lyric nonfiction. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

words

classes

One Mic Stand Spoken Word Open Mic. Enjoy a mix of spoken word works. Free, 7pm. Piedmont Virginia Community College, V. Earl Dickinson Building, 501 College Dr. pvcc.edu

Creative Writing Workshop. Led by Fralin student educators and UVA Creative Writing instructors. Free, 4pm. The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA, 155 Rugby Rd. uvafralinart museum.virginia.edu

Reckoning: A Series on U.S. Presidents and Racial Inequality. Exploring the views and political policies of individual presidents toward minority populations, with an indepth focus on how they were affected. Free, 7pm. Online. woodrowwilson.org

etc.

outside

Five inspiring wedding vibes, from rustic glam to '80s South Beach

Arts From Underground. Artmaking, drinks, and karaoke inside The Looking Glass. Free, 7pm. Ix Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

outside

Writer’s Eye Teacher Preview Party. Discover the 2022 selections through tours and interactives and enjoy dinner and drinks. Free (RSVP required), 5pm. The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA, 155 Rugby Rd. uvafralin artmuseum.virginia.edu

SPRING / SUM MER 2 022

etc.

Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, September 7. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. klugeruhe.org

Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. Explore the only museum devoted to Indigenous Australian art in the U.S. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

ON SALE FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 9 AT 10 A.M.

Sunset Thursday. Enjoy a glass of wine from the outdoor terrace bar while listening to live music. Free, 5pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwood farmandwinery.com

Thursday Evening Sunset Series. Live music, food trucks, Carter Mountain wine, Bold Rock hard cider, and a beautiful view of the sunset. $10, 6pm. Carter Mountain Orchard, 1435 Carters Mountain Trl. chiles familyorchards.com

Arts Week Reception. Enjoy free food and drinks and explore the art galleries. Free, 5:15pm. The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA, 155 Rugby Rd. uvafralinartmuseum. virginia.edu Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, September 7. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org C ONTINUED ON PAGE26


CULTURE THE WORKS

25

Firmament of referentiality UVA professor and poet Kiki Petrosino expands her story through prose arts@c-ville.com

be learning. And I always want to be in a position of learning.

A

Bright also explores your Italian grandfather’s life and death by suicide. How did you decide to include his story?

By Sarah Lawson s a poet, Kiki Petrosino has published four collections, including most recently, White Blood: A Lyric of Virginia, and received the Pushcart Prize and the Rilke Prize, among other awards and fellowships. As a prose writer, her first full-length book, Bright: A Memoir, published in August, and she will give a reading from it on Friday, September 9, at New Dominion Bookshop.

In the memoir, I wanted to talk about how I would observe my Italian grandfather’s relationship with nature. In thinking about his influence on my life, I couldn’t not also talk about his death and how that affected me. Also, as it happened, I was majoring in English but minoring in Italian, which I had started studying because I wanted to learn his language. So, while I’m trying to learn this language and read the literature—encountering Dante’s Wood of the Suicides—in my memory, that corresponded to that particular moment of my grandfather’s death, and so it also points to how my literacy was shaped. It isn’t only the high points that have gone into making you who you are, but it’s also the grief. All of those things are marbled into experience and so I could not leave that out of the memoir.

C-VILLE Weekly: Though your poetry has embraced aspects of memoir, Bright marks your first book of prose exploring personal history. How did you decide to make this shift? Kiki Petrosino: I consider this to be

What drew you to include the specific and wide-ranging literary references that you did?

@cville_culture facebook.com/cville.weekly

SUPPLIED PHOTO

When I wrote my last poetry book, I found myself reading works of history, looking at primary sources. When I was writing the memoir, I was putting this together I am interested in the way that fairy during the height of the pandemtales are allegorical. Bright is a ic and all the archives were closed. In her memoir Bright, Kiki Petrosino relates her experience as a Black American of interracial background through memoir that tells the story, in part, So what I had was my memory of fairy tales and literary references to Shakespeare, Thomas Jefferson, and Dante. Read an expanded version of this of my own life living as a Black what works of literature were in conversation online at c-ville.com. my personal lexicon, my own firAmerican of interracial background. And because my external appearmament of referentiality. I encountered description of someone’s appearance but ance announces that fact, what I often enDante at a pivotal point in my literary edthat it also has these other meanings. It’s counter, especially when I first meet people, a superficial term that doesn’t speak to the ucation, so that work became entwined with is that I can tell that there is a story about interior life of the person being described. my literacy. The same with Beowulf, with me that they’re telling themselves. And those I wanted to ask what does it mean to me Shakespeare. So I wove together the memstories may or may not match up with my to have this descriptor applied to me and oir not having to do, and not being able to do, outside research, but thinking about the lived reality. In a society where, historically, what relationship do I have to the term … the optical marker of race has been so deto see if the memoir could allow me to tangle of literacy that I could tell. Those are terminative of someone’s experience, I wantclaim that term in a way that is resonant the works that came out. ed there to be a place where I talk about how for me and doesn’t necessarily connect to I came to be but also how it feels to be this Is there anything in particular that what other people say brightness is. you’re excited to share with local self. And so the language of fairy tales readers at your upcoming event? seemed to overlay quite well onto the kind As you explore the lives of your Black ancestors in Bright, you continue your For me, writing becomes complete when it’s of investigation I was making. work to examine the legacy of Thomas shared with other people. To be able to share Jefferson, which is also a recurrent You write that, “To write a poem is to this work that I was putting together during theme in your poetry. How has that assert one’s attachment to the materialia time of really close quarantine and lockevolved over the course of your work? ty of language, but it also requires the tween those two modalities. For me, the down, and all the isolation that many artists poet to assume the openhanded posture I continue to approach Jefferson with fascigenerative place—the place where writing felt, it’s going to be meaningful to actually of a questioner.” What questions did you nation and curiosity. That doesn’t mean I bring that out into the world and speak it in can happen—is in the space between absograpple with through this work? take an uncritical view of him, that I don’t lutes. Jefferson is an incredibly complex words. And the audiences at New Dominion I wanted the reader to understand the term see what his vision excluded as much as what figure. To read him solely as a hero or soleare always so wonderful. It’s going to be an “brightness,” and that it is both a physical it included. It means that I walk a line bely as a villain excludes other things we could honor to read there for the community. What led you to structure Bright around fairy tale interludes, and how do you hope that shapes the reader’s experience?

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

a really exciting expansion of my writing practice. Over the past several years, I became really intrigued by how difficult it is to write an essay. I can anticipate how it will feel to write a poem; I couldn’t anticipate how it would feel to write an essay but I wanted very much to write sentences and paragraphs and hear how my voice would sound in that form.


CULTURE THIS WEEK Farmers Market at Ix. Over 60 local vendors with produce, prepared foods, artisan goods, and more. Free, 8am. Ix Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

C ONT I N U E D F R O M PAGE 2 4

Friday 9/9 Magic: The Gathering. A casual evening with multiple formats, including draft, modern, legacy, and pioneer, and prizes for participants. $5, 6pm. The End Games, 374 Hillsdale Dr. theendgames.co Light House Studio’s 21st Annual Youth Film Festival. A celebration of our community, students, and filmmaking. $14-102, 7:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. lighthousestudio.org

Saturday 9/10 music Amanda Shires. The Grammy and Americana Award-winning singer-songwriter and virtuoso violinist’s new album, Take It Like a Man, is a fearless confessional. $27-149, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com Berto’s Brunch. Join Berto and Vincent for brunch, wild gypsy rumba, and Latin guitar. Free, 11am. Tavern & Grocery, 333 W. Main St. tavernandgrocery.com Gina Sobel. The award-winning songwriter and composer brings together elements of funk, jazz, and American folk music. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarlecider works.com

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Ron Gentry. Sip on wine and enjoy live music. Free, 1pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

Virginia Cannabis Freedom Festival

etc. Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, September 7. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. klugeruhe.org FARMacy Anniversary Celebration. Celebrate five years of FARMacy in the CODE courtyard with live music from Chamomile & Whiskey’s Marie Borgman and Koda Kerl, face painting, vendors, and food. Free, 5pm. CODE Building, 240 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. farmacy.guru Storytime. Featuring both recent storybooks and classics kids know and love. Free, 11am. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com The Center Soirée: Anchors Aweigh. Set sail for an evening of cruise ship–style fun aboard the S.S. Center, where you’ll enjoy live music, dancing, cuisine, cocktails, a fundraising casino, and more. $250, 5:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.com Virginia Cannabis Freedom Festival. Celebrate all things hemp with live music from Kendall Street Company, The Runawayz, Free Union, and Mighty Joshua, and enjoy food, drinks, vendors, and more. Benefiting VHC and Blue Ridge Food Bank. $35-40, 2-10pm. The Shops at Stonefield, 2100 Hydraulic Rd. vahemp.org

SUPPLIED PHOTO

26

Kendall Street Company Saturday 9/10 | The Shops at Stonefield Tara Mills. Grab a glass and enjoy live music in the orchard. Free, noon. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com

music

The Cows. Rock as reggae, reggae as ska, and ska as rock. Free, 5:30pm. Potter’s Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potterscraft cider.com

Black Sterlings. Featuring Sharif and Justin Storer. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glass housewinery.com

Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, September 7. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

Willie DE Band. Rock, blues, and funk. $10, 6pm. The Batesville Market, 6624 Plank Rd. batesvillemarket.com

Charlottesville Chamber Music Festival. Grammy Award-winning violinist James Ehnes, violinist-violist Tim Summers, violist Jessica Thompson, pianist Andrew Armstrong, and cellist Raphael Bell perform. Free-$25, 3pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA Grounds. cvillechambermusic.org

outside Charlottesville City Market. Fresh produce, handmade gifts, homemade baked goods, and more. Free, 8am. Charlottesville City Market, 100 Water St E. charlottesville.gov

Irish Music. An energetic and eclectic Irish jam session with Patrick and Aaron Olwell and friends. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com

Fall

Workshop:

2022

music Vincent Zorn. Solo wild gypsy rumba. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com

etc. Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, September 7. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. klugeruhe.org

music

Family Game Night. Enjoy dinner, refreshing cocktails, mocktails, and beers, and play a variety of games for all ages, including corn hole, jumbo Jenga, cards, and more. Free, 5pm. Dairy Market, 946 Grady Ave. dairy marketcville.com

Baby Jo’s. Tunes from the seven-piece, New Orleans-inspired boogie and blues band. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskey jarcville.com

Geeks Who Drink Trivia Night. Useless knowledge means everything at this authentic homegrown trivia quiz. Free, 8pm. Firefly, 1304 E. Market St. fireflycville.com

Monday 9/12

@ McGuffey Art Center

Sketching Fall’s Foliage

/ John A. Hancock @ the Shenandoah Valley Art Center

w

Thursday, Oct. 20th & Friday, Oct. 21st, 10:00 am - 4:00 pm

Shenandoah Valley Art Center

Tuesday 9/13

Sundays at the Winery. Mimosas, awardwinning wine, cider, beer, food, and live music. Free, 1pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarm andwinery.com

Charlottesville w/Pencil John A. Hancock

L.Y.A.O Comedy Open Mic Night. Chris Alan hosts this talent showcase. Free, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com

Dungeons and Dragons. Start a group or join an existing one. No materials or experience required. $5, 4pm. The End Games, 374 Hillsdale Dr. theendgames.co

Sketching w/

Astronomy on Tap—C’ville #19. Join UVA astronomers for free talks, trivia, and prizes, plus a telescope observing. Free, 7pm. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery, 520 Second St. SE. aotcville.com

WTJU Vinyl Takeover. A lineup of radio DJs spin the tunes, and Crustworthy Pizza food truck slings the pies. Free, 1pm. Potters Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potterscraft cider.com

etc.

The Jazz Connection. Jazz quartet playing standards and originals with occasional guest performers. Free, 6pm. Kardinal Hall, 722 Preston Ave. kardinalhall.com

etc.

Second Sunday Bluegrass Jam. All levels, all ages, and all instruments welcome. Free, 1pm. The Batesville Market, 6624 Plank Rd. batesvillemarket.com

Sunday 9/11

Andrew D. Kaufman: The Gambler Wife. Kaufman’s new book offers a fresh and captivating portrait of Anna Dostoevskaya. Free, 4pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

Berto & Vincent. Rumba rumba. Free, 7pm. South and Central Latin Grill, Dairy Market. southandcentralgrill.com

Paramount Presents: Johnny Mathis. The Voice of Romance tour. $49-150, 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

Scuffletown. Kick off your weekend with music, wine, and friends. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

words

Gin & Jazz. Brian Caputo Trio performs in the hotel lobby bar. Free, 5:30pm. Oakhurst Hall, 122 Oakhurst Cir. oakhurstinn.com

Saturdays, 1:30 - 4:00 pm 5 weeks, starting Oct. 1st

info: HancockJohnA.Artist@gmail.com

register: johnahancock.com 434-939-7445

info: HancockJohnA.Artist@gmail.com

register: johnahancock.com 434-939-7445

126 S. Wayne Ave. Wayenesboro VA, 22980, 540-949-7662, svartcenter@gmail.com


CULTURE EATDRINKCVILLE

27

Wisdom from the wells Area bartenders share quick takes on barstool etiquette By Carrie Meslar

something or drop another guest’s check— we are still listening. There are a lot of moving parts behind a busy bar, but they all require our attention to keep things running smoothly. So when things get hectic, we are still there to make your favorite drink and swap stories, but we are also working to make sure that the people on the other side of the room are getting the same treatment.”

living@c-ville.com

B

Dex at Brightside Beach Pub Years bartending: 18

What he wants you to know: “When you ask us ‘What’s good here?’ we’d like to think it’s all good. We wrote the menu after all. Knowing what you like, and perhaps more importantly what you don’t like, helps put us on the right track to recommend something you will enjoy. Everything isn’t made for

Clay at Epineux Culinary Firm (pop-up series)

FILE PHOTO

Years bartending: 8

Local bartenders offer a behind-the-scenes look at the goings-on at your friendly, neighborhood watering holes.

every drinker, so throw us some additional qualifiers on what you are looking for. It makes our jobs easier and it is more likely that you will really enjoy the drink in front of you, which is what we are all about.”

Shaugna at Crozet Pizza at Buddhist Biker Bar Years bartending: 9

What she wants you to know: “Regulars are important, but if we are doing it right, we have a lot of them. Sometimes between making the drinks, running food, answering the phone, and making sure everyone is having a good time, we might forget your name or your regular drink order. It’s nothing personal, so don’t hesitate to remind us by saying your name or ordering that favorite drink we make for you without having us guess. We are working hard back here to make sure you want to come back!”

Joel at Bobboo at the Quirk Charlottesville Years bartending: 20 (give or take a few)

What he wants you to know: “Spirits are more versatile than you might realize. There are significant variations that exist within each category, and taking the time to experience those differences is not to be overlooked. With the resurrection of classic cocktails, more people are getting accustomed to seeing these spirits in elevated uses, but tasting them in neat form allows you to enjoy the craftsmanship that goes into a wellmade bottle of spirit.”

Gil at The Bebedero Years bartending: 7

What he wants you to know: “There is a lot going on. We are constantly searching for that balance between production and service. It’s not personal when we step away to grab

What he wants you to know: “Trust us. Set aside your notion of what experience you are going to have, and trust us to put our knowledge and experience to work. There might be a specific version of a Manhattan that you love to make at home, but when we have created a version that has been tasted and tweaked to just the right place, be willing to go with it! It’s rare that any bartender you encounter is there with zero experience, so allow yourself to put your night into our hands. You might end up with a favorite new experience that you didn’t even know was an option.” When COVID-19 forced the service industry to grind to a halt, many of the people who worked in it suddenly found themselves not only without work, but without the interactions that make one choose a career in hospitality. Getting back to the grind hasn’t been without hurdles, but it also brings a renewed sense of pride in the craft. There is a magic that occurs when everything is running well in a restaurant. It’s a hum of passion and hard work coming together for the guests, so while your bartenders are doing their best to adapt the swan method of looking graceful and composed on the surface, know that there is a strong possibility that, beneath the calm, they are paddling like hell.

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

artenders have long been relied on as secret keepers and unofficial therapists. There in times of joy and times of sorrow, observing real life at one of the last true gathering places in our increasingly tech-driven world. In the current era of sitting down at the bar, more and more conversations are happening around the aging concept that the customer is always right. This isn’t to say that bartenders are any less excited to serve you, it is in fact the very basis of what they do, but perhaps it’s time to take a closer look at the goings-on behind the bar, and bring a bit more awareness to the next round. Where one person sees a margarita, another sees an entire litany of things—the tequila that serves as the backbone, the lime juice that hopefully was squeezed just hours before, the delicate addition of sweetener, a necessary component that should provide balance without being cloying. These thoughts happen simultaneously along with observations of half a dozen other things taking place around them. If you’ve ever had a drink with someone who is, or has been, a bartender you have likely witnessed this silent analysis. In that spirit, and in celebration of the simple joy of a wellmade cocktail, here are some insights from area bartenders—things they wish more of their customers knew about life behind bars.

@cville_culture

Science Talk

Spiritual Seven Gospel Singers

Using Satellite Technology to Help Protect the Cultural Heritage of Ukraine

Known by many as the “Gospel Temptations”

SEP 10 at 7:30 PM

SEP 13 at 7:00 PM

Sponsored in part by:

Featuring LIVE MUSIC from SUNDRIED OPOSSUM Pay What You Will

(540) 943-9999 521 W. Main Street Waynesboro, VA 22980 Tickets on Sale:

SEP 28 at 6:00 PM www.waynetheatre.org

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Larnell Starkey & the


28

20th Annual In The Pink

Tennis Tournament Friday, Sept. 23, 2022 and Saturday, Sept. 24, 2022 Grab a racquet and join us at seven clubs around town for tennis and pickleball to fight breast cancer and support women’s health at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital

REGISTER starting July 1, 2022 at mjhfoundation.org/in-the-pink To Benefit Women’s Health and Breast Cancer Prevention In Our Community at Sentara Martha Jefferson Hospital

mjhfoundation.org

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Hosted by The Women’s Committee of Martha Jefferson Hospital Foundation

Business Booths | Panel Discussions | Live Music

BlackBusinessExpo.org | FREE EVENT

Featuring:

Ebony Groove

5:30 PM | Go-Go / Funk / R&B

4 PM | Soul / R&B


29

We need volunteers who love animals! Email: volunteer@caspca.org

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com @cville_culture

434-973-5959 x303

Rummage Store

Laundry

Lobby Greeters

Dog Walkers

facebook.com/cville.weekly

caspca.org


30

CULTURE RESTAURANT LISTINGS

Order up!

These local establishments are open and waiting to take your order. Email living@c-ville.com to add your restaurant to the list.

Asian Cuisine Afghan Kabob Authentic Afghan cuisine. 400 Emmet St. N. afghankabobcville.com. $$ Akira Ramen & Sushi Japanese cuisine. 3912 Lenox Ave., Ste. 320. akirasushiramen.com $ Asian Express Chinese and Japanese with healthy options. 909 W. Main St. newasian express.com. $ Bamboo House Korean and Chinese options. 4831 Seminole Trail. 973-9211. $$ Bang! Asian-inspired tapas and inventive martinis. 213 Second St. SW. bangrestaurant.net. $$ Chimm Thai Thai street food. 5th Street Station; Dairy Market. chimmtaste.com. $$ Coconut Thai Kitchen Thai favorites from the Monsoon Siam team. 1015 Heathercroft Ln., Crozet. coconutcrozet.com. $$ Doma Korean-style barbecue, kimchi, and more. 701 W. Main St. domakoreankitchen.com. $ Himalayan Fusion Indian, Nepalese and Tibetan cuisine. 520 E. Main St. himalayanfusion.com. $ Kanak Indian Kitchen Offering traditional homemade Indian food, plus cocktails. 5th Street Station. kanakcville.com. $ Lemongrass Vietnam meets Thailand. 104 14th St. NW. 244-THAI. $$ Lime Leaf Thai An upscale Thai experience. Rio Hill Shopping Center. 245-8884. $$ Marco & Luca Chinese snack food, including dumplings, sesame noodles, and pork buns. 112 W. Main St., Downtown Mall; 107 Elliewood Ave.; Seminole Square Shopping Center. $ Maru Korean BBQ & Grill Traditional Korean food with modern additions. 412 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. marudowntown.com. $

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Manila Street Filipino food. Dairy Market. dairy marketcville.com. $ Mashu Festival Authentic Asian festival food. Dairy Market. dairymarketcville.com. $ Milan Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with all the standards. 1817 Emmet St. milanindian-cuisine.com $$ Mochiko Hawaiian eats and suggested Hawaiian beer pairings. 5th Street Station. hawaiianfood cville.com. $ Monsoon Siam Original Thai cuisine. 113 W. Market St. monsoonsiamcville.com. $$ Mashumen Japanese ramen and rice bowls. 2208 Fontaine Ave. mashumen.com. $$ Now & Zen Gourmet Japanese and sushi. 202 Second St. NW. nowandzencville.square.site. $$ Pad Thai Homestyle Thai cooking from an experienced chef. 156 Carlton Rd. padthaicville.com. $$ Pei Wei Asian Kitchen Chinese staples from fresh ingredients. 5th Street Station. peiwei.com. $ Pineapples Thai Kitchen Thai favorites from the Monsoon Siam team. 722 Preston Ave. pine applescville.com. $$ Peter Chang China Grill Authentic Sichuan cuisine by a renowned chef. Barracks Road Shopping Center North Wing. peterchangcharlottesville. com. $$ Red Lantern Chinese cuisine by the pint or quart. 221 Carlton Rd. redlanterncharlottesville.com. $ Silk Thai Fresh, authentic Thai. 2210 Fontaine Ave. charlottesville.silkthairestaurant.com. $$ Tara Thai Affordable Thai faves, with multiple meat, fish, and veggie options. Barracks Road Shopping Center. tarathai.com. $$ Taste of China Chinese standards from a lengthy menu. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. taste ofchinacharlottesville.com. $$ Ten Upscale second-floor spot serving modern Japanese. 120 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ten-sushi.com. $$$ Thai ’99 II Thai noodle and rice dishes, curries, and stirfrys. Albemarle Square. thai99usa.com. $

Thai Cuisine & Noodle House Traditional Thai food, noodle dishes, and vegetarian specials. 2005 Commonwealth Dr. thaicuisinecville.com. $$

Glass Half Full Taproom A large selection of beers, wines, and spirits. 5th Street Station. glasshalffullbar.com. $

Umma’s Korean and Japanese-American cuisine. 200 W. Water St. ummasfood.com. $$

Kardinal Hall An extensive list of brews. 722 Preston Ave. kardinalhall.com. $$

Farm Bell Kitchen New-Southern cuisine with local farm-to-table ingredients. 1209 W. Main St. farmbellkitchen.com. $$

Vu Noodles Fresh, vegetarian Vietnamese noodles, pho, bahn mi, and more. 111 E. Water St. vunoodles.com. $

The Lobby Bar Playful takes on classic cocktails and mocktails, with a menu of bar snacks. 499 W. Main St. quirkhotels.com. $

First Watch Breakfast, brunch, and lunch chain with locally grown ingredients. Barracks Road Shopping Center. firstwatch.com. $$

Bakeries

Lucky Blue’s Bar Fast-casual bowls, burritos, and cheesesteaks. 223 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. luckybluesbar.com. $

Mel’s Café Southern soul food, including all day breakfast. 719 W. Main St. 971-8819. $

Albemarle Baking Company Breads, cakes, and pastries. 418 W. Main St. albemarlebaking co.com. $ Bee Conscious Baking Company Pastries, cakes, and organically-grown produce. Dairy Market. beeconsciousbakingcompany.com. $ Bowerbird Bakeshop Pastries, breads, and cookies using locally sourced ingredients. 120 10th St. NW, bowerbirdbakeshop.com. $ Caked Up Cville Small-batch cupcakes and cakes. cakedupcville.com. $ Cake Bloom A cake and bubbles bar with freshly-baked treats by the slice or whole. 705 W. Main St. cakebloom.com. $$ Cou Cou Rachou Croissants, tatins, financiers, danishes, cake slices, muffins, and more. 917 Preston Ave. Suite B; 1837 Broadway St. coucou rachou.com. $

Matchbox Wood-fired pizzas, salads, salmon, steak dinners, and gourmet burgers. 2055 Bond St. match boxrestaurants.com. $$ Michie Tavern Southern midday fare from an 18th-century tavern. 683 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy. michietavern.com. $$ The Milkman’s Bar Led by mixologist River Hawkins, the joint serves creative cocktails that pay homage to the ‘50s. Dairy Market. milkmansbar. com. $$ Miller’s Old-school bar serving up elevated Southern pub fare. 109 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. millersdowntown.com. $ Outback Steakhouse Bloomin’ onions and giant steaks. 1101 Seminole Trl. outback.com. $$ The Peidmont Bar & Kitchen Everything from sandwiches and pizza, to salads and burgers. 1791 Richmond Rd. thepiedmontva.com. $$

Doodle’s Diner Country cookin’ from breakfast to burgers. 1305 Long St. doodlesdiner.com. $

Moose’s by the Creek All day breakfast and lunch favorites. 1710 Monticello Rd. 977-4150. $ The Nook All day diner classics. 415 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. thenookcville.com. $ Timberlake’s Drug Store and Soda Fountain A variety of sandwiches, soups, salads, and old fashioned milkshakes. 322 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 296-1191. $ Tip Top A wide range of diner staples, including all day breakfast. 1420 Richmond Rd. tiptop restaurant.com. $ Villa Diner Mainstay with housemade pancakes, biscuits, and more. 1250 Emmet St. N. thevilladiner.com. $

Burgers, BBQ, and Chicken

Peloton Station Cycle-centric tavern and bike shop. 114 10th St. NW. pelotonstation.com. $$

Ace Biscuit & Barbecue Breakfast and lunch spot with BBQ and soul food by the biscuit. 600 Concord Ave. acebiscuitandbarbecue.com. $

Great Harvest Bread Co. Sandwiches, sweets, and bread baked from scratch every day. McIntire Plaza. greatharvestcville.com. $

Ralph Sampson’s American Taproom An upscale sports bar experience. 973 Emmet St. N. americantaproom.com. $$

Angelic’s Kitchen Soul food eatery serving chicken, seafood, ribs, and more. Dairy Market. angelics kitchen.com. $

MarieBette Café & Bakery European-inspired fare. 700 Rose Hill Dr. mariebette.com. $

Rapture Playful Southern cuisine. 300 E. Main St. rapturerestaurant.com. $$

Brown’s Fried chicken and sides. 1218 Avon St. 295-4911. $

Paradox Pastry Known for biscuits, European pastries, and the legendary DMB cookies and brownies. 313 Second St. SE. #103. paradox pastry.com. $

Red Crab Seafood Seafood boils, po boys, and more. 905 Twentyninth Pl. Ct. redcrabseafood. com. $

Burger Bach New Zealand-inspired gastropub. The Shops at Stonefield. theburgerbach.com. $$

Gearharts Fine Chocolates Freshly baked pastries, cakes, cookies, brownies, and chocolates. 243 Ridge McIntire Rd. gearhartschocolates.com. $

Petite MarieBette MarieBette’s little sister. 105 E. Water St. mariebette.com. $

The Rooftop Bar Serving up pizzas, alongside cocktails, locally-sourced craft beers, and local wine. 499 W. Main St. quirkhotels.com. $

The Pie Chest Homemade breakfast and hand pies, plus by-the-slice options. 119 Fourth St. NE.; 1518 E. High St. thepiechestcville.com. $

Sedona Taphouse Lots of craft beers and an all-American menu. 1035 Millmont St. sedona taphouse.com. $$

Quality Pie Ex-Mas chef Tomas Rahal serves Spanish-inspired fare. 309 Avon St. qualitypieva. com. $$

Selvedge Brewing Elevated bar fare from Chef Tucker Yoder. The Wool Factory. thewool factory.com. $$

Sliced. cake bar Mobile bakery offering whole cakes, cake flights, cake pops, and buttercream shots. slicedcakebar.com. $

Skrimp Shack Shrimp, fish, and chicken tacos, sandwiches, and baskets. 1970 Rio Hill Center. theskrimpshack.olo.com. $

Bars and Grills

South Street Brewery Draft brews, cocktails, wine, and an extensive food list. 106 South St. W. southstreetbrewery.com. $$

Alamo Drafthouse Burgers, pizzas, salads, snacks, and desserts prepared fresh from locally sourced ingredients. 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com. $ Beer Run Massive tap and packaged beer offerings, plus food. 156 Carlton Rd. beerrun.com. $$ Bobboo A curated list of whiskeys from Virginia and around the world, with bespoke charcuterie boards and classic, hand-crafted cocktails. 499 W. Main St. quirkhotels.com. $$ Bonefish Grill A seafood-centric menu, plus steaks and cocktails. Hollymead Town Center. bonefishgrill.com. $$ The Château Lobby Bar Creative cocktails, wine, craft beer, and small plates sourced from local purveyors. 122 Oakhurst Cir. oakhurstinn.com. $$ Dürty Nelly’s Pub—Deli Subs and sandwiches, with a late-night pub menu. 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. durtynellyscharlottesville.com. $

Texas Roadhouse Steaks, ribs, and from-scratch sides. Albemarle Square. texasroadhouses.com. $$ Timberwood Grill All-American eatery and after-work watering hole. 3311 Worth Crossing. timberwoodgrill.com. $$ Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery Locally sourced, beer-infused dishes including Southern classics and a kids menu. 520 Second St. SE. threenotchdbrewing.com. $$ The Whiskey Jar Saloon-style Southern spot with more than 90 varieties of whiskey. 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskeyjarcville.com. $$ Whistlestop Grill American comfort food. 1200 Crozet Ave., Crozet. thewhistlestopgrill.com. $

Breakfast Joints and Diners

Citizen Burger Burgers, salads, and other favorites. 212 E. Main St., Downtown Mall; Dairy Market. citizenburgerbarcville.com. $$ Five Guys Fast-casual hamburgers, hot dogs, and fries. Barracks Road Shopping Center; Hollymead Town Center. fiveguys.com. $$ GRN Burger Griddle smashed burgers, salty fries, and crunchy nuggets, all meat free. Dairy Market. grnburger.com. $ Lazy Parrot Wings and Brews Ribs, chicken, and brisket served in a tropics-themed space. Pantops Shopping Center. lazyparrotwingsandbrews.com. $$ Luv’n Oven Gizzards, livers, fries, and shakes. 162 Village Sq., Scottsville. luvn-oven.com. $ Martin’s Grill Hamburgers, veggie burgers, and fries. Forest Lakes Shopping Center. martinsgrill.com. $ Mission BBQ Pulled turkey, pork, and chicken, plus racks by the bone. The Shops at Stonefield. mission-bbq.com. $$ Moe’s Original BBQ Alabama-style pulled pork smoked in-house. 2119 Ivy Rd. moesoriginalbbq.com. $ Multiverse Kitchens A digital food hall home to seven different restaurants—Fowl Mouthed Chicken, Firebox, Brookville Biscuit + Brunch, Keevil Tea Room, Smashing Salads, Long Strange Chip, and Toad in the Hole. McIntire Plaza. multiverse kitchens.com. $-$$ Riverside Lunch Smashburgers, dogs, and fries. 1429 Hazel St., 971-3546; 1770 Timberwood Blvd., 979-1000. $ Royalty Eats Soul food staples, including chicken and waffles, plenty of sides, and desserts. 820 Cherry Ave. 923-3287. $

Belle Breakfast and lunch sandwiches, pastries, and coffee. belle-cville.square.site. $$

Soul Food Joint A homecooked meal made up of your favorite Southern staples, sides, and fixins. 300 E. Market St. soulfoodjoint.com. $

Firefly Craft beer, burgers, salads, vegetarianfriendly menu. 1304 E. Market St. fireflycville.com. $

Blue Moon Diner Serving breakfast and lunch options like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and BLTs. 600 W. Main St. bluemoondiner.net. $

Vision BBQ Meats smoked the old fashioned way. 249 Ridge McIntire Rd. visionbbqcville.com. $

The Fitzroy A kitchen and bar offering updates of comforting classics. 120 E. Main St. thefitzroy cville.com. $$

Chickadee Comfort food crafted with care. The Glass Building, 313 Second St. SE. chickadee cville.com. $

Wayside Takeout & Catering Fried chicken and barbecue sandwiches. 2203 Jefferson Park Ave. waysidechicken.com. $

Fardowners Local ingredients liven up pub fare like sliders and sandwiches. 5773 The Square, Crozet. fardowners.com. $$


CULTURE RESTAURANT LISTINGS Coffee Places and Cafés Atlas Coffee Espresso, coffee, tea, and freshbaked pastries. 2206 Fontaine Ave. atlascoffee cville.com. $ Baine’s Books & Coffee Wide selection of coffee, tea, pastries, and paninis. 485 Valley St., Scottsville. bainesbooks.com. $ Brews on High An independently owned, drive-thru coffee shop. 406 10th St. NE. brews onhigh.com. $ C’ville Coffee & Wine Full menu of coffee, sandwiches, and wines. 1301 Harris St. cville coffee.com. $ Daily Grind Coffee & Creamery Family-owned and operated, serving coffee and espresso drinks, all-fruit smoothies, milkshakes, and ice cream scoops. 3450 Seminole Trl. dailygrindcville.com. $

Dino’s Wood-Fired Pizza & Rotisserie Chicken A selection of wood-fired artisan pizzas and rotisserie chicken with flavors from around the world. Dairy Market. dinos.restaurant. $$ Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie The alternative pizza. 4916 Plank Rd., North Garden. drhoshumblepie.com. $$ Fabio’s New York Pizza Pizza, subs, salads, and calzones made by natives of Naples. 1551 E. High St. fabiosnypizza.com. $ Fry’s Spring Station Fire-roasted pizza and Italian eats. 2115 Jefferson Park Ave. eatatfrys.com. $ Lampo Neapolitan-style pizza and snacks. 205 Monticello Rd. lampopizza.com. $$ Lampo2go Lampo’s to go location. 929 Second St. SE. lampopizza.com. $$ Luce Literal hole in the wall serving fresh, handmade pasta to go. 110 Second St. NW. lucepasta. com. $$

Eleva Coffee The Brooklyn-based coffee roasting company offers espresso drinks, smoothies, and bagged beans. Dairy Market. elevacoffee.com. $

Mellow Mushroom Trippy-themed franchise, with pizza and beers. 1321 W. Main St. mellow mushroom.com. $

Greenberry’s Java, specialty drinks, and fresh baked goods. Barracks Road Shopping Center. greenberrys.com. $

Red Pump Kitchen Upscale eatery featuring local, seasonal Mediterranean and Italian dishes. 401 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. redpump kitchen.com. $$

Green House Coffee Coffee, smoothies, sandwiches, salads, and from-scratch cakes, cookies, sweet breads, and more. 1260 Crozet Ave., Crozet. greenhousecrozet.com. $ Grit Coffee Espresso beverages, with breakfast and lunch fare. 610 Riverside Shops Way; The Shops at Stonefield; 112 Main St., Downtown Mall; 19 Elliewood Ave.; 1110 Old Trail Dr., Crozet. gritcoffee.com. $ Higher Grounds Serving Trager Brother’s coffee. 1215 Lee St., UVA. hg-uva.com. $ JBird Supply Coffee Roaster Ethically sourced, specialty coffee. 969 Second St. SE. jbirdsupply. com. $ Lone Light Coffee Quality coffee drinks. 119 Fourth St. NE.; 1518 E. High St. lonelightcoffee. com. $ Milli Coffee Roasters Espresso drinks, waffles, paninis, and more. 400 Preston Ave., Ste. 150. millicoffeeroasters.com. $

Sal’s Cafe Italia Family owned and operated, from Sicily and Brooklyn. 221 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. salscaffeitalia.com. $ Tavola Rustic Italian with housemade pastas, craft cocktails, and a Wine Spectator award-winning list. 826 Hinton Ave. tavolavino.com. $$ Vita Nova Creative ingredients on hearty pizza by the slice. 310 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. vitanovapizzapasta.com. $ Vinny’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria This regional chain has pies plus a slew of subs, pastas, and stromboli. Hollymead Town Center. vinnysitaliangrill.com. $$ Vivace Every kind of pasta imaginable, plus seafood. 2244 Ivy Rd. vivacecville.com. $$

South and Central Latin Grill Small plates, steaks, sides, and more. Dairy Market. southand centralgrill.com. $$

Revolutionary Soup Soups and sandwiches. 108 Second St. SW., Downtown Mall. revolutionary soup.com. $

Torchy’s Tacos Mexican street-food-style tacos. The Shops at Stonefield. torchystacos.com. $

Roots Natural Kitchen Fast-casual salads and grain bowls. 1329 W. Main St. rootsnaturalkitchen. com. $

Mediterranean & Caribbean

Take It Away Sandwiches on freshly baked breads. Dairy Market; 115 Elliewood Ave. takeit awaysandwichshop.com. $

Aromas Café & Catering Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. 900 Natural Resources Dr. aromascafeandcatering.com. $

Taste Shack Fast-casual soups, sandwiches, burgers, and more. 2291 Seminole Ln. 956-4782. $

Bacio Mediterranean Cuisine Rustic and modern Greek, Lebanese and Italian cuisine. 375 Four Leaf Ln. baciomed.com. $$

Upscale Casual

Cava Fast-casual Mediterranean with lots of vegetarian options. 1200 Emmet St. N, #110. cava. com. $

Fig Southern and Mediterranean bistro fare. 1331 W. Main St. figuva.com. $ Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar Dishes from Spain to Greece and wines of the world. 416 W. Main St. orzokitchen.com. $$ Otto Turkish Street Food Go for the doner kebabs and stay for the rosemary fries. 111 W. Water St. otto-cville.com. $ Pearl Island Cafe Caribbean-inspired lunch spot with vegan options. 233 Fourth St. NW. pearl islandcatering.square.site. $ Smyrna Simple, locally sourced dishes from a Mediterranean, Aegean cuisine. 707 W. Main St. smyrnacville.com. $$ Sticks Kebob Shop Kebobs, bowls, and more. 917 Preston Ave.; 1820 Abbey Rd. stickskebob shop.com. $ Sultan Kebab Authentic Turkish cuisine with vegetarian options. 333 Second St. SE. sultan kebabcville.com. $ Thyme & Co. Lebanese flatbread, dips, salads, bowls, and desserts. 104 14th St. NW., Ste. 2. thyme-co.com. $

Latin American

Zoës Kitchen Fresh made Mediterranean. Barracks Road Shopping Center. zoeskitchen.com. $

Mudhouse Coffee and pastries. 213 W. Main St., Downtown Mall; 116 10th St. NW.; 5793 The Square, Crozet. mudhouse.com $

Brazos Tacos Austin, Texas-style breakfast, lunch, early dinner, and brunch tacos. 925 Second St. SE. brazostacos.com. $

Oakhurst Inn Cafe A contemporary eatery with freshly baked treats and artisanal coffee. 122 Oakhurst Cir. oakhurstinn.com. $

The Bebedero Upscale, authentic Mexican. 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com. $$ Chipotle Made-to-order burritos and tacos. Barracks Road Shopping Center; 2040 Abbey Rd., Ste. 101. chipotle.com $ Cinema Taco A movie-themed joint offering tacos, burritos, empanadas, and margaritas. 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jefferson theater.com. $ Continental Divide Tacos and enchiladas. 811 W. Main St. continental-divide.square.site. $$

Bodo’s Bagels Sandwiches on bagels made in-house daily. 1418 N. Emmet St.; 505 Preston Ave.; 1609 University Ave. bodosbagels.com. $ Botanical Plant-Based Fare Sandwiches, bowls, mac and cheese, and shareables, all meat and dairy free. 421 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. botanicalfare.com. $$

Guadalajara Family-run authentic Mexican food. Multiple locations. guadalajaramexicanva.com. $

Iron Paffles & Coffee Sweet and savory puff pastry waffle sandwiches, with vegan options. 214 W. Water St. iron-made.com. $

Belmont Pizza and Pub Fresh, stone-baked pizza. 211 Carlton Rd., Ste. 10. belmontpizzaandpub. com. $

Billy Pie at Random Row Brewing Stone oven Neapolian style pizza in a brewery taproom. 608 Preston Ave. randomrow.com. $

Little Star Spanish- and Mexican-inspired food. 420 W. Main St. littlestarrestaurant.com. $$ Mas Spanish tapas and wines. 904 Monticello Rd. mastapas.com. $$ Morsel Compass The taco food truck’s brick-andmortar spot. 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. morsel compass.com. $$

Christian’s Pizza Fresh pies, by-the-slice or whole. Multiple locations. $

Passiflora A Baja-Mediterranean-inspired menu. 422 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. passiflorava. com. $$

Crozet Pizza Family-owned pizza parlor. 5794 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet; 20 Elliewood Ave. 601 Fifth St. SW. crozetpizza.com. $

Qdoba Mexican Grill Spicy burritos, quesadillas, and Mexican salads. 3918 Lenox Ave. qdoba.com. $

Fleurie Upscale, modern French cuisine with à la carte and tasting menus. 108 Third St. NE. fleurierestaurant.com. $$$ Hamiltons’ at First & Main Contemporary American cuisine with a full bar and extensive wine list. 110 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. hamiltons restaurant.com. $$$ Ivy Inn Fine dining in a charming tollhouse. 2244 Old Ivy Rd. ivyinnrestaurant.com. $$$ The Local New American cuisine and wine. 824 Hinton Ave. thelocal-cville.com. $$ Marigold by Jean-Georges Committed to sustainable and seasonal dishes by an acclaimed chef. 701 Club Dr. marigoldjg.com. $$$

Ivy Provisions Deli and retail food shop offering fresh, housemade breakfast and lunch all day. 2206 Ivy Rd. ivyprovisions.com. $ Jersey Mike’s Subs Subs, salads, and wraps. 2040 Abbey Rd., Ste. 104; 5th Street Station. jerseymikes.com. $ Jimmy John’s Sandwiches and gourmet subs. 1650 E. Rio Rd.; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center. jimmy johns.com. $ Kitchenette Sandwich Shop Sandwiches, soups, and salads made fresh. 920 9 1/2 St. NE. kitchenette va.com. $ Mane Course Sandwiches A fast-casual, equestrian themed restaurant. 179 Connor Dr. mancourse sandwiches.com. $ Organic Krush Organic foods and cold-pressed juices, including all day breakfast, smoothies, wraps, and bowls. The Shops at Stonefield. organickrush. com. $$

The Mill Room An upscale, resort eatery with an American menu. 200 Ednam Dr. boarshead resort.com. $$$ Mockingbird A dinner-only menu with a modern take on Southern classics. 421 Monticello Rd. mockingbird-cville.com. $$ Oakhart Social Seasonal, creative, modern American food for sharing. 511 W. Main St. oakhartsocial.com. $$ Petit Pois Locally sourced French dishes paired with wine in cute bistro quarters. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. petitpoisrestaurant.com. $$ Pink Grouse A game-forward menu and a curated wine list with highlights from across Virginia and Europe. 499 W. Main St. quirkhotels.com. $$ Public Fish & Oyster East Coast seafood, including a raw bar, craft cocktails, and microbrews. 513 W. Main St. publicfo.com. $$ Restoration Great views and American fare. 5494 Golf Dr., Crozet. oldtrailclub.com. $$ The Ridley Black-owned experiential Southern cuisine and craft cocktails. 1106 W. Main St. the ridleyva.com. $$ Riverbirch Restaurant Fresh and local American-style cuisine. 630 Riverside Shops Way. river birchrestaurant.com. $$ Siren American-Mediterranean inspired fare with a seafood focus brought to you by Chef Laura Fonner. 247 Ridge McIntire Rd. sirencville.com. $$ Southern Crescent Cajun and Creole fare. 814 Hinton Ave. thesoutherncrescent.com. $$ Tonic Seasonal, local café fare with craft cocktails and curated wine list. 609 E. Market St. toniccville.com. $$ Zocalo Flavorful, high-end, Latin-inspired cuisine. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. zocalorestaurant.com. $$

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Anna’s Pizza No. 5 Family-owned and operated. 115 Maury Ave. 295-7500. $

Café Frank Chef Jose De Brito brings everyday food from a classic French kitchen. 317 E. Main St. cafefrankcville.com. $$

@cville_culture

Starbucks Coffee and tea drinks, pastries, and sandwiches. Multiple locations. starbucks.com. $

Chopt Creative salad chain with ingredients from local purveyors. Barracks Road Shopping Center. choptsalad.com. $

La Michoacana Taqueria & Restaurant Hearty Mexican standards, including tacos, tamales, and tortas. 1138 E. High St. 202-1336. $

C&O Restaurant An à la carte menu, with musttry cocktails. 515 E. Water St. candorestaurant. com. $$$

The Melting Pot Fondue fun for all. 501 E. Water St. meltingpot.com. $$$

Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Baja-style tacos and other Mexican eats. 5th Street Station. fuzzystacoshop. com. $

Italian and Pizza

Brasserie Saison Modern European fare and house-brewed beer. 111 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. brasseriesaison.com. $$

Baggby’s Gourmet Sandwiches Sandwiches, salads, and soups. 512 E. Main St. Downtown Mall. baggbys.com. $

Snowing in Space Freshly brewed nitro cold brew coffee. 2415 Ivy Rd. snowinginspace.com. $$

Guajiros Miami Eatery Miami-inspired, with strong Cuban influence as well as Central and Southern American dishes. 1871 Seminole Trail. guajiros.net. $

Bizou Playful French-American bistro. 119 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. bizoudowntown.com. $$

Maya Locally sourced Southern fare and imaginative cocktails. 633 W. Main St. maya-restaurant. com. $$

Farmacy Café Organic, local superfood Mexican fusion. The CODE Building. farmacy.guru. $$

The Workshop A coffee and wine shop featuring Grit Coffee and pastries from Cou Cou Rachou. The Wool Factory. thewoolfactory.com. $

The Alley Light Classic, French, shared plates, craft cocktails and small grower wines. 108 Secpnd St. SW. alleylight.com. $$

Soups, Salads, and Sandwiches

The Bradbury Cafe Serving breakfast, brick oven pizza, sandwiches, and salads, with coffee and espresso. 300 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebradburydowntown.com. $

Shenandoah Joe Local roaster with a coffee bar and pastries. 945 Preston Ave.; 2214 Ivy Rd. shenandoahjoe.com. $

Aberdeen Barn A classic steakhouse. 2018 Holiday Dr. aberdeenbarn.com. $$$

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

Al Carbon Coal-fire prepared chicken, plus plenty of sides. 1875 Seminole Trl.; 5th Street Station. alcarbonchicken.com. $

Quirk Cafe Serving locally-roasted selections from Blanchard’s Coffee Roasting Company, cold brew on tap, and other beverages and bites. 499 W. Main St. quirkhotels.com. $$

Panera Bread Chain with casual fare. Barracks Road Shopping Center; 5th Street Station. panera bread.com. $$

Vocelli Pizza Pizza, pasta, paninis, salads, stromboli, and antipasti. Woodbrook Shopping Center. vocellipizza.com. $

Milli Second Cafe & Wine Bar An offshoot of Milli Coffee Roasters. The CODE Building. @millicafe. $

Poindexter Coffee All-day breakfast, lunch, and coffee. The Graduate, 1309 W. Main St. graduate hotels.com. $

Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine & Café Authentic Mexican cuisine. 112 W. Main St., Ste. 6. sombreros cville.com. $

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32

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


33

CROSSWORD

To be continued BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. “Correct me ____ wrong ...” 5. Comedian Margaret 8. Beseeches 14. Mont Blanc, par exemple 15. ____ de parfum 16. Bad-mouths 17. Handyman’s accessory 19. Kind of joke 20. Two-time N.L. batting champ Lefty 21. ____ choy 22. Have another birthday 23. Caterer’s container 24. “The Big Chill” actor 28. Exam for a future public defender, for short 30. ____-advised 31. Things you can crack without damaging them 32. Mother of Beyoncé and Solange Knowles 33. Ginger ____ 34. One might say “One, two, testing, testing” into it 35. “This isn’t over” ... or what’s indicated by this puzzle’s circled letters 40. Former U.S. Senate minority whip Jon 41. Social reformer Dorothea 42. “Weekend, here I come!” 44. “Me and Bobby ____” (posthumous #1 hit for Janis Joplin) 47. Feel bad 48. Opposite of plummet 49. Frank Sinatra School of the Arts co-founder 53. Nigerian tribe 54. Suffix with morph-

#3

55. Energizer size 56. Duane ____ (drugstore chain) 58. Short-term govt. securities 60. Emulated a bookie 63. “Deal’s off” 64. University URL ending 65. Scott of “Charles in Charge” 66. Gauge 67. After tax 68. MLB playoff event

DOWN 1. “Am ____ risk?” 2. Puts the pedal to the metal 3. Apple product discontinued in 2017 4. Anthony or Ball of hoops, familiarly 5. Green with the 2010 hit “Forget You” 6. “2001: A Space Odyssey” computer 7. LGBTQ+ magazine since 1992 8. Former 9. Job hunter’s site 10. Short albums, briefly 11. Italian cheese 12. Member of the 2020 World Series champions 13. Scoffs (at) 18. “Having said that ...” 21. “The Fresh Prince of ____-Air” 23. Final: Abbr. 25. Ventimiglia of “This Is Us” 26. Assimilate 27. “Hey, wait your turn in line!”

29. Q neighbor 33. Knee injury site, for short 34. Chex ____ (party food) 36. Scrutinizes 37. One of 100 in Scrabble 38. Perfect self, in psychoanalysis 39. Hyperglycemia sufferer 43. To and ____ 44. Volcano in E. Sicily 45. Small jazz bands 46. Pleasant-sounding rock? 47. Actress de Armas of “Knives Out” 50. Lessens, as pain 51. Rainbow ____ 52. William Shatner’s “____War” 57. Band that won the 1974 Eurovision Song Contest 59. New Guinea port from which Amelia Earhart left on her last flight 60. What “X” might mean 61. Poet Amanda Gorman’s “____ to Our Ocean” 62. [Send assistance!]

ANSWERS 8/31/22

Sobfest

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

#6 solution © 2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

#5 solution

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#6


34

By Rob Brezsny

Libra

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): How to be the best Libra you can be in the next three weeks: 1. Make sure your cool attention to detail never gets chilly. Warm it up now and then. Invite your heart to add its counsel to your head’s observations. Tenderize your objectivity. 2. Always be willing to be puzzled. Always be entertained and educated by your puzzlement. Proceed on the theory that nothing ever changes unless somebody is puzzled. 3. Practice, practice, practice the art of moderation. Do so with the intention of using it as a flexible skill rather than an unthinking habit. 4. Applying the Goldilocks principle will be essential. Everything must be just right: neither too much nor too little; neither overly grand nor overly modest.

Scorpio

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There are blessings in every abyss. You, of all the signs in the zodiac, have the greatest capacity to find those blessings and make them yours. Likewise, there is an abyss in each blessing. You, of all the signs, have the most power to make sure your experiences in the abyss don’t detract from but enhance the blessing. In the coming weeks, dear Scorpio, take maximum advantage of these superpowers of yours. Be a master of zeroing in on the opportunities seeded in the dilemmas. Show everyone how to home in on and enjoy the delights in the darkness. Be an inspirational role model as you extract redemption from the messes.

September 7 – 13, 2022 c-ville.com

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Sagittarius

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): One of my favorite Sagittarians is practical mystic Caroline Myss, who was born with sun and Mercury and ascendant in Sagittarius. In accordance with current astrological omens, I’ve gathered six of her quotes to serve your current needs. 1. There isn’t anything in your life that cannot be changed. 2. When you do not seek or need approval, you are at your most powerful. 3. Healing comes from gathering wisdom from past actions and letting go of the pain that the education cost you. 4. The soul always knows what to do to heal itself. 5. What serves your spirit enhances your body. What diminishes your spirit diminishes your body. 6. What is in you is stronger than what is out there to defeat you.

Capricorn

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I have always felt you Capricorns are wise to commune with rocks, dirt,

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “To love oneself is hard work,” declares Virgo author Hanif Abdurraqib. He adds, “But I think it becomes harder when you realize that you’re actually required to love multiple versions of yourself that show up without warning throughout a day, throughout a week, throughout a month, throughout a life.” Let’s make that your inspirational strategy, Virgo. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to refine, deepen, and invigorate your love for all your selves. It may be hard work, but I bet it will also be fun and exhilarating. mud, sand, and clay. I think you should regularly touch the actual earth with your hands and bare feet. If I’m out hiking with a Capricorn friend, I might urge them to sniff blooming mushrooms and lean down to kiss the exposed roots of trees. Direct encounters with natural wonders are like magic potions and miracle medicine for you. Moreover, you flourish when you nurture close personal relationships with anything that might be described as foundational. This is always true, but will be extra true for you in the coming weeks. Your words of power are kernel, core, gist, marrow, and keystone.

Aquarius

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The coming weeks will be a favorable time to dream up creative solutions to problems that haven’t fully materialized yet. Then you can apply your discoveries as you address problems that already exist. In other words, dear Aquarius, I’m telling you that your uncanny facility for glimpsing the future can be useful in enhancing your life in the present. Your almost psychic capacity to foretell the coming trends will be instrumental as you fix glitches in the here and now.

Pisces

(Feb. 19-March 20): In the coming weeks, logic may be of only partial use to you. Information acquired through your senses might prove less than fully adequate, as well. On the other hand, your talents for feeling deeply and tapping into your intuition can provide you with highly accurate intelligence. Here’s a further tip to help you maximize your ability to understand reality: Visit a river or creek or lake. Converse with the fish and frogs and turtles and beavers. Study the ways of the crabs and crayfish and eels. Sing songs to the dragonflies and whirligig beetles and lacewings.

Aries

(March 21-April 19): Aries-born Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was one of the greatest basketball players ever. He excelled at most aspects of the game. Some experts say his rebounding was only average for a player his size—seven feet, two inches. But he is still the third-best rebounder in National Basketball Association history. And he played for 20 years, until age 40. What tips might Abdul-Jabbar have for you now? Here’s a suggestion from him that aligns with your current astrological omens: “Work on those parts of your game that are fundamentally weak.” The implication is that you have a lot of strengths, and now it’s time to raise up the rest of your skill set.

Taurus

(April 20-May 20): As a Taurus, you are always wise to be reverent toward your five senses. They are your glorious treasures, your marvelous superpowers, your sublime assets. In the coming weeks, they will serve you even better than usual. As you deploy them with all your amazement and appreciation unfurled, they will boost your intelligence. They will heighten your intuition in ways that guide you to good decisions. You will tune into interesting truths that had previously been hidden from you. I suspect your sensory apparatus will be so sharp and clear that it will work almost as extrasensory powers.

Gemini

(May 21-June 20): When you Geminis are at your best, you don’t merely tolerate dualities. You enjoy and embrace them. You work with them eagerly. While many non-Geminis regard oppositions and paradoxes as at best inconvenient and at worst obstructive, you often find how the apparent polarities

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are woven together and complementary. That’s why so many of you are connoisseurs of love that’s both tough and tender. You can be effective in seemingly contradictory situations that confuse and immobilize others. All these skills of yours should come in handy during the coming weeks. Use them to the hilt.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): Author Jean Frémon says Cancerian naturalist Henry David Thoreau “always had two notebooks—one for facts, and the other for poetry. But Thoreau had a hard time keeping them apart, as he often found facts more poetic than his poems.” Judging from your current astrological omens, Cancerian, I suspect you are entering a time when facts will be even more poetic than usual. If you open yourself to the magic of reality, the mundane details of everyday life will delight you and appeal to your sense of wonder. Routine events will veer toward the marvelous. Can you bear to experience so much lyrical grace? I think so.

Leo

(July 23-Aug. 22): “What good is it if you read Plato but never clean your toilet?” writes author Alice Munro. To which I add, “What good is it if you have brilliant breakthroughs and intriguing insights but never translate them into practical changes in your daily rhythm?” I’m not saying you are guilty of these sins, Leo. But I want to ensure that you won’t be guilty of these sins in the coming weeks. It’s crucial to your long-term future that you devote quality time to being earthy and grounded and pragmatic. Be as effective as you are smart. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: RealAstrology.com, (877) 873-4888


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36

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: A.M.Z.

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The object of this suit is to: Terminate residual parental rights in A.M.Z (dob 4/26/07) and approve a foster care plan with a goal of adoption. It is ORDERED that X Moises Morales, appear at the abovenamed Court and protect his or her interests on or before October 3rd, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. 8/1/2022 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

BLUE RIDGE COUNTRY STORE 518 E Main St, Charlottesville, VA 22902

The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) AUTHORITY for a Wine and Beer Off Premise license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Banana Stand LLC, Owner NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license must be Submitted to ABC no later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required newspaper legal notices. Objections should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.


VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316

In the matter of the adoption of a child known as AUBREY LYNNE JOHNSON a minor, born on February 8, 2016 by Lynda Donel Keller

Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

PETITIONER

The object of this suit is to

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: D.C.

ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of the above-styled suit is an adoption action An affidavit having been filed that due diligence has been used by the Petitioner to ascertain the identity and address of the natural father, Jerod Michael Johnson, without success. It is hereby ORDERED that all interested parties appear on or before September 16th, 2022 in the Clerk’s Office of this Court and do what is necessary to protect his interest in this matter ENTER: H. Thomas Padrick, Jr.

DATE: 8/3/2022

Approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residential parental rights of Megan Fultz in the child born to them on May 26, 2006 in Charlottesville, Virginia It is ORDERED that the X defendant Megan Fultz appear at the abovenamed Court and protect his or her interests on or before September 21, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. 8/10/2022 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316

Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

The object of this suit is to terminate residual parental rights of E.M. (2/10/20) and R.S. (1/14/2021) and aprove plan with adoption goal.

David M. Barredo JUDGE

The object of this suit is to Approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residential parental rights of Megan Fultz & Jason Henry in the child born to them on January 12, 2012 in Charlottesville, Virginia It is ORDERED that the X defendant Megan Fultz appear at the abovenamed Court and protect his or her interests on or before September 21, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. 8/10/2022 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

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It is ORDERED that the X defendant Katie Shaver appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before September 27, 2022 at 9:00 a.m.

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: T.H.

September 7 - 13, 2022 c-ville.com

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: E.M. and R.S.

8/3/2022 DATE

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VOL. 31 NO. 36 n SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2022

CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE, FLUVANNA, GREENE, LOUISA, MADISON, NELSON, ORANGE, AUGUSTA

Sweet Spot

IN ORANGE COUNTY BY CARLA HUCKABEE

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

Find Your

SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2022 ISSUE 3136

30

YEARS OF REAL ESTATE

39


40 SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2022 ISSUE 3136

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Enjoy your private oasis!! This beautiful home in desirable Preddy Creek combines a wonderful neighborhood feel while enjoying more space & trees, plus no HOA. Upon approaching you’ll will see mature landscaping leading to a covered front porch. As you walk through the door you are greeted with hardwoodfloors flowing from the foyer to the living room with a fireplace & on to the dining room. Continue to the bright family room opening to the kitchen making a perfectentertainment space. The kitchen with granite countertops & plenty of storage space is perfect for the home chef. Walk out onto your back deck with space to grill &socialize while overlooking your swimming pool or enjoy soaking in the hot tub. Head upstairs to find four large bedrooms including your master suite with attachedbath & walk-in closet. In the basement you’ll find a rec/multi-purpose room with full bath. The well thought out design allows access to the basement’s full bath fromthe two-car garage to keep those wet bathing suits out of the house. As you enter the tree lined backyard, you’ll find your relaxing pool in a private setting with aperfect combination of sun & shade. Just minutes to DIA, NGIC, UVA Research Park, & all Greene County has to offer! MLS# 630265 $490,000

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This wonderful Forest Lakes home is set at the end 2032 AVINITY LOOP of a quiet cul-de-sac. As you enter you walk into the large living room with a bay window & tons Beautiful Craig Builders townhouse! Walk in to the of light. Follow hardwood floors to the dining impressive two story foyer. The main floor is built room with a matching bay window. In the updataround your gourmet kitchen. Enjoy youroversized ed kitchen you are greeted with granite counter island along with upgraded cabinets, countertops, ! p ! ro ct D a tr n ce Pri r CoTrim work is tops & tons of cabinet space. The movable island derange. and appliances including U an gas gives tons of flexibility for the solo chef or a group amazing throughout with crown molding. Your livingroom is filled with natural light along with a fireplace to prepare holiday dinners. All this is open to the surrounded by custom built shelving. From the living family room. Step out on your new Trex deck room, step out onto your private bluestone patio. The with a view of the lake. Upstairs you will find largedining area is perfect for entertaining and confour large bedrooms including your master suite nects to your big balcony to enjoy mountain views. with attached bath including tiled shower & huge Upstairs is your dual master floorplan. The primary walk-in closet. Three additional rooms, another Sunday 1-3 upstairs. pm master comes witha spa-like bath & huge walk-in updated bath, & laundry complete The closet. The second large bedroom has two closets. finished basement provides a terrific home office. 2808 Magnolia Dr 2142 Avinity Loop 1544 Sawgrass Ct MLS# 634066 $440,000 Peace & tranquility less than 15 minutes from Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhouse MLS# w/mountain Complete 1st floor living, lg MBR & BA w/laundry. 633306 $515,000 Hardwoods on main floor. Gourmet kitchen & loft open to LR. Outside patio. $410,000

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41

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FEATURE

SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2022 ISSUE 3136

42

F Sweet Spot or four years, from 1734 to 1738, Orange County extended all the way to the Mississippi River. Even though it has shrunk in size, its prodigious history, ideal location, home prices, and hometown atmosphere still make it a sweet spot for Central Virgina homebuyers. Last year Pat McAloon and Monica Xia moved from Columbus, Ohio to purchase the Holladay House, built circa 1830 in historic downtown Orange. Since Ohio was indeed part of Orange County almost 300 years ago, they like to say they have really just “moved into town.” Only 20 miles from Charlottesville, 60 from Richmond, and 70 from Washington, Orange County is a sweet spot for easy access to these cities and others up and down the east coast. When they moved, McAloon says, “We focused on finding a new home in Virginia because we would be closer to my family in Fairfax County and looked at Central Virginia for its easy access to UVA, the University of Richmond, JMU, and my alma mater in Williamsburg.” They wanted to operate a short-term rental business, and Holladay House offered the perfect layout and location to attract visitors looking for history, outdoor adventures, wining, and dining.

Infused with History Few counties can claim two presidential residences. James Madison, the fourth President and “Father of the Constitu-

Find Your

IN ORANGE COUNTY BY CARLA HUCKABEE

tion” lived at Montpelier, and Zachary Taylor, number 12, was born at Montebello, near Barboursville. Both homes are on the National Register of Historic Places along with 32 other historic landmarks. James Madison is the heavy hitter with his own museum in Orange, though Zachary Taylor gets a mention there as well. The museum boasts an extensive collection of documents, costumes, farm equipment, and family artifacts. For a deeper dive into all things Madison, including a long overdue and updated view of slave ownership and treatment, visit Montpelier, James Madison’s lifelong home. Even its location on Constitution Highway is a nod to the Father of the Constitution and Architect of the Bill of Rights.

Altogether, the 2,700-acre grounds combine history and outdoor experiences with more than eight miles of walking trails. But Orange County isn’t just about the Revolutionary Period. Civil War scars are remembered in battlefields, hospitals, and monuments. The Exchange Hotel Civil War Medical Museum in Gordonsville evolved from a grand hotel built in 1860 to a receiving hospital during the war and eventually to today’s museum. The Fort Germanna Visitor Center in Locust Grove commemorates the 42 German men, women, and children who arrived in Virginia in 1714 and settled along the Rapidan River. The Orange Commercial Historic

District gives an unmatched flare to the county seat that 5,000 residents call home. The Holladay House, one of three structures in Orange that was standing during James Madison’s lifetime, has been a bed and breakfast for 30+ years. McAloon and Xia have retained much of the original woodwork in the floors, mantels, and doors, and many period antiques to enhance their guests’ stays. With its 1859 courthouse and Robert E. Lee’s place of worship during 1863-64, Orange celebrates the architecture of its commercial historic district with walking tours and an eye towards rehabilitation rather than razing.

Taking It Outdoors The history isn’t just in the buildings, it’s in the very ground, and, in the case of Montpelier’s Old Growth Landmark Forest, in the trees. Nearly every historic site in the county includes substantial walking trails that retrace footsteps from centuries past and offer views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Hikers can view formal gardens and meadows, contemplate the lives honored at the Montpelier slave and Madison family cemeteries, and explore the demonstration forest on the Montpelier grounds. With a 3.9-mile trail linking Montpelier’s eight miles to Grelen Nursery’s more than six-mile trail system, hikers will run out of daylight before they run out of trails. At Grelen, a 1,000-acre tree nursery, hikers can take a break at the Farm-toTable Cafe, The Market at Grelen, and


Farm-fresh with a Side of History

Throughout the county, from Gordonsville to Locust Grove, residents and visitors are out and about exploring all that Orange County offers. And everyone seems ready for a celebration, just in time for the 47th annual Orange Street Festival on Saturday, September 10 from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. More than 100 artisan, craft, and com-

mercial vendors will be on hand to make sure the 5,000 expected visitors have a good time. Food and beverages, live music, a kids’ zone, and beer/wine garden make this family-friendly event a great venue for the community. The Orange County Chamber of Commerce has sponsored the Street Festival since 1974, only missing 2020 due to the pandemic. Executive Director Judi Cooper says “People are excited about being able to be out and about again. We have a number of new businesses in the local area and new vendors from all across the Commonwealth. “This is a good opportunity to get a jump on holiday shopping and get some

43

Large home with plenty of updates. New Dishwasher 2021, New Double Pane windows, Well Pump Updated 2019, New Roof 2018. Wrap around deck, freshly painted and boards replaced. Screened porch and a Detached garage . Large Master Bedroom, with walk in closet and luxury soaking tub! Living room has 2 sided Fireplace. All on 3 acres. You will love this home and the location. $310,000

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unique gift items.” And a great time to show off the town of Orange.

From-Heres and Came-Heres There are two types of people that love the Orange County lifestyle: those that hail from Orange County and more recent arrivals. McAloon and Xia arrived in Orange and purchased the Holladay House in 2021. “There are two things we like best about living in Orange: the people and the scenery. There are several civic organizations here that help introduce newcomers to ‘from-heres’ and ‘cameheres.’ Once you meet a few people,” says McAloon, “it is not long before you meet a lot of people through them. “We also love how driving anywhere for an errand is like taking a Sunday drive.” Beautiful scenery, welcoming people, and a friendly business community is a great combination. McAloon continues, “Orange is business-friendly, and business owners here are very supportive of one another. It has been a pleasure finding ways to collaborate with our business neighbors.” Cooper enthuses about “the sense of hometown and welcoming atmosphere.” That hometown feel is attracting more homebuyers. Mack Cowan, REALTOR® and Property Manager with Cowan Realty says, “Compared to Culpeper, Fredericksburg, DC, and Richmond, we’re small. So our real estate market didn’t go as crazy as other areas over the past year or two. “Our average price is less than Charlot-

1440 Central Park BLVD STE 210 Fredericksburg, VA

tesville but similar to Albemarle County. Because we are slightly less competitive, the buyer has a little more power here. Our market has slowed, so even though interest rates are around six percent, buyers can get concessions from sellers, like closing cost assistance. More than half of my transactions in the last few months have had seller concessions. “We do have a small number of commuters to Northern Virginia, and you may see more of that with our aggressive internet expansion. The Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring a fiber link connection and doesn’t plan to stop until every address has access. Even though the most remote addresses may take a few years, if a buyer knows an address they are interested in, the company can provide an install date within a threemonth window.” McAloon agrees. “So much work is done remotely now that the distance of a commute is less of a concern. Moving here from a metro area will get you more house and more land for less money; and [you will] have beautiful scenery all around. And on those days when you do drive into the office or meet a client in a city, the commute is pleasant. I would rather drive an hour on a beautiful road than crawl on I-95 for 45 minutes!” With UVA’s Weldon Cooper Center predicting county growth of 32.9 percent by 2050, don’t wait to find that sweet spot in Orange County. The sooner you become a “came-here” the sweeter life will be. Carla Huckabee writes about high-performing real estate.

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

Take the old Silk Mill Building in Orange. After a historic rehab, it enjoys a second life as a thriving marketplace. Starting in 1929, spools of silk thread came into the silk mill and were turned into cloth. Today the former mill is now home to shops and restaurants like Provisions Market Table and the Silk Mill Grille and small-batch brewery Iron Pipe Aleworks. Nearly 200 locals work at the place that still serves as a lively center for the town of Orange. Gordonsville, too, caters to craft beer and wine lovers and brings the farm right to the table. The newest entry, Patch Brewing, transformed the old VFW building into a fun-friendly atmosphere

Taking to the Streets

Welcome to 7591 Gold Dale Rd!

FEATURE

History and nature may get top billing in Orange County, but local businesses cater to a growing restaurant, winery, and retail scene. Surrounded by rolling hills of farms and vineyards, everything has a crisp, green feel to it. Donna Waugh-Robinson, REALTOR® with Jack Samuels Realty, says, “There’s a lot going on in Orange and Gordonsville. Both are vibrant communities with active main streets and business districts.” And, like Holladay House, many of the businesses are housed in rehabbed historic buildings.

combining good music, craft beer, a garden, pavilion, kids’ activities, and food trucks. In town, the hickory-smoked barbeque smells wafting from the BBQ Exchange draw you in for slow-roasted pork shoulders and spare ribs. Savor real Virginia barbecue in a rustic building with tin siding, picnic tables covered with paper, and sides of collard greens, Donna’s baked beans, and Brunswick Stew. What’s not to love? In Unionville, Sweet Vines Farm Winery offers to make your dreams come true with private events, popcorn and wine tastings, charcuterie picnics, and other experiences. If you prefer four-star dining, Orange County will not disappoint. Vintage Restaurant at The Inn at Willow Grove offers upscale dining in a historic setting in the Manor House. And the “casually elegant” Palladio Restaurant serves up high-end Italian cuisine in a white-tablecloth setting. All on the grounds of a—you guessed it—historic wine estate at Barboursville Vineyards. Before dinner, walk the grounds of the landmark plantation ruins of the mansion Thomas Jefferson designed for the former Virginia governor. And inhale deeply to enjoy the aromas of the award-winning Octagon, the estate’s centerpiece wine.

SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2022 ISSUE 3136

imbibe in local beer, cider, and wine. After a break, they can explore the newest addition to the Grelen Trail System. The Duncan Trail adds 1.5 miles of trails and the new, higher Grelen Overlook, which offers breathtaking, panoramic views. Water lovers find the Rapidan River along the northern border of the county, and the Anna River that follows the southern border. Canoe and kayak launches in the Siegen Forest near Fort Germanna give paddlers easy access to the Rapidan. Flatwater options entice anglers and paddlers, too. The 124-acre Lake Orange may be best known for the world record white bass of nearly seven pounds caught in 1989. Today’s anglers might be just as happy with pulling largemouth bass, bluegill, or walleye from the warm water reservoir. In the northeast corner of the county, Lake of the Woods boasts two lakes, one just for fishing. The 500-acre main lake (that features marinas and sand beaches) is the centerpiece of this resort-style gated community near Locust Grove. Golfers sharpen their game at three nearby courses, or enjoy disc golf on the course near Orange.


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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers BELMONT LOFTS

PEA RIDGE FARM

317 acre estate that has it all, location, views, water, a spectacular 5-BR residence: event center and more! The 15+ acre lake is centered among lush rolling fields of rich grass and unparalleled views. Additional acreage available. 25 minutes west of Charlottesville. MLS#631962 $8,875,000 Steve McLean,434.981.1863

EVERGREEN

A private 18 acre horse farm, with 4 bedroom main residence, 1 bedroom cottage, beautiful 8 stall center aisle barn, outdoor riding ring, and several fenced pastures and hay fields. With access onto 570 plus acres of parkland with trails. MLS#632164 $1,295,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

STONY POINTE

A spacious and meticulously maintained 4 bedroom, 5.5 bath Manor home on 57 acres of tranquility, and panoramic views of the Southwest Mtns. and to the west are winter views of the Blue Ridge Mountains, 6 miles from Charlottesville. MLS#626941 $2,650,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

SPACIOUS PENTHOUSE CONDO! One of the finest condos in Belmont and the Downtown Mall area. 2-story, 3-bedroom, 3.5-bath condo, over 3,150 finished square feet, extra high ceilings, a modern and open floor plan with huge windows and doors, plus a large rooftop terrace with views of the Downtown Mall all the way around to Monticello. Contemporary flair with many fine architectural details, many built-ins and great storage unit. Secure garage and garden space. MLS#634149 $2,150,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

OWENSVILLE ROAD

5-bedroom residence on 2 acre lot in Meriwether Lewis Elementary District! Stunning home has top quality finishes and many features include: open floor concept on all levels; fully loaded chef ’s kitchen; and so much more! MLS#632111 $1,675,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

WOLFCREEK FARM

Situated near the Blue Ridge Mtns. in Madison County on 333 acres. Currently runs as a grazing farm for beef cattle. There are 2 homes on the property and a complement of necessary farm buildings. NOT IN CONSERVATION EASEMENT! MLS#630435 $3,200,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

WOOD’S END

Striking residence on 5+ acres in the heart of Keswick. Architecturally-designed with numerous high-end custom features. Gracious one-level living with 3,471 fin. sq. ft. Minutes from the world class Keswick Hall, Charlottesville, UVA, and Pantops. MLS#626196 $1,195,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

MOUNT PARAN CHURCH

Church residence. Redesigned by architect Bruce Wardell as his own home. A separate addition has 3 or 4 bedrooms and 3 full baths. Has been further enhanced and improved by the current owners. Bucolic views complete the perfect setting. MLS#630270 $810,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

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GIBSON’S HOLLOW LANE

Ivy area. Minutes from town and backing up to Bundoran Farm, Gibsons Hollow offers complete and private domain at the end of a private road. Mountain top ridges offer panoramic views with minor clearing at several building sites. There is a caretaker’s house which is being offered as is, and 19th century log outbuildings. There are multiple parcels and division rights, making this an excellent conservation easement candidate. Your own nature preserve. MLS#634183 $4,000,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124 or Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

RAGGED MOUNTAIN FARM

Two wonderful estate parcels comprised of 185.01± acres in coveted Ragged Mountain Farm. Excellent elevated building site, complete privacy, and beautiful views. Murray/Henley/Western school district. MLS#621083 $1,895,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


45

SIMMONS GAP/ ESTES RIDGE

10 acres of mature woods. Property has long road frontage and consists of two parcels being combined and sold as one. No homeowners association! Design and build your dream residence on this very wellpriced parcel. MLS#621178 $189,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

SOUTHERN ALBEMARLE

ECOVILLAGE CHARLOTTESVILLE

The Owner has been working with planners and the County of Albemarle to develop on this property an environmentally sensitive and sustainable housing community. 6.5 acre site with two houses. For more details visit: www.ecovillagecharlottesville.org. MLS#633951 $1,750,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MISSION HOME ROAD

146.88 ac. in Albemarle & Greene County. Privacy & protection adjacent to the Shenandoah National Park! Full division rights & multiple home sites. Extraordinary timberland. Views of the mountains, along with easy access to trails & Skyline Drive. MLS#620276 $1,100,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

ESTATE PARCEL IN AFTON

Stunning, mountain views available on this attractive 14± acre property, possessing lovely streams and woods. This parcel is only 1.5 miles from Route 151 Brew Trail, with easy access to Wintergreen, Charlottesville & UVA. MLS#629702 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250 or Robert Mellen, 434.996.7386

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87+ acre pine forest property is a good investment tract, or use as a hunting and recreational tract, or with multiple division rights, a place to build a home or more than one home. Potential mountain views, and private settings. MLS#629213 $499,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MEADOW FARM

436+ acre parcel of land in Southern Albemarle! 4 division rights; complete privacy; lush, gently rolling terrain; long road frontage; stream; 3-acre lake; 125-135 acres of open land; mature hardwood forests. Under conservation easement. Owner/agent. MLS#634139 $2,985,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farmhouse (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MURPHY’S CREEK FARM

Wonderful gently rolling parcel of land with just under 26 acres, 18 miles south of Charlottesville. The land is wooded (mostly hardwoods) with an elevated building site, stream/creek, total privacy, and long road frontage. MLS#619394 $249,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FRAYS MILL

4.15-acre lot offers privacy, great location, small subdivision, state maintained road, high speed internet available, just 3.5 miles to Rivanna Station, NGIC and 6 miles to Hollymead Center and the CHO Airport. MLS#608508 $189,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

GARTH ROAD

11.73-acre buildable lot in Western Albemarle! One of a kind location and a rare opportunity to purchase a large lot in an estate neighborhood 10 minutes to town. 2 division rights and is gently rolling with a small stream bisecting the property. MLS#628219 $795,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GLENMORE

1+ acre lot, there are no other available homesites in Glenmore with this privacy, protection and convenience to the Main Gates as well as the Glenmore Club facilities. This lot has water and sewer available and is ready to build on now! MLS#634160 $395,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076


HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 4, 2022 THERE WERE 128 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS

THE REALTOR CODE OF ETHICS

REALTORS® are members of the National Association of REALTORS®

SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2022 ISSUE 3136

46

n 41 were in Albemarle with an average price of $588,256 n 10 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $381,150

Never heard of it? It’s probably because our code is something we like to practice rather than preach. It’s a commitment to honesty, integrity, and trust that’s been protecting property owners like you since 1913.

n 13 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $366,260 n 5 were in Greene with an average price of $341,550 n 14 were in Louisa with an average price of $376,818 n 11 were in Nelson with an average price of $355,232 n 19 were in Orange with an average price of $363,769 n 6 were in Staunton with an average price of $234,383 n 9 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $320,122

HOMES SOLD REALTORS® are members of the National Association of REALTORS®

THE 156 MILL CREEK DR MILL CREEK

115 AZALEA DRIVE FRYS SPRING

25 LOBLOLLY ROAD LAKE MONTICELLO

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • REWeditor@c-ville.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@c-ville.com • 434.996.4019

101 JOHN RUCKER DR FOUR SEASONS

624 LAKE NELSON LN ARRINGTON

240 N MADISON ST STAUNTON

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

MADISON COUNTY

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

NELSON COUNTY

www.charlottesville.gov Real estate tax rate: $.96 per $100 ci.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.92 per $100 www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100 www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

fluvannacounty.org Real estate tax rate: $.884 per $100

greenecountyva.gov Real estate tax rate: $.82 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100 www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.71 per $100 nelsoncounty-va.gov Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

DESIGNER

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the C-VILLE Weekly, assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

The Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

orangecountyva.gov Real estate tax rate: $.804 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 • e-mail: ads@c-ville.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47 SEPTEMBER 7 - 13, 2022 ISSUE 3136

Coming Soon

GREYLEDGE

HEADQUARTERS

$6,950,000

$2,600,000 |

A spectacular 1842 Virginia Landmark situated on a 739-acre estate with magnificent views of the Blue Ridge & Allegheny mountains. The original architectural elements: 17-inch thick, Flemish bond laid brick walls, oversized 6 over 6 windows, 13 fireplaces, plaster walls and tongue and groove flooring have been expertly paired with all the modern conveniences. The 9723 sq ft Greek Revival residence has been meticulously renovated to a pristine level rarely seen. The residence sits at 1200 feet overlooking the beautiful 6-acre lake w/ layered mountain views beyond. The level of natural beauty & privacy enjoyed from the residence is unparalleled. 20 min south of Lexington & 30 min to Roanoke airport, 7 min to Town of Buchanan. J USTIN H. WILE Y | 4 3 4 9 8 1 5528 PE TE R A. WILE Y | 4 3 4 4 22 20 9 0

C H A R LOT T ES V I L L E VA

|

4 3 4 2 9 3 3 9 00

First time ever on the open market, two exceptional parcels with incredible views over Charlottesville and layered Blue Ridge Mountains beyond. These private parcels, perched on the western slope of the Southwest Mountains, offer complete seclusion yet are only 15 minutes from downtown Charlottesville, its restaurants and amenities and UVA. Perfect as a family compound or build on one and sell the other. Please do not drive on property without an appointment. PE TE R A. WILE Y

|

4 3 4 4 22 20 9 0

|

JUSTIN H. W ILEY | 434 981 552 8 PE TE R A. W ILEY | 434 42 2 2 090

434 9 81 5528

WIL EYP RO P ERT Y.CO M

SPRING HILL

$2,495,00 |

MLS 63071 0

O RANGE VA

|

540 672 3903

SOLITE FARM

$910,000 |

MLS 63 0924

Welcome to Spring Hill: A beautiful 207+ acre farm in a protected enclave of Madison County with incredible views of both the Blue Ridge and Southwest Mountains. The natural beauty and privacy are unparalleled. An attractive farmhouse with a c. 1804 section is perfect as a weekend getaway or guesthouse, leaving numerous incredible building sites for the primary residence—an excellent candidate for a conservation easement.

129 rolling acres minutes from the Village of Fork Union. The land is a mix of open crop/pasture, and hardwood forest, and is in two tax map parcels. The existing driveway enters the property from West Bottom Road, and continues on past the beautiful two acre pond to a perfect elevated home site. The larger of the two parcel also has frontage on route 15, and has 11 acres zoned commercial. the open land is currently leased as crop land. Great farm property, or solid investment.

PE TE R A . WIL E Y

JUSTIN H. W ILEY

| 434 422 20 9 0

|

434 981 552 8

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

M L S 6 2 3 6 81

MLS 62731 9

140 beautiful acres, very private, yet conveniently located to both towns of Gordonsville, and Orange. This parcel consists of 35 acres in pasture, with numerous great building sites, and 105 wooded acres, which surrounds the open land. The parcel has numerous springs that flow into the White Oak Creek, which bisects the property, and there is natural area suitable for constructing a pond. Property is further enhanced by a recently updated driveway, long frontage on Mallory's Ford Road, and a deeded access out to Mountain Tract Road. JUSTIN H. WIL E Y

FOSTERS BRANCH

$575,000 |

FOSTER FARM

$825,000 |

MLS 63 3 952

Headquarters, circa 1837, is located west of Charlottesville in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, one of White Hall's/Browns Cove's most historically significant and best preserved properties married with a tastefully designed 2005 addition. The 5 bedroom, 4 bath home sits on 50 acres of pasture and mature hardwoods with stunning views of the pond and surrounding mountains. The estate includes a managers house, stable, utility barn, and numerous other dependencies. Incredibly private surrounded by the natural beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Doyles River frontage. Property can also be purchased with 428 acres for $5,250,000.