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SUMMER CAMP GUIDE INSIDE!

VOL. 30 NO. 13 n MARCH 31 - APRIL 6, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T HE CHARLOTTESVILL E

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Market research With sunny days ahead, Charlottesville’s farmers’ markets are up and running


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Springhouse Sundries is a charming wine, beer, and sundries shop nestled in the west wing of the Dairy Market – Charlottesville’s new food & market hall. Springhouse Sundries provides the Charlottesville community with flavorful, creative, and affordable wine. The shop also sells fine cheeses, meats, and specialty goods with a focus on local products. With charcuterie boards becoming an ever-growing trend, this is the perfect place to come and craft delightful entertainment food. Founded by locals Priscilla Martin Curley and Matt Hauck, the shop is firmly rooted in their wine passion. Priscilla’s background includes culinary school in New York, becoming a Certified Sommelier, Tavola Restaurant management, and running the Wine Guild of Charlottesville. Matt discovered wine later in life, earning a Level 3 Certificate in Wine from the London Wine and Spirits Education Trust and producing three vintages of his own as assistant winemaker at Glass House Winery. These two have a passion for wine that expands beyond their immense qualifications. They desire to position wine not only as

Priscilla Martin Curley & Matt Hauck

SPRINGHOUSE SUNDRIES BRINGS CULINARY PASSIONS TO DAIRY MARKET

a fantastic drink but also as a fun experience for the public. Matt and Priscilla are always happy to share their knowledge with customers. In a post-pandemic world, the shop intends to host themed wine tastings and events. Outside of Springhouse Sundries, Matt and Priscilla love to entertain. They often host dinner parties where they practice their craft and debate over who is the better cook. They are excited to bring their vision to life in the Dairy Market. The market’s concept of one location uniting food, drink, and sundries resonated with them, and they are thrilled to be part of the new Charlottesville destination. Visit Springhouse Sundries and pick up wine, cheese, olive oil, or get an expert recommendation for something new!

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Producing the goods How farmers’ markets found their pandemic footing. NEWS 7

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8 UVA students flock to Danville for COVID vaccines. 9 New podcast looks at UVA’s history of racial injustice. 11 The B.U.C.K. Squad aims to end local gun violence.

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Every year, like flowers returning after a winter hibernation, the city farmers’ market sprouts up out of the pavement on Water Street. Charlottesville residents flock to the stalls to peruse the vegetables and tacos and fruit and cheese and jewelry and meat and everything in between. (You told us your favorite farmers’ market items on page 33, a selection ranging from tomatoes to cheese. For me it’s a simple one—fresh strawberries.) It’s a cherished local tradition. This year, coronavirus has thrown off the market’s regular rhythms. The City Market is currently a drive-through, and the IX market, which operated only in the winter through its first few years, has stepped in as a yearround, in-person alternative (page 12). Even though some traditions remain off-kilter, I get the sense that there’s something important about this spring. The most delightful part of the season is the optimism. This time last year, there was nothing to be optimistic about, as the bleak realities of the coronavirus were just beginning to set in. Coronavirus is still here, of course, and we still have to be careful. But unlike last spring, this year I have some optimism, I have some hope. That will make the tomatoes or the cheese or the strawberries taste even better.—Ben Hitchcock

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“I personally don’t think we should be arresting or penalizing somebody for something we’re getting ready to legalize.”

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—Governor Ralph Northam, talking about potentially moving up the date marijuana will become legal in Virginia

NEWS

Listen up PAGE 8

Mayor’s poem sparks conversation

IN BRIEF Council competition The Charlottesville Democratic Party will hold competitive primaries for two local elections in June. Four Democrats qualified for the City Council ballot before last week’s filing deadline. School board member Juandiego Wade, UVA planner Brian Pinkston, social entrepreneur Carl Brown, and software engineer Josh Carp—who declared his candidacy 48 hours before the deadline—will compete for two party nominations this summer. In the fall, the two winners will face off against two independent candidates, entrepreneur Yas Washington and sitting Mayor Nikuyah Walker, for a pair of council seats. Washington initially declared her candidacy as a Democrat but did not manage to qualify for the party’s official ballot and has decided to continue her campaign independently. Current City Councilor Heather Hill is not seeking re-election.

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offered sharp critiques of the city. “This community said you wanted something different,” she said. “And you all said that you were open to being challenged.” Bellamy supported Walker. “A lot of us throughout our community, we like comfortable activism,” he said during the stream. “We like calling these things out in a way that makes you feel good. But not in a way that’s true, that’s going to get to the root of the issue.” Bellamy also shared experiences from his own four-year stint on council. “Being a Black elected official is one of the most challenging things you’ll ever have to do,” he said. “We have to navigate things people have no idea about. So when we share our art, it’s easily misconstrued, because people are looking at it from their vantage point.” Two of Walker’s colleagues, Councilors Heather Hill and Lloyd Snook, released a joint statement on the poem on Friday. “As White individuals, we can only dimly understand the present-day impact of Amer-

ica’s history of slavery, lynching and sexualized violence toward Black people in general, and toward Black women in particular,” the councilors wrote. “We do not—because we cannot—share her pain; no one can judge someone else’s pain.” They continued, “But it can never be appropriate for our Mayor—as our leader and as our representative—to use terms of sexual violence to characterize the City of Charlottesville. The ‘rape’ metaphor was salacious, but it was also jarring and hurtful to victims of sexual assault and rape.” The councilors wrote that they wished Charlottesville was receiving national attention for the positive steps the city has taken in recent years, specifically citing increased investment in affordable housing. “Our future success depends on the good will and the desire for unity of people of all backgrounds,” they concluded. “This poem did not help build that unity.” City Council’s next meeting is Monday, April 5.

“When I wrote that poem, it did exactly what I was hoping it would do—besides the ‘everybody across the country talking about it’ part. But I wanted to hit a nerve.” MAYOR NIKUYAH WALKER

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Earlier this month, Charlottesville City Schools’ longtime superintendent Dr. Rosa Atkins announced her retirement, effective May 31, sharing that she would like to spend more time with her grandkids. However, it seems she is not quite ready to be a full-time grandma—in July, she will be joining the Virginia Department of Education as the assistant superintendent for talent acquisition and development. Meanwhile, the school board has appointed former teacher and principal James Henderson as Atkin’s temporary replacement. A new permanent superintendent will be selected by October.

ast Wednesday morning, Mayor Nikuyah Walker posted a poem on her Facebook and Twitter pages. “Charlottesville: The beautiful-ugly it is. It rapes you, comforts you in its cum stained sheets and tells you to keep its secrets,” the mayor wrote. The poem grabbed the attention of people in and outside town, with some applauding the mayor’s candor and others arguing that her choice of words represented a bridge too far. Within hours, The Washington Post, The Associated Press, Fox News, and others had written about Walker’s poem. In a Thursday evening Facebook Live video with former vice-mayor Wes Bellamy, she elaborated on her post. “When I wrote that poem, it did exactly what I was hoping it would do—besides the ‘everybody across the country talking about it’ part,” Walker said. “But I wanted to hit a nerve.” She also said she feels she was elected to speak freely, and that she has consistently

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Rosa Atkins

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A poem published last week by Mayor Nikuyah Walker was applauded by some, while others said she’d gone too far.

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

The Democratic primary will also see Charlottesville Commonwealth’s Attorney Joe Platania attempt to fend off a challenge from former public defender Ray Szwabowski. Both consider themselves progressives. Platania was elected in 2016. Szwabowski is running under the slogan “Time for change.”

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Anything in common?


NEWS

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Speaking up UVA students explore school’s history of racial injustice in new podcast

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n 1990, 12 percent of UVA’s students were Black. In the three decades since, that number has fallen, and now hovers around 6 percent. (The school doesn’t represent the state—19 percent of Virginia residents are Black.) How did the university lose so many Black students? How can it increase Black enrollment? And how can it make sure Black students feel safe and included on Grounds? These are just a few of the tough questions tackled in a new podcast, “Still We Rise,” created by a handful of UVA students as part of a larger oral history project called Reflections: Oral Histories. “Still We Rise”—a nod to Maya Angelou’s acclaimed poem—explores the legacy of racial injustice at UVA through thoughtful and provocative conversations with Black students, staff, faculty, alumni, and members of the Charlottesville community. “We’re not looking so much at the era of slavery and segregation,” explains third-year Logan Botts, creator and manager of the podcast. “A place where we have a lot of ground to make up is what happened after Black students came to UVA. What has happened since integra-

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tion? What is that culture and environment like? What can we do and what conversations do we need to have to make that better?” Last year’s uprisings against police violence and systemic racism inspired Botts to start the podcast. She worked with her team at Reflections to secure financial support from UVA’s Democracy Initiative, allowing her to hire five students—almost all of color—to write, produce, and host each episode. After a semester of research, interviews, and production, the students launched the podcast in early January, kicking it off with a two-episode discussion on the history of race in athletics and the role student-athletes play in social justice. The second pair of episodes, released in late February, examines UVA’s struggles to recruit and enroll more Black students, as well as the lack

A group of UVA students has been working together on a podcast exploring the university’s history of racial discrimination.


NEWS

Shot out Danville vaccination center halts walk-ins after UVA students flock south Percent of residents who have received at least one vaccine dose, by locality 14% – 23% 24% – 29% Charlottesville

29% – 38%

STAFF IMAGE

39% +

Danville More than 83,000 residents of Charlottesville and Albemarle County have been vaccinated, while in Pittsylvania County, where Danville is located, 23,554 vaccines have been administered. The health department reports that 27.4 percent of Virginians have received at least one dose of the vaccine.

By Emily Hamilton

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DENA POTTER, VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL SERVICES

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“The clinic opened temporarily to walk-ins so that we could continue to vaccinate people. We now have stopped that.”

needed. We learned that 3,000 doses per day outpaces the current demand in Danville.” “As we were working through that strategy, the clinic opened temporarily to walkins so that we could continue to vaccinate people,” Potter says. “We now have stopped that, and we urge people not to travel to Danville to get a vaccine.” According to the Virginia Department of Health, 27.4 percent of Virginians have received at least one dose of the vaccine and 14.7 percent of Virginians are fully vaccinated. In Charlottesville and Albemarle, 83,187 total vaccine doses have been administered, while in Pittsylvania County, where Danville is located, 23,554 vaccine doses have been administered. Charlottesville is currently in Phase 1B of vaccination rollout, and the Danville area is in Phase 1C. After guidance was issued urging others not to travel to Danville to get the vaccine, some Charlottesville residents who had already done so reached out to the Blue Ridge Health District to see if they could receive their second dose here in Charlottesville. At a BRHD press conference on March 25, local officials said they are unable to give second doses to those who received their first dose in a different locality. “We’ve heard of a lot of different community members and students driving down to Danville to get their first dose of the vaccine, and we’ve also heard from folks who are requesting that they can get their second dose here in Charlottesville,” said Kathryn Goodman, the Blue Ridge Health District public relations and communications manager. “We want people to be vaccinated, and we understand that it’s hard to be patient and wait for the vaccine supply to increase in the health district,” Goodman said. “But given the limited vaccine supply, we are unable to provide second doses for individuals who are going to these larger vaccination centers.”

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arly last week, UVA first-year Reese Alpher heard she could get a coronavirus vaccine if she drove two hours south to a community vaccination center in Danville—so she jumped at the chance. “When I went, the word was that [the shots] were getting thrown out and that there were too many vaccines just for Danville, and it was for surrounding areas,” Alpher says. “When I got there, there was no one in line.” Alpher says she walked up without an appointment and got a shot in less than 20 minutes. Word of vaccine availability in Danville soon spread like wildfire through the UVA student body. Alpher was one of more than 700 students added to a GroupMe chat called Get Vaccinated UVA, where students were sharing information about how to get a shot in Danville. In the early part of last week, dozens if not hundreds of students caravaned south to get their shots. Shortly after, however, the Virginia Department of Health issued guidance urging residents not to travel to community vaccination centers without an appointment or invitation, and the Danville center stopped accepting walk-ups.

The Danville center initially opened on March 15 at the former JCPenney store in the Danville Mall, with a goal of administering 3,000 vaccine doses per day. The center was started with FEMA funding that allowed for three community vaccination centers to open across the state. Danville, a smaller and more rural town than Charlottesville, was selected as a location due to its relatively high proportion of vulnerable residents. An announcement about the opening of the Danville Community Vaccination Center originally stated that vaccines would be administered only to those with an appointment, and that walk-ins would not be accepted. But word spread quickly among UVA students that traveling to Danville without an appointment would still get them a vaccine. After state health officials became aware that many UVA students, who reside in the Blue Ridge Health District, were going to Danville’s health district to receive their vaccines, VDH and The Virginia Department of Emergency Management issued a press release urging people not to travel to community vaccination centers without an appointment, and effectively ending walk-in vaccinations. “Fluctuating registration numbers in the initial stages of site operations have allowed for walk-ins in some isolated instances, but this is no longer the case,” the press release read. Dena Potter, director of communications at the Virginia Department of General Services, leads vaccine communications for the state, and clarified the miscommunication surrounding unused vaccines at the Danville site. “When we opened the Danville CVC, it was the first in the state, and we allocated 3,000 doses per day for that site,” Potter says. “We went into this knowing we needed to be flexible and learn from each location, and we built in the capacity to scale up or down, as

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

of safe, inclusive spaces for Black students on Grounds. “We pick topics that are at the forefront of the dialogue about UVA,” says Botts. “When you think about [UVA], athletics and academic rigor are some of the first things that come to mind. But we never talk about the racial history and context of those.” The podcast’s next episodes will discuss student activism on Grounds, as well as the fraught relationship between UVA and the Charlottesville community. “Student self governance is everything that they talk about here at UVA, but the notion of [it] lends itself to perpetuating some inequities, with students of color bearing the burden of doing a lot of activism work and advancing equity,” explains graduate student Victoria Nelson, one of the podcast’s hosts. “We want to pay tribute to the work that’s being done [at UVA] and may not be recognized, particularly by racially marginalized students,” adds third year and co-host Pinay Jones. Hard conversations about racial injustice are especially important at a place like UVA, founded by enslaver and rapist Thomas Jefferson, and built by an estimated 4,000 enslaved laborers. UVA did not admit a Black student until 1950 and did not fully integrate until well into the 1960s. “There’s a rich, rich history of segregation and discrimination specifically against Black students and faculty,” says Nelson, who is Black. “We want to shed light on that, and want to situate ourselves in the present moment, paying tribute to what has happened in the past and how that has affected us today.” In addition to highlighting the injustices endured by Black students, the podcast celebrates their many strides and accomplishments at UVA. “[The Black experience] is very much a struggle and rooted in oppression...but there’s also this sense of community,” says Jones, who is Black. “We try to strike that balance between highlighting very real injustice...and the beauty that people have been able to construct out of their experience.” While the team hopes the podcast attracts a variety of listeners, they especially want current UVA students to tune in, think critically, and take action. “The people who care about the racial legacy are already talking about it. But there is a large percentage of the student body, faculty, and administrators who don’t know where to begin,” says Botts. “I want to create a place where you can come knowing nothing and leave knowing something—and potentially start a deeper journey into making UVA a better place.” Students of color are strongly encouraged to submit their own stories through the Reflections website. “[For] a lot of marginalized groups, especially Black people, our stories are told by other people,” says Jones. “So it feels good to be a part of a project where we are marginalized students, many of us Black, we’re telling the story, and drawing on other Black people who can tell their story in the moment.” “Still We Rise” is free on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and other podcast platforms.

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NEWS

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Guns down B.U.C.K. Squad calls on city, community for support By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

ZACK WAJSGRAS

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Last Friday afternoon, the B.U.C.K. Squad hosted a field day at Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church for the kids of South First Street.

an epidemic or pandemic? You cut the transmission,” Gilmore says. With these much-needed services comes a hefty price tag. Gilmore says Guns Down Virginia requires $540,000 per year to run its programs. He also hopes to hire the squad’s 10 part-time violence interrupters and outreach workers as full-time employees. “The only unsuccessful resolution that we had, it was only unsuccessful because I couldn’t get my team there because they were at work. I had to go by myself, and that was very dangerous,” says Gilmore. “We’re fighting for funding.” In February, City Council donated about $20,000 to the B.U.C.K. Squad for conflict resolution training, but it has not offered financial support since then, says Gilmore. The group has relied on community donations, which has barely kept it afloat. Though Gilmore does not agree with calls to take away all police funding, he believes that a portion of the city police department’s nearly $19 million budget should go toward violence interruption. “It don’t cost much to fund what we do. It’s no price on life,” he says. The nonprofit also needs office space and mediation centers, as well as physical locations for wraparound services across the community. As members of City Council continue to fight amongst each other, Gilmore hopes they can get along long enough to listen to his plea for help. “City Council needs us to do a conflict resolution and de-escalation on them,” he says. “There’s no way there’s supposed to be that much division when you got lives at stake.”

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Pertelle Gilmore

community service together several times a week, which could mean picking up trash or making meals for elderly residents. Meanwhile, the squad connects them with the resources they need, such as mental health care and job opportunities. Their community service time requirement “depends on the level of the beef and [their] personalities,” explains Gilmore. “Two guys have been doing it for 45 days now because that’s how deep they were in the street.” After they complete their service, both parties are invited to get involved in the B.U.C.K Squad, and learn how they can help stop gun violence too. “We don’t deal with no police at all. We try to get on the front end before the police have to get involved,” says Dickerson, referencing the city’s long history of police violence against Black residents. (Just this month, Charlottesville Police Chief RaShall Brackney announced that two white officers had been fired for injuring two Black men during separate incidents.) However, the B.U.C.K. Squad is just one part of the fight to end gun violence in Charlottesville. As executive director of the Virginia chapter of New York-based Guns Down Inc., of which the squad is a part of, Gilmore and his team plan to tackle the root causes of violence through a variety of new programs, including mental health services, career development, financial planning, grief counseling, vocational training, gun buybacks, and community events. “A lot of violence comes from mental [trauma]. It’s a disease,” says Shelly Martin, event coordinator and outreach specialist for Guns Down Virginia. “How do you stop

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ZACK WAJSGRAS

party separately, and “try to get them to think rationally,” explains Gilmore. “First thing we tell them is we love you. And it’s the truth—we want to be the embodiment and personification of love,” says Gilmore. “A lot of people in the community, the only thing they’ve ever seen is negativity and abuse,” adds violence interrupter Shawn Harris. “We want to show them there is another way and better way. You can still achieve your goals without all the extra violence and hate.” Once the parties agree to stand down, the mediators ask them to participate in a roundtable talk and sign a commitment contract. The parties then have to perform

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

oy and laughter filled the summery Friday afternoon air, as dozens of children danced in a church parking lot across from the South First Street public housing neighborhood. People later left the dance floor to tour the inside of a rescue truck and pick out new reads from the Free Book Bus, while others waited their turn for a haircut. Kids and grown-ups alike ended the afternoon of fun with pizza, popsicles, and ice cream sandwiches. “Our focus is on the babies out there. We are trying to change the whole perpetual cycle of ignorance,” says Pertelle Gilmore, executive director of the B.U.C.K. Squad, which sponsored the community field day. “We can put them in a position where they can be prosperous and healthy, and be the rightful rulers of their circumstance and condition.” Investing in Charlottesville’s Black youth is one of the many ways the squad is working to put an end to gun violence, which has significantly increased in the city’s predominantly Black neighborhoods since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Last year, Charlottesville police responded to 122 reports of shots fired and four gun-related homicides—including the December 27 murder of Gilmore’s close friend, 32-yearold Jamarcus “Buck” Washington, who was heavily involved in gun violence prevention. Devastated by Washington’s death, Gilmore contacted his mentor Herb Dickerson the next day. Together, they put together a list of people in the Black community who they could ask and trust to take action. Within a week, the B.U.C.K.—Brothers United to Cease the Killing—Squad was out on the streets, intervening in conflicts before they turned into deadly shootings. So far the group has been wildly successful. Out of the 40 conflicts B.U.C.K. has intervened in, only one resulted in a shooting. “We all have a past—that’s what gives us our credibility doing the job that we do,” says Gilmore of the group. “A lot of us were birthed into environments of violence. We all had traumatic situations and have dealt with life-controlling issues, [like] addiction and substance abuse.” “We all got to the point of maturity and understanding of our life that the way we were living was not conducive to health or wealth, but destruction,” he adds. “We have a vision together to heal the community that we once destroyed.” Gilmore mans the squad’s crisis hotline (284-3111), which is available 24 hours a day. After he receives a call about a potentially violent conflict in a Black neighborhood, he, along with associate executive director Dickerson and supervisor Dean Smith, picks out two violence interrupters and one outreach worker to send to the scene. The mediators sit down with each


12

Farm Charlottesville’s farmers’ markets spring to life By Paul Ting

S

pring is springing, in its Virginia way, with perfect breezy days becoming more frequent every week. For many locals, the annual return of chirping birds means rolling out of bed early on Saturday and heading downtown, to the City Market. The beloved market has been in action since 1973, providing an opportunity to shop for fresh produce and farm-raised meats, but also a chance to “see and be seen” as much of the community shops, eats, and mingles. However, much like the rest of us, the City Market has been forced to adapt as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Even now, as vaccinations and decreasing case numbers give the public reason to look forward with hope, City Market is not sure when it will return to “business as usual.” It is clear that the ability to quickly adapt to changing conditions in the community and frequently adjusted guidance from local government is a key strategy at this point in time. Once the market returns to in-person shopping, it will be welcome news indeed. Since April 2020, when it was announced that the market would be switching to a drive-through model, shoppers have been required to preorder their produce online and then drive up in their vehicles on Saturday mornings for contact­less pick up. This new model is open to any vendor registered with the city, providing a wide array of options as well as allowing

fresh

“Local producers have filled in food shortages with fresh, high-quality products.”

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CECILE GORHAM, MARKET CENTRAL

shoppers to continue to do business with preferred vendors. Of course, while the ability to buy from local farms is greatly welcomed, the change meant a temporary end to browsing in person, picking up a freshly cooked breakfast or coffee on Saturday morning, and the social aspects of attending the market. The pivot has not been without challenges. The market has had to shift locations multiple times in response to fluid govern­ ment regulations and local closures—it started at Pen Park before moving to Darden Towe Park and then to Charlottesville High School. According to City Market Manager Justin McKenzie, “The biggest challenge was migrating vendors and customers online. The shift from an in person…to an online system, where products have to be created/posted and customers have to register and purchase time slots, was difficult at the beginning.” Although the Charlottesville City Market certainly deserves kudos for its work these past few months, it actually wasn’t the first to establish the online ordering, drivethrough market model. That distinction goes to the Local Food Hub, a nonprofit founded in 2009 with the goal of connecting area independent farms directly with consumers and increasing access to fresh, local food for food-insecure communities. Quickly recognizing the needs and challenges that COVID-19 presented, the Local Food Hub


announced the establishment of its contactless pick-up market on April 1, 2020, “due to small farms and food businesses challenged by stay-at-home executive orders.” The Local Food Hub market and the City Market operate similarly, and both of them currently utilize the same online platform for ordering. Pick up for the Local Food Hub market occurs twice a week on Wednesdays and Fridays at the old Kmart parking lot off Hydraulic Road (with some small adjustments made recently to allow the Blue Ridge Health Department to set up a large tent in order to distribute COVID-19 vaccines). While the Local Food Hub features a smaller number of vendors, the organization notes that vendors are specifically chosen for quality and to provide a good assortment of products, but also to minimize overlap that could decrease individual vendor profits. It’s worth highlighting that Local Food Hub vendors receive 100 percent of their sales without any fees taken out. In fact, the online ordering platform allows shoppers to also pay fees incurred by the vendors for credit card processing and the online platform. This highlights the nonprofit mission behind the market, but many may be unaware that it means the organization operates the market at a loss. For those who wish to support these efforts, donations to the Local Food Hub are always welcome, and you can “buy” market support while you are doing your weekly shopping.

Take a walk

Visitors to the Saturday IX farmers’ market enjoy a variety of freshly prepared Korean food from Sussex Farm.

winter months when the City Market was closed. However, due to its popularity during the pandemic, the market was continued past March last year, and ran through the rest of 2020. In January 2021, the market resumed for its fourth season, and quickly announced that it will again continue through the year. The organization behind this market is Market Central, a nonprofit that “advocates for local food, farmers’ markets, and strong connections between the producers and community.” While it does charge vendors fees to rent space, it relies on donations for much of the work at the market and in the broader community. In

addition, Market Central is able to provide SNAP and SNAP Match incentive coupons through a partnership with the Virginia Fresh Match program. Cecile Gorham, co-founder and chair of Market Central, observes, “Both customers and vendors have appreciated and favorably responded to the opportunity to safely walk through our outdoor space for essential and nutritious food. Families seem to enjoy the opportunity to safely get outside.” A recent visit to the IX market showed many precautions being taken: posted signs, hand sanitizer stations, widespread mask wearing, strict social distancing, and touch-

free transactions. Perhaps more importantly, it revealed fresh produce and meats, a bevy of favorite food trucks, and many neighbors supporting local farms and businesses. Not only do these markets keep dollars in the local economy and promote community, but, through the inspired work of the city and nonprofits, they also help bring food to many who truly need it. As Gorham is proud to point out, during the pandemic “it has been important for vendors and customers to have options to connect for local food. Local producers have filled in food shortages with fresh, highquality products.”

Vendor spotlight Good eats

Sweet Jane’s Kitchen offers Marylandstyle jumbo lump crab cakes, both

Perfect pear Myo Quinn found her way to Charlottesville from New York City when the COVID-19 pandemic hit. Shortly after, Quinn met Holly Hammond of Whisper Hill during a visit to the IX market. The duo became fast friends and fast business partners. Their joint venture, the

recently launched Pear, offers sweet and savory baked goods at the IX.

Still truckin’ Opened in the midst of the pandemic, Basan food truck is a staple presence at IX market, which is the only market that currently features food trucks. The menu offers an interesting mix of ramen, Korean fried chicken, and some amazing and ever-changing specials, based on Asian street food. Co-owner Anna Gardner explains, “Market Central has been absolutely wonderful trying to work with vendors and adapt safety protocols to all of the changes.” Co-owner Kelsey Naylor adds, “the farmers’ market scene has been incredibly helpful for us. It allows us to serve people in a setting where they can really spread out, or take food home, which helps minimize risk for all involved.”

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No more feeling crabby

Sharing is caring Offering a wide variety of organic produce, fresh eggs, and meats each week at the IX market and the Local Food Hub market, Bellair Farm has become well known in Charlottesville largely as a result of its community-supported agriculture program. “Business has changed a lot,” says Michelle McKenzie, who credits the quick pivots by the markets for being instrumental in helping get through 2020, “We saw record sales…

from farmers’ markets, which helped offset reduced income from events on the farm.” Whisper Hill Farm offers many items that are popular among shoppers, including fresh garlic and a wide variety of peppers. Prior to 2020, most of the farm’s business was at farmer’ markets, but one result of this past year was an increase in its CSA, from 30 members in 2019 to 250 members in 2020. The farm has just opened up an additional 200 members shares for 2021.

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In addition to fresh eggs and produce, Sussex Farm is known for freshly prepared Korean food and a wide variety of kimchi. Jennifer Naylor, affectionately known as “Mama Bird” to those who frequent her stall, says it’s been challenging to provide fresh food and an alternative to grocery stores. “I think it’s an absolute necessity for people to consume what’s local and fresh to boost their immune system during times like this,” she explains, “Now, the market has become a place to go for safe, healthy, local food and fresh air.”

ready to eat and to take away and cook at home. Owner Alyce Johnson says they experienced an overall decrease in engagement this past year, but they’re “grateful to still be operational and hopeful for the upcoming season. The local community’s commitment to supporting local businesses has been really encouraging.”

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

If you’re hankering for the in-person market experience right away, the IX Art Park Farmers Market still allows customers to wander the premises, letting everyone check out what’s fresh, what looks good, and what might inspire the perfect menu. Held on Saturday mornings, the focus is on a more traditional outdoor market experience that doesn’t require advance ordering (although online ordering for pick up is available). In addition, there are fresh prepared food options available from food trucks and some of the vendors. The IX Park market was founded in 2018, previously existing as a way of bridging the

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15

2021 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

directory of Summer Camps, Schools & Programs for kids

r e C m a m m p Su Guide

june 21-25 rising 7-8th graders

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STEM SUMMER CAMP

june 14-18 rising 5-6th graders


2021 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

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It’s time to

play!

Experienced the zero-gravity sensation of weightlessness while riding MASS Mayhem.

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

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Learned to bodyboard or sur f on the triple-jet FlowRider.

Rode a bike on Massanutten’s beginner-friendly Bike Park trails.

Outdoor WaterPark opening summer 2021! For the latest info & summer season pass details, visit massanuttenwaterpark.com.

ain air on Breathed in the fresh mount lift ride. air ch a scenic

Book your pass to play & find more specials at

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• Parents – As parents, it is important to focus on the positive aspects of camp. Remember that separation is natural, necessary, and inevitable – what better place to have that first experience than in a caring and nurturing environment designed specifically for children? Parents can also focus on the amazing benefits of camp – an experiential education like no other teaching valuable 21st century survival skills like leadership, teamwork, problem-solving, and interpersonal communication. “The greatest gifts that parents can give their child are independence and resiliency,” said Peg Smith, ACA’s former chief executive officer. “Parents should remember that by choosing camp they are giving both.”

Prepare Your Child... and Yourself for Camp! For parents, the most heart-racing, adrenalin pumping moments happen when you let go and watch your child try something on his or her own. The moment the training wheels come off, the first trip down the driveway on the skateboard, the time our children ride the

school bus – these are more than just memories, these are critical moments that define growth and change. For many families, the first time they send their child to camp is one of the biggest let go, hold your breath, and watch them soar moments in childhood.

In today’s world of high-tech kids and families who have a constant connection to each other, it’s essential to take the time to emotionally prepare for camp. It is, of course, important to prepare the first-time camper, but families need to make sure that Mom,

2021 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Dad, younger siblings at home – virtually 17 everyone – is ready to adjust to camp life. The American Camp Association® (ACA) provides the following tips to help ease first-time families into the camp experience:

• Siblings - Bob Ditter, family therapist and one of the nation's leading experts on camp, cautions it is likely that the child left at home will experience separation anxiety and truly miss his or her sibling. To help them prepare, be sure to talk about the upcoming separation. Before the eldest child leaves for camp take a picture of your children together that the sibling can keep in their room or carry around. Remind your children about the communication they can have with each other through letters and postcards.  • Other family members – Be sure that everyone is aware of the upcoming experience. Let family members know how to

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     

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2021 Summer Programs mountaintopmontessori.org

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Summer day camps for Summer Programs age2021 3 - rising 6th grade


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2021 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE 18


It is, of course, important to prepare the first-time camper, but families need to make sure that Mom, Dad, younger siblings at home – virtually everyone – is ready to adjust to camp life.

Camp is an equal opportunity life-changer. By sending a child to camp, families are truly giving a gift that lasts a lifetime. By tak-

2021 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

contact camper if they are interested through letters and care packages — make sure they are aware of any communication policies the camp may have, i.e. no phone calls or restrictions on what can be sent in a care package. In addition, an increasing number of camps are using Web sites to display photos or video during the camp session. According to ACA’s 2011 Emerging Issues Survey, 75 percent of responding camps indicate that they post photos or videos to a Web site for families to view. Forty-five percent indicate that they post information, photos, and videos to social media outlets like Facebook. Families should be sure to ask camp directors about these options.  

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ing steps to mentally prepare for camp, families not only keep from getting “kid-sick” for their camper, but they can stay positive about the camp experience – which goes a long way toward helping first-time campers adjust to life at camp. And just like taking off the training wheels, the moment families see their camper radiating confidence and joy they will feel that burst of pride and gratitude that they allowed their child this experience.

About ACA: The American Camp Association® (ACA) is a national organization with more than 12,000 individual members and 3,000 member camps. ACA is committed to collaborating with those who believe in quality camp and outdoor experiences for children, youth, and adults. ACA provides advocacy and evidence-based education and professional development, and is the only national accredit-

ing body for the organized camp experience. ACA accredits approximately 2,400 diverse camps nationally. Accreditation provides public evidence of a camp’s voluntary commitment to the health, safety, and overall wellbeing of both campers and staff. For more information, visit ACAcamps.org. Reprinted by permission of the American Camp Association. ©2021, American Camping Association, Inc.

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2021 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

20

An Independent Boarding and Day School for Bright Children Ages 7 to 13 with Learning and Attention Issues

NOW ENROLLING FOR THE 2021 SUMMER PROGRAM 434.293.9059 - OaklandSchool.net

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

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OVER 40 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE s CARING SERVICE WITH INTEGRITY

SUMMER–ALL AGES CLASSES June 8-July 15 u

SUMMER CAMPS:

June 21-24, June 28-July 1, July 12-15 Beginning – Advanced Exciting performances end the camps! u PRINCESS/PRINCE/“FROZEN”

NOW MORE THAN EVER—it’s important for kids to be healthy physically, mentally, emotionally. Dance provides that plus social interaction! WE REQUIRE wearing a mask, hand sanitizing, distancing. Snacks and breaks are outside!

Elsa, Anna, Cinderella & more! Tutus & tiaras, capes & crowns. Kids love music from the wildly popular movie. Creative movement, arts & crafts. Ages 3-6. u HIP HOP/BROADWAY JAZZ/ LYRICAL/BALLET/TAP Great new dances! Learn how to choreograph! Fun rhythms! Cool current music! Crafts, snacks—stage makeup. Ages 6-10, 10-Teens.

u BALLET-JAZZ INTENSIVE WORKSHOP

MOBILE APP! Easy to register from your phone! Download our app.

TYPE IN: “Wilson School of Dance”

Ages 9-14: Level II-III • Ages 11-Teens: III-Int./Adv.

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3114 Proffit Rd (Near Baker Butler & Hollymead schools) • Cville


CULTURE

21

WEDNESDAY 3/31

IT’S A LAUGH

OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK

As any comedian knows, there’s no rush like standing in front of a roomful of strangers and making them laugh. At the weekly Comedy Open Mic Night, hosted by local comedians Heather Kilburn and John Rad, you can work out all the material you perfected at home during the pandemic. Preregister, and try your monologues and oneliners on an outdoor, socially distanced audience. Free, 8:30pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE, 207-2355.

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WEDNESDAY 3/31

SEEING SAW

FRIDAY 4/2 & SATURDAY 4/3

While a virtual Lighting of the Lawn was the safest option this academic year, we still missed being there when UVA turned the Rotunda’s holiday lights on in December. Brighter Together offers another chance to see the historic landmark dancing with color, as one of five pop-up art events tying together themes of spring and renewal, alluding to the brighter future ahead after a tough year. Students and community members are encouraged to stop by to enjoy student-created videos, art, and music. Attendees are encouraged to wear masks, gather in groups of 10 people or fewer, and remain at least six feet apart while on the Lawn. Free, 8pm. The Rotunda, UVA. arts.virginia.edu/brightertogether.

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PUBLICITY PHOTO

LIGHT AT THE END

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Saw Black has that rare musical talent that makes listeners want more. With his lyrical delivery and production technique, Black seduces with soulful country-folk that is sometimes plaintive, sometimes weird and whispery. Many of the Richmond singersongwriter’s tracks can be found on Warhen Records, including the sold-out 2020 cassette Horsin’ ‘Round. Black performs as part of the Save the Music series, in a livestream to benefit Foothills Child Advocacy Center. Donations accepted, 8pm. facebook.com/frontporchcville.


22

Eat up!

CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

TAKE US OUT In an ongoing effort to support local dining establishments during the pandemic, our writers have been enjoying a variety of takeout meals from some of their favorite restaurants. Contribute to this ongoing series by sending your own delicious experiences to living@c-ville.com.

One of my favorite pre-COVID pastimes was seeking out the latest in local cuisine. While I’ve made an effort to support a variety of area businesses and eateries during the past several months, I’ve primarily frequented my favorite spots. Enter Tonic, a new-to-me restaurant that has reinstated the thrill of discovery into my quarantine routine. Opened in August, Tonic has pandemic dining down pat. It offers socially distanced dining in a spacious outdoor seating area complete with a full bar and a seamless takeout option. The staff is helpful and friendly, and the hand-written specials menu adds a personal touch. The catfish features lightly battered filets paired with a unique huckleberry aioli—it’s easily one of the best dishes I’ve had in Charlottesville (so good, I ordered it twice!). Another highlight is the pickled shrimp Johnny cake, which is a Southern food trifecta of cornbread cake, tangy shrimp, and aioli. A trip to Tonic is not complete without the restaurant’s namesake: Try the signature house cocktail composed of Vitae Spirits’ gin and housemade tonic.—Desiré Moses

Our sources say Guajiros Miami Eatery serves the best Cuban sandwich in town.

like hummus, cabbage, cucumbers, and greens, and more unusual options such as fried eggplant, beet salad, and celery labneh dip. I highly recommend the fried eggplant, and I was impressed with the celery dip, and wish I had asked for a second scoop. I found the tzatziki and arabesk hot sauce to be an ideal combination of mild and spicy. I also enjoyed a side of the rosemary fries, which complemented the unique Turkish flavors of my bowl. The plentiful toppings and protein make this a new favorite in my rotation of fast-casual weeknight dinners.—Madison McNamee

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I once lived in Miami, and for years I’ve missed the Cuban food and coffee that was woven into the culture. Guajiros is here to fill that void. Definitely the best Cuban sandwich in town, but don’t stop there. Owned by brothers from Miami, Guajiros’ menu has all of the things I miss: café con leche (dark-roasted sweet coffee), pastelitos (pastries with guava paste), ham croquetas, plantain chips, and a full range of sandwiches. Delicioso!—Paul Ting

Otto Turkish Street Food If you’re craving fast casual but want to eat local, then Otto Turkish Street Food is the place to hit. Think Cava/Chipotle style, but with kebab. You’ll find bowls, wraps, and sandwiches, along with excellent sides. I opted for a bowl with chicken doner, and they did not skimp on the protein—my eyes widened at the plentiful scoops that went into my bowl. The doner kebab is cooked on a vertical rotisserie, then sliced into flavorful thin shavings. (Vegetarians will be pleased to know there’s also falafel.) Toppings include Mediterranean standards

Café Frank Will Richey and Jose De Brito have teamed up again at Café Frank. Chef De Brito earned a James Beard award nomination during the pair’s previous partnership at The Alley Light, so expectations are high. Prior to a full opening, the focus was on to-go entrées of classic, time-consuming French recipes such as choucroute, paella, and cassoulet. The paella was a perfectly executed dish of chicken, shrimp, mussels, and well-spiced rice. It has me eager to try the other options.—Paul Ting

Vision BBQ

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STAFF PHOTO

Tonic

Otto Turkish Street Food’s doner sandwich can be ordered with chicken or beef, and a variety of toppings, including red pepper paste, rosemary fries, and fried eggplant.

There’s certainly no shortage of barbecue joints in the Charlottesville area, but Vision proves there’s still something to be said for doing things the good ol’ fashioned way— no chemical starters, no gas, no electric. I sampled Vision’s specialty sandwich, The Hot Mess, as well as the standard for any quality BBQ spot, the pulled-pork platter. The pulled pork was slightly fatty, but overall not too dry, and it was complemented by tangy North Carolina vinegar sauce. The Hot Mess was a truly glorious experience. Though the spongy sub roll left something to be desired, the flavorful pimento, the light heat of the peppers, and the fallapart brisket were a combination perfect enough to warrant a return visit.—Will Ham

I once lived in Miami, and for years I’ve missed the Cuban food and coffee that was woven into the culture. Guajiros is here to fill that void. PAUL TING


CULTURE THE WORKS

23

Poets know it Young writers find connection to joy and empowerment in new workshop By Alana Bittner arts@c-ville.com

W

hen expressing the value of writing poetry, Valencia Robin references a quote by U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo: “You begin to learn to listen to the soul, the soul of yourself in here, which is also the soul of everyone else.” Robin says that, when she was young, no one told her poetry could work this way. In high school, the poets she learned about felt “archaic” and intimidating, with little connection to her own life. The urge to write poetry didn’t arise until years later, when she discovered contemporary poets she could identify with. Today, Robin is an award-winning poet whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Virginia Quarterly Review, and Black Renaissance Noire, to name a few. With support from New City Arts, Robin has paired up with poet and pediatrician Irène Mathieu to help Charlottesville teens find the connection to writing that she feels she missed out on as a young person. “It’s empowering when a person can take control over their own narrative and say what they need to say, exactly how it needs to be said,” says Mathieu. In February, the pair put out a call for writers that expressly welcomes high school students of color, queer and nonbinary students, low-income students, immigrants, and differently labeled students to participate in Poetry of Power, a virtual

workshop for young people from marginalized backgrounds. Robin and Mathieu hope to dispel the misconception that poetry is grim or somber. Instead, Robin says they’ll introduce students to “poetry that privileges joy.” This joy can be a form of empowerment, she says, pointing out that “what has sustained communities of color and other marginalized groups is our creative spirit, our songs and poems and other forms of art.” Robin says the idea of “joy and poetry as tools for survival” inspired the name of the workshop. She cautions, however, that poetry is not a magic wand that will solve all problems. It is a tool that allows “all poets, whether young or old, to make sense of what’s going on in their lives, to unpack what’s confusing, joyful, or painful, and figure out how they feel about it.” Adolescence brings confusion, joy, pain, and other intense emotions. Through writing, young poets can wrap their minds around whatever they may be struggling with, emerging with a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment. “To capture your particular way of walking in the world is incredibly empowering,” says Robin. The workshop addresses the logistical aspects of writing poetry as well. Students get career advice, free author headshots, and the chance to perform their work at a virtual public reading. Organizers have also invited a guest speaker, local student activ-

ist and writer Zyahna Bryant, who organized her first demonstration against police injustice at age 12 and published her first book of poems, Reclaim, as a high school senior. “She’s living proof that age is just a number, that if you feel called to speak and serve, you’re never too young,” says Robin. Reese Bryan, Nhandi Hoge, Zoe Shelley, Violet Tillman, Autumn King, and Madeline Caduff present original poetry during a virtual reading on April 1. For more information, go to newcityarts.org.

Girl Team By Zoë K Shelley

Award-winning poets Valencia Robin and Irène Mathieu teamed up with New City Arts for Poetry of Power, a workshop that encourages teens from marginalized backgrounds to express themselves

By Violet Tillman

They say that absence makes the heart grow fonder, And perhaps that is true I missed the rain during that ice and snow, and then, After a long winter of stark forests, As wisps of life sprouted up from grey soil My love for the earth flared bright and bold I’d clawed at each scrap, clinging to any warmth and calling it spring

You know what’s sad? When I ask my girl friends If this happens to them too Each one has a similar story

“To capture your particular way of walking in the world is incredibly empowering,” VALENCIA ROBIN

But something makes me happy I have a girl team Always supporting me All my stories And my stress They listen When I’m with them I feel free of Societies grip on me I’m grateful For my girl team

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And so, it’s like this: Stars peek out from clouds That lingering scent of rain Wafts up near the trees at the edge of the yard Where I am lying and thinking quietly that Absence made my heart grow desperate While presence, this presence Was what made my heart grow fond

You know what’s sad? I get told that I shouldn’t wear a bikini But my brother doesn’t have to wear a shirt Society, what have you done to me? I need a support team

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Here I am now, April standing in the forest, putting blackberries in my basket Tasting a few, seeds stuck in indigo teeth That soft and whimsical voice calling to me— Frogs in the creek at dusk, flowers shifting in the breeze, drizzle on the tin roof— Ushering me out to the cliff by the swollen river that overlooks the hills Where I end my day to the sun setting low, Warm

You know what’s sad? Some boy barely older than me Brings out out a phone And tries to stealthily snap Several shots Of me in my swimsuit But I see him I don’t know him He’s sitting all the way over there What can I do for myself? How do I save my dignity?

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

SAD

You know what’s sad? I get told my stomach Is scandalous My breasts are bad Something to be saved for a Supposed husband? I don’t agree


24

Spr St

A

BULK

PRODUCE

Organic Chia Seeds $3.99/lb (Reg. $5.49)

Organic Cucumbers $2.99/lb

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Organic Medjool Dates $7.99/lb (Reg. $9.99)

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

Organic Fuji Apples $2.49/lb

Organic Brussels Sprouts $3.99/lb

Organic Raw Walnuts $9.99/lb (Reg. $14.99/lb) Organic Raw Almonds $11.99/lb (Reg. $17.99)

Local Seedlings From Forrest Green Farms $4.99 Each

923 PRESTON AVE. 293-4111 WWW.IYFOODS.COM


25

ring In Your Step Sale

APRIL 1ST – 30TH GROCERY Buddha Teas All Varieties 20% Off Organic India Tulsi Teas 20% Off

OUR STANDARDS

Acure Body Care 20% Off

Ala Mason Soaps & Hand Cream 20% Off NOW Brand Supplements 20% Off Bach Rescue Remedies 20% Off

NO HYDROGENATED OILS ALL OUR CHEESE IS ANIMAL RENNET FREE NO PRESERVATIVES OR ARTIFICIAL COLORING

MON-FRI 8AM-8PM, SAT 9AM-6PM, SUNDAY 10AM-6PM

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NONE OF OUR PRODUCTS CONTAIN HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

Curbside phone orders available from open until 5 PM daily!

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ALL OF OUR PRODUCE IS NON-GMO

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

Manitoba Harvest Hemp Hearts 15% off

HEALTH & BODY CARE


26

CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

Order up! These local establishments are open and waiting to take your order. (Keep in mind that some information is subject to change, and descriptions may not apply, due to current circumstances.) Email living@c-ville.com to add your restaurant to the list. Asian Cuisine Afghan Kabob Palace Authentic Afghan cuisine. 400 Emmet St. N. 245-0095. $$. Asian Express Chinese and Japanese with healthy options. 909 W. Main St. 979-1888. $. Bamboo House Korean and Chinese options. 4831 Seminole Trail. 973-9211. $$. Chimm Thai Thai street food. 5th Street Station. 288-1122. $$. Doma Korean Kitchen Korean-style barbecue, kimchi, and more. 701 W. Main St. 202-1956. $. Kanak Indian Kitchen Offering traditional homemade Indian food, plus cocktails to go. 385 Merchant Walk Sq. Ste. 400. 328-2775. $. Lemongrass Vietnam meets Thailand. Veggie options and delivery, too. 104 14th St. NW. 244THAI. $$. Lime Leaf Thai A tad more upscale than the average Thai place. Rio Hill Shopping Center. 245-8884. $$. Maru Korean BBQ & Grill Traditional Korean food with modern additions. 412 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 956-4110. $.

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

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Milan Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with all the standards; beer and wine available to go. 1817 Emmet St. 984-2828. $$. Mochiko Good Hawaiian eats (and suggested Hawaiian beer pairings, too). The Yard at 5th Street Station. $. Monsoon Siam Delicious, unpretentious favorites like pad Thai, tom yum noodle soup, and vegetarian dishes. 113 W. Market St. $$. Now & Zen Gourmet Japanese and sushi spot. 202 Second St. NW. 971-1177. $$. Pad Thai Homestyle Thai cooking from an experienced chef. 156 Carlton Rd. 293-4032. $$. Peter Chang China Grill Authentic Sichuan cuisine by a renowned chef. Barracks Road Shopping Center North Wing. 244-9818. $$. Red Lantern Chinese cuisine by the pint or the quart. 221 Carlton Rd. 979-9968. $. Silk Thai Fresh, authentic Thai, plus specials like marinated wings. 2210 Fontaine Ave. 977-8424. $$. Tara Thai Serves up affordable Thai faves, with multiple meat, fish, and veggie options. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-9998. $$. Taste of China Chinese favorites on 29N. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 975-6688. $$. Taste of India Indian fare favorites on the mall. 310 E. Main St, Downtown Mall. 984-9944. $$. Ten Upscale second-floor spot serving modern Japanese and offering its popular cocktails for carry-out. 120B E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-6691. $$$. Thai ’99 II Thai noodle and rice dishes, curries, and stir frys in an inspired interior. Gardens Shopping Center. 964-1212. $. Thai Cuisine & Noodle House Traditional Thai food, noodle dishes, and vegetarian specials. 2005 Commonwealth Dr. 974-1326. $$. VuNoodles Fresh, vegetarian Vietnamese noodles, pho, bahn mi, and more. 111 E. Water St. 465-1267. $.

Bakeries Albemarle Baking Company Get your ABCs of baked goods. 418 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 293-6456. $.

Bowerbird Bakeshop Pastries, breads, and cookies using locally sourced ingredients, delivered right to your doorstep. 120 10th St. NW, bowerbirdbakeshop.com. $

The Whiskey Jar Saloon-style Southern spot with, naturally, more than 90 varieties of whiskey (get some in a cocktail to go). 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549. $$.

Gearharts Fine Chocolates Freshly baked pastries, cakes, cookies, and brownies—plus chocolates! 243 Ridge McIntire Rd. 972-9100. $.

Whistlestop Grill Southern comfort foods in Crozet. 1200 Crozet Ave. 823-9000. $.

Wayside Takeout & Catering Famous Ole Virginia fried chicken and barbecue sandwiches. 2203 Jefferson Park Ave. 977-5000. $.

Glaze Burger and Donut Housemade donuts, coffee, milkshakes, plus burgers and vegan options. 1001 W Main St. 284-5465. $.

Breakfast Joints

Wild Wing Café Classic wings and beer. 820 W. Main St. 979-WING. $$.

Great Harvest Bread Company Sandwiches, sweets, and bread baked from scratch every day. McIntire Plaza. 202-7813. $. MarieBette Café & Bakery French pastries for breakfast, more pastries for lunch. 700 Rose Hill Dr. 529-6118. $. Paradox Pastry Known for the biscuits, European pastry, and the legendary DMB cookies and brownies. 313 Second St. SE #103. 245-2453. $.

Petite MarieBette MarieBette’s little sister. 105 E. Water St. 284-8903. $. The Pie Chest Homemade breakfast and hand pies, plus by-the-slice options (for those who can’t decide). 119 Fourth St. NE., 977-0443; 1518 E. High St., 984-0555. $. Quality Pie In the former Spudnuts spot, ex-Mas tapas chef Tomas Rahal serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 309 Avon St. 284-5120. $$. Sliced. cake bar Mobile bakery offering whole cakes, cake flights, cake pops, and buttercream shots, for delivery or curbside pickup. 242-5501. $.

Bars and Grills Alamo Drafthouse Burgers, pizzas, salads, snacks and desserts prepared fresh from locally sourced ingredients. Served in the cafe or while you watch a movie. 5th Street Station. 326-5056. $. Beer Run Massive tap and packaged beer offerings, killer nachos, three meals daily. 156 Carlton Rd., 984-2337. $$. Fardowners Restaurant Local ingredients liven up pub fare like sliders and sandwiches. 5773 The Square, Crozet. 823-1300. $$. Firefly Craft beer, burgers, salads, vegetarianfriendly menu. 1304 E. Market St. 202-1050. $. Matchbox Restaurant Wood-fired pizzas, salads, salmon & steak dinners, gourmet burgers and a happy hour M-F from 3-6. 2055 Bond St., 284-8874. $$. Peloton Station Cycle-centric tavern and bike shop. 114 10th St. NW. 284-7786. $$. Sedona Taphouse Lots of craft beers (and sangria to go) and an all-American menu. 1035 Millmont St. 296-2337. $$. Selvedge Brewing New brewery in The Wool Factory serves elevated bar fare from Chef Tucker Yoder. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $$. TCO 2go Specialty sandwiches like pulled pork and fried fish from The Catering Outfit in a drive-thru. 221 Carlton Rd. 951-4699. $$. Texas Roadhouse Steaks, ribs, and fromscratch sides. Albemarle Square. 973-4700. $$. Timberwood Grill All-American eatery and after-work watering hole. 3311 Worth Crossing, 975-3311. $$. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery Locally sourced, beer-infused dishes including Southern classics and a kids menu. 520 Second St. SE. 956-3141. $$.

Farm Bell Kitchen New-Southern cuisine with local farm-to-table ingredients. 1209 W. Main St. 205-1538. $$. First Watch Breakfast, brunch, and lunch chain with locally grown ingredients. 1114B Emmet St. N. 202-5383. $$. Villa Diner Mainstay with housemade pancakes, biscuits, roast turkey, soups, sides, and salad dressings. 1250 Emmet St. N. 296-9977. $. Murphy’s Coffee & Bagel House Breakfast spot serves delicious coffee and freshly baked New York bagels. 26 Buck Dr. 939-6033. $$.

Burgers, BBQ, Dogs and Diners

Vision BBQ Meats smoked the old fashioned way with wood and a match. 249 Ridge McIntire Rd. 443-4352. $

Coffee Places with Kitchens Baine’s Books & Coffee Wide selection of coffee, tea, pastries, and paninis. 485 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-3577. $. Belle Coffee & Wine Breakfast and lunch sandwiches. Free kids meals with adult meals. 9964919. $$. C’ville Coffee & Wine Full menu of coffee, sandwiches, and wines. 1301 Harris St. 8172633. $. Greenberry’s Java and specialty drinks, fresh baked goods. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-0200. $.

Ace Biscuit & Barbecue Breakfast and lunch spot with BBQ and soul food by the biscuit. 600 Concord Ave. 202-1403. $.

Milli Coffee Roasters Espresso drinks, chai, hot chocolate, light fare, wine. 400 Preston Ave, Suite 150. 270-9706. $. Whole bean delivery available. $

Blue Moon Diner Beloved local diner serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner options like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and BLTs. 600 W. Main St. 980-6666. $$

The Workshop A coffee and wine shop featuring Grit Coffee and pastries from Cou Cou Rachou, located in The Wool Factory. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $.

Burger Bach New Zealand-inspired gastropub. The Shops at Stonefield. 328-2812. $$. Cavalier Diner Breakfast all day, traditional diner fare, and Greek food. 1403 N. Emmet St. 977-1619. $ Doodle’s Diner Country cookin’ from breakfast to burgers. 1305 Long St. 295-7550. $. Five Guys Two locations for local carnivores. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 975-GUYS; Hollymead Town Center, 963-GUYS. $. Fox’s Café Daily specials, burgers, dogs, and dinners. 403 Avon St. 293-2844. $. Lazy Parrot Backyard BBQ The Lazy Parrot Grill’s sister restaurant. Pantops Shopping Center. 244-0723. $$. Luv’n Oven Gizzards, livers, fries, and shakes. 162 Village Sq., Scottsville. 286-3828. $. Martin’s Grill Delicious hamburgers, veggie burgers, and fries. Forest Lakes Shopping Center. 974-9955. $. Mel’s Café Southern soul-soothing food. A longtime favorite on West Main. 719 W. Main St. 971-8819. $.

Family-Friendly Ann’s Family Restaurant Good old country cooking. 1170 Thomas Nelson Hwy. (Rte. 29, south of Lovingston). 263-8110. $. The Light Well Coffee-kitchen-tavern serves healthy ingredients in original recipes. 110 E. Main St., Orange. (540) 661-0004. $. Michie Tavern Traditional Southern lunch from an 18th-century tavern. 683 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy. 977-1234. $$.

Frozen Treats Chaps More than 20 years of gourmet homemade ice cream. Diner fare including breakfast and burgers. 223 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4139. $. Corner Juice UVA alum-owned juice spot with cold-pressed options. 1509 University Ave. $. Kirt’s Homemade Ice Cream Ice cream made fresh in the store. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 202-0306. $.

Mission BBQ Pulled turkey, pork, and chicken, plus racks by the bone. The Shops at Stonefield. 260-7740. $.

La Flor Michoacana Homemade paletas (popsicles), ice cream, and ice cream cakes, plus other sweet treats. 601A Cherry Ave. 984-1603 $.

Moe’s Original BBQ Alabama-style pulled pork smoked in-house. 2119 Ivy Rd., 244-7427; 200 W. Water St., 202-2288. $.

Smoothie King Chain features smoothies, supplements, and healthy snacks. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 295-8502; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center, 975-5464. $.

Moose’s by the Creek American favorites, plus mounted moose antlers for photo ops. 1710 Monticello Rd. 977-4150. $. Riverside Lunch Popular joint known for smashburgers. 1429 Hazel St. 971-3546. $. Royalty Eats Soul food goodness including Chicken & Waffles, ribs, and specialties like teriyaki salmon. 820 Cherry Ave. $

Gourmet Groceries and Gas Stations Batesville Market Sandwiches to order, salads, and baked goods plus cheeses, produce, and packaged goods. 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. $.


27

Bellair Market Gourmet sandwich spot on Ivy Road. 2401 Ivy Rd. 971-6608. $. Blue Ridge Bottle Shop Craft beer store with both bottles and growlers available—plus sample before you buy! 2025 Library Ave, Crozet. 602-2337. $. Brownsville Market Breakfast starting at 5am, plus burgers, sides, and famous fried chicken. 5995 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. 823-5251. $. Feast! Nationally noted cheese, wine, and specialty food shop. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 244-7800. $$. Foods of All Nations Sandwiches, deli, and salads at this gourmet grocery. 2121 Ivy Rd. 296-6131. $. Greenwood Gourmet Grocery Made-to-order sandwiches, fresh soup, and a deli with macn-cheese, bread pudding, and rotating dishes. 6701 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. (540) 4566431. $. Hunt Country Market A rotating menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus wine offerings. Call to order. 2048 Garth Rd. 296-1648. $. Integral Yoga Natural Foods All-natural food, organic produce, supplements, plus a deli and juice/ smoothie bar. 923 Preston Ave. 293-4111. $. J.M. Stock Provisions Whole-animal butcher shop with sandwiches to go, great craft beer selection, and nicely curated wine selection. 709 W. Main St. 244-2480. $$. Keevil & Keevil Grocery and Kitchen Belmont grocery with breakfast and lunch sammies, plus takeaway dinners. 703 Hinton Ave. 989-7648. $. Market Street Café Gourmet breakfast, rotisserie chicken, and deli meats. 1111 E. Rio Rd. 964-1185. $.

Fellini’s #9 A local landmark featuring Italian favorites plus some inventive new takes. 200 W. Market St. 979-4279. $$. Lampo Authentic Neapolitan pizzeria in Belmont. 205 Monticello Rd. 282-0607. $. Luce Literal hole in the wall serving fresh, handmade pasta to go. 110 Second St. NW. $$. Mellow Mushroom Trippy-themed franchise, with great pizza and even better beer selection. 1321 W. Main St. 972-9366. $. Red Pump Kitchen Tuscan-inspired restaurant. 401 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2026040. $$. Tavola Rustic Italian with housemade pastas, craft cocktails, and a Wine Spectator awardwinning list. 826 Hinton Ave. 972-9463. $$. Vita Nova Creative ingredients on hearty pizza by the slice. 310 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-0162. $. Vinny’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria This regional chain has pies plus a slew of subs, pastas, and stromboli. Hollymead Town Center. 973-4055. $$. Vivace Every kind of pasta imaginable, plus seafood. 2244 Ivy Rd. 979-0994. $$. Vocelli Pizza Pizza, pasta, panini, salads, and stromboli plus antipasti. Woodbrook Shopping Center. 977-4992. $.

Latin American Al Carbon Chicken prepared in an Indigenous Mexican coal-fire, flame-roasted rotisserie manner, plus sides like fried yucca and fried plantains. 1875 Seminole Trail. 964-1052. $.

Mediterranean Aromas Café Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. Sandwiches, salads, and famous falafel. 900 Natural Resources Dr. 244-2486. $. Basil Mediterranean Bistro Mediterranean fare from grape leaves to tapas, plus wine. 109 14th St., 977-5700; 5th Street Station, 202-7594. $. Cava Fast-casual Mediterranean with lots of vegetarian options. 1200 Emmet St. N, #110. 227-4800. $.

Otto Turkish Street Food Go for the doner kebabs and stay for the rosemary fries. 111 W. Water St. 328-8786. $

Revolutionary Soup Choose from a slew of enticing soups made daily. 108 Second St., Downtown Mall. 979-9988. $.

Sticks Kebob Shop Everything tastes better on a stick! 917 Preston Ave. 295-5262; 1820 Abbey Rd. 295-5212. $.

Roots Natural Kitchen Fast-casual salad and grain bowls. 1329 W. Main St. 529-6229. $.

Sultan Kebab Authentic Turkish cuisine with plenty of meat and vegetarian options, and notable appetizers, too. 333 Second St. SE, 9810090. $. Thyme & Co. Traditional Lebanese flatbreads and salads. 104 14th St. NW, Suite 2. 282-2436. $.

Miscellaneous Nationalities Bang! Tapas Asian fusion cuisine served tapasstyle. 213 Second St. SW. 984-2264 $$. Bizou Playful French-American bistro with a beloved meatloaf dish. 119 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-1818. $$.

Pearl Island Caribbean-inspired lunch spot in the Jefferson School City Center. 233 Fourth St. NW. 466-0092. $.

Mill Creek Market The Southern sister of Bellair Market. Avon Street, across from the Southside Shopping Center. 817-1570. $.

Chipotle Simple menu of made-to-order burritos and tacos. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 8720212; 2040 Abbey Rd. Suite 101, 984-1512. $.

Trader Joe’s This grocery chain boasts top quality at low cost, including “Two Buck Chuck” wine (which is actually $3.50). The Shops at Stonefield. 974-1466. $$.

Continental Divide Charlottesville’s favorite hole-in-the-wall spot has delicious tacos and enchiladas. 811 W. Main St. 984-0143. $$.

Wyant’s Store Country-store fare like coffee and donuts, with daily specials and a great (cheap!) cheeseburger. 4696 Garth Rd., Crozet. 823-7299. $.

Italian and Pizza Anna’s Pizza No. 5 In the family for 35 years. 115 Maury Ave. 295-7500. $.

Christian’s Pizza The place to get fresh pies, by-the-slice or the whole darn thing. 118 W. Main St., Downtown Mall, 977-9688; 100 14th St. NW, 872-0436; 3440 Seminole Trail, 9737280. $.

Crozet Pizza Unpretentious, family-owned pizza parlor with nationally recognized pies. 5794 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet, 823-2132; 20 Elliewood Ave. 202-1046. $. Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie Pizza joint in the Crossroads mini-mall. 4916 Plank Rd., on 29S at North Garden. 245-0000. $$. Fabio’s New York Pizza Pizza, subs, salads, and calzones made by natives of Naples. Get your pie the Sicilian way. 1551 E. High St. 8720070. $.

Junction Innovative Southwestern cuisine with locally sourced ingredients in Belmont. 421 Monticello Rd. 465-6131. $$. La Michoacana Mexican deli serves budgetfriendly burritos, tacos, and enchiladas. 1138 E. High St., 409-9941; 2291 Seminole Ln., 9564299. $. Little Star Spanish- and Mexican-inspired food expertly prepared in a wood-fired oven. Great craft cocktails, too. 420 W. Main St. 252-2502. $$. Mas Spanish tapas and wines in the heart of Belmont. 904 Monticello Rd. 979-0990. $$. Morsel Compass Popular food truck’s brickand-mortar spot. 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. 989-1569. $$. Qdoba Mexican Grill Spicy burritos, quesadillas, and Mexican salads made before your eyes. 3918 Lenox Ave. 244-5641. $. Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine & Café Healthy, authentic Mexican cuisine. 112 W. Main St., Suite 6. 979-0212. $.

Soups, Salads, Sandwiches Baggby’s Gourmet Sandwiches Satisfying sandwiches, salads, soups, and super-friendly service. 512 E Main St. Downtown Mall. 984-1862 $.

Bodo’s Bagels Still the king of bagels. Drivethru available at 1418 N. Emmet St., 977-9598; 505 Preston Ave., 293-5224; and outside service at 1609 University Ave., 293-6021. $. Chopt Creative salad chain with ingredients from local purveyors. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 328-8092. $. Citizen Bowl Shop Specialty salads with gluten-free, vegetarian, and paleo-friendly options. Also now selling groceries like yeast, flour, and brownie mix, plus gloves and toilet paper. 223 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 234-3662. $. Durty Nelly’s Down-home pub and deli now offering five subs (except the Dagwood) for $35. 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. $. HotCakes Fancy sandwiches, housemade entrées, and desserts. Delivery available. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 295-6037. $. Iron Paffles & Coffee Pastry dough + waffle iron + savory or sweet insides. 214 W. Water St. 806-3800. $. Ivy Provisions Local deli and retail food shop offering fresh, housemade breakfast and lunch all day, plus wine and craft beer by the bottle and on draft. 2206 Ivy Rd. 202-1308. $. Jack’s Shop Kitchen Farm-to-table brunch, lunch, and supper spot with elevated classics. 14843 Spotswood Trail, Ruckersville. 939-9239. $$.

Bonefish Grill Sister to mega-popular Outback Steakhouse featuring seafood, grilled non-fish specialties. Hollymead Town Center. 975-3474. $$. Outback Steakhouse Bloomin’ onions and giant steaks. 1101 Seminole Trail. 975-4329. $$. Public Fish & Oyster Simply prepared, responsibly sourced seafood. 513 W. Main St., 995-5542. $$.

Upscale Casual C&O Serving up a three-course $68 prix fixe menu. 515 E. Water St. 971-7044. $$$. Café Frank French-influenced café dining and takeout with special attention on its wine and cocktail lists. 317 E. Main St. 825-9496. $$ Fig Bistro & Bar Mediterranean and New Orleans-inspired dishes with housemade ingredients. 1331 W. Main St. 995-5047. $. Hamiltons’ at First & Main Contemporary American cuisine in the heart of downtown C’ville. 110 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2956649. $$$. Ivy Inn Offering Fine dining in a charming tollhouse. 2244 Old Ivy Rd. 977-1222. $$$. The Local Belmont neighborhood spot featuring comfort favorites. 824 Hinton Ave. 9849749. $$. Maya Upscale Southern cuisine. 633 W. Main St. 979-6292. $$. The Melting Pot Fondue fun for all. 501 E. Water St. 244-3463. $$$. The Mill Room AAA, four-diamond eatery at The Boar’s Head, 200 Ednam Dr. 972-2230. $$$. Oakhart Social Seasonal, creative modern American food for sharing. 511 W. Main St. 995-5449. $$. Oakhurst Inn Coffee & Café Southern style breakfast and lunch. 1616 Jefferson Park Ave. 872-0100. $. Restoration Great views and delicious food, ranging from fried green tomatoes and burgers to crab cakes and pasta. 5494 Golf Dr., Crozet. 823-1841. $$. Southern Crescent Cajun and Creole fare in Belmont. 814 Hinton Ave. 284-5101. $$. Tonic Seasonal, local café fare with craft cocktails and curated wine list. 609 E. Market St. 226-4270. $$ Wayland’s Crossing Tavern Pub food, vegetarian plates, and kid-friendly fare. 1015 Heathercroft Cir., Crozet. 205-4669. $$. Zocalo Flavorful, high-end, Latin-inspired cuisine. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4944. $$.

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College Inn Late-night goodness. Pizza, gyros, subs, and its delivery can’t be beat. Breakfast items, too. 1511 University Ave. 977-2710. $.

Guajiros Miami Eatery Food inspired by the everyday meals of Miami, with strong Cuban influence as well as Central and Southern American dishes. 1871 Seminole Trail. 465-2108. $

Sticks A fast-food alternative: kebobs (veggie options available), sides, salads, desserts. Preston Plaza, 295-5262; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center. 295-5212. $.

Steaks and Seafood

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Belmont Pizza and Pub Fresh, stone-baked pizza on hand-tossed pies. Beer, too! 211 Carlton Rd., Suite 10. 977-1970. $.

Guadalajara Family-run Mexican food celebrating 30 years. 805 E. Market St., 977-2676; 395 Greenbrier Dr., 978-4313; 2206 Fontaine Ave., 979-2424; 108 Town Country Ln., 293-3538; 3450 Seminole Trail, 977-2677. $.

The Shebeen Pub and Braai Conjures the South African veldt. Vinegar Hill Shopping Center. 296-3185. $$.

Which Wich Superior Sandwiches Create your own sandwiches by marking up the pre-printed brown bags. Hollymead Town Center. 977-9424. $.

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

Market Street Wine An expertly curated selection. 305 Rivanna Plaza Dr., Suite 102, 9649463; 311 E. Market St., 979-9463. $$.

The Bebedero Upscale authentic Mexican, plus cocktails and made-to-order guac. Order from sister restaurants Revolutionary Soup and The Whiskey Jar and pick up food from all three, at once. 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2343763. $$.

Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Fresh, handmade, Bajastyle Mexican food. 435 Merchant Walk Sq., Suite 600. 214-0500. $.

Kitchenette Sandwich Shop From meatloaf with cheddar and jalapenos to tofu Reubens, these sammies satisfy. 920 91/2 St. NE. 2607687. $ Panera Bread Co. Ubiquitous chain with casual fare. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 2456192; Hollymead Town Center, 973-5264; Fifth Street Station, 973-5264. $.

Mahana Fresh Tropical themed, fun flavored ingredients in bowls and sweets. 2142 Barracks Rd. 284-5846 $.

Whole Foods Market Fresh, all-natural sandwiches ranging from classic favorites to vegan delights. 1797 Hydraulic Rd. 973-4900. $$.

Jimmy John’s Low-cost sandwiches on 29N. “Freaky fast” delivery. 1650 E. Rio Rd. 9752100. $.

Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar Dishes from Spain to Greece and wines of the world. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 975-6796. $$.

Brazos Tacos Austin, Texas-style breakfast, lunch, early dinner, and brunch tacos. 925 Second St. SE. 984-1163. $.

Market Street Market Deli in the downtown grocery serves sandwiches and prepared foods. 400 E. Market St. 293-3478. $.

Jersey Mike’s Subs Subs from Jersey. 2040 Abbey Rd. #104, 529-6278; 5th Street Station, 328-8694. $.


28

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

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#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


29

CROSSWORD

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BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

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March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

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By Rob Brezsny

CULTURE FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Taurus (April 20-May 20): How distraught I was when I discovered that one of my favorite poets, Pablo Neruda, was an admirer of the murderous dictator Joseph Stalin. It broke my heart to know I could never again read his tender, lyrical poetry with unconditional appreciation. But that’s life: Some of our heroes and teachers disappoint us, and then it’s healthy to re-evaluate our relationships with them. Or maybe our own maturation leads us to realize that once-nurturing influences are no longer nurturing. I recommend that sometime soon, you take a personal inventory with these thoughts in mind. I suspect there may be new sources of inspiration headed your way. Get ready for them.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Self-help author Steve Maraboli has useful advice for you to consider in the coming weeks. I hope you’ll meditate on what he says and take decisive action. He writes, “Incredible change happens in your life when you decide to take control of what you do have power over instead of craving control over what you don’t.” To get started, Gemini, make a list of three things you do have power over and three things you wish you did but don’t have power over.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): While he was alive, Cancerian author Franz Kafka burned 90 percent of everything he wrote. In a note to a friend before he died, he gave instructions to burn all the writing he would leave behind. Luckily, his friend disobeyed, and that’s why today we can read Kafka’s last three novels and a lot more of his stuff. Was his attitude toward his creations caused by the self-doubt that so many of us Cancerians are shadowed by? Was he, like a lot of us Crabs, excessively shy about sharing personal details from his life? In accordance with astrological omens, I urge you to at least temporarily transcend any Kafka-like tendencies you have. It’s time to shine brightly and boldly as you summon your full powers of self-expression.

Aries (March 21-April 19): In the novel House of Leaves, the hero Johnny Truant describes his friend Lude as wanting “more money, better parties, and prettier girls.” But Johnny wants something different. What is it? He says, “I’m not even sure what to call it except I know it feels roomy and it’s drenched in sunlight and it’s weightless and I know it’s not cheap.” In my opinion, that declaration is far too imprecise! He’ll never get what he wants until he gets clearer about it. But his fantasy is a good start. It shows that he knows what the fulfillment of his yearning feels like. I suggest you get inspired by Johnny Truant’s approximation to conjure up one of your own. Gaze ahead a few years, and see if you can imagine what your best possible future feels like. Then describe it to yourself as precisely as possible. I think yearnings like those will be healthy and wise for you to cultivate in the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need expansive influences that stretch your imagination and push you beyond your limitations. You will benefit from meditations and experiences that inspire you to outgrow overly small expectations.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo actor and director Jean-Louis Barrault aspired to “wake up a virgin each morning.” He wanted “to feel hungry for life,” as if he had been reborn once again. In order to encourage that constant renewal, he regarded going to sleep every night as “a small death.” I recommend his approach to you during the coming weeks. In my astrological opinion, the cosmic rhythms will be conspiring to regularly renew your desires: to render them pure, clean, raw, and strong. Cooperate with those cosmic rhythms!

Libra

(July 23-Aug. 22): To create your horoscope, I’ve borrowed ideas from Leo-born author Cassiano Ricardo. He speaks of a longing “for all that is tall like pine trees, and all that is long like rivers, and all that is purple like dusk.”

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Blobs, spots, specks, smudges, cracks, defects, mistakes, accidents, exceptions, and irregularities are the win-

Holding Rad rugs from a new vibe Forth stir up

CENTER SPO

T

gatherin A revamped edere place in Belv

Scorpio

dows to other worlds,” writes author Bob Miller. I would add that all those things, along with related phenomena like fissures, blemishes, stains, scars, blotches, muck, smears, dents, and imperfections, are often windows to very interesting parts of this seemingly regular old ordinary world—parts that might remain closed off from us without the help of those blobs and defects. I suggest you take full advantage of the opportunities they bring your way in the coming weeks.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Innovative psychologist Carl Jung had a nuanced understanding of the energies at work in our deep psyche. He said our unconscious minds are “not only dark but also light; not only bestial, semi-human, and demonic, but also superhuman, spiritual, and, in the classical sense of the word, ‘divine.’” I bring this to your attention, Sagittarius, because now is a favorable time to get better acquainted with and more appreciative of your unconscious mind. For best results, you must not judge it for being so paradoxical. Don’t be annoyed that it’s so unruly and non-rational. Have fun with its fertility and playfulness and weirdness.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The fantasy drama “Game of Thrones” appeared on TVs all over the world. But the audience that watched it in China got cheated out of a lot of essential action. Government censorship deleted many scenes that featured nudity and sex, fighting and violence, and appearances by dragons, which play a starring role in the story. As you can imagine, Chinese viewers had trouble following some of the plot points. Telling you about this, Capricorn, is my way of nudging you to make sure you don’t miss

any of the developments going on in your own personal drama. Some may be hidden, as in China’s version of “Game of Thrones.” Others might be subtle or disguised or underestimated. Make it your crusade to know about everything.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind,” wrote author Rudyard Kipling. Yes, they are. I agree. They change minds, rouse passions, build identities, incite social change, inspire irrationality, and create worlds. This is always true, but it will be especially important for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks. The ways you use language will be key to your health and success. The language that you hear and read will also be key to your health and success. For best results, summon extra creativity and craftsmanship as you express yourself. Cultivate extra discernment as you choose what you absorb.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean linguist Anna Wierzbicka says the Russian expression Dusha naraspashku means “unbuttoned soul.” She continues, “The implication is that it is good, indeed wonderful, if a person’s ‘soul,’ which is the seat of emotions, is flung open in a spontaneous, generous, expansive, impetuous gesture, expressing full trust in other people and an innocent readiness for communion with them.” I wouldn’t recommend that you keep your soul unbuttoned 24/7/365, but in the coming weeks, I hope you’ll allocate more time than usual to keeping it unbuttoned. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, 1-877-873-4888.

T ART OF CRAF g

r house Potter’s cide past embraces its

2021 FEB / MARCH

Inside. Outside. Home.

Inside the lines

There’s no place like

home. Inside. Outside. Home.

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A WW II-era home—and its modern-day kitchen redo

Retaining the best of an unfinished Bundoran property, new owners craft their forever home

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

Leo

(Sept. 23-Oct.22): Is there anything more gratifying than being listened to, understood, and seen for who you really are? I urge you to seek out that pleasure in abundance during the coming weeks. My reading of the astrological omens tells me you need the nurturing jolt that will come from being received and appreciated with extra potency. I hope you have allies who can provide that for you. If you don’t, search for allies who can. And in the meantime, consider engaging the services of a skillful psychotherapist or life coach or some other professional listener.

A SPRUCE UP

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stop. Burger

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

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Time.

BURGeR WeeK

$6 signature burgers MAY 14 - 22, 2021 SPONSORED BY:

C-VILLEBURGERWEEK.COM Holly’s Diner


Q&A What’s your favorite thing to buy at the farmers’ market?

Tomatoes! Nothing beats a ripe summer tomato. @KKHILL79/INSTAGRAM

Tomatoes, tomatoes, tomatoes!!! TERRI ANNE DI CINTIO/FACEBOOK

Farmers. @COREYGOREYFUNNYSTORY/ INSTAGRAM

AMBROSIA!! Greek treats at IX Park farmers’ market Saturdays. Spanakopita? Leek and mushroom tarte? Baklava? Yes, please!! Great for weekend brunch! Ambrosia! P.S. and she even uses paper boxes!! LEENA MILLER/EMAIL

English peas and @eatbasan.

Rocky will be at the Eternal Attic on Friday, April 2nd 10 – 4

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paying you top dollar for your gold and silver and antiques.

gold and silver are still up! now is the time to sell!

Rocky pays more for gold, silver and many other items he can resell

ROCKY BUYS: GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM JEWELRY (EVEN BROKEN) GOLD, SILVER PLATINUM COINS, BULLION HE PAYS EXTRA FOR GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS HE CAN RESELL ROCKY WILL PAY UP TO $3000 FOR A GOOD ONE CARAT DIAMOND SOLITAIRE STERLING FLATWARE, HOLLOWWARE ANTIQUE GUNS AND AMMUNITION, SWORDS, CIVIL WAR ITEMS POST CARDS, OLD QUILTS, OLD CLOCKS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE SOME GLASSWARE SOME COSTUME JEWELRY SOME POCKET AND WRIST WATCHES LIKE ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE, OMEGA, AND MORE RUNNING OR NOT SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY

we are now back open regular hoursTuesday – Saturday 9:30 to 5, antiques open at 9 for both buying gold and silver and shopping! jewelry repairs done on the premises often while you wait Bench Jeweler wanted $40,000 to $60,000 a year plus benefits - call for details.

HOURS: tues - sat 9:30 - 5 • 1-800-296-8676 Antiques open at 9:00

rockysgoldandsilver.com

@PFDAUGHERTY1959/INSTAGRAM

Meat pies from The Pie Guy. @NPD_BLUE/TWITTER

Everything that’s in season.

Herbs. I buy them every year to start my summer herb garden! @SLOVIE64/INSTAGRAM

Caromont Farm Esmontonian goat cheese. Doesn’t get more local than that.

HAPPY when picking up fresh local-grown vegetables, walk to car, then eye the overgrown and unfinished disaster hotel project and get REAL upset...

Tomatoes.

@LUFFAKLEIN/TWITTER

@LADDIES_MOM/INSTAGRAM

@HINGELEYJIM/TWITTER

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

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Next week’s question: How have you changed your exercise routine in the last year?

March 31 – April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

@TRISHCARP/INSTAGRAM


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BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844-242-1100. (AAN CAN)

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Advancing Healthcare Through

CLINICAL TRIALS Study for Family Caregivers

Exercise Training and Drug Study

Study for Type 2 Diabetics

Men and women who provide in-home care to their adult loved ones with chronic health conditions are needed for a study about caregiving stress, sleep, and cardiovascular health. Participation involves 1 study visit lasting 90 minutes: completing questionnaires and getting non-invasive cardiovascular tests at the visit, and wearing a wrist-worn sleep tracker for a week and a blood pressure monitor for a day after the visit are required. Compensation: $60 at completion of participating. Principal Investigator: Jeongok Logan, PhD, RN.

Non-smoking, inactive adults aged 21-50 needed for study on the effect of exercise and the drug liraglutide on blood vessels. You must have 3 of the 4 characteristics: overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fasting blood sugar. Study requires three 1-hour and two 9-hour visits over 5 months in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Participants are randomized to one of 4 groups: control, exercise training, study drug, or exercise + study drug. Compensation is $1,500. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, MD.

Men and women with type 2 diabetes aged 18-60 needed for study on the effect of the drug empagliflozin (used to control blood sugar) on blood vessels. Study requires two 1-hour outpatient visits and two 7-hour admissions in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. The study drug is taken for 12 weeks. You must have Type 2 diabetes, be a non-smoker, and not taking insulin. Compensation is $800.00, paid in installments. Principal Investigator: Eugene Barrett, MD, PhD.

UVA School of Nursing Soojung Ahn 434.233.4593 | sa4ve@virginia.edu IRB-HSR #22260

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu HSR200065

We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet and C’ville! To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/

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Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities:

HEALING/MEDICINE

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March 31 - April 6, 2021 c-ville.com

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How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.

In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

AUCTION

“One of Virginia’sLargest Consignment Auctions” Antiques, Farm Equipment, Furniture, Housewares, Toys, Vehicles and MORE! Gray Auctions Co. VA#1104 Friday, March 26, 2021 @ 9 A.M. & Saturday, March 27, 2021 @ 9 A.M. 14089 Robinson Road, Stony Creek, VA 23882 For all info Visit:www.graycoservices.com or

Call Joe Gray at 804-943-3506

GET THE SCOOP ON OUR NEWS, ARTS, AND LIVING CONTENT BEFORE ANYONE ELSE. @CVILLENEWS_DESK @ARTSCVILLE @EATDRINKCVILLE


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VOL. 30 NO. 13 n MARCH 31 - APRIL 6, 2021

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A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

MARCH 31 - APRIL 6, 2021 ISSUE 3013

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Watson Manor, home to The Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at UVA

RUGBY AREA BY MARILYN PRIBUS

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Charlottesville’s Sought-After


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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers AVENTADOR

KESWICK COUNTRY CLUB

Bordering (Full Cry)Pete Dye golf course and lake, within grounds of Keswick Hall, 5-star luxury resort, is this magnificent 5-bedroom residence constructed of the finest materials with attention to every detail. MLS#603398 $4,200,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.FairwayDriveAtKeswick.com

FARMINGTON

VERULAM FARM

Landmark estate just west of University of Virginia on 500 acres. Classic home of the highest standards with elegant spaces, 5 bedroom suites, formal gardens, pool, cottage, event barn, and bold mountain views creating a one-of-a-kind offering. MLS#597954 Andrew Middleditch, 434.981.1410

MERIDIEN

Private, peaceful, and perfect—a sophisticated country estate offering stunning Blue Ridge views from over 40 rolling acres, 9 miles NW of Charlottesville. C. 1840, character-rich yet modernized home with 5 BR and 3.5 BA. Under conservation easement. MLS#613521 $3,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

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1954 Milton Grigg 8-BR residence on over 2.5 acres. Fronting the 17th fairway in Farmington, offering a quality-built home, gorgeous setting, and prime location only minutes to UVA and Downtown. MLS#606911 $4,950,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

Magnificent Georgian manor home with expert craftsmanship, fine details throughout, gracious style, and modern amenities. Over 10,000 finished sq. ft. including 6 BR, 6 full and 2 half baths, main-level master, fabulous eatin kitchen, and numerous entertaining spaces. Guest home and 296+ acres with panoramic pastoral and mountain views. Well-located in protected area 16 miles from Charlottesville. Open photo gallery for extensive information and pictures. MLS#602894 $4,750,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.AventadorVA.com

RUSTLING OAKS

Attractive, well-built residence on 4.09+/- mostly wooded acres, end of cul-de-sac location, 3BR/3.5BA, high ceilings, beautiful hardwood flooring, large wellproportioned rooms, finished bonus room above 2-car garage, full unfinished walk-out basement. MLS #614704 $1,385,000. Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

KESWICK

Enjoy mountain views of the historic Southwest Mountains from this livable 4-BR residence on 6 private acres. Convenient and quick to Pantops, Historic Downtown Mall, and UVA. Within steps of all the amenities at Keswick Hall. MLS#611672 $989,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

WOODLANDS

Beautifully restored 1780s Colonial on 293 acres in Northampton County. This historic home has 4 BR, 3 full & 2 half BA. Property has access to deep water on the Machipongo River which flows into the Atlantic. Rare offering. MLS#614051 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 WoodlandsFarmVa.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

NORTH DOWNTOWN

Stunning Colonial Revival style circa 1913 residence has been recently restored to perfection. The current owners lovingly and thoughtfully preserved the exterior and interior architectural details yet have used modern high end finishes for a huge “wow” factor. The floor plan is updated for an easy, comfortable lifestyle. Great flexibility in this fourbedroom, five-bath brick home with coveted private backyard and off-street parking. Walk to the amenities of the Historic Downtown Mall and UVA. MLS#608794 $1,549,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

TOTIER HILLS FARM

Exquisite brick mansion, superb quality construction and features in over 9,000 finished square feet. On 98 gently rolling acres with total privacy, a stream, and pond. Only 5 minutes to shops, 15 miles to UVA. MLS#600284 $2,700,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.TotierHillsFarm.com

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


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ASHCROFT

Stunning mountain views abound throughout this bright, spacious, 4-BR residence. Privately tucked on 2.26 acres adjoining common space. Located minutes from Pantops, UVA, and all Charlottesville has to offer. MLS#607638 $1,145,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RICHMOND

FOOTHILLS FARM

Private, peaceful, & scenic with idyllic setting & views! 170 acres of pristine farmland with c. 1921, 4-BR farmhouse. Separate 1-BR, 1-BA apartment above 2-bay detached garage. Currently used as cattle farm, property includes barn & additional outbuildings. MLS#613650 $1,585,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SIX MILES NORTHWEST

Private 4.29 acres, spacious Traditional brick home, built circa 2006, 4 BR and 4.5 BA, attached 3-bay garage and detached 2 bays. Meriwether Elementary District, NO HOA, only 6 miles to Barracks Road Shopping Center. MLS#614079 $1,250,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MILTON VILLAGE

21-acre lot minutes east of Charlottesville. Level building site has well already drilled & soils tested for drain field. Fenced with 4-board along road frontage. Creek, small pond, and automatic waterers. Close to public Rivanna River access. MLS#612288 $375,000 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610

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Nearly two acres in the City of Richmond on desirable Rothesay Circle with potential river views. Open woodland with mature hardwoods and small fields. Minutes from Carytown, James River Park, and downtown. MLS#2031412 $449,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325

BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

WESLEY CHAPEL ROAD

Nice, mostly wooded residential building lot in Meriwether Lewis School District! Great privacy, 1.72± acres, beautiful rural setting in an area of large farm and estate properties. Located approximately 15 miles NW of Charlottesville. MLS#613685 $125,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BUFFALO RIVER ROAD

Elevated 21-acre tract, mostly mature hardwood forest and road frontage in northwest Albemarle. Elevated homesite offers potential panoramic Blue Ridge Mountain views with some clearing. Adjacent 21 acres also for sale. MLS#614424 $260,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

LONESOME MOUNTAIN ROAD

5-acre lot that has not been available for many years. This country but close-to-town location is conveniently located with quick access to Historic Downtown Mall, UVA, NGIC, airport, and North Fork Business Park. MLS#593160 $250,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

GILBERT STATION ROAD

Wonderfully private, 67-acre tract of land approximately 11 miles north of Charlottesville in Barboursville. Mostly wooded with a creek and road frontage. Tremendous views. MLS#552156 $565,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

JOHNSON HOUSE

3-BR, 2-BA Virginia farm-house nestled in historic district of Covesville, located only 14 miles south of Charlottesville. Mostly open front pasture with nice pond in front. Remainder of acreage is wooded to top of back ridge. Century Link internet. MLS#613228 $516,500 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610


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BARRACKS

RECENTLY SOLD

RECENTLY SOLD

RECENTLY SOLD

$1,975,000 1101 Rugby Road

$2,600,000 1835 University Circle

$1,150,000 1822 Edgewood Lane

BARRACKS

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Exceptionally renovated c.1925 residence. Easy walk to The Corner, Grounds, Downtown and Barracks Road Shopping Center. The owner has created an amazing compliment to details, design, light and craftsmanship.

BARRACKS

Tucked privately behind towering boxwood hedges, this c. 1922 Eugene Bradbury masterpiece on an expansive double parcel is within easy walking distance of the University.

BELMONT

Elegant and unique, stone Country French home located in sought-after University neighborhood. Formal living room with fireplace, built-in bookcases & handsome moldings.

ANDREA HUBBELL REALTOR 434.249.9207 andrea.hubbell@nestrealty.com nestrealty.com/andreahubbell


AUCTION

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

Friday, Apr.9 at 1PM

April

9

Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

LACKEY LANE

Friday

Unique Fixer Upper! Circa 1930’s Railroad House in Covesville. Lovely double front porches. First floor is a separate apartment. Second floor, which is accessed from the back, is at ground level. Come out to see the possibilities! Can be purchased with 1 acre at $185,000 or with 50 acres for $375,000

601 Bridge St Danville, VA

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FORECLO S U R E

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OLD TRAIL DRIVE

Auction will be held at The Institute for Advanced Learning & Research 150 Slayton Ave, Danville, VA Bridge Street Side

Prime Location

Attractive Interior

Attractive Interior

Selling for David Lingerfelt, Substitute Trustee Property: 601 Bridge St, Danville, VA (tax parcel 21459) Type: Occupied Apartment Building - 74 units Occupancy: 93%, opportunity to fill vacancies at mkt rate Buildings: Two historic buildings adapted for reuse: the Tobacco Company Cigar Factory, circa 1894, and the Waddill Printing Company, circa 1926. Redeveloped into apartments in 2004 with two stair and elevator towers added to connect the buildings and provide full ADA accessibility. Size: 87,704 sq.ft. on 1.7 acres Features: secured entry access, elevators, community room, patio terrace, 24hr maintenance, on-site mgmt. Location: Very attractive location w/ much to offer tenants • Adjacent to the popular Riverwalk Trail • One block from Averett University’s Riverview Campus • Near restaurants, breweries, shops, & attractions incl. the Science Center, Community Mkt, Carrington Pavilion, etc Tax Assm’t: $7,259,000 Value-Add: Foreclosure removes rent restrictions giving an outstanding opportunity to increase rents to market rate. After 3 years, restrictions are removed completely. AGENT ON SITE (appt req’d - call or visit website) • Tue, Mar.23, Noon-4PM • Tue, Mar.30, Noon-4PM • Tue, Apr.6, Noon-4PM • Other dates avail. by appt. DIR TO PROPERTY: Main St. to Memorial Dr. 1/4mi to L on Newton St to R on Bridge St. Property on left.

CONTACT Mike Torrence TRF Auctions 434-847-7741

TRF

AUCTIONS

Torrence, Read, & Forehand

Rick Read CBC Read & Co. 434-455-2285

Colliers Int’l Multifamily Advisors 804-320-5500

TRFAuctions.com 434-847-7741 101 Annjo Court, Forest, VA 24551 | VAAF501

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

(434) 939-7098

24 Hour Return

Hilltop Produce & Seafood Rentals include air conditioning, rub rails to 78 Zion Park Ct, Troy, VA 22974 protect your belongings and equipped with a hitch to tow a trailer rental. Cargo van at Zion Crossroads starting at $19.95, reserve your van today. Off I64, Exit #136, Rt.15 South Open 7days

U-Box Portable Storage One container fits about one and a half rooms. Perfect for a studio or dorm room. Internal Dimensions: 95” X 56” X 83.5”

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VOL. 30 NO. 9 n MARCH 3 - 9, 2021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

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A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

We’ve Got Central Virginia

COVERED! Spring Happenings 2021: Digital and Beyond BY KEN WILSON

24 HOURS • 52 WEEKS 3 6 5 D AY S P E R Y E A R ONLINE & IN PRINT

Real Estate Weekly

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

TERMS SUMMARY: A bidder’s deposit of $150,000 (in the form of a cashier’s check payable to “David Lingerfelt, Substitute Trustee”) is required to bid. Successful bidder must execute Foreclosure Sale Agreement immediately after the sale. Closing to occur within 30 days. Closing can be extended an additional 21 days if buyer adds $150,000 to the non-refundable deposit and presents a commitment letter from a lender satisfactory to the Trustee. No buyer’s premium will be charged. Full terms and conditions available online.

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200

CAAR

74-Unit Apartment Community

Move In Ready! One level living in Old Trail! Energy efficient home with partially finished basement. Looks deceivingly small from the outside yet there is over 5,000 sq. ft. expertly designed to fit a variety of needs. 6” Castilian walnut floors, large rooms, sizable closets, custom master closet, deep front porch and lovely patio. This home is perfect for entertaining, working and learning remotely. Come visit in person or ask for a virtual tour through FaceTime. Owner is RE agent. $626,000


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Charlottesville’s Sought-After

RUGBY AREA

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

BY MARILYN PRIBUS

“The Rugby area of Charlottesville is a very popular area,” declares Associate REALTOR® Georgia Lindsey of Charlottesville’s Nest Realty. “It has architecturally attractive homes on tree-lined streets in a long-established area.”


Where Exactly is the Rugby Area?

University of Virginia is a peaceful place to visit with ongoing exhibits. Although now closed for pre-planned building maintenance—including a new roof—the museum is expected to open by summer. Until then, talks, virtual tours, and curatorial clips of 10-15 minutes on a variety of artworks are available online at: uvafralinartmuseum.virginia.edu/ exhibitions.

Why do Home Buyers Like Rugby? “There is real appeal in the Rugby area and it’s always been at the upper end of prices in Charlottesville,” says Lindsey. “It’s a quiet area, very residential, right in the middle of town, but without busy streets.” The area is mostly built out with virtually no vacant lots for new construction. These are mostly older neighborhoods, she adds, and often there is just one entry to a neighborhood so

there are cul-de-sacs and dead ends with no through traffic. “The Rugby area is certainly appreciated for its proximity to the University and easy access to all other areas of Charlottesville, including dining and shopping,” Lindsey continues. “There are other special aspects too, including larger lots. Half of the homes sold in the Rugby area last year were on lots of a halfacre or more with mature landscaping.” She adds that the homes themselves often feature handsome architectural design with five-to-six bedrooms. “They are individual in design and detail with no two alike,” she continues. “In fact, some are close to 100 years old with wellmaintained exteriors and thoughtfully updated and renovated interiors. People are very drawn to the classic outward appearance of the properties.” “It’s just a beautiful, picturesque area,” chimes in Inessa Telefus, a REALTOR®

517 LEXINGTON AVENUE

Courtney Sargeant Courtney

Sargeant

Selling Charlottesville Again & Again

Selling office: Charlottesville 434.293.4319 Again & Again text: 434.962.3100 courtneysargeant7@gmail.com Text: 434.962.3100 courtneysargeant7@gmail.com

FEATURE

It’s a bit hard to define, concedes Lindsey. “It’s such a popular area, people want to say that’s where they live.” That desire tends to “stretch” the edges. Generally, however, it’s considered to encompass a number of neighborhoods from University Avenue and the Rugby Road corridor to Route 29 and the 250 Bypass. Rugby Road begins at University Avenue opposite the UVA Rotunda and continues to Preston Avenue. Along the way it is home to numerous architecturally significant dwellings constructed in different decades from the 1920s onward. Although these large homes were originally built as single-family properties, a number now serve as fraternity and sorority houses. Also on Rugby Road are the UVA President’s House, the University of Virginia School of Architecture, and Fayerweather Hall—originally built in the late 1800s as a gymnasium and now home to the McIntire Department of Art. Madison House is here as well. This non-profit organization typically coordinates several thousand UVA students with volunteer opportunities at nearly 150 community partner organizations in the Charlottesville-Albemarle region. During this COVID year, they have adapted many of their programs with an innovative pivot to virtual volunteering. Also of interest (and occasional amusement) is the Beta Bridge, built in 1923, which is frequently repainted—sometimes daily. The Fralin Museum of Art at the

4209 HAWKINS LANE

NOMINATE ME

NOMINATE ME

Country Living in Convenient Location. Close to NGIC, Hollymeade, Pantops. Private Stocked Pond & almost 5 acres in Albemarle County. Main Level Master Suite, Tiled Dual Head Shower, Bamboo Hardwoods in Living Room, Eat In Kitchen w Stainless Appliances & Granite Counters. Covered Front Porch w View of your pond & pasture. Covered rear deck & Finished Basement with HUGE Family Room, 2nd Full Laundry Room, 3rd Full Bathroom & 4th Bedroom. 6 miles to Proffitt Rd.9 Miles to Hollymeade Town Center. MLS# 605931 $535,000

NOMINATE ME

130 TURTLE CREEK RD Buy and Sell Cville Team Nominees: Candice & Bert

Candice Van der Linde Candice van der Linde, Realtor @Candice_Realtor Buy and Sell Cville Team

Passionate about Helping People SELL & BUY Residential Real Estate in the Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you & Share Some of our Best Adventures!

Call: 434-981-8730 • Connect: BuyandSellCville.com Come visit: RE/MAX Realty Specialists

Turtle Creek Condo 1 BR 1 BA, with a NEW TRANE HVAC; brick fireplace with Buy and Sell Cville Team coveredNominees: porch Candice & Bert 943 Glenwood Station Ln #203 & storage Passionateunit. about Helping Buy and Sell Cville Team Charlottesville, VA2 22901 People SELL & BUY Residential Community has 2Candice Pools, Tennis Courts, Fitness Center, Club House &Real sidewalks Nominees: & Bert Estate in the throughout. Walk to Stonefield Shopping Center, mountain biking Trails, playgrounds Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you Passionate & Schools. MLSabout #614747 Helping $146,000 & Share Some of our Best

Candice der Linde, Realtor @Candice_Realtor Peoplevan SELL & BUY Residential

@Candice_Realtor

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Stroll quintessential Charlottesville among the notable Victorians. Lexington Ave is pristine and adored by all who visit. This charming city home hasbeen extensively renovated; featuring redesigned character in all bathrooms, master suite created on 3rd level with tremendous banquette seating & abundant light. Ornate fixtures throughout the home convey. All rooms feature unique shelves, custom art features & organic tile and Onyx detail. Large level fenced yard with playstructure, abundant parking in both the front and rear. MLS# 611555 $ 945,000

Candice van der Linde, Realtor

43 MARCH 31 - APRIL 6, 2021 ISSUE 3013

House Hunt with a House Hunt Charlottesville with a Rugby Native Native

Real Estate in the Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you & Share Some of our Best

Adventures!


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with Loring Woodruff Real Estate Associates. “The houses don’t come on the market often and when they do, they move very quickly.” Other selling points include that neighborhood students attend the well-regarded Venable Elementary School, and the fact that many Rugby area homes are within a mile of the University, so residents can walk to the Grounds or The Corner—the bend in the University Avenue that’s home to University-related shops and eateries. Telefus adds that in the past year she knows of at least two families who sold properties in the Rugby area in order to buy another within the same neighborhood. “They liked where they were living,” she says, “and were both upsizing.” In fact, she continues, people often upsize with an addition to their existing property because these older homes tend to have larger lots than those of dwellings built in the last couple decades as the land itself became more expensive. This means there is room to expand on an existing lot.

FEATURE

Nearby Neighborhoods “Rugby is typically on the higher end of pricing in our local real estate market,” Lindsey observes. “So far in 2021, we’ve seen two homes close their sales, two go under contract, and currently have two available on the market, with the average sales price so far this year being $1.4 million. In 2020, there were 11 homes sold in the Rugby area, with an average sales price of just over $1 million.” On the other hand, there are nearby neighborhoods with many of the ame-

nities, but more modest housing budgets. Where Rugby Road meets Preston Avenue, it makes a quick jog to become Rugby Avenue which continues to McIntire Park. Rugby Avenue travels to and through several neighborhoods adjoining the Rugby area including Rugby Hills,

2586 Kendalwood Lane

3239 Bergen Street AVINITY

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

FIRST FLOOR MASTER SUITE IN THIS UNIQUE FLOORPLAN IN DESIRABLE FOREST LAKES SOUTH. This home will check all the boxes on your list. Extremely well maintained home. Spacious open floor plan with first floor master suite, vaulted great room with fireplace, large eat-in kitchen, formal dining room,private screened porch; second level features 3 additional large bedrooms and full bath and irrigation system. Roof, heat pump, hot water heater, garage door and dishwasher were all recently replaced. Community amenities include swimming pools, tennis courts, exercise gym, playgrounds, walking trails, basketball court, lakes and more. Home is convenient to NGIC, Hollymeade Towne Center, schools, UVA and airport. MLS# 614970 $449,900

2 years new! Come see this beautiful still new home on premium lot with incredible views in desirable Avinity neighborhood. This beautiful spacious home is loaded with upgrades and ready for occupancy. The owners spared no expense to make this the most desirable home in the neighborhood. Entire home level features beautiful luxury vinyl plank flooring ,entry level features, one car garage, large family room,, full bath and fenced in backyard; Main level features gourmet island kitchen with double oven, stainless steel appliances, gas range, pantry, gray cabinets, granite counter tops, large dining area, bright open living room and large deck; Third level features master suite, 2 additional bedrooms and full bath; 4th level features loft area leading out to terrace level overlooking beautiful farm. MLS# 615275 $449,900

One level living just minutes from Charlottesville, Interstate 64 and local attractions. This affordable updated 3 bedroom 2 bath home has been freshly painted and has brand new flooring throughout. Kitchen has been updated. Brand New roof. New stove and refrigerator to be installed soon. Large level lot. Large storage shed.

FOREST LAKES SOUTH

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Southern Pines, Greenleaf, Rose Hill, and others. Lindsey observes that, like Rugby itself, the majority of homes in these neighborhoods are owner-occupied single-family dwellings. The area serves as a sort of transition from Downtown Char-

lottesville to the University and consists primarily of medium-sized, moderately priced homes. Many of these neighborhoods are walking distance to Greenleaf and McIntire Parks and convenient to UVA and Downtown Charlottesville. “These neighborhoods,” Lindsey points out, “serve as popular options for anyone considering Charlottesville real estate.” In 2020, the homes sold in these neighborhoods generally had 2-4 bedrooms and were mostly built between 1947 and 1965. Prices ranged from $285 thousand to $849 thousand with an average of $525 thousand. Homes in these areas tend to be older, so trees and plantings are mature, and many folks are longtime residents. These are attractive, friendly neighborhoods that often have limited entrances, which prevent busy through traffic. Most have some sort of Neighborhood Association. The Greenleaf area, for example, is a post-World-War-Two community with a number of modest homes and bungalows on smaller lots. Carol Morrill, RN, a UVA Neonatal ICU nurse and a nursing instructor, lives in the Rugby Hills/Greenleaf Park area. “In years past,” she says, “we had a vibrant Neighborhood Association that often spearheaded intergenerational gatherings at Greenleaf Park, which was a natural gathering place. We had a babysitting cooperative and hosted an annual Easter Egg Hunt, Halloween Costume Parade, and Neighborhood Potluck Picnics.” In these days of COVID-19 however, she says, the potlucks have evolved to

Woods Edge

Janet Bradley HomeSell Realty

janet@janetsellshomes.net (434) 996-0303

2019 Woodbrook Ct Charlottesville, Va 22901


centers, each offering a wide variety of vendors, theaters, and restaurants. Then, too, there are smaller retail enclaves like The Corner on University Avenue opposite the UVA Grounds with its variety of college-flavored eateries and shops. The area around Preston Avenue at 10th Street also offers distinctive shopping and dining. This is where the Dairy Market is opening gradually. Dating back to 1937, it was originally a dairy producing home-delivered milk, cheese and other products. Now, it’s completely remodeled and houses local creators of food and spirits from MOO THRU (ice cream) to Starr Hill (craft brewery) and more. Just across the street is Integral Yoga—a unique food store—and a branch of Sticks. Twice is Nice, an upscale resale store benefitting seniors, has two shops there as well. And, of course, Martin’s Hardware is a Saturday morning mecca for folks needing just the right plumbing, painting, or electrical item. The general area is served by Venable Elementary School, Walker Upper Elementary School, Buford Middle School, and Charlottesville High School. Specialized district-wide schools include

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Annie Gould Gallery

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food trucks which come by appointment to a local cul-de-sac for a night out (from a distance) with neighbors. “Another time recently,” she recalls, “a neighbor sponsored a porch concert to lower the feelings of isolation we all feel.” She adds that Greenleaf Park is temporarily closed due to renovations. “Usually,” she explains, “it’s a big draw for young families because of the spray ground water park and the beautiful rain garden.” She adds that the water is all recycled now to enhance water conservation. “We’re also on the regular beat for most dog owners in the neighborhood,” she adds, “because there is a trail through the woods along the 250 Bypass from Greenleaf to Walker School.” Her neighborhood’s nearness to the city is a big plus for Morrill who, in nice weather, often walks about 20 minutes to the hospital or bicycles—in less time—to work. “The Charlottesville Area Transit bus # 9 serves our area,” she says, “and it’s a free ride since COVID. The #9 loop goes past the new YMCA and the UVA hospital. It’s been a Godsend if I’m stuck in a storm and need to leave my bike parked at the hospital.”

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109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery FEATURE

Life Is A Team Sport. Life Is A Team Sport.

Schools, Shopping, Fitness While the entire area is almost completely residential, it is surrounded by easily accessible shopping, entertainment, and eateries. Substantial shopping settings include the Barracks Road Shopping Center, the Shops at Stonefield, the Historic Downtown Mall and other

Lugo-McGinniss Academy and the Charlottesville-Albemarle Technical Education Center. Morrill, the UVA nurse, mentions there are tentative plans in the works to convert Walker Upper Elementary—which now serves citywide 5th and 6th graders—to a preschool, but final decisions haven’t been made. The Crow Pool and Recreation Center on Rose Hill Drive is on the Walker School grounds and serves as an aquatics and fitness center for local students as well as a facility of the Charlottesville Parks and Recreation for all ages. The center is planning a slow reopening as COVID restrictions are gradually relaxed. The recently completed Brooks Family YMCA at McIntire Park offers a variety of fitness classes (observing COVID safety limits) for children and adults including a swim team for youngsters. All in all, the folks residing in the Rugby area and nearby neighborhoods enjoy the quiet residential lifestyle combined with close-in-ness for shopping, schools, entertainment, and fitness opportunities. Marilyn Pribus is a long-time contributor to The Real Estate Weekly.

You don’t even have to choose sides. You don’t even have to choose sides. But you should try to surround yourself with as much talent as possible on the field...and in your neighborhood. Encouraging and accepting diversity in your community But you should try to surround yourself with as much will promote a greater sense of engagement, better prepare your talent as possible on the field...and in your neighborhood. Enchildren for the global community they will inhabit... couraging and accepting diversity in your community give us all a richer life. To better understand how neighborhood diwill promote a greater sense of engagement, better prepare your versity will benefit you and your family, please log onto children for the global community they will inhabit... www.ARicherLife.org. give us all a richer life. To better understand how neighborhood di-

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act

versity will benefit you and your family, please log onto www.ARicherLife.org.

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

The Rose Hill section of town also adjoins Rugby. Betsy Phipps, a Social Worker with UVA Healthcare, has lived in the Rose Hill area for more than 20 years. “We raised two kids here,” she says. “They went to Venable which is nearby. In fact, our house is within one mile of their elementary school and my husband’s and my jobs. It’s great to be so close.” Their home is in a nicely planned neighborhood with a single entrance which means the only auto traffic is residents and their guests. “Even though we are close to everything, we also feel like we’re off the beaten path,” she says. Phipps and her husband know many of the neighbors on their circle and the development has its own private singlelot-sized park with picnic tables and playground structures for children. “It’s just very pleasant,” Phipps says.


MARCH 31 - APRIL 6, 2021 ISSUE 3013

46

HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF MARCH 28, 2021 THERE WERE 92 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 37 were in Albemarle with an average price of $506,821 n 5 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $614,000 n 9 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $294,150 n 5 were in Greene with an average price of $284,715 n 9 were in Louisa with an average price of $287,922 n 1 was in Madison with a price of $207,000 n 10 were in Nelson with an average price of $325,288 n 1 was in Orange with a price of $289,900 n 9 were in Staunton with an average price of $252,389 n 6 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $234,691

Right now rates are low and home choices are plentiful. But no matter which way the market is leaning, it’s essential to work with a professional. REALTORS have an objective eye and are experienced in seeing things from both a buyer’s and a seller’s ®

perspective. Now more than ever, you need a REALTOR to help you achieve your goals and realize your dreams. ®

Every market’s different, call a REALTOR today.

HOMES SOLD

®

Ask if your agent is a REALTOR,®

a member of the National Association of REALTORS®

©2007 National Association of REALTORS®.

THE 4451 ALSTON STREET PLEASANT GREEN

121 ROADES COURT BURNET COMMONS

9 RASSAWEK COURT LAKE MONTICELLO

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

1261 N LAKESHORE DRIVE LOUISA

2771 BEECH GROVE RD ROSELAND

1012 SELMA BLVD STAUNTON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47 MARCH 31 - APRIL 6, 2021 ISSUE 3013

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

ATTRACTIVE COLONIAL IN MERIWETHER HILLS

2720 Leeds Lane 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 2612 SQ FT $509,900 mls 615010 Mike Peters 434-981-3995

STORYBOOK CAPE COD

655 Harrison Street 4 BR, 3 BA, 2795 SQ FT $395,000 mls 608408 Steve White, 434-242-8355

CUSTOM-BUILT BRICK RESIDENCE

2330 Homestead Farm Road 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 5614 SQ FT $1,525,000 mls 611677 Steve White, 434-242-8355

UNDER CONTRACT

STUNNING 36 ACRE PARCEL

3500 Martin Kings Road Views of Monticello & Carter’s Mountain $184,000 mls 613834 Betsy M. Watson, 434-249-5995

BUILDING LOT IN LAKE MONTICELLO

Colonial Road Wooded lot of .35 acres $25,000 mls 614969 Maury Atkins, 540-223-2719

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME

Ragged Mountain Drive 3.02 acres, Ivy Creek frontage $285,000 mls 580314 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

VIEW THESE LISTINGS ONLINE

BROOK HOLLOW FARM

FIREFLY FARM

12570 Chicken Mountain Road 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 4510 Sq Ft, 100 Acres $3,200,000 mls 609301 Jane Porter Fogleman, 434-981-1274

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM/RWR-REW-WEEKLY-LISTINGS/

Charlottesville 434.951.5155 | Greene 434.985.2348 | Zion Crossroads 434.589.2611 | Western Albemarle 434.205.4355 WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

6057 Gordonsville Road 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 4132 SQ FT $1,795,000 mls 614593 Steve White, 434-242-8355


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C-VILLE Weekly | March 31 - April 6, 2021  

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