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WWW.CAAR.COM - 13, 2021 O F R E A LT O R S ® VOL. 30 NO. 14 n APRIL 7 E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N HE CHARLOTTESVILL A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No.14

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P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-817-2749 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

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FEATURE 14

On the run

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com

After a year of cancellations and virtual events, the Charlottesville Marathon is back. NEWS 9

told

11 Red Carpet Inn to become a homeless shelter. 13 VA Supreme Court says Confederate statues can go.

CULTURE 17

us...

18 Extra: 4CP knows The Laramie Project remains as relevant as ever. 19 Screens: Godzilla vs. Kong is a fun monster mash. 20 Sound Choices: Album reviews

21 The Working Pour: Barboursville wins again. 25 Sudoku 25 Crossword 27 Free Will Astrology

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Statues are symbols, of course, and symbols only matter so much. Policy changes like wealth redistribution, investment in education, drug policy reform, and more are the tools that will ultimately lead to a better and more equitable community. But I don’t have to tell you that here in Charlottesville we have a particularly fraught relationship with our symbols. It’s just plain old good news that, after years of fight from dedicated activists, the Supreme Court of Virginia finally ruled that Charlottesville’s Confederate statues are not protected by state law. Charlottesville will now be allowed to join municipalities all over the world—including neighboring Albemarle County—in toppling ugly monuments to racists (page13). There are still some details to be ironed out. The city might have to hold public hearings about the future of the monuments, and once it figures out how to take them down it’ll have to decide what to do with the huge, oddly shaped hunks of metal. (Our suggestion: blast them in to outer space, where they become pieces of forgotten intergalactic detritus, impossible to ever view or retrieve. Okay, sure, rocket ships might not fit in the city budget, but you get my drift.) In the meantime, though, let’s appreciate the people who made these changes possible, and look forward to seeing those empty pedestals.—Ben Hitchcock

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“Displaying these statues in the public is like displaying the burned remains of a cross from a Ku Klux Klan rally.”

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—UVA professor John Edwin Mason at Monday’s City Council meeting, asking the city to cover the Lee and Jackson statues with tarps until they can be removed

NEWS On April 12, phase 2 of vaccinations will begin in the Blue Ridge Health District, which makes all residents age 16 and older eligible for a shot. As of last week, the district is in phase 1C, meaning higher education employees, members of the media, construction workers, lawyers, hairdressers, and a variety of other professions are now able to register. Demand for shots remains high in the area, and many who showed up to the JC Penney for vaccination appointments last week reported waiting for hours before getting the jab.

School’s in

KAREN BLAHA

A new federal railroad infrastructure package means that, eventually, Charlottesville will see a second daily train to D.C. and expanded service to central Virginia destinations like Richmond.

Feeling special on Harris Street

Charlottesville City Council

Another development vote divided City Council at its April 5 meeting. Developers Cville Business Park LLC, which already has a permit to destroy one house and a small commercial building on Harris street and construct 105 new apartment units, asked at Monday’s meeting for a new permit to kick that up to 120. Both the initial permit and the new one promise the building will contain five designated affordable units and also five units available for those paying with housing vouchers. The Planning Commission unanimously approved the new permit in March. On Monday, City Council voted 4-1 to approve the new permit, with the majority of council arguing that all new housing is good housing. Mayor Nikuyah Walker was the lone dissenter, saying the project didn’t provide for enough affordable units.

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Software engineer Josh Carp declared his candidacy for City Council 48 hours before the deadline to make the ballot. Eight days later, he dropped out, citing concerns about his own mental health and anxiety. Carp says he hopes to continue advocating for the issues that spurred him to get involved in the first place, like climate and housing policy. Dropping out is an understandable decision—the thought of sitting on Charlottesville City Council should be enough to make anyone uneasy.

ast month, Governor Ralph Northam signed agreements with CSX railroad and other entities to complete a $3.7 billion investment in passenger rail in Virginia. The agreement will eventually add more train service to and from Charlottesville, but it will be at least a couple of years before passenger rail becomes available. The city’s three currently offered train routes are the daily Northeast Regional from Roanoke to D.C. and points north, the Crescent from New Orleans to New York, and the Cardinal from Chicago to New York. The latter two only run three days a week. The Charlottesville area was promised a second daily train to D.C. in 2014 after a western bypass of U.S. 29 was canceled and other projects received the funds, but the new route never materialized because the only railroad bridge that crosses the Potomac is at 98 percent capacity. The new rail package could remedy that issue, adding a two-track bridge dedicated to passenger and commuter service next to the existing Long Bridge—though it might not be ready for a decade. The Commonwealth of Virginia will also soon own tracks between Doswell and Clifton Forge, allowing Charlottesvillians to take the train east. This will form part of the proposed east-west Commonwealth Corridor, but there’s no timetable yet for when service might begin. Details may be forthcoming in the next year as Virginia works on an update to its statewide rail plan. Amtrak ridership has taken a hit due to the pandemic, but the American Rescue Plan has allowed the company to hire back more than 1,200 furloughed employees. The Crescent will return to daily service in July.

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Carp’s out

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April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

Townies, say goodbye to any peace and quiet you might have enjoyed during the pandemic. UVA announced on Thursday that it will resume a regular, fully in-person education plan for the fall 2021 semester. “These plans are based on our expectation that vaccines will be widely available by the beginning of the fall term, and the prevalence of the coronavirus will be much lower than it is today,” wrote the administration in a community-wide email.

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Rolling out the red carpet Homelessness aid groups transform decrepit motel into new shelter By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

STAFF PHOTO

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The former Red Carpet Inn will soon be transformed into a non-congregate emergency shelter for people experiencing homelessness.

environment for everybody, and that there’s support to get basic needs met, [like] food and clothing. [We’ll] also provide connections to more unique services in the community— employment services, mental health services, substance abuse treatment, and medical care.” The former hotel will help alleviate the desperate need for affordable housing in the Charlottesville area. Over the next five years, PHA plans to construct 60 additional affordable housing apartments on the property. They’ll be rented for no more than 30 percent of the gross income of future residents. By 2023, Virginia Supportive Housing will also build 80 permanent housing units at the site. Those apartments will be available to disabled individuals who chronically struggle with homelessness, and a variety of services will be offered. PACEM plans to move its guests staying at the local La Quinta Inn & Suites into the newly renovated hotel by the end of the month. “We’re replacing the wallpaper and cleaning the walls. There’s mold underneath the

wallpaper in the rooms—in some rooms it’s pretty extensive,” says Haro. “We’re also replacing the carpets.” The hotel wasn’t empty, however. A handful of long-term guests had been living there when the inn changed hands. The previous owner didn’t tell the tenants about the property sale, says Bugg. “We did actually request well ahead of time the names of folks so we could do some outreach to ensure what happened didn’t happen. [But] when we went to check on the people to see if they had a plan, the owner had never notified anyone that the hotel was closing,” says Bugg. “[The owner] even had collected rent beyond the closing date.” PHA was able to place the guests in a new hotel, and will allow those still in need of housing to move into the new shelter. “The [new] development is actually aiming to solve problems like this,” Bugg says. “Those people were paying $1,200 to $1,400 a month for one of those hotel rooms—no one should have to do that.”

“Those people were paying $1,200 to $1,400 a month for one of those hotel rooms—no one should have to do that.” EBONI BUGG, CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMS

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ince the start of the coronavirus pandemic, local shelters have drastically expanded their efforts to house our most vulnerable community members. With support from the Thomas Jefferson Area Coalition for the Homeless and People and Congregations Engaged in Ministry, those experiencing homelessness have been able to stay at hotels, where they receive daily meals, case management services, and assistance with transition into permanent housing. Putting people up in hotels isn’t cheap, however. “The pandemic continued far, far, far longer than people anticipated, so you had a situation where there was a possibility of spending millions a year to keep people in these hotel rooms—but no real long-term solution for their homelessness,” says Eboni Bugg, director of programs for the Charlottesville Area Community Foundation. After forming a partnership with TJACH last spring, the philanthropy facilitators at CACF began to look for permanent housing options around Charlottesville. When the Red Carpet Inn off Route 29 in Albemarle County was put up for sale over the summer, CACF saw the spot’s potential. CACF gave the Piedmont Housing Alliance a $4.25 million grant to purchase the property and transform it into a noncongregate emergency shelter for people experiencing homelessness. Once it’s been renovated, PACEM and TJACH will manage the 115 single-occupancy rooms. The shelter “will be similar to the kind of support people have been getting in emergency shelter programs with PACEM,” says TJACH Executive Director Anthony Haro. “We’re making sure that it’s a safe and healthy

According to PACEM Executive Director Jayson Whitehead, demand for emergency housing has spiked over the course of the pandemic. Since last summer, the 60 rooms reserved for high-risk guests at the La Quinta have remained at full capacity. During the winter, TJACH had to reserve additional rooms for high-risk guests at several other area hotels, while PACEM provided shelter at a handful of local churches for around 70 guests who weren’t medically vulnerable. Over the past few months, UVA Health employees have visited the hotels and congregate shelters, as well as The Haven and Salvation Army shelter, to offer guests COVID vaccines. “Surprisingly high numbers of our folks have taken advantage of that...considering all of the fears and conspiracy theories,” says Whitehead. Once the new shelter is fully completed, people in need of emergency housing will be able to contact The Haven, complete the intake process, and receive transportation to the shelter. Guests will be within walking distance of a bus stop, as well as necessary amenities, like grocery stores and laundromats. They can also reserve rides with JAUNT. A majority of PACEM’s guests are experiencing homelessness due to larger factors, like mental illness and addiction, says Whitehead. However, evictions remain a huge concern for local housing advocates. From January 1 to April 2, 15 eviction judgments (out 92 unlawful detainer hearings) were made in Charlottesville, and 15 (out of 66 hearings) were made in Albemarle County. The end of the pandemic might be approaching, but the city’s problems with low-income housing won’t fix themselves any time soon. “We will need support from the community to make this project a success financially,” says Haro.


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NEWS

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Goodbye, generals By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

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“We’ve been under the throes of the continuation of Jim Crow…for so long now. That’s exactly what those statues represent,” says Gathers. “To finally have a ruling that’s a victory for us, it’s really a victory for all decent and morally pointed mankind.” “It’s sad all that we as a community have had to deal with to get to this point,” he adds. “Some may question if it was worth it—especially if you consider not just the loss of life, but the taking of a life.” Acting City Attorney Lisa Robertson and former council member Kristen Szakos noted several years ago that the statues were never protected by the 1997 law. Last year, state Attorney General Mark Herring agreed that the law did not apply retroactively.

“Don’t just outsource our toxic waste to another community.” JALANE SCHMIDT, UVA PROFESSOR AND ACTIVIST

Because the plaintiffs still have an opportunity to appeal the state Supreme Court’s ruling, the city must wait for the court to finalize its decision before proceeding with the removal procedures prescribed by the new state law, explained Robertson at Monday’s City Council meeting. Schmidt hopes the city will not take the same route as Albemarle County, which sent its Confederate “Johnny Reb” statue off to the Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation last fall. “Don’t just outsource our toxic waste to another community,” she explains. “That’s not taking moral responsibility. That’s just washing your hands of the problem and shipping it off to somebody else.” As Charlottesville determines the fates of the racist statues in the coming months, Gathers encourages everyone to get involved in the community engagement process. “We need to go ahead and lay General Lee and Jackson to rest finally and permanently,” he says.

T ART OF CRAF

@cville_weekly

A SPRUCE UP

The Virginia Supreme Court ruled that Charlottesville can legally take down the statues of Confederate Generals Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee.

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or nearly a century, Charlottesville’s downtown statues of Confederate Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson have stood as brutal emblems of white supremacy. Local Black activists have fought long and hard for the bronze eyesores to be taken down for good, but the city has faced a string of roadblocks over the past four years: a lawsuit, an injunction, and, notoriously, the white supremacist Unite the Right rally. Finally, the painful battle seems to have an end in sight. On April 1, the Virginia Supreme Court overturned a Charlottesville Circuit Court decision that barred the city from removing the monuments. The lower court had ruled that the city couldn’t meddle with the monuments because the statues were protected by a 1997 law preventing localities from moving so-called war memorials. However, the Supreme Court ruled that the law did not apply to statues erected before that date, and thus did not apply to Charlottesville’s segregation-era monuments. Both the Lee and Jackson statues were erected in the 1920s, in the midst of the Jim Crow era and at the height of Ku Klux Klan membership. “This court decision will positively impact so many lives,” said Mayor Nikuyah Walker in a city press release. “I want to express gratitude to Zyahna Bryant, Dr. Wes Bellamy, and Kristin Szakos for igniting the sparks that started this local mini-revolution. We are forever indebted to the community for their steadfastness and perseverance.” After student activist Zyahna Bryant’s 2016 petition calling on the city to take down the racist statues gained significant public support, City Council voted in favor of removing them in 2017. The Sons of Confederate Veterans and the Monument Fund, joined by several other individuals, then

sued the city the same year, claiming the 1997 statute made it illegal for the city to “disturb” the monuments. Last year, the Democrat-controlled General Assembly amended the law to allow localities to take down war memorials. However, Circuit Court Judge Richard Moore had already granted an injunction that prevented Charlottesville from removing the statues, and awarded the plaintiffs more than $350,000 in attorney’s fees. “The big issue was not really whether the city would take down the statues—they can under the new law—but there were two barriers in the way of that: the pending injunction from this previous case, [and] these attorney’s fees,” explains UVA constitutional law professor Rich Schragger. “[The Supreme Court ruling] eliminates the attorney’s fees award and lifts the injunction, which means the city can proceed.” When University of Virginia professor and activist Jalane Schmidt, who has advocated for the removal of the statues and led historical tours recontextualizing them, heard the news last week, she felt a mixture of excitement and sadness. “I wish this could have happened several years ago. We lost three people,” says Schmidt, referring to the deaths of Heather Heyer and two Virginia State Police troopers during the Unite the Right rally. “Things should have never gone this far.” “There is a mother, Susan Bro, who is bereft with the loss of her daughter,” Schmidt says. “There are several small children who are now growing up without fathers. There are dozens of community members who are permanently injured and many more who are traumatized.” Community organizer Don Gathers, who was a counterprotester at the Unite the Right rally, was also overjoyed to learn of the court’s ruling, but pained by the violence and tragedy the court battle has inflicted upon the community.

STAFF PHOTOS

State supreme court rules city can take down Confederate statues


14

Running through it

Charlottesville marathoners charged out of the gate in 2018. This year’s event will look different, with a rural setting and staggered start times.

By Ben Hitchcock

A

n expansive Virginia pasture opens up alongside the third mile of this year’s Charlottesville half-marathon course. The path then drops down on to Clark Road, a snaky, tree-lined gravel road where the next hill—and there’s always another hill—is obscured by trees until you turn a corner and start climbing. Runners pass Our Lady of the Angels Monastery, where the nuns like to take a break from praying every now and then to make cheese, then stomp across a wooden bridge over the babbling Moorman’s River. There’s mystery here in the woods, and mystery is a precious commodity after a year of living in a bubble. This year, “you fall in to one of two categories,” says James Russell Gill III, a profes-

sional runner and one of the organizers of the annual Charlottesville Marathon. “You either put on the pandemic 20, or you start running the pandemic 20 miler.” There’s some hyperbole there, but I think the sentiment is right. That’s why I’ve been huffing and puffing through the countryside, past the nuns and over the bridge. I’m not an experienced runner, and I’m certainly not a fast runner, but when the virus swept the nation, my world shrunk, and the rewards of running—movement, momentum, a journey—became rarer and more appealing. An adventurous friend suggested we commit ourselves to the half marathon, and I found myself off to the races at a pace that would not have been possible for me before the pandemic. According to the local pros, I’m not the only one who’s been craving space and

ZACK WAJSGRAS

@cville_weekly April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

BAD TO THE BONE SPORTS

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The Charlottesville Marathon returns after a rough year

Ragged Mountain Running Shop’s Mark Lorenzoni says Charlottesville is blessed with an abundance of beautiful places to run.

speed. The Charlottesville Marathon (and the half marathon and 8K undercard races) returns on April 10, after a year off due to the virus. Gill says the event is full to capacity. “A lot of people have become more active,” he says, “and the hope is some lifestyles have changed a little bit.” Mark Lorenzoni, local coach, race organizer, and 39-year proprietor of Charlottesville’s Ragged Mountain Running Shop, says the early days of the pandemic were anxious, but the running community bounced back quickly. “After a few weeks we started to just see an explosion of people picking up running, picking up walking for exercise,” Lorenzoni says. “And folks that were current runners found it even more satisfying, because it became their sole form of exercise after the gyms closed.”


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Around the country, runners sought the woods this year. “Trail races really took over,” says Glen Anderson, a Louisa-based super marathoner. It’s easier to social distance out in the wilderness, and like the Charlottesville race, many big events were replaced by a more rural equivalent. “Some of the prettiest courses I’ve ever run, those trails in Arizona, Montana,” Anderson says. Anderson is a dedicated runner who has competed in marathons all across the country. He says he’s run the Charlottesville Marathon “at least 10 or 12 times.” Even after running throughout the nation, there’s something distinctive about Charlottesville’s rolling hills, says Anderson. Well, maybe what’s distinctive is the sheer amount of hills. “I invite friends from all over the country and say, ‘come run my home course,’” Anderson says. “They run it and say ‘I’m one and done, I’m not coming here again.’” “We have been so lucky to have an environment where we have venues to go,” says Lorenzoni. “We go out in the country, the trails, the green belt around the city. We’ve got so many wonderful venues that are free. Foxhaven. Ragged Mountain Reservoir. I could go on.” Last month, Lorenzoni helped put on a safety-modified version of the annual Charlottesville Ten Miler, featuring staggered start times, masks required at the finish line, and a social-distancing-friendly route. Lorenzoni reports that the event was a huge hit as both a race and a fundraiser. Similar precautions will be in effect for the marathon. “I have this philosophy with my athletes,” Lorenzoni says. “You become your attitude. If you’re negative, and defeatist, and you don’t think you can accomplish something, it’s not going to happen. And I feel that same way about this pandemic. Okay, so it isn’t the greatest situation in the world. Let’s figure out a way to make it count.” Gill says he thinks the return of the marathon will mark an important moment for

GET OUT THERE Whether you like pounding pavement in the city or cruising through the countryside, the Charlottesville area has a run you’ll love. Here are a few of our favorite spots to shake off the flab.—B.H.

The entire Rivanna Trail is beautiful, but this paved stretch running roughly parallel to the John Warner Parkway is particularly good for jogging. The smooth path is popular for pedestrians, bikers, and runners alike, and lets patrons dip in to the forest without ever leaving the city. Ditch your car at the YMCA and follow the path past the skate park for a great urban forest jaunt.

SaundersMonticello Trail

Ragged Mountain Reservoir

Saunders-Monticello Trail

bers say Prolyfyck lets them run with more safety and confidence. While collectively the runners don’t speak frequently about how the death of Ahmaud Arbery—who was murdered in 2020 while jogging in Georgia—affects them, “It’s important to be as vigilant as possible while we’re running, especially if it’s alone,” says Chris Cochran, a counselor at Monticello High School. But running with the group makes the whole experience better, he says. “Running with people you know that are going to motivate you, encourage you to push yourself, and hold you accountable really has a way of bringing the best out of you.” That’s proving true on and off the road. “The crew has become an amazing networking vehicle,” says Derrick Waller, a product manager at PRA Health Sciences, “both supporting each other’s businesses and projects, but also serving as a way to positively impact the community.” Those efforts include picking up trash as they run, raising money for charity, dedicating runs to different community causes, and even helping one of their neighbors along the route with an upcoming move. Cochran says he hopes that in the years ahead, Charlottesville as a whole will start to look more like the Prolyfyck Run Crew: “A bunch of people who don’t all look alike trying to leave the place better than they found it by pitching in and doing what they can individually,” he says. “When we’re all making small contributions, the results can be massive. I’m looking forward to seeing that change.”—Nathan Alderman This story was originally published in our debut issue of 434 magazine, on stands now.

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SKYCLAD AERIAL

MARK LORENZONI, RAGGED MOUNTAIN RUNNING SHOP

They gather by the dozens at the Jefferson School at 6am every Monday, Wed­nesday, and Friday: Black, brown, and white, women and men, old and young, united by the road ahead of them. Year-round, they run, jog, or walk a challenging route through the city. Members say the group has changed their lives for the better—and together, they’re working to do the same for Charlottesville. William Jones III, co-owner of Charlottesville’s His Image Barber Shop and Natural Hair Studio, began what’s become the Prolyfyck Run Crew—inspired by lyrics in Nipsey Hussle’s 2018 song “Victory Lap”—to share his love of running. Jones ran solo when he moved to Charlottesville in 2006, but over the years, he invited friends and customers to come with him, and the group began to grow one or two people at a time. By 2019, its ranks had begun to bloom; new members included former vice mayor Dr. Wes Bellamy, who worked with Jones to design a roughly five-mile course through Charlottesville’s historically Black neighborhoods and public housing projects. “We run the route weekly to encourage an active, healthy lifestyle,” says Crew member James Dowell, who runs marketing for the Virginia reggae band Mighty Joshua, “and to also show that it’s people of color, their color, out here running the streets. They’re community members and residents who greet us every day, and they are family.” Therapist Juanika Howard says the group is her “accountability partner,” helping her get up and go when she’d rather sleep in. She’s seen close to 100 people gather for some runs. Other group mem-

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The Ragged Mountain Natural Area features seven miles of forested trails, most of which overlook the sparkling water below. The trails are narrow, but the packed-dirt surface is great for running. Be ready for some switchbacks and a couple big hills. Unfortunately, you’ll have to resist taking a refreshing plunge at the end of the workout—swimming in the reservoir isn’t allowed.

The Prolyfyck runners complete a five-mile course through Charlottesville’s historically Black neighborhoods each week.

April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

This well-maintained gravel route winds its way up the side of Carter Mountain towards Monticello. The path offers sweeping views of dramatic ravines below, and passes over a series of gorgeous curved wooden bridges that hug the mountainside. It’s not too steep, so you’ll feel the satisfaction of climbing a mountain without having to conquer any backbreaking uphill stretches.

DERRICK J WALLER

Rivanna Trail at McIntire Park

“After a few weeks we started to see an explosion of people picking up running, picking up walking for exercise.”

the running community in town, after a year mostly full of cancellations, postponements, and just-not-the-same virtual events. “It’s been a staple for almost 20 years,” he says. “A lot of people build up to it and get excited about it. I think it’s important for the community for something else to feel a little bit more normal again.” This year’s half-marathon course is an out and back, a truncated version of the full marathon. Some runners prefer a loop, but I like the out and back—I appreciate the neat promise that every climb will be rewarded with an equal downhill. As we break out of the murky woods and haul our asses up the final rise, my legs are heavy and my feet are sore, but I have a pretty good sense of how much elevation remains. We’ve covered a lot of miles, and I think we’ll finish strong.

As the pandemic drove people apart, Prolyfyck Run Crew brought them together


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April 17, 2021 Thank you for supporting the CharlottesvilleAlbemarle SPCA!

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Spread smiles on April 17 at 10 AM during the #BowWOWwalk! Be part of a social-distanced car parade celebrating rescue pets and spreading joy to senior residents at Morningside of Charlottesville. Don't want to be in the parade? You can fundraise as a "Cat Napper" or walk, bike, or hike for the pets in our care. Your support provides veterinary care, food, and more for the homeless pets at the SPCA. Scan to donate now!

At 1 PM at check out the SPCA's social media for a livestream performance by animal-loving musicians Sally Rose and Erin Lunsford! They'll be coming to you from the shelter, so you'll get to meet some adoptable pets, too!

bowwowwalk.caspca.org/2021 Top Dog Sponsor:

PJ Styles and Kevin Graham will be onsite and broadcasting live!

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CULTURE

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THROUGH 4/15

staple, serving up jazz with some country blues flavor. Kathleen Kraft’s vocals range from down-home grit to clear, pure balladry, and she’s backed up by Doug Hedstrom on guitar, Michael Haag on bass, and her son, Quintas Mills, on drums. Spread out your picnic blanket, sip a glass of wine, and enjoy the tunes. No cover, 1pm. Pippin Hill Farm & Vineyards, 5022 Plank Rd., North Garden. pippinhillfarm.com.

SUNDAY 4/11

SOULFUL REVIVAL

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Charlottesville musicians Calie Garrett and Gary Green give us a chance to celebrate the welcome—and long awaited— return of warm weather and dogwood blossoms with an afternoon of much-needed soulful jams in an outdoor setting. On the piano, Garrett draws upon her background of gospel and soul to play both familiar favorites and originals. Her moving performance pairs beautifully with Green, a harmonica wizard who’s performed with everyone from Terri Allard to Jimmy Buffett. No cover, 3pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com.

April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

Release dates and streaming access make it a challenge to see every movie nominated for a best picture Academy Award this year. But serious Oscar pool competitors know the short film category is a more easily achievable viewing list. Enter Violet Crown’s Oscar Shorts series, part of the theater’s RSVP Cinema program. The shorts will show on the big screen in three categories: animated, live action, and documentary. The films in each group are offered back-to-back, so viewers can gain an edge while enjoying the authentic movie experience we’ve all been missing. Prices and times vary. Violet Crown Cinema, 200 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. charlottesville. violetcrown.com.

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SUNDAY 4/11

SHORT TRAVEL NEARBY YOUR INVESTMENT Kat & the Travelers are well into their second decade as a local music

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OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK


CULTURE EXTRA

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Painful truths

Thanks, neighbors for all the wonderful support throughout this past unique year and over the past four decades! - The Lorenzoni Family

Four County Players brings reality home in The Laramie Project

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LINDA HOGAN PHOTOGRAPHY

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Linda Zuby joins Four County Players’ ensemble cast for The Laramie Project, directed by Perry Medlin and produced by Edward Warwick White.

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By Tami Keaveny arts@c-ville.com

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ince 1973, Four County Players has been producing plays with community volunteers, teaching theater technique to aspiring actors of all ages, and entertaining central Virginia audiences in the charming town of Barboursville. When the pandemic closed venues in March 2020, the theater group pressed pause, initially hoping that waiting it out could salvage the season. As the reality of the shutdown became clear, the Players decided “the show must go online,” and presented the livestreamed Help Desk last fall. The theater returns to its 48th season on April 7 with The Laramie Project, which details the attack on University of Wyo-

ming student Matthew Shepard, who was tortured and murdered for being gay. Producer Edward Warwick White spoke with C-VILLE about the play. C-VILLE: Why did you choose The Laramie Project for a 4CP production? Edward Warwick White: We’ve had our eyes on this piece for quite some time, and it honestly felt like the time was right and overdue. With the pivot from our planned 48th season and everything that is happening in the world around us, we’ve been thinking more and more clearly and critically about what stories we are telling and what voices we are elevating. Matthew Shepard died 23 years ago, but despite changes in legislation and policy, this is a story and headline we could wake


CULTURE SCREENS up and read tomorrow. Theater entertains, but it is also an opportunity to use the platform to educate, question, and advocate for change. In a nation that is plagued with deep issues of racism, bigotry, homophobia, and xenophobia, it’s critical that we shine the light on these issues whenever and wherever we can. The Laramie Project is one of those opportunities. Did moving the show online bring any new opportunities?

Absolutely! The Laramie Project is an incredible script to begin with, but director Perry Medlin has had a strong vision for the show from the start. He really wanted to lean in to the documentary feel of the piece, and the online setting is perfect for it. What would normally be staged in person, you now see news reporters on-screen commenting on the action, in-depth interviews that feel like footage from a videographer working on the piece. It’s stunning as a virtual piece, and I think it will really resonate with audiences given how we take in news and information now... it really feels like a matter of “what we lost in the fire, we gained in the flood.” How did cast members stay in touch with this story during the pandemic delay?

Titans gone wild Godzilla vs. Kong lets the monsters take the wheel By Deirdre Crimmins arts@c-ville.com

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hen it comes to monster movies, the bigger the better. The monsters should be huge, the action fantastic, the budgets sky-high, and the melodrama immeasurable. Godzilla vs. Kong steps into the colossal shadow cast by the cinematic history of both titular creatures, and leaves its own gargantuan mark on the franchises. Taking the helm to direct this latest installment is Adam Wingard, who began his career working on micro-budget indie horror. While that might not seem like the typical training for a kaiju blockbuster director, the path from horror to Godzilla is well-trodden. Godzilla (2014) was directed by Gareth Edwards, who cut his teeth on Monster, and Michael Dougherty directed Trick ‘r Treat before he took on Godzilla: King of the Monsters. Both films had their own unique strengths and weaknesses, but as directors, Edwards and Dougherty walked so that Wingard could run. Godzilla has been portrayed in 36 movies over the past 67 years, alternately appearing as an ancient creature and a new, nuclear-era phenomenon. In Godzilla vs. Kong, he’s mad as hell—and leaving a path of destruction everywhere he goes. This time around, though, Kong (who seems to have dropped King from his title

several movies ago) is the emotional center and clear star of the film. The movie opens with the giant gorilla having a lazy morning, going for a walk set to easy rock and roll. The primate is graying but still physically imposing, perhaps even more since we last saw him in Kong: Skull Island. This calm morning is a ruse, though, and Kong knows it. Like a jungle-themed The Truman Show, Kong’s home is an ersatz habitat, and he is trapped under the scrutiny of scientists and the military as a means to control and protect. Researcher Irene (Rebecca Hall) knows Kong best, and her adopted daughter Jia (Kaylee Hottle) has a special bond with the big ape. Never one to let another creature grab too much screen time, Godzilla breaks the idyll by launching into a seemingly unprovoked attack. Apex Cybernetics is possibly up to no good, which may or may not be linked to the Godzilla attack that came out of nowhere. Low-level employee Bernie (Brian Tyree Henry) escapes by the skin of his teeth and is determined to get to the bottom of it. (Bernie provides comic relief throughout the film, making the most of being a hilarious addition to a largely humorless script.) Within 10 minutes of the film’s start, we know both the creatures and the plot. The swiftness of the setup is important in Godzilla vs. Kong because it confirms an understanding of why audiences want to see a monster matchup like this in the first place—

it’s not for the human drama. At their best, monster movie plots are a thin frame around which all of the fantastical action can revolve. This is not to say that a bad performance or a ludicrous plot cannot run a fun clash of colossi, but those flicks quickly lose focus. Godzilla vs. Kong understands that, and uses the monsters to drive the plot. Godzilla vs. Kong revels in the spectacle, taking us to incredible worlds with ancient flying creatures, gravity-reversed underworlds, and laboratory bunkers buried miles below the Earth’s surface to conceal top secret experiments. And we get to see plenty of monster fights.

Godzilla vs. Kong PG-13, 113 minutes HBO Max, Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Unlike Godzilla (2014), the film is not trying to build up to a massive showdown between behemoths. We watch them match up and go for the win many times—at sea and in the city. The CGI for these creatures and their surroundings looks marvelous, and is enhanced by equally deft sound design. Never are the maneuvers of the battle lost in confusion of bad editing or inexplicably tight framing. It is all there in its indulgent, escapist glory.

April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

When tackling a show with such intense, strong, and emotional content like The Laramie Project, it’s so important to stay connected as a company. One thing I thought was really smart is that Perry holds Sunday company gatherings. The space is there for the cast to unpack anything that needs to be unpacked, to be together, and to even just be social. It’s critical that everyone feel that support, safety net, and safe, brave space to share what’s on their hearts and minds. It’s also important in a piece like this that cast members have the opportunity to explore who these real-life people are or were. You want to honor the truth, not create caricatures. What can Charlottesville learn from The Laramie Project?

The sheer spectacle of Godzilla vs. Kong’s monster battles is balanced by director Adam Wingard’s smart plot decisions.

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WARNER BROS.

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I think there is a lot that Charlottesville can learn from The Laramie Project. In many ways, this is a story that should not only resonate, but one that should ring loudly and painfully true. Like Laramie, we are a (in many ways) small town that many love—that many brand as a great place to be. But we are also a town that is known nationally for tragedy, a painful history, and conflict. Like this story, we have to own what happens here. We can’t distance ourselves from the bad, and the pain, and the hurt. We can’t say “well, I wasn’t there,” or “I would never do that.” One of my favorite lines from the show is “And we have to mourn this and we have to be sad that we live in a town, a state, a country where shit like this happens. I mean, these are people trying to distance themselves from this crime. And we need to own this crime. I feel. Everyone needs to own it. We are like this. We are like this. We are like this.” We have to own what happens here. We say “the bad guys weren’t from here. This isn’t who we are. This isn’t Charlottesville. This isn’t America.” But it is. This is who we are, as painful as it may be. We have a lot to learn.

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Wire Workings & Silverwareables

CULTURE SOUND CHOICES

REFLECTING THE PAST AND STARING DOWN THE FUTURE

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Matthew E. White & Lonnie Holley

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Broken Mirror, A Selfie Reflection Spacebomb/Jagjaguwar For his latest solo effort, the mastermind behind Richmond’s Spacebomb Records has teamed up with 70-year-old Alabama singer Lonnie Holley. Before pursuing music, Holley was known for his work as a visual artist, crafting sculptures and environments from found objects. When Matthew E. White asked Holley to write and sing across a batch of instrumentals that he had recorded with the Spacebomb house band, Holley applied the same artistic aesthetic to the project. Comprised of five extended “compositions,” Broken Mirror, A Selfie Reflection is an indulgent, dreamlike amalgam of sound and imagery that serves as a commentary on life in the digital era. The title track, “Broken Mirror (A Selfie Reflection)/Composition 9,” is a 10-minute romp of chants and synth layers that draws on cultural tropes like “mirror, mirror on the wall,” and the threat of “seven years of bad luck,” as the narrator stares at his own image on a cell phone. This record isn’t a casual listen, but rather, a thought-provoking one that manages to be entirely futuristic while remaining rooted in the present. (Released April 9)

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Vivian Leva & Riley Calcagno Vivian Leva & Riley Calcagno Free Dirt Records

MAKING CONVERSATION WITH FIVE LOCAL CREATIVES

1 ABODE

What is 434? It’s recreation, it’s culture, it’s society—it’s how we live in Charlottesville. In this full-glossy quarterly magazine, you’ll meet townspeople from all corners of our area, from creatives to CEOs, each with their own story to tell. Every issue will connect readers with the best things to buy, see, and get involved in that season.

This is the 434, and we’re all about town.

ON STANDS NOW!

Born and raised in Lexington, Virginia, Vivian Leva had a vast musical training ground right at home: Her parents are veteran old-time musicians who have been performing for over a decade as Jones & Leva. Alongside her mom, Leva brought the sounds of the Blue Ridge Mountains to Washington state as a workshop teacher in the summer of 2016. There, she met Riley Calcagno, a member of the string band The Onlies. They forged a musical partnership, and Calcagno contributed to Leva’s 2018 debut, Time Is Everything. Now, the duo has released its first proper full-length, a beautiful integration of indie-folk, mountain music, and classic country. The pair’s pure harmonies unfurl over virtuosic finger-picking, as they tackle themes of heartbreak (“Will You”), the sublime (“Love and Chains”), and loneliness (“Biding All My Time”). Leva and Calcagno are more than the sum of their parts, and while they currently reside in Portland, Oregon, their self-titled disc is pure Appalachia. (Released March 12)

Stray Fossa With You For Ever Nice Guys Records Brothers Nick and Will Evans grew up in southern Tennessee, and along with

childhood friend Zach Blount, they wrote songs and played in bands together throughout high school. The trio went their separate ways for college, but after graduate stints across the globe in Berlin and the U.K., they reformed as Stray Fossa in Charlottesville in 2018. (Will had attended undergrad at the University of Virginia, and Charlottesville’s burgeoning music scene seemed like a good place to kick-start their musical pursuits.) The group built a studio in an attic, where the guys recorded a handful of EPs as well as their full-length debut, With You For Ever. Written in the beginning stages of the pandemic, the album not only reflects the surreal aspects of a global health crisis and social isolation, but also brims with nostalgia, offering a joyous and hopeful reprieve of shimmery dream pop. Standout track “Bright Ahead” boasts a maturation in sound from the band’s early work, while highlights like “Orange Days’’ take a wistful look in the rearview. With You For Ever is a collection to get lost in, washing over the listener in a wave of keys, steady percussion, reverb, and gossamer vocals. (Release March 9) —Desiré Moses


CULTURE THE WORKING POUR

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A sweet win Barboursville Vineyards wins a record-setting fifth Governor’s Cup By Paul H. Ting

2021 Virginia Governor’s Cup Case

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2015 Barboursville Vineyards Paxxito ($35, winemaker Luca Paschina) 2016 Barboursville Vineyards Octagon ($55, winemaker Luca Paschina) 2019 Barboursville Vineyards Vermentino Reserve ($23, winemaker Luca Paschina) 2019 Bluestone Vineyard Petit Manseng ($24.50, winemaker Lee Harman) 2016 Breaux Vineyards Meritage ($45, winemaker Josh Gerard) 2016 Breaux Vineyards Nebbiolo ($62, winemaker Josh Gerard) 2019 Carriage House Wineworks Petit Verdot ($31, winemaker Michael Fritze) 2017 R.A.H. Wine Company Series 1 ($35 for 375ml bottle, winemaker Maya Hood White) 2017 King Family Vineyards Mountain Plains ($70, winemaker Matthieu Finot) 2015 Michael Shaps Wineworks Meritage ($50, winemaker Michael Shaps) 2014 Trump Winery Brut Reserve ($80, winemaker Jonathan Wheeler) 2017 Veritas Winery Petit Verdot ($45, winemaker Emily Pelton)

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With consistent production of excellent wine every year, Barboursville Vineyards is not only one of the historical pioneers of Virginia wine but an enduring shining star.

el of well-qualified judges, and those wines that score 90 points or higher are awarded gold medals, of which there were 96 this year. The top 12 wines make up the Governor’s Cup Case, and the top wine is then awarded the Cup. According to Paschina, the Virginia Governor’s Cup is “one of the most stringent competitions in the United States.” This year, Barboursville was also recognized with two other wines in the final case (2016 Octagon red blend and 2019 Vermentino Reserve), and received three additional gold medals (2019 Sauvignon Blanc Reserve, 2017 Paxxito, and 2017 Octagon), for a total of six. An examination of the complete list of gold medals and the composition of the final case reveals a local wine industry that is growing, exploring, and continuing to mature. A wide range of wineries is represented from all geographic areas of the state, with both well established and familiar names, but also wineries that have only recently launched. In addition, an increasing diversity of grape varieties is seen, both red and white, including ones that are not traditionally associated with Virginia such as vermentino, nebbiolo, moscato, and tannat. Six gold medals, three wines in the Case, and a fifth Governor’s Cup. For Barboursville Vineyards, these results reinforce its standing as one of the pillars of the Virginia wine industry.

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The Governor’s Cup Case is used by the Virginia Wine Board Marketing Office to promote Virginia wine. VWBMO recently announced the creation of the Virginia Governor’s Cup Gold Medal Trail, which includes all 47 wineries, cideries, and meaderies that received a gold medal. More information can be found at taste.virginiawine.org.

April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

here’s something alluring and gratifying about continuing a best practice that originated in the ancient world, and the 2021 Virginia Governor’s Cup winner is a prime example. On March 9, Governor Ralph Northam presented the award to Barboursville Vineyards for its 2015 Paxxito. The Cup is given to the top-scoring wine in the annual competition, which this year saw more than 100 wineries in the state submit a total of 544 wines for judging. Winemaker Luca Paschina accepted the award, flanked by Fernando Franco, viticulturist at the winery since 1998, and associate winemaker Daniele Tessaro. The 2015 Paxxito is a sweet, dessert-style wine made with moscato ottonel and vidal blanc and a production technique called passito. Passito is perhaps best known because of vin santo, a style of wine that has been produced in Italy since at least the Renaissance era. Paschina calls it an “ancient method of winemaking” that “requires lots of labor,” including picking and sorting the individual grapes by hand. In short, passito involves picking grapes relatively early to preserve their natural acidity and then laying them out on straw mats or perforated wooden trays for drying. Historically, this occurred by exposure to sunlight and wind, but Paschina admits that the often-unpredictable weather in Virginia has led the winemakers to actively circulate air for drying. Barboursville started using passito in 2001, and now has a Paxxito Barn where the process occurs. As water is removed, the shriveled grape gains concentration of flavor and sugar (sugar concentration can be as high as 47 percent by the end). In addition to requiring intensive manual labor, the process also results in less wine produced. Paschina says that, despite this, “the reward is big,” as volume is exchanged for concentrated flavors and a dense mouthfeel. The resultant wine is sweet and unctuous, with intense aromatics and flavors of honey and dried fruits, such as peaches and apricots. On the finish, the acidity takes over, leaving an impression much like a sweet-tart candy. Founded in 1976 by the Zonig family of Italy, Barboursville was the fifth winery started in the state of Virginia. In 1990, Paschina joined the winery from his home in the Piedmont wine region of Italy. Despite the fact that Paschina has been behind three previous Governor’s Cup winners, it’s obvious from his emotional words that this award still brings him great pride. For the local wine industry, the Cup is widely considered the most prestigious annual competition. Now in its 39th year, the competition’s rules require, among other things, that wines entered be produced with 100 percent Virginia fruit. Wines are subject to a strict blind-tasting process with a pan-


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WINE

DOWN WHAT’S DELISH AT LOCAL WINERIES?

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD 2019 Viognier

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With bright acidity, the 2019 Viognier is refreshing for those warm spring afternoons. On the nose you may find hints of white lilies and honeysuckle. White peaches, asian pears, and honeydew melon dominate the palate, with a fine and mineral finish for balance. Our 2019 Viognier is perfect for your springtime salads, goat cheese, roasted chicken, or even pork chops!

WINERY

April 17th - Strawberry Street Food Truck

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MADISON

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KESWICK VINEYARDS LOUISA

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53RD WINERY & VINEYARD 64

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13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

DUCARD VINEYARDS Cuvée 719 A blend of Chardonnay, Viognier, and Traminette, the Cuvée 719 has a powerful nose with citrus notes of lemon zest and grapefruit. With a vibrant acidity and a refreshing palate, you’ll find flavors of lemon candy, white flowers, and clementine for a refreshing zip! Perfect to pair with oysters, scallops, soft cheeses, and salads with rich creamy dressing. As we head into the warmer months, this is a wine to enjoy outsides with friends and family. Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and lots of beautiful views along scenic back roads. Get some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit on our lawns, or pick up a bottle or three of our award-winning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walk-ups accommodated on a space-available basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website! Open daily; Mon-Thurs 12-5 pm; Fridays 12-9 pm; Sat/Sun 12-6 pm NEW: Offering tasting flights daily. Table service, well-spaced, led by DuCard staff host, crystal glassware, red, white or mixed flights. An elegant way to get to know our wines.

April 10th- Second Saturday Concert Series featuring Local Vocals (5:30-8:30pm) and beer on tap by Beer Hound Brewing Co.

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Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm

Fridays - Friday Night out at Ducard (5:30 - 8:30 pm) come out and kick off the weekend with dinner and live music at DuCard.

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STANARDSVILLE

KILAURWEN WINERY 81

April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

We are open 7 days a week 11am to 5pm, offering curbside pickup and for those visiting we have bottle sales only Monday through Thursday and Friday through Sunday offer wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights (four 2 oz pours). The following areas are available for customers: outside tables, deck off tasting room and wellspaced seating inside our Pavilion. Groups greater than 10 not permitted. We ask that customers refrain from moving inside and outside tables. Children and Pets are welcome but pets must remain outside of buildings. Customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs, blankets and glassware. Please note that we cannot pour into glassware brought from home. Please follow entrance and exit signs when coming into the tasting room to purchase wine. Restrooms are available in tasting room and pavilion, one patron at a time. Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our Covid operating procedures.

April 18th - Blue Ridge Pizza Co.

April 17th- Seafood Saturday with Oysters, Crabcakes and Live Music! Food by Noimi Bay Oyster Ranchoysters, crabcakes, burgers and brats; with live music by 2 Wishes. Advance tickets suggested ($10), but will be available at the door ($15). Food and wine not included. 40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 • www.ducardvineyards.com


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the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of pre-packaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase. April 13th - Tasting Tuesday, 2017 Petit Verdot Estate Reserve (7 pm) 1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

KILAURWEN WINERY 2014 Rosé An elegant tea-rose color, this wine has notes of wild strawberries and pink grapefruit on the palate. Crisp and bright, with a touch of minerality underlying a distinctive and refreshing finish. Enjoy with your favorite shellfish dishes, roasted turkey, or sharper cheddar and manchego cheeses. *Bronze Medal winner, 2016 Mid-Atlantic Southeastern Wine Competition*

Apple Pear Cider Made from estate-grown and handpicked apples and pears, this cider is fruit forward and refreshing with balanced sweetness and acidity. Honeyed apples and pears are detected on the nose while flavors of fig, spice, and a hint of sage characterize the palate. Available as a sparkling & still cider.

April Hours: Fridays (4-8PM), Saturdays (12-8PM), Sunday (12-5PM)

The Outdoor Tasting Room reopens on Friday, April 9th Upcoming calendar of events featuring live music, food trucks, yoga, and more available on our website. April 9th - Live music by FarAway (5-8 pm)

KESWICK VINEYARDS 2019 LVA Rose 100% Touriga Nacionale. This is a dry Provencal style wine has amplified aromas of freshly cut red berries, citrus fruit and a hint of green apple. The palate is light and vibrant with lovely acidity, good palate weight and length. Flavors of cherry, strawberry and raspberries are dominant before warmth shows a touch more of the citrus tones and slight spiciness on the finish. Perfect on its own during the warmer months or paired with shellfish and oysters on the half shell. Tasting Room Hours We welcome guests daily from 10am5pm. No reservations are required for open air, first-come, first served seating at our courtyard tables. Guests may also bring their own blankets and lawn chairs and spread out on the lower hillside. Please remember face masks are required for all guests ages 5+ when not seated. Wine is available by

Special orders are available any day of the week to those preferring to arrange gateside pick up at a date and time of your choosing. Place order by calling 434-985-2535. 1543 Evergreen Church Rd Stanardsville, VA 22973 (434) 985-2535 www.kilaurwenwinery.com

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The Barn & Veranda is open every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. Indoor & outdoor tables are available on a first come basis. Couch reservations may be made on our website.

2531 Scottsville Rd. (5 mi from Downtown Charlottesville) Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

COVID regulations still in effect require 6 foot spacing, mask wearing except when seated at tables, and group size limited to 6 people.

@cville_culture

Eastwood is a women-owned business created by a group of wine lovers and agriculture enthusiasts producing awardwinning Virginia wines. We embrace the power of storytelling and the vision that there is no ceiling you can’t break. We look forward to toasting you in one of our tasting rooms soon!

April 16th - Live music by John Kelly (4-8pm) and The 106 food truck (12-6 pm)

Our season opening will be the weekend of April 17 & 18. Hours will be from noon - 6 pm. First come, first serve at outdoor umbrella tables in our Boxwood Garden. Enjoy the mountain views while sipping your favorite Kilaurwen wines which are available by the bottle, the glass and DIY tasting flights. You’re welcome to bring your own picnic or snacks to enjoy with our wine!

April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY

*Bronze Medal winner, 2015 Mid-Atlantic Southeastern Wine Competition*


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CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU

CROSSWORD

Breakout room

Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS

1. Fend (off) 5. ____ Juice (California-based smoothie chain) 10. Booking.com booking 14. Grad 15. Whatsoever 16. Zen garden accessory 17. Malek of “Bohemian Rhapsody” 18. Trailer follower 19. Genesis spot 20. *Comics debut of 3/12/51 23. High-____ monitor 24. Writer Gogol 27. *”To Kill a Mockingbird” lawyer 31. *Longtime reality cooking show with a pitchfork in its logo 33. Regret 34. “Peachy!” 36. One blowing off steam? 37. “May ____ excused?” 38. City by the Bay, informally 40. Chart-topper 41. Novelist Whitehead with two Pulitzer Prizes for fiction 43. End of many URLs 44. Brian in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 45. *”Q: Why did the toilet paper roll down the hill? A: To get to the bottom,” e.g. 46. *Very cheap, as merchandise 49. Dublin’s St. ____ Church, dating from 1793 53. “Supposing ...” 54. Feature of Zoom or Google Meet ... or what the answers to each of the asterisked clues all feature

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32. New Jersey’s ____ Hall University 35. Chain with Popcorn Nuggets 36. Noted work in which many different positions are discussed 38. More in need of a massage 39. Director Reiner 42. Raspberry or lemon desserts 47. Snitch (on) 48. Swing one’s hips 50. Three more than quadri51. Alphabetically first member of the Baseball DOWN Hall of Fame 52. Sounds like a broken 1. Caution record 2. Jai ____ 55. Go ____ great length 3. Jamaica exports 56. Yoked animals 4. Composer Shostakovich 57. Big name in skin care 5. Film actor whose last name 58. Arizona city or landform sounds like a film festival 59. Orthopedist’s scan, briefly 6. Physics 101 subject 60. Assistance 7. Connoisseur 61. Wild place 8. Thin Russian pancakes 9. Bad thing to spring 10. Sapling 11. “Tubular!” 12. Mike’s candy partner ANSWERS 3/31/21 13. Ballpoint ____ 21. Cornish game ____ 22. “Watch What Happens Live” host Andy C A P N S L O F R E S C A 25. 1950s tennis champion A R E A H A R R A T I O N L I Z Z O O M G E V A D E D Gibson I O T A D E E M E D 26. “Fighting” Big Ten team S P F P U Z O O M N I B U S R I I S P E N N I N E C K 27. Actor Robert of “Spenser: A E S O P E H U D N A Y For Hire” C H O R I Z O O M E L E T Y E S U N I V A L F I E 28. Give a break from A S T O A P E R S D I O S the game Z O O M I S P R I N T T N T F R E S N O C O O P 29. “Get what I’m talkin’ S P I R E A Z O O M L I N K about?” D I E T E R A L P U M N O 30. Dearie S E S A M E G A S M O W S 59. Puzzle with a start and a finish 62. Counterpart to digital 63. ____ grease 64. Laughfest 65. Not up ____ (below standard) 66. Ones steeped in tradition in England? 67. Things exchanged between brides and grooms 68. Photo-sharing app, familiarly 69. Four-time Grammy winner for Best New Age Album

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By Rob Brezsny

Taurus (April 20-May 20): In the 1930s, Taurus-born Rita Levi-Montalcini was a promising researcher in neurobiology at the University of Turin in Italy. But when fascist dictator Benito Mussolini imposed new laws that forbade Jews from holding university jobs, she was fired. Undaunted, she created a laboratory in her bedroom and continued her work. There she laid the foundations for discoveries that ultimately led to her winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. I foresee you summoning comparable determination and resilience in the coming weeks, Taurus.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Religious scholar Karl Barth wrote, “There will be no song on our lips if there be no anguish in our hearts.” To that perverse oversimplification, I reply: “Rubbish. Twaddle. Bunk. Hooey.” I’m appalled by his insinuation that pain is the driving force for all of our lyrical self-revelations. Case in point: you in the coming weeks. I trust there will be a steady flow of songs in your heart and on your lips because you will be in such intimate alignment with your life’s master plan.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): “It is not easy to be crafty and winsome at the same time, and few accomplish it after the age of six,” wrote author John W. Gardner. But I would add that more adult Crabs accomplish this feat than any other sign of the zodiac. I’ll furthermore suggest that during the next six weeks, many of you will do it quite well. My prediction: You will blend lovability and strategic shrewdness to generate unprecedented effectiveness. (How could anyone resist you?)

Leo

Aries (March 21-April 19): Author Susan Sontag defined “mad people” as those who “stand alone and burn.” She said she was drawn to them because they inspired her to do the same. What do you think she meant by the descriptor “stand alone and burn”? I suspect she was referring to strong-willed people devoted to cultivating the most passionate version of themselves, always in alignment with their deepest longings. She meant those who are willing to accept the consequences of such devotion, even if it means being misunderstood or alone. The coming weeks will be an interesting and educational time for you to experiment with being such a person.

time gazing into flames. I also hope you will super-nurture the radiant fire that glows within you.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Physicist Victor Weisskopf told us, “What’s beautiful in science is the same thing that’s beautiful in Beethoven. There’s a fog of events and suddenly you see a connection. It connects things that were always in you that were never put together before.” I’m expecting there to be a wealth of these aha! moments for you in the coming weeks, Virgo. Hidden patterns will become visible. Missing links will appear. Secret agendas will emerge. The real stories beneath the superficial stories will materialize. Be receptive and alert.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): Jungian psychoanalyst and folklore expert Clarissa Pinkola Estés celebrates the power of inquiry. She says that “asking the proper question is the central action of transformation,” both in fairy tales and in psychotherapy. To identify what changes will heal you, you must be curious to uncover truths that you don’t know yet. “Questions are the keys that cause the secret doors of the psyche to swing open,” says Estes. I bring this to your attention, Libra, because now is prime time for you to formulate the Fantastically Magically Catalytic Questions.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In April 1933, Scorpio-born African American singer Ethel Waters was in a “private hell.” Her career was at an impasse and her marriage was falling apart. In the depths of despondency, she was invited to sing a new song, “Stormy Weather,” at New York City’s famous Cotton Club. It

was a turning point. She later wrote, “I was singing the story of my misery and confusion, of the misunderstandings in my life I couldn’t straighten out, the story of the wrongs and outrages done to me by people I had loved and trusted.” The audience was thrilled by her performance, and called her back for 12 encores. Soon thereafter, musical opportunities poured in and her career blossomed. I foresee a parallel event in your life, Scorpio. Maybe not quite so dramatic, but still, quite redemptive.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I love to see you enjoy yourself. I get a vicarious thrill as I observe you pursuing pleasures that other people are too inhibited or timid to dare. It’s healing for me to witness you unleash your unapologetic enthusiasm for being alive in an amazing body that’s blessed with the miracle of consciousness. And now I’m going to be a cheerleader for your efforts to wander even further into the frontiers of bliss and joy and gratification. I will urge you to embark on a quest of novel forms of rapture and exultation. I’ll prod you to at least temporarily set aside habitual sources of excitement so you’ll have room to welcome as-yet unfamiliar sources.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet John O’Donohue suggested that a river’s behavior is worthy of our emulation. He said the river’s life is “surrendered to the pilgrimage.” It’s “seldom pushing or straining, keeping itself to itself everywhere all along its flow.” Can you imagine yourself doing that, Capricorn? Now is an excellent time to do so. O’Donohue rhapsodized that the river is “at one with its sinuous mind, an utter rhythm, never awkward,” and that “it con-

tinues to swirl through all unlikeness with elegance: a ceaseless traverse of presence soothing on each side, sounding out its journey, raising up a buried music.” Be like that river, dear Capricorn.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Is life not a thousand times too short for us to bore ourselves?” wrote philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. In response to that sentiment, I say, “Amen!” and “Hallelujah!” Even if you live till age 99, that’s still too brief a time to indulge in an excess of dull activities that activate just a small part of your intelligence. To be clear, I don’t think it’s possible to be perfect in avoiding boredom. But for most of us, there’s a lot we can do to minimize numbing tedium and energy-draining apathy. I mention this, Aquarius, because the coming weeks will be a time when you will have extra power to make your life as interesting as possible for the long run.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): I know of four different governmental organizations that have estimated the dollar value of a single human life. The average of their figures is $7.75 million. So let’s say, for argument’s sake, that you are personally worth that much. Does it change the way you think about your destiny? Are you inspired to upgrade your sense of yourself as a precious treasure? Or is the idea of putting a price on your merit uninteresting, even unappealing? Whatever your reaction is, I hope it prods you to take a revised inventory of your worth, however you measure it. It’s a good time to get a clear and precise evaluation of the gift that is your life. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888.

We were a meal kit before there were meal kits.

pegssalt.com Sold in local groceries, Whole Foods, and Amazon Prime

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Peg’s Salt. The original every day, easy meal solution.

April 7 – 13, 2021 c-ville.com

(July 23-Aug. 22): Staring at flames had benefits for our primitive ancestors. As they sat around campfires and focused on the steady burn, they were essentially practicing a kind of meditation. Doing so enhanced their ability to regulate their attention, thereby strengthening their working memory and developing a greater capacity to make longrange plans. What does this have to do with you? As a fire sign, you have a special talent for harnessing the power of fire to serve you. In the coming weeks, that will be even more profoundly true than usual. If you can do so safely, I encourage you to spend quality

CULTURE FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

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Q&A

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How have you changed your exercise routine in the last year? I gave up my gym membership and subscribed to two online fitness programs—one local and one not. I’m paying way less and get to work out to both live and recorded classes. TERRI ANNE DI CINTIO/FACEBOOK

I’ve added long outdoor power walks to my regular routine to help mitigate cabin fever. @MRSTHELIN/TWITTER

Worked out at home from March until June, five times a week. When ACAC reopened in June, I returned to classes. Never even got a sniffle. @SHARON_SALZ/INSTAGRAM

I started working out regularly with the beautiful and inspiring Sabrina Feggans. GAIL ESTERMAN/FACEBOOK

I didn’t tbh. PABLO ENCISO/FACEBOOK

Began in the basement, random workouts with whatever I had, now I hit the commercial gym extra hard each time because I appreciate it so much more. @DAVETHEKAYAKER/TWITTER

I workout in VR on an Oculus headset using an app called Supernatural. There are other fitness apps that have boxing, dance, rhythm games, and other VR environments that you can use in conjunction with your exercise bike, rowing machine, or treadmill.

Doing all my regular workouts via Zoom. @NPD_BLUE/TWITTER

Fortunately I haven’t had to change a thing. I walk with intermittent spurts of something I like to think of as running.

BIG shoutout to the Y’s Jeri Evans, who started teaching classes for her regular students online in May. When the Y got up and running, she was teaching from the facility. She has been a lifesaver for the Silver Sneakers crowd.

HENRY HAGENAU

@BINQ407/INSTAGRAM

@JENNIFER_RIDLEY/TWITTER

Instead of a gym I work out outside, and I have been walking a LOT more! @INESSATELEFUS/INSTAGRAM

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook. com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

A guide to vintage

Charlottesville's best spots for your 'something old'

Cheek to cheek

A two-person dance floor (what a romantic idea!)

SP R I N G 2 02 1

On a love train

We're on board for this Staunto n wedding PAGE 62

Love is

patient, love is kind Six couples (finally) get their big day

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HERE COME THE BRIDES

Small packages

A planner advises: how to hold a microwedding

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Next week’s question: What’s the strangest thing in your refrigerator?


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CLINICAL TRIALS Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities: Program Manager- Day Support, Louisa County. Part-time 20 hours per week. Direct Support Professionals Residential Services (FT and PT) We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet and C’ville!

Study for Family Caregivers

Exercise Training and Drug Study

Study for Type 2 Diabetics

Men and women who provide in-home care to their adult loved ones with chronic health conditions are needed for a study about caregiving stress, sleep, and cardiovascular health. Participation involves 1 study visit lasting 90 minutes: completing questionnaires and getting non-invasive cardiovascular tests at the visit, and wearing a wrist-worn sleep tracker for a week and a blood pressure monitor for a day after the visit are required. Compensation: $60 at completion of participating. Principal Investigator: Jeongok Logan, PhD, RN.

Non-smoking, inactive adults aged 21-50 needed for study on the effect of exercise and the drug liraglutide on blood vessels. You must have 3 of the 4 characteristics: overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fasting blood sugar. Study requires three 1-hour and two 9-hour visits over 5 months in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Participants are randomized to one of 4 groups: control, exercise training, study drug, or exercise + study drug. Compensation is $1,500. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, MD.

Men and women with type 2 diabetes aged 18-60 needed for study on the effect of the drug empagliflozin (used to control blood sugar) on blood vessels. Study requires two 1-hour outpatient visits and two 7-hour admissions in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. The study drug is taken for 12 weeks. You must have Type 2 diabetes, be a non-smoker, and not taking insulin. Compensation is $800.00, paid in installments. Principal Investigator: Eugene Barrett, MD, PhD.

UVA School of Nursing Soojung Ahn 434.233.4593 | sa4ve@virginia.edu IRB-HSR #22260

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu HSR200065

How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.

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To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/ In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline CRC 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu IRB-HSR #21403

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VOL. 30 NO. 14 n APRIL 7 - 13, 2021

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APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

The Boxley Place Inn

No Prettier Place BY KEN WILSON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Louisa County Living:


APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

UNDER T C 34 ONTRA

NOW IS THE TIME TO SELL! STING NEW LI

STING NEW LI

UNDER T C CONTRA

FOUR SOLD IN BOVE A S DAY PRICE! ASKING

3940 GILMERS MILL LANE

316 STARCREST ROAD

748 EXTON COURT

Country living just 20 minutes from CharlottesWonderful home in the sought after Mill Creek Wonderful two bedroom town home only 8 ville! The 11+ acres has it all. Enjoy the two South neighborhood. First floor living is showminutes to Downtown. Updated and ready acre stocked pond, walk through the woods, cased with the open concept connecting the for you to move in. Walk into the sun filled liv& use the pasture for your horses, goats, other kitchen,dining area, and living room. Enjoy ing room with wood burning fireplace. A few livestock, or as a large fenced yard. Three stall cooking in your updated kitchen with huge issteps down you will find your spacious kitchbarn & run-in shed waiting for you. Walk into land. The large master suite has a walk-in closet en with dining area and half bath. Upstairs is the main floor of the house to find your beautiful and attached bath. The laundry caps off the your master suite with attached bath plus an kitchen with tons of cabinets & counter space first floor. Head upstairs to find three additional additional bedroom and full bath. Don’t forget to entertain. On that level, you’ll also find your bedrooms and full bath. Head downstairs to the storage in the attic. Off your dining area large master suite. Upstairs is a second bedthe finished, walkout basement which is a rare is a wonderful screen porch to enjoy on these room, full bath, & loft looking down onto the livfind in the neighborhood. The large combinabeautiful days. The porch overlooks the open ing room. Head to the downstairs to appreciate tion room has plenty of room to create several common area behind the property. Enjoy the the flexibility of the house. Currently used as a living spaces like a home office, rec room, and benefit of a big backyard with none of the separate two bedroom apartment with full kitcheven a guest suite with the full bath. The view maintenance since the HOA includes lawnen or you can use the terrace level as an adfrom the back deck is the wonderful fencedcare! There is also a pool to enjoy all summer. Sunday 1-3 pm ditional family room, bedroom, & office. There in lawn and a wooded common area to give MLS# 614564 $235,000 2808 Magnolia Dr Avinity Loop are tons of options to enjoy the peace & quiet more privacy a neighborhood. 1544 Sawgrass Ct than expected in2142 Peace & tranquility less than 15 minutes from Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhouse w/mountain Complete 1st floor living, MLS# lg MBR &615586 BA w/laundry. MLS# 615511 $475,000 $420,000

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20 Min to Cville Hardwood Floors Winter Water Views 20 Min 20toMin Cville to 20Cville Min 20 to Min Cville to Cville Well Maintained 4 Hardwood Bed Ranch Floors Hardwood Floors

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Winter Water Winter Views Water Winter ViewsWater Views

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Well Maintained Well Maintained 4 Bed 4 Bed Ranch Ranch 4 Bed Ranch

Integrity & Service is Our Motto! Cynthia Hash

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Keller Williams Realty 3510 Remson Ct # 301 Charlottesville VA 22901, 434-220-2200. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this is not considered a solicitation. Fair Housing Compliant. Licensed to sell real estate in Commonwealth of VA. Each office independently owned & operated.


35 APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

2884 PALMER DRIVE | $2,675,000 | MLS 604640 4 Bedrooms • 4 Full Bath & 1 Half Bath • 4,118sqft • 4.15 Acres • 2.5 Car Garage

3280 BROADMOORE DRIVE | $2,700,000 | MLS 604638 4 Bedrooms • 3 Full Bath & 1 Half Bath • 4,000 sqft • 2 Car Garage

2869 PALMER DRIVE | $2,850,000 | MLS 604639 4 Bedrooms • 4 Full Bath & 2 Half Bath • 4,606 sqft • 3 Car Garage

2559 PALMER DRIVE | $2,425,000 | MLS 604636 3 Bedroom • 3 Full Bath & 1 Half Bath • 3,750sqft • 2 Acres

2571 PALMER DRIVE | $2,625,000 | MLS 604637 4 Bedroom • 4 Full Bath & 1 Half Bath • 4080sqft • 2 Car Garage • 2.7 Acres

keswickestate.com Murdoch Matheson

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CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Frank Hardy Sotheby’s International Realty is proud to present 5 newly constructed exclusive residences within Keswick Estate. The product of intensive planning and collaboration among the area’s top builders and architects, these homes embody the highest standard of craftsmanship. Owners of these homes will enjoy thoughtfullydesigned floor plans with main-level masters, spacious secondary bedrooms and seamless transitions between the indoor and outdoor space.


CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY

NEWS & VIEWS Local Real Estate News Statement from Quinton Beckham, Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® 2021 President Over the weekend, the Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® (CAAR) learned of a video depicting a distressing incident that has been shared widely on social media. The subject of the video is a member of the Association. CAAR is taking appropriate actions under the National Association of REALTORS® Code of Ethics, which was recently amended to include stricter standards around discriminatory speech and conduct. While the specifics of this issue cannot be commented upon, the individual is no longer a member of CAAR’s Board of Directors. The Charlottesville area has not been a stranger to issues of racial discrimination, particularly in recent years. However, we–as an Association and greater community–have been learning of and from our history and are committed to being better each and every day. This incident will not stand in the way of Charlottesville’s progress towards coming together as a community in a unified effort to overcome issues of discrimination and intolerance. It should not stop individuals from moving to and residing in our beautiful city and surrounding counties. This behavior is in no way reflective of who we are. CAAR believes, individually and collectively, that we should actively work towards a diverse, inclusive, and equitable community, where all citizens, whatever their gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, age, sexual orientation or identity, education, or disability, are valued and respected. We also believe in nondiscriminatory approaches and equal opportunity and advancement. We respect and value diverse life experiences and heritages and ensure that all voices are valued and heard. CAAR members are committed to modeling diversity, equity, and inclusion for the entire community and to maintaining an inclusive environment with equitable treatment for all. About CAAR – The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® serves more than 1,300 real estate professionals and affiliate WWW.CAAR.COM

VOL. 30 NO. 1 n JANUARY 6 - 12, 2021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

members throughout the City of Charlottesville and the counties of Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, and Nelson. Since 1925, the Association has advocated for the protection of private property rights and provides tools and technology for members to achieve expertise in serving the needs of customers and clients. The CAAR membership is committed to enriching the region’s neighborhoods by engaging in a variety of educational programs as well as community service events each year. NOTE: The term REALTOR® is a registered collective membership mark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of the National Association of REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics.

What’s Happening Around Town? ReImagineCVA Online Platform Launched to Directly Connect the Public with Area Nonprofits Community members encouraged to visit reimaginecva.org to learn more and get involved. ReImagineCVA, an interactive online platform that allows donors and volunteers to directly connect with and support community organizations in the Central Virginia region has launched with a diverse and growing directory of over 200 nonprofits already participating in the initiative. The Center for Nonprofit Excellence (CNE) partnered with The United Way, The Equity Center, and Thriving Communities Group to create and manage ReImagineCVA as a comprehensive search-and-discover guide to active nonprofits and community organizations doing important work in Charlottesville and the counties of Albemarle, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, and Orange. “The challenging events of the past year, ranging from the public health crisis to severe economic hardship to social justice inequities, have placed even more focus on the critical role that the nonprofit sector plays in building a thriving and just community,” said CNE Executive Director Cristine Nardi. “Many people are asking themselves ‘How do I make a difference starting today WWW.CAAR.COM

VOL. 30 NO. 9 n MARCH 3 - 9, 2021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

WWW.CAAR.COM

VOL. 30 NO. 4 n JANUARY 27 - FEBRUARY 2, 2021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

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in the community I live in and love?’ Anyone who has ever wondered how to find meaningful ways to move beyond individual reaction to create real community transformation can find convenient and impactful connections through the ReImagineCVA platform.” At the ReImagineCVA website, users can quickly locate specific community organization profiles that highlight the organization’s mission, impact, and giving opportunities as a direct way to connect the community to what organizations need right now—from products and supplies to donations to ways to volunteer through hands-on or skilled volunteering. “One unique and very compelling feature of ReImagineCVA is the breadth of nonprofits participating in the platform, ranging from large and well-established to small and newly emerging, so that donors and community members can get a very comprehensive view of the many different types of organizations active in our region,” said Ben Allen, Executive Director of the Equity Center at the University of Virginia. “ReImagineCVA will be a results-oriented central place for learning about and engaging with nonprofits and partner organizations, connecting nonprofits, volunteers, donors and the community directly and actively to one another,” says Ravi Respeto, President & CEO, United Way of Greater Charlottesville. “We are still recruiting community organizations to join the ReImagineCVA directory and warmly welcome participation from organizations in Charlottesville and the counties of Albemarle, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, and Orange.” “With ReImagineCVA, the opportunity to get involved and make a difference is at your fingertips with a dynamic, online platform that will continue to evolve and develop in response to our community.” Micah Kessel, Thriving Communities Group. If you are a member in the community with questions about getting engaged via ReImagineCVA, please contact Caroline Emerson, cemerson@unitedwaycville. org, at United Way. If you are a community organization and want to learn more about how to ensure your organization’s profile and needs are included, please contact Raquel Suarez, rsuarez@ thecne.org, at CNE. Let us know what this platform could do for you by using #ReImagineCVA on social media. About Center for Nonprofit Excellence: Center for Nonprofit Excellence (CNE) believes we can best strengthen the social impact sector by investing in the people and organizations that build community. We mentor, train, coach, advocate and partner with our A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

members and community organizations at large so they can be positive, powerful agents for community change. We help social impact organizations build the foundations of strong leadership, effective governance and skilled, motivated and inspired staff. With direct engagement with over 710 nonprofit organizations last year alone and established strong partnerships with regional funders across the state, CNE has built a diverse, progressive, dynamic community of practice. CNE invests in nonprofits because strong nonprofits create strong communities. The United Way of Greater Charlottesville: The United Way of Greater Charlottesville is committed to a strong, equitable community where every person can thrive. Through financial stability and school readiness programs and innovative partnerships, we work to break down systemic barriers so that all individuals and families can achieve their potential. The Equity Center: The Equity Center is the University of Virginia’s newest collaborative multi-disciplinary center, established in August 2019. The Equity Center tangibly redresses racial and socioeconomic inequality in university communities by advancing a transformative approach to universities’ fundamental research mission, which will in turn reform institutional values, pedagogy, and operations. Specifically, the Equity Center will change the way that University of Virginia (UVA) scholars interact with members of the surrounding community, replacing a model that has been extractive with one that is respectful and collaborative and conducts research that benefits communities. This approach will be a model for institutions of higher education domestically and globally to leverage their anchor positions in local communities to eradicate racial and socioeconomic inequity. Thriving Communities Group: Thriving Communities Group supports organizations who believe institutions can work together better in creating a common good. We do so by equipping their communities with data design and digital resources that grow long lasting foundations of thought partnership through interactive data mapping and storytelling. We are founded by researchers with big hearts, at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture (IASC) at the University of Virginia in 2012. Since then we’ve supported community foundations and collective impact groups across the country from Raleigh - to Memphis - to Oklahoma City - to Waco, TX. Every day we believe and strive to design and bring data for the common good to empower those who want to help make this world more fair, collaboratively intelligent, and thriving.

We’ve Got Central Virginia

WWW.CAAR.COM

VOL. 30 NO. 10 n MARCH 10 - 16, 2021

FREE

COVERED!

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

O N L I N E & I N P R I N T • 3 6 5 D AY S P E R Y E A R

WINTER on the Slopes:

Wintergreen and Massanutten Resorts BY KEN WILSON

Spring 2021:

Happenings Digital and Beyond BY KEN WILSON

Why Seniors

Love Central Virginia

BY KEN WILSON

2021

Free and Open to All BY KEN WILSON

Real Estate Weekly

CAAR

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

NEWS & VIEWS

APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

36


37

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

LACKEY LANE

Unique Fixer Upper! Circa 1930’s Railroad House in Covesville. Lovely double front porches. First floor is a separate apartment. Second floor, which is accessed from the back, is at ground level. Come out to see the possibilities! Can be purchased with 1 acre at $185,000 or with 50 acres for $375,000

APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

Annie Gould Gallery

OLD TRAIL DRIVE

Move In Ready! One level living in Old Trail! Energy efficient home with partially finished basement. Looks deceivingly small from the outside yet there is over 5,000 sq. ft. expertly designed to fit a variety of needs. 6” Castilian walnut floors, large rooms, sizable closets, custom master closet, deep front porch and lovely patio. This home is perfect for entertaining, working and learning remotely. Come visit in person or ask for a virtual tour through FaceTime. Owner is RE agent. $626,000

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

Semi-Custom Villa Style Homes Surrounding a Pocket Park! From $499,900 Tour our Newest Model Homes and Old Trail Village Tour Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere inBelvedere Belvedere and and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 Villa Model in |Old Trail Village | 406 Astel Crozet, 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in Old in434-987-6522 Trail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VAVA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Sales Center Now Open on-site off Rt 29 North!


FEATURE

APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

38

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Louisa County Living:

B

ack in the 1980s, Maury Atkins remembers a standard saying whenever he and his family drove back up to Louisa County from Florida or some other vacation spot and were getting close to home. “You know what,” his dad would say, “there is no prettier place than here.” Now a broker with Roy Wheeler Realty, Atkins had graduated from Virginia Tech and was back in Louisa at the time, managing his family’s 1,000-acre farm. Today he could reside anywhere he wants—but where does he live? Still on the same road where he grew up. A lot of folks nowadays—from born and bred natives to young couples drawn by affordable housing and retirees who settle here because—share Atkins’ (and his dad’s) sentiments about the pretty patch of rolling Central Piedmont countryside

No Prettier Place BY KEN WILSON

named after Princess Louise of Great Britain (1724-1751), the youngest daughter of King George II. They all agree they’ve never seen a prettier place. Take a drive around Louisa on a lovely spring day. Enjoy the picturesque farms and cottages and the impressively grand estates. And note the family-friendly new neighborhoods, the little shopper’s “metropolis,” as Atkins calls it, that has sprung up at Zion Crossroads, and the power plants and big footprint retailers that spur the economy and enlarge the tax base. All this building has not and will not overwhelm the area’s natural beauty. Restrictions on development have left most of Louisa looking like it did in Patrick Henry and John “Box” Brown’s day and ensure that it will stay that way season after beautiful season, year after year. Maintaining “a rural look and feel,” says Olivia Ryan with Valere Real Estate, “is a stated County goal. When you divide

a property, you have to have a buffer along the highway; it has to be forested in some places and fenced.” Rural the place may be, but not for lack of sophistication and urbanity. Ryan loves what she calls its “human resources, the people who move here from different places that are so diverse. My friends are as entertaining as if I were in New York sitting and talking about all the wonderful places they have lived and traveled—that is what the atmosphere is here in Louisa County. And yet you can still go and meet a family that is the fifth generation on the farm.” “It is such a good mix,” Ryan continues. “If I had young children, I would definitely be taking them out to meet some of the people who are the resources here.” Proximity is another plus. “The Central Virginia location is a wonderful thing. We’re a short distance to the ocean, the mountains, or the city.” Ease of access is high on the list of

Louisa’s advantages for John Miyagawa, a grateful refugee from Northern Virginia congestion, now happily nested in Zion Crossroads: “The social services are first rate, and first-responder response time is very good. Getting into town is a hop, skip and a jump. I’m 13.5 miles and 20 minutes from Martha Jefferson Hospital; I’m 16.5 miles and 25 minutes from the Downtown Mall. The morning commute in has the sun at your back and the same is true for the return.” Morning and evening surfing is easy as well. Internet speed, often a downside of country life, is improving rapidly in Louisa. In March the County, Dominion Power, Rappahannock Electric Co-Op, and Central Virginia Electric Co-op signed a partnership to bring high-speed Internet to every resident and business in the County through fiber-optic cable. “Louisa is really pro-active about those kinds of things,” says James Dickerson with Charlottesville Solutions.


39 APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

METICULOUS CRAFTSMANSHIP AND TIMELESS FINISHES New Homes in the City of Charlottesville, Albemarle, and Louisa County Decorated model shown by appointment located at 210 Glenleigh Rd, Charlottesville VA 22911 Evergreenhomebuilders.com | 434.282.4584

FEATURE

R E A L E S TAT E A P P R A I S E R S & C O N S U LTA N T S Accurity Fincham & Associates, Inc. is the premier appraisal firm in the Charlottesville Area. As an independently owned and operated franchise of Accurity Valuation, one of the largest appraisal firms in the nation, Accurity Fincham & Associates, Inc. offers their clients a wide variety of appraisal services both locally and nationally. Our knowledge, expertise, and high-quality appraisal services is unmatched in the profession. We Bring Value Home. Accurity Fincham & Associates offers a broad spectrum of services for residential properties including; appraisals for loan origination, forensic and valuation fraud reviews, litigation support, statistical analysis and collateral valuation reviews.

Our clients include government agencies, GSEs, law firms, risk management firms, mortgage lenders, CPAs and others who rely on the firm’s specialized services and high level of expertise.

Woody Fincham SRA, AI-RRS, RAA wfincham@accurity.com (757) 750-7877

14 Lafayette Dr • Palmyra, VA 22963 accuritycville.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Woody and his staff service a diverse property type range that includes green homes, rural property large acreage estates, new construction, complex designs and custom homes, high value estates, as well as typical residential homes.


40 APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

Celebrating Excellence & Success

2020 AWARD WINNERS Continuing our 94 year legacy, we remain mindful of our purpose

Trust, Tradition & Market Leadership

Katelyn Mancini

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

REALTOR’S REALTOR

Jim McVay

Caroline Revercomb

Duke & Sharon Merrick

OUTSTANDING ROY WHEELER ASSOCIATE

OUTSTANDING FARMS & ESTATES ASSOCIATE

OUTSTANDING RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATE

Jan Shiflett

Susan Stewart

Fiona Tustian

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT GREENE

Maury Atkins

Susan Cameron Reres

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT ZION CROSSROADS

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT EDNAM

OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION EDNAM

Mike Peters

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OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION FARMS & ESTATES

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT FARMS & ESTATES

Kimberly Johnson

EXEMPLARY EFFORT

EXEMPLARY EFFORT

Julie Ballard

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EXCEPTIONAL NEW ADDITION

NEW HORIZON

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Byrd Abbott

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MOST PROFESSIONAL

JOAN ESPOSITO COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD

Virginia Gardner MARKETING & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

CHARLOTTESVILLE 434.955.5155 | WESTERN ALBEMARLE 434.205.4355 | ZION CROSSROADS 434.589.2611 | GREENE COUNTY 434.985.2348

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

OUTSTANDING TEAM

Steve White

Katelyn Mancini

OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION OUTSTANDING PRODUCTION GREENE ZION CROSSROADS

Simone & Dave Alley


41

2020 AWARD WINNERS GOLD MEDALLION CLUB

Maury Atkins

Katelyn Mancini

Simone & Dave Alley

Susan Cameron Reres

Jim McVay

Duke & Sharon Merrick Fiona Tustian

Mike Peters

Caroline Revercomb

APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

Celebrating Excellence & Success

Susan Stewart

Warren Maupin

Steve White

SILVER MEDALLION CLUB

Jane Porter Fogleman

Virginia Gardner

Julie Ballard

Jan Shiflett

Kimberly Johnson

Alex Tiscornia

FEATURE

Byrd Abbott

Hock Hockensmith

BRONZE MEDALLION CLUB Carter Schotta

Bevin Cetta Boisvert

Alex Ix

Wendy Peery

Barb Kelley

John Updike

Jay Reeves

Logan MacKethan

Jim Bonner

Becky Templeman

Sarah Buczynski

Sandy Stuart

Sandra Lauer

Russell Johnson

Ryan Ferguson

Rod Brunelle

Logan Wells Klalo Dan & Sue Ann Conquest

CHARLOTTESVILLE 434.955.5155 | WESTERN ALBEMARLE 434.205.4355 | ZION CROSSROADS 434.589.2611 | GREENE COUNTY 434.985.2348

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

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Courtney Sargeant

John Greene


Lake Anna

APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

42

609 SHAMROCK ROAD Location, Location, Location!!! Minutes to UVA! A wonderful 3 bedroom, 2 bath split level home. Lots of light with spacious rooms. Near Fry Springs Station and UVA hospital. Private, great backyard/ back deck from the kitchen slider. Extra space/ mudroom off driveway. Leased through 6/30. Can close anytime. MLS# 614473 $399,000

One of the loveliest places of all in Louisa is Lake Anna. Built in 1972 by Virginia Electric and Power Company, now Dominion Energy, Inc., to cool the turbines at North Anna Nuclear Power Station, the lake itself is a 13,000-acre reservoir amidst fields and forests between Charlottesville, Fredericksburg, and Richmond. Approximately 17 miles long, it has roughly 200 miles of shoreline. The power station at the lake provides electricity to 450,000 homes, and 17 percent of electricity statewide. Homeowners and day trippers both are attracted by its marinas, parks, and public fishing areas, which boast what some regard as some of the best bass fishing in the Commonwealth. Dickerson moved to Louisa from Southern Albemarle County in 1973. What does he like to do on Lake Anna? What doesn’t he do: “We take the grandkids and we go swimming,” he says. “We have a kayak and sailboat there. We have a big pontoon boat. We go fishing, swimming, and in the fall and winter I go duck hunting with friends.” Others come to golf or hike, visit Lake Anna Winery, or enjoy the variety of restaurants.

FEATURE

Zion Crossroads

415 2ND STREET NE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Beautiful downtown apartments! Choose from one bedroom, one bath or two bedrooms, two baths. All hardwood floors, high ceilings and lots of light! Gas cooking! Peaceful deck or balcony overlooking gardens. Includes most utilities! One year lease. Available June 1. Sorry, no pets. MLS#s 614073, 614138, 614691, 615090. $1,195 - $1,995.

124 MIDDLESEX DRIVE Great investment opportunity! A-unit (right side) has new kitchen and floors on main level! Cul-de-sac location. Open kitchen, dining, living room floor plan features half bath on main level. Three bedrooms and one full bath upstairs. Spacious rooms, fresh paint throughout. MLS# 614266. $399,000

1110 East Market Street, 16E Charlottesville, VA Licensed in Virginia

(434) 978-7900 • newhousecompany.com

Situated around at the intersections of James Madison Highway, Three Notch Road, and Interstate 64—and officially designated as the county’s growth area— the unincorporated community of Zion Crossroads is a mix of residential and commercial and industrial properties, including a Wal-Mart, a 900,000-squarefoot Wal-Mart Distribution Center, and a Lowes, plus smaller shops, restaurants, dentist and doctor’s offices, a bank and a credit union. “In my early life I never expected,” Atkins marvels, “that within 10 minutes of my house I’d have this little metropolis with anything you ever need right here.”

The 950-acre, private, and gated community of Spring Creek has its own nationally recognized golf course, sports club with fitness center, 25-meter saltwater pool, sports courts, and miles of walking trails. Lots are priced from the $80,000s.

Mineral Simpler living can be had in the town of Mineral, known for its gold, zinc and lead mining heritage. In busier days there were more than 15 gold mines in the area. Zinc and lead were still mined here in the 1970s. Mineral’s little Walton Park, named for former leading citizen Elizabeth Trice Walton (born in 1905), is a lovely place to picnic or hold an event. Walton is buried in stately Spring Grove Memorial Park Cemetery, a quiet place to stroll and reflect. Every July Walton Park hosts dozens of the country’s hottest pickers at the Mineral Bluegrass Festival, a threeday, family-friendly party that welcomes campers. In warm weather, the park is home to lively flocks of Carolina chickadees and tufted titmice, as well as white-breasted nuthatches, black-throated green warblers, and yellow-throated vireos. Redbellied or downy woodpeckers, northern flickers, and yellow-bellied sapsuckers populate the area during winter. In spring, wildflowers lure red-spotted purple butterflies.

Economy Louisa’s number one industry is timber and its second is agriculture, with numerous farms dedicated to livestock, crops, and wine. Dominion Energy at Lake Anna is its largest single employer. “They’re in the process of developing more industrial parks,” Dickerson says. “They have a good land use mix: the industrial parks are away from the urban areas, so the urban people don’t feel as


AUCTION Friday, Apr.9 at 1PM

April

9

Friday

601 Bridge St Danville, VA

Housing

74-Unit Apartment Community Auction will be held at The Institute for Advanced Learning & Research 150 Slayton Ave, Danville, VA

History Curious newcomers and old-timers alike keep the Louisa County Historical Society busy. “I’ve been impressed that a lot of people move here and then come to the museum and say, ‘I’ve just bought this old house and I want to learn more about it and the county,’” says Karleen Kovalcik, Executive Director of the Louisa County Historical Society and the Director of the Sargeant Museum of Louisa County. Even the newcomers are interested in the history.” Some go to search family records, or trace their genealogy, perhaps taking advantage of instructional seminars. Other enjoy lectures on historical events and issues. For Black History Month alone there were four events. Oral histories were recently taken from the 13 African American students who integrated Louisa County High School in 1965. Among the educational programs are heritage skills workshops, and an open-hearth cooking guild. Online lesson plans with craft activities currently replace the usual free family days. The annual Volunteer Day at Heritage Day Farm is scheduled for Saturday, May 8.

Louisa Now Louisa today is a thriving county, but one which supports people in times of need. The Louisa Resource Council offers food and clothing, and essential services like medical and dental support; during the pandemic it has been adding eight to ten new families to it client list every week. “Come check us out,” Dickerson says. “Louisa is a great place to live and to work.” And to breathe easy. “The night sky,” Ryan marvels. “You can go out at night and teach your children astronomy. There are just so many things to do here for the creative soul. Disney World and other resorts get called destination spots. But the way I feel about life in Louisa is that your home is your destination.”

Bridge Street Side

Prime Location

Attractive Interior

Attractive Interior

Selling for David Lingerfelt, Substitute Trustee Property: 601 Bridge St, Danville, VA (tax parcel 21459) Type: Occupied Apartment Building - 74 units Occupancy: 93%, opportunity to fill vacancies at mkt rate Buildings: Two historic buildings adapted for reuse: the Tobacco Company Cigar Factory, circa 1894, and the Waddill Printing Company, circa 1926. Redeveloped into apartments in 2004 with two stair and elevator towers added to connect the buildings and provide full ADA accessibility. Size: 87,704 sq.ft. on 1.7 acres Features: secured entry access, elevators, community room, patio terrace, 24hr maintenance, on-site mgmt. Location: Very attractive location w/ much to offer tenants • Adjacent to the popular Riverwalk Trail • One block from Averett University’s Riverview Campus • Near restaurants, breweries, shops, & attractions incl. the Science Center, Community Mkt, Carrington Pavilion, etc Tax Assm’t: $7,259,000 Value-Add: Foreclosure removes rent restrictions giving an outstanding opportunity to increase rents to market rate. After 3 years, restrictions are removed completely. AGENT ON SITE (appt req’d - call or visit website) • Tue, Mar.23, Noon-4PM • Tue, Mar.30, Noon-4PM • Tue, Apr.6, Noon-4PM • Other dates avail. by appt. DIR TO PROPERTY: Main St. to Memorial Dr. 1/4mi to L on Newton St to R on Bridge St. Property on left. TERMS SUMMARY: A bidder’s deposit of $150,000 (in the form of a cashier’s check payable to “David Lingerfelt, Substitute Trustee”) is required to bid. Successful bidder must execute Foreclosure Sale Agreement immediately after the sale. Closing to occur within 30 days. Closing can be extended an additional 21 days if buyer adds $150,000 to the non-refundable deposit and presents a commitment letter from a lender satisfactory to the Trustee. No buyer’s premium will be charged. Full terms and conditions available online.

CONTACT Mike Torrence TRF Auctions 434-847-7741

TRF

AUCTIONS

Torrence, Read, & Forehand

Rick Read CBC Read & Co. 434-455-2285

Colliers Int’l Multifamily Advisors 804-320-5500

TRFAuctions.com 434-847-7741 101 Annjo Court, Forest, VA 24551 | VAAF501

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

With so much to love, what’s selling in Louisa? Everything, of course, helped by the low taxes—72 cents per hundred was the 2020 assessed value. “Waterfront homes at the lake,” Ryan says. “Small cottages. New builds. Raw land. Small lots and large lots. New home construction is scattered throughout. Drive up and down any country road and you’ll see Old Craftsman style ranch houses.” “If you’re a retiree and you want a little more privacy, you might come out to Louisa,” Atkins says. Others prefer the amenities and no maintenance options at Spring Creek or want a place on Lake Anna where the grandkids can come and visit. Or for young families and professionals commuting to work, “to the east, near Gum Spring and Holly Grove, you can be within a 35-minute commute to work in Richmond. You can jump on I-54 and be in Short Pump in 30-35 minutes sometimes.” “There is a ton of residential growth,” Dickerson notes. “We’re getting it from Fredericksburg, around the lake, northern Virginia, the Richmond area on the southeastern side of the county, and the Zion Crossroads area on the western

side. People who want to get out of the urban areas and have that more rural lifestyle are moving and buying farms and homes on two acres. I’m working with some first-time homebuyers right now who can’t afford a house in Albemarle County. Here their mortgage payment is going to be less than their rent is. There is a lot of that going on.”

FEATURE

crowded. There is a lot of tax revenue, which the county has reinvested, and not a lot of debt service. The county office building is relatively new, the courthouse is new.” So are the schools. “Louisa has wonderful schools, teachers, and staff,” Ryan says, “and our physical facilities are fabulous. They had to be completely rebuilt after the earthquake, but the county had earthquake insurance.” To be so prepared, to bounce back even better— “I think that’s saying a lot for a rural county.” So does the Louisa Arts Center, with its art gallery, its classes and youth programs including summer camp, and the plays and musical performances it presents. One family “has given many things back to the County” says Ryan, even donated a Steinway piano. If conditions permit, the Center’s Cooke-Haley Theater will reopen on June 21 with The Everly Brothers Experience, featuring brothers Zachary and Dylan Zmed, honoring the iconic Everly Brothers, one of the most popular rock acts of the 50’s and 60’s. Common sense and CDC recommended safety precautions will be taken.

APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

FORECLO S U R E

43


APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

44

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers MEADOWBROOK HILLS

NORTH DOWNTOWN

Colonial Revival style c. 1913 residence restored to perfection. Flexible and updated floor plan with 2,970 finished square feet. Coveted private backyard and off-street parking. Walk to the amenities of the Historic Downtown Mall and UVA. MLS#608794 $1,549,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RUSTLING OAKS

Attractive, well-built residence on 4.09+/- mostly wooded acres, end of cul-de-sac location, 3 BR, 3.5 BA, high ceilings, beautiful hardwood flooring, large well-proportioned rooms, fin. bonus room above 2-car garage, full unfin. walk-out basement. MLS #614704 $1,385,000. Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

OLD VIRGINIA

Beautiful, mostly open rolling Albemarle County parcel offering 51.8 acres, sweeping panoramic mtn. views, bold stream, pond, & old unrestored log cabin. Has division rights & potential for conservation easement. 16.2 miles west of Charlottesville. MLS#615504 $745,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

Classic circa 1946 brick home with slate roof on over 1 acre in desirable city location. This home is currently being remodeled and renovated. Features main level master bedroom and bath, a huge eat-in kitchen and lovely sun room across the back. Three bedrooms and two baths on the second floor, including the original master bedroom. Walk-out terrace level features large rec room, fifth bedroom and a fourth full bath. The 1.04 acre lot may possibly be subdivided. MLS#615341 $2,150,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

ASPIAN LAWN

Gorgeous lake and mountain views from 183 scenic acres within 16 miles of Charlottesville. Circa 1750’s residence, 6 bedrooms, 5 baths, 2 fireplaces and, whole-house generator. Guest cottage, barn, lush pastures, and 11-acre lake. MLS#610431 $1,945,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

OLD TRAIL

Classic brick Georgian, c. 2008, 5 BR, including main level master suite, spacious and modern open floor plan. Views of the adjoining Old Trail Golf Course, buffered by small woods, views of the Blue Ridge Mtns. MLS#614945 $1,475,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

SWEET RETREAT

A retreat for all seasons! Enjoy total privacy from this mountain home offering distant Blue Ridge Mountain views across the Rockfish Valley. Sited on 14+ acres, the home offers 4 BR and 4.5 BA. MLS#610115 $995,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.330GraceGlen.com

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville, 14 miles to CHO Airport. 177 private acres with c.1901 classic Virginia farm house, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

KESWICK ESTATES

Exquisite English Country home on premiere 2.5 acres. Very private with lovely views of the golf course and distant mountains. The architecturally designed, 7,000+ square foot residence offers a beautiful, light-filled, spacious living room, dining room, gourmet kitchen, library with limestone fireplace surround, luxurious master complete with dressing room and office, media room, and 4 additional bedrooms. Built with the highest quality materials and workmanship. MLS#611738 $1,695,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

VERULAM FARM

Landmark estate just west of University of Virginia on 500 acres. Classic home of the highest standards with elegant spaces, 5 bedroom suites, formal gardens, pool, cottage, event barn, and bold mountain views creating a one-of-a-kind offering. MLS#597954 Andrew Middleditch, 434.981.1410

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


45

FRAY’S GRANT

2 fabulous home sites mostly in beautiful hardwoods, gently rolling and PRICED BELOW TAX ASSESSMENTS! Lots range from 21 to 44 acres, private settings and frontage on the Rivanna River. Ten minutes to airport, excellent shopping. Call Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 for pricing.

BELLAIR

Rare opportunity to purchase a building lot just under 1 acre in sought-after Bellair. Lush, mature landscaping, partly wooded, stream/creek. Minutes from UVA, shopping, dining, and entertainment. Murray/Henley/Western Albemarle school district. MLS#614627 $375,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GREENTREES

CRAWFORD’S KNOB

An opportunity to own a deeded nature preserve protected in perpetuity, a chance to purchase and hold wilderness, and to leave it largely unaltered. This property is ideal for the passive enjoyment of wild lands and the conservation minded buyer. MLS#608893 $1,900,000 Will Carr, 434.981.3065

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BURNLEY ROAD

Choose your builder and build your dream home on this 8+ private acre lot in Northern Albemarle. Exceptional Blue Ridge Mtn. views with privacy. Close proximity to NGIC, airport, shopping, and University Research Park. Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MILTON VILLAGE

21-acre lot minutes east of Charlottesville. Level building site has well already drilled & soils tested for drain field. Fenced with 4-board along road frontage. Creek, small pond, and automatic waterers. Close to public Rivanna River access. MLS#612288 $375,000 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610

EXCEPTIONAL LARGE ACREAGE

2 wonderful estate parcels in coveted Ragged Mountain Farm. Excellent building sites, complete privacy, beautiful Blue Ridge mountain views. Murray/Henley/Western Albemarle school districts. 84.79 acres: MLS#563174 $995,000; 100.22 acres: MLS#563171 $1,100,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

R ED

U

C

ED

188+ acres in Albemarle, 12 miles south of Charlottesville on Rt 20. This wooded tract, mostly in planted pines, offers long road with potential for eight 21-acre lots. There is conservation easement potential. MLS#614109 $1,400,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

CHURCH POINT FARM

944 acres along the lower Chickahominy River with 8 miles of shoreline. The property consists of marsh, farmland, woods, and cypress swamp and is managed for waterfowl, deer, turkey, and dove. Features 3-BR brick dwelling. MLS#2036779 $3,960,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325 www.churchpointfarm.com

APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FACTORY MILL ROAD

Great 47-acre wooded lot with exceptional privacy, ideal for residential construction. Easy access to I-64 and Route 250 and 20 minutes to Short Pump. Good road frontage on state road and mostly level land. NO HOA. MLS#613846 $375,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

BUFFALO RIVER ROAD

Elevated 21-acre tract, mostly mature hardwood forest and road frontage in northwest Albemarle. Elevated homesite offers potential panoramic Blue Ridge Mountain views with some clearing. Adjacent 21 acres also for sale. MLS#614424 $227,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076


APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

46

Live It Up

HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF APRIL 4, 2021

THERE WERE 119 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 52 were in Albemarle with an average price of $493,287 n 15 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $525,512 n 14 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $271,204 n 3 were in Greene with an average price of $337,333 n 10 were in Louisa with an average price of $380,180 n 14 were in Nelson with an average price of $198,321 n 3 were in Orange with an average price of $572,966 n 7 were in Staunton with an average price of $193,971 n 1 was in Waynesboro with a price of $159,700

HOMES SOLD

A Publication of The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS®

VOLUME 27, ISSUE 1

www.caar.com

Lexington Avenue Stroll quintessential Charlottesville among the notable Victorians. This charming city home has been extensively renovated; featuring redesigned character in all bathrooms, master suite created on 3rd level with tremendous banquette seating & abundant light. Large level fenced yard with abundant parking in both the front and rear. MLS# 611555

$945,000

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 Candice@BuyAndSellCville.com

Homes of Distinction in Central Virginia Look for our latest issue where you pick up C-VILLE Weekly

THE 228 TURKEY RIDGE LANE PEACOCK HILL

626 PRESTON PLACE RUGBY

7219 AMICUS ROAD RUCKERSVILLE

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

25 WESTON ROAD LOUISA

197 TYE RIVER DEPOT LN ARRINGTON

26429 PENNFIELDS DR ORANGE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


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—Seniors Safe at Home client

Half c orner

MEDICARE 101

APRIL 7 - 13, 2021 ISSUE 3014

“I had been living in a home that was not safe or healthy for me or anyone else. I don’t know where I would be living today if it weren’t for AHIP.”

HOSTED BY: COREY HYDE-LAWSON

SENIORS

Safe at Home

2ND TUESDAY EACH MONTH 8:30AM AND 4:00PM

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Join us for a free educational session and learn about Medicare. We talk about a variety of different topics such as how Medicare works with employer insurance, what healthcare looks like in retirement, drug coverage, and more. Zoom link is below for the meeting and feel free to call or email with questions. https://us02web.zoom.us/j/2220563994?pwd=T2lLVnN YYkxwTnQ3SHJkNzVHTElmQT09

EMAIL Clawson@bostbenefits.com PHONE 434-485-6307

elderly neighbors are waiting for critical home repairs right now. Your support will keep them safe.

Seniors Safe at Home helps local senior citizens age in place by taking care of urgent repairs: leaking roofs, access ramps, plumbing and electrical issues, failed furnaces, and more.

Safe at Home

AHIP + CAAR + BRHBA | AHIPVA.org SPONSORS

Champion: Wells Fargo Benefactors: Pape and Company, Inc. and Home Instead Senior Care Supporters: Better Living, Inc.; Central Virginia Waterproofing; and Blue Ridge Termite and Pest Management

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

SENIORS


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C-VILLE Weekly | April 7 - 13, 2021  

C-VILLE Weekly | April 7 - 13, 2021  

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