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VOL. 30 NO. 12 n MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T WWW.CAAR.COM HE CHARLOTTESVILL E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Police department lets two officers go after misconduct incidents PAGE 13

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See the light: documentary explores history of the Blue Ridge Tunnel PAGE 18 Opening this spring: The Ridley, located in The Draftsman Hotel

Commercial Real Estate: POISED FOR A COMEBACK BY CARLA HUCKABEE

Sign of the times The student said her Lawn room sign was protest. UVA said it was a threat. Should it have come down?

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No.12

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15 NEWS 9 10 Tourism board unhappy about cuts to budget. 11 Would land use reform create affordable housing? 13 CPD officers fired over conduct toward Black men. 15 Another UVA Lawn room sign stirs controversy.

CULTURE 17 18 Extra: Local filmmakers go deep with Blue Ridge Tunnel doc. 19 Screens: A look at the eight best-picture nominees.

20 Small Bites: Supper’s served at Ivy Road House, The Ridley, and Broadcloth. 26 Sudoku 27 Crossword 29 Free Will Astrology

Q&A 31 If you could have dinner with any person, living or dead, who would it be?

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THIS WEEK

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Let’s talk about the Lawn. I went to UVA not long ago—I know what happens on the Lawn. Yes, when you stop by for an admissions tour, the place seems impossibly perfect, wellmanicured and gleaming. But as the students in this week’s cover story point out, that’s always been a bit of an illusion (page 15). Even during the day, kids are sitting around surreptitiously sipping from Solo cups. At night, there’s nothing surreptitious about the partying, and running naked from the Rotunda all the way down the Lawn and back is a bucket list item for every Wahoo. (The men’s basketball team didn’t make it far in the NCAA tournament this year, but on the night they won in 2019, every step of the Rotunda was draped with student clothing, and a stream of nude bodies hurtled down the hill all night long.) Look back into history a little further, the scene gets no more dignified. In 1840, a professor was quite literally murdered on the Lawn during a night of revelry for the hammered, gun-toting elite students of the day. Then, most importantly, there’s the fact that the Lawn was built by enslaved laborers. We can only imagine the full human cost of the construction of the beautiful Grounds. All this goes to say: The Lawn is not a sacred place. It’s special to many people, me included. It’s architecturally marvelous, and I sure hope new classes of students keep streaking forever. But the Lawn isn’t, and has never been, sacred. I commend this current generation of students for recognizing that, and pushing the limits, and making themselves heard.—Ben Hitchcock

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“Whether you fall into phase 1A or 1B or even 1C, we want everyone to be preregistered because we anticipate an increase in our vaccine supply in the coming weeks.”

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—Kathryn Goodman of the Blue Ridge Health District, at a press conference about vaccine distribution last week

NEWS

Cop out PAGE 13

Big bucks from Biden

IN BRIEF Don’t shoot a cow, man A Harrisonburg police officer accidentally shot a fellow officer on Saturday, as the department was in hot pursuit of a cow that had wandered out of a stockyard. Local ranchers first tried to capture the animal but injured it in the process. When the police department intervened, the cow charged the officers and gunfire ensued. The officer who was shot is in stable condition at UVA hospital. Unfortunately, the same cannot be said for the cow, which was euthanized.

RESCUE PLAN SPECS

Volleyball layoffs

Total size of the American Rescue Plan

BILLION

Aid for local governments around the country

$10.5 MILLION

Aid for Charlottesville City

President Joe Biden signed the American Rescue Plan into law on March 11.

EZE AMOS

Keep ’em coming Another statue from a bygone era is set to come down in Richmond—this time it’s Harry Byrd, an infamous segregationist who spearheaded Virginia’s “massive resistance” to school integration in the 1950s. Northam signed a bill this week that will remove Byrd’s statue from Richmond’s Capitol Square.

UVA’s men’s basketball team was knocked out of the NCAA tournament in the first round last weekend, falling 62-58 to 13th-seeded Ohio. The formerly defendingchampion Cavaliers had a difficult task this time around, after having to cancel practice for the week before the tournament due to a case of COVID in the locker room. It’s the fifth time in eight NCAA tournament appearances that Tony Bennett’s Hoos have fallen to lower-seeded opponents.

MILLION

Aid for Albemarle County

$113.7 MILLION

Aid for Richmond City

Champs at last

The UVA women’s swimming and diving team took home the program’s first-ever national championship last weekend. The team won the national meet by more than a few lengths, finishing with a total of 491 points—runner-up NC State had just 354. “I’m kind of in awe of what [the swimmers] have done and how much they’ve improved here over the last couple of years,” said head coach Todd DeSorbo to VirginiaSports.com after the victory.

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Champs no more

$21.2

@cville_weekly

Earlier this month, a slim Democratic majority in Congress passed the American Rescue Plan, a massive stimulus package designed to restart the economy. One important component of the plan is direct cash assistance for local governments, many of which have been severely affected by the economic downturn during the pandemic. Local governments will have more or less free rein to use those dollars how they please. Both Albemarle County and Charlottesville City will seek public input in the coming weeks to determine how to most effectively disburse the funds. MIKE COMER/NCAA PHOTOS VIA GETTY IMAGES

Governor Ralph Northam’s office intervened this week to close a loophole in a General Assembly-approved gambling bill. The governor has ensured that “skill games,” pay-for-play consoles that have popped up in gas stations and other stores around the state, will be banned after July 1. Manufacturers claim the games reward skilled playing, while opponents insist that they’re just plain old gambling.

$130.2 THE WHITE HOUSE

Skills killed

TRILLION

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

UVA fired its entire volleyball coaching staff on Thursday for undisclosed reasons. The school opened a “review of a personnel matter” on Wednesday and evidently didn’t take long before gathering enough information to dismiss all four coaches and administrators—two men and two women. “While I am unable to comment on the details, I do want to commend our student-athletes for their leadership,” said athletic director Carla Williams in a statement.

$1.9


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NEWS

E XPE RI E N CE

FILE PHOTO

N O BA R S . N O S P R IN G S . P U R E CO M FO RT.

Both the city and county budgets include cuts for the Charlottesville-Albemarle Convention & Visitors Bureau, potentially slowing marketing for touristy spots like Monticello.

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Come visit... please Regional tourism board protests budget cuts By Mary Jane Gore

T 218 West Market Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 434-970-1900 I Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 5pm www.lodgerva.com

r e C m amp m u S Guide

Annual directory of Summer Camps, Schools & Programs for kids published in c-ville March 31st, April 14th and May 5th To book your space email: classyexec @c-ville.com

he Charlottesville area’s tourismdependent economy has felt the effects of the pandemic. “From Q4 2019 and Q4 2020, Albemarle County lost 44% employment in the Accommodations and Food Services Sectors,” wrote Eric Terry, president of the Virginia Restaurant, Lodging & Travel Association, in a recent letter to Roger Johnson, the chair of the Charlottesville-Albemarle Convention & Visitors Bureau. Calling the financial and workforce damage “unprecedented,” Terry also noted that hotel occupancies are down 50 percent. Tourism sector advocates are now upset that both the city and county budgets for the next fiscal year include cuts for the CACVB, a government-funded board tasked with attracting tourists to town. The proposed CACVB budget from the city for the 2022 fiscal year is $946,848, down $265,843 from this year, and the county budget is $606,281, down $151,135, for a total reduction of $417,000 for FY 2022. The CACVB did receive $120,0000 from the federal CARES pandemic relief act, which went to transition offices from two brick-and-mortar buildings to two mobile visitor centers, one each for county and city. The CACVB and its supporters say the county stiffed the board by not giving enough lodging tax revenue back to the tourism industry.

The VRLTA points to a state statute that requires any lodging tax in excess of 2 percent be spent solely on tourism. The county charges a 5 percent lodging tax, but has proposed that next year the 3 percent excess be sent to the general fund, to cover the reduced CACVB budget as well as money for cultural community agencies and maintenance costs for the Parks & Recreation Department. Ann Mallek, a member of the Albemarle County Board of Supervisors who represents the county on the CACVB, says the state allows tourism dollars to go to parks “for something that benefits the tourists who come here for recreational purposes.” “We are in disagreement with the county about whether that is a way to support tourism,” counters Roy Van Doorn, the president of the Charlottesville VRLTA and a partner at City Select, which produces marketing brochures for the city and for UVA.

“At this point, all hotels in Virginia Beach are booked to capacity for the summer. Those are people who won’t be spending their time and money here.” ROY VAN DOORN, VIRGINIA RESTAURANT, LODGING & TRAVEL ASSOCIATION


NEWS

Red tape Developers outline obstacles to building affordable housing By Sean Tubbs

A

housing, though some members of the Crozet Community Advisory Council have panned the idea. “Southern Development would love to be able to produce those kinds of things, but there just aren’t places to produce them,” Armstrong said. “We need to put that missing middle into our zoning ordinances and remove the barriers that exist.” Henry said another external factor is that many people who end up purchasing homes are moving to the area for the first time, and can outbid those who are seeking to move up the property ladder in a place with limited supply. “A retiree moving from northern Virginia, for example, has a lot larger budget for a home than a young professional trying to find a job in Charlottesville,” Henry said. “Some of those folks are pushed out to areas like Staunton, Waynesboro, Palmyra, Richmond.” Henry also said housing is more expensive to build now than when many existing neighborhoods were first developed. Back then, developers did not have to comply with regulations to reduce stormwater runoff or meet requirements to build sidewalks and other public infrastructure. “Municipalities used to be in the business of building roads,” Henry said. “A lot of that

has been pushed off to the private sector for various reasons, a lot of them are reasonable. But it’s added to the cost of homes.” Another factor in the increasing cost of development is the increasing complexity required to get a bank to finance a project, especially if the proposal includes both commercial and residential elements, noted Andrew Clark, vice president of government affairs for the Home Builders Association of Virginia. Clark works as a lobbyist to pass legislation in the General Assembly, and this past session focused on a bill to create a housing opportunity tax credit. Such a credit would help fill the financing gap, but opportunities for credits are limited. Various nonprofits and other entities compete for limited lowincome housing tax credits provided by the Virginia Housing Development Authority. Clark said other solutions include making it easier for localities to create tax abatement programs and to waive fees for development. Albemarle County is considering doing the opposite, and increasing fees developers pay in order to cover the cost of processing land use applications. The Board of Supervisors will take that up at a public hearing on April 21. Armstrong also hopes that Governor Ralph Northam will sign a bill directing the state to study how accessory dwelling units might help increase the supply of homes. Armstrong said if people want change, they have to speak up at local meetings to support additional housing. “That’s not just at the comprehensive planning level or in the zoning ordinance level,” Armstrong said. “That has to go all the way down to the very small technical policies, standards, and specifications that cities and counties publish that everyone has to follow because that’s where the cost comes in.”

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s the greater Charlottesville-Albemarle area continues to feel the effects of a housing shortage, a panel of developers argued last week that localities in the area can incentivize new construction through land use reform. “We intentionally, through our comprehensive plans and our zoning ordinances, limit the supply of land for new homes,” said Charlie Armstrong, vice president of land development at Southern Development, during a panel discussion held by the central Virginia Regional Housing Partnership, a program of the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission. Additionally, Armstrong noted that the land set aside for new construction has limits on how many people are allowed per plot: “We intentionally, as a community, limit the density of new homes that is allowed on any one piece of land.” That’s especially troubling given that a 2019 housing needs study commissioned by the RHP found that housing prices and rents have increased steadily over the years, while wages have not. Since 1980, Albemarle’s Comprehensive Plan has set aside roughly 5 percent of the county’s 726 square miles for residential development. However, much of that land also has to be rezoned for dense development. Since rezoning approvals are “We intentionally, no sure thing, the zoning code adds to the through our cost of each unit. Fellow panelist Chris Henry of Stony comprehensive plans Point Development Group pointed out sevand our zoning eral recent projects in Albemarle that would ordinances, limit have seen denser housing constructed, but which have been stopped or stalled due to the supply of land for opposition from neighbors. That includes new homes.” Southern Development’s 130-unit Breezy Hill project near Glenmore, which failed to CHARLIE ARMSTRONG, SOUTHERN get a necessary rezoning from the Board of DEVELOPMENT Supervisors in January. “At some point we have to have some tough conversations as a community about how we want to solve that problem,” Henry said. “Where are we going to designate areas that we want to develop in a way that allows the price of housing to come down and more supply to come on line?” A housing plan under development in Albemarle County calls for reforming the zoning code to allow thousands more units on designated land in the form of triplexes, bungalow courts, and other structures that require more residential density. Albemarle County planners have also added language in the Crozet Master Plan COURTESY ALBEMARLE COUNTY to try to make it easier to build The Breezy Hill development, shown above, would have seen 130 new units constructed off Route 250, but a necessary rezoning didn’t pass the County Board of Supervisors. this so-called “missing middle”

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

Not surprisingly, Van Doorn believes the time is now for a marketing blitz. “At this point, all hotels in Virginia Beach are booked to capacity for the summer,” he says. “Those are people who won’t be spending their time and money here.” Some have suggested that the city and county use federal and local emergency funds to make up for the CACVB’s shortfall. “I am hopeful the budget for both fiscal years will be made whole through the localities’ receipt of funds from the American Rescue Plan,” says Courtney Cacatian, the chair of the CACVB, referring to the $1.9 trillion federal relief package. Charlottesville and Albemarle are set to receive over $30 million in total from the plan. Both the city and the county are currently in the process of determining how those funds will be distributed. The county has a public hearing scheduled for April 28. Mallek says the board’s request for county and city relief has been received and “we are talking about it.” As the board fights for funding, some have expressed concerns about its effectiveness as a vehicle for helping the tourism industry. In the letter to CACVB, Terry and Van Doorn faulted the CACVB’s composition as being out of touch with the industry itself. The board’s 15 members include just one representative from the hospitality industry, the Omni’s marketing director. The CEO of Veritas is the only board member who works in the food and drink industry. The board has several elected politicians, as well as various county and city officials. Terry says it is one of very few convention and visitors bureaus in the state with politicians on the board. The CACVB styles itself as a resource for local businesses. It produces a visitor’s guide and helps wedding and reunion parties find venues for their events. City Councilor Heather Hill, one of the city government’s representatives on the board, says that even before VRLTA raised concerns, CACVB was working on board development and focused on industry representation and experience, as well as equity, diversity, and inclusion. Several business owners contacted by C-VILLE didn’t know much about the CACVB or its marketing. River Hawkins, a co-owner at The Bebedero, was not very familiar with the CACVB except for its Visitors Guide, but says “anything that brings people into my restaurant is great.” Walter Burton, general manager at The Draftsman hotel, says that CACVB has been helpful in keeping communication lines open during the pandemic and has sent out business surveys to find out how people are doing. “They have done a great job keeping people involved,” Burton says. Van Doorn, a partner in a local marketing firm, insists the answer is more marketing. He thinks there’s a perception that Charlottesville can coast on its reputation as a beautiful, historic, and relaxing location, but that keeping visitors coming will take proactive effort. “McDonald’s is number one, and it’s because they never stop marketing,” he explains. “We can’t just say we’re good and open the doors. It’s going to take perpetual marketing.”

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LISA WOOLFORK Convener Black Women Stitch Panelist

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R EG I S T ER NOW AT TOMTOMFOUN D ATION .OR G/CLASSR O OM -TO-BOARDROOM PRESENTED BY

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NEWS

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You’re fired By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

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Charlottesville Police Chief RaShall Brackney, pictured with Major Jim Mooney (right) and Sergeant Greg Wade during Friday’s virtual press conference, discussed the firing of two white CPD officers who were accused of using excessive force against Black men.

However, body camera footage showed that Gilmore’s phone fell on the ground when Wood tackled him. Gilmore’s lawyer, local criminal justice attorney Jeffrey Fogel, was not satisfied with the department’s findings. In order to properly assess whether bias was at play during the interaction, “one would need to look at Officer Wood’s history with the department and any other evidence that may touch on his treatment of Black people,” wrote Fogel in an open letter to the CPD. “You did no investigation of this question and offer no reason why Officer Wood acted the way he did.”

“Any force used when affecting an unlawful detention is itself excessive,” JEFFREY FOGEL, LOCAL ATTORNEY

In addition, Fogel disputes the finding that Wood unlawfully detained Gilmore but didn’t use excessive force. “Any force used when affecting an unlawful detention is itself excessive,” he wrote. During the press conference, Brackney also addressed the case of Jeffrey Jaeger, the other officer who was removed from duty. Last December, Jaeger was convicted of misdemeanor assault and battery for slamming Andre Henderson into a wooden fence during a March 3 arrest. “Wood and Jaeger’s actions highlight the injustices that permeate the fabric of our society and of a criminal legal system that is rooted in supremacy and anti-Black violence,” said Brackney. “Their actions erode the community’s confidence, and elevate fears that Black and Brown communities...will be brutalized, overpoliced, and underprotected.” “They have harmed this community, and for their actions I am sorry,” Brackney concluded.

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wo white Charlottesville police officers who injured two Black civilians in separate incidents are no longer employed by the department, announced Chief RaShall Brackney at a virtual press conference on Friday. One officer, Jeffrey Jaeger, was convicted of assault in December. The other, Joseph Wood, was determined to have breached the department’s internal standards when he detained a local musician during a January roadside encounter. After conducting an internal investigation, the department concluded that Wood violated its policies when he tackled LaQuinn Gilmore to the ground, leaving Gilmore with several injuries. However, the unlawful detainment was not motivated by racial bias, according to the department’s investigation. Gilmore’s lawyer believes CPD did not do a thorough enough investigation to reach that conclusion, however. While driving down Monticello Avenue on January 11, Gilmore, who is Black, began to feel sick from the antibiotics prescribed to him for a hand infection, so he pulled over. Body camera footage publicly released by the department shows that Wood parked behind Gilmore, got out of his car, and asked him if he was okay. Gilmore assured Wood that he was fine, and held his phone up to record the encounter. Wood began to walk away, but turned around when Gilmore complained that cops “be playing too much.” He then asked Gilmore for his driver’s license. Wood “failed to articulate or justify his reasoning to reengage, and reacted solely on being challenged,” explained Brackney. The footage shows that Gilmore refused to give Wood his license, claiming multiple times that he did nothing wrong. Gilmore soon crossed to the other side of the street and told Wood to stop “harassing” him, but

Wood followed him, continued to ask for his license, and called for back-up. About two minutes later, Wood suddenly slammed Gilmore to the ground. Another officer helped Wood roughly pin down and handcuff Gilmore, ignoring the splint on his injured hand. After sitting Gilmore up, Wood performed a pat down, though he had no legal reason to suspect Gilmore was armed. As around half a dozen officers stood by, Wood handcuffed Gilmore again when he refused to stop recording the incident, and forced him to stand against the back of his car. The supervisor on duty eventually arrived on the scene, and claimed that Wood had probable cause to follow Gilmore because he could have been driving drunk. “[Wood] body slammed me on my face for nothing!” Gilmore exclaimed. “My spine is in pieces.” Once Gilmore gave the officers his social security number, they discovered his license was suspended. He was not charged with a crime, and was allowed to have a friend drive him home. Though the department ruled that Wood did not use excessive force during the encounter, hospital records show that Gilmore suffered a closed head injury, a concussion, contusions on his legs, acute bilateral lower back pain, and acute posttraumatic headaches. Brackney would not confirm during the press conference if Wood injured Gilmore. “We don’t substantiate medical claims,” said the chief. Because Wood initiated the encounter to check on Gilmore, Brackney also claimed that he did not racially profile him. “There were no racial slurs, ethnic status, or characteristics that were based solely on [Gilmore’s] race for the detention,” she said. The internal investigation did not sustain Gilmore’s claims that Wood drew his gun during the encounter, or that officers on the scene damaged his cell phone and tail light.

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

CPD releases two officers over violent misconduct incidents


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NEWS

15

Sign on UVA forces student to take down ‘threatening’ Lawn poster By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

Two days after putting up a poster criticizing UVA’s long history of racism and oppression on her Lawn room door, fourth-year Hira Azher was forced to take it down, or possibly be kicked out of her residence.

“The [Ture quote] combined with the ‘Burn it all down’ is a statement that this system entirely needs to be shut down.” HIRA AZHER, UVA FOURTH-YEAR

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she says criticizes the school’s surveillance of students and the community, history of white supremacy and police violence, and its mishandling of the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. UVA “does not care about the violence it inflicts upon the Charlottesville community and UVA students, especially on the most marginalized of those groups,” Azher says. “The [quote] combined with the ‘Burn it all down’ is a statement that this system entirely needs to be shut down.”

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a university dean and a facilities management employee showed up, and told her they had to take down her sign. (Azher opted to take it down herself, so it would not be thrown away.) They also handed her a letter from Housing and Residence Life, claiming the sign “advocates physical violence” and was not protected speech. “The threatening nature of this Lawn sign is particularly apparent in the face of recent history, including the fear and intimidation brought to the Lawn by torch-bearing rioters on August 11, 2017, the violence that continued the following day, and the January 6, 2021 insurrection at the Capitol that resulted in several deaths,” reads the letter. “If you post this or a similar sign on your door in the future, you will be subject to further discipline, including potential removal from University housing,” the letter ends. Azher argues that UVA completely misrepresented the meaning of her poster, which

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

COURTESY HIRA AZHER

U

VA’s Lawn is the school’s historic center. Here, prospective students and donors are wowed; here, a select few fourth-years are chosen to live, as a reward for their hard work on behalf of the institution and its associated clubs. The university would very much like every blade of grass on the Lawn to stay in its place. And so Hira Azher’s signs have cut like a knife. Last fall, the fourth-year stirred up controversy when she hung a large black sign on her Lawn room door. “Fuck UVA,” read the hand-painted sign. “UVA Operating Costs: KKKops, Genocide, Slavery, Disability, Black and Brown Life.” Other Lawn residents followed her lead and posted similar posters on their doors. Some alumni and community members urged UVA administration to forcibly take down the signs, claiming they were offensive to Lawn visitors. (Azher says several people harassed her and tried to cut down her poster.) After consulting with its legal team, the university ruled that the signs were protected under the First Amendment and should stay up, though it also changed the policy for Lawn room door signs moving forward. Starting next year, their size will be restricted. UVA President Jim Ryan penned a letter to the school community entitled “Great and Good, Revisited,” in which he wrote that “personally, I find the signs deeply disappointing,” but that “I believe it is a matter of principle and the obligation, especially of universities, to protect speech even when it is offensive.” However, when Azher, a Muslim woman of color, put another poster criticizing the university on her door earlier this month, Housing and Residence Life accused her of inciting violence. She was told to take the sign down—or possibly be kicked out of her room. “I was just really angry and frustrated,” says Azher. “This is so obviously not an incitement of violence.” The second sign is a bright red poster showing the Rotunda surrounded by flames, its clock replaced with a camera shutter. Below the Rotunda is a camera, belt buckle, University Police Department badge, gun, and a banner stating, “Burn it all down!” A Ku Klux Klan robe, along with the Grim Reaper holding a scythe and wearing a mask, loom behind the building. Underneath the scene is a quote from civil rights activist Kwame Ture: “In order for non-violence to work, your opponent must have a conscience,” followed by Azher’s take: “UVA has none!” Angered by the murder of Xzavier Hill and other acts of police brutality in the Charlottesville area, as well as the surge in COVID cases following fraternity and sorority rush, Azher put the poster on her door on March 11. Two days later, she says

Virginia ACLU Executive Director Claire Guthrie Gastañaga also disagrees with UVA’s rationale for removing Azher’s poster. In order to be exempted from the First Amendment, “speech must be ‘directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action,’” says Gastañaga. “[The poster] does not appear to be intended to produce ‘imminent lawless action,’ and neither is a poster with a quotation standing alone likely to ‘produce’ such action.” A UVA spokesman did not respond to request for comment by press time. Second-year Ella Tynch, UVA Young Democratic Socialists of America communications chair, accuses the university of being hypocritical when deciding what is acceptable and unacceptable on the Lawn. There will soon be additional restrictions on Lawn room signs, but “no restrictions on whether or not students can run naked down the Lawn,” Tynch says. “It’s very clear that these restrictions are in response to a specific leaning [and] political opinion,” says Tynch, referencing last year’s “Fuck UVA” Lawn posters. This is not the first time this spring that the university has tried to silence Azher’s acts of protest. On February 28, she put a poster on her door that was almost identical to the one HRL forced her to take down this month, but did not picture flames surrounding the Rotunda. The poster was torn down in the middle of the night the same day, she says. Azher assumed a student had removed the original sign, but when HRL asked her to take down the recreated poster several weeks later, the residence administrators informed her they had removed the first sign, too. “They had never told me why it was taken down, or that they had taken what was mine and I had worked so hard to create,” claims Azher. “This time maybe because I was closing the shutters at night, they weren’t able to take it down discreetly.” Though Azher does not believe the university had legal grounds to remove her posters, she stresses that the issue is “so much bigger” than freedom of speech. “[Freedom of speech] has historically always protected hate speech and white supremacy. It has never helped or protected us when we’re fighting for liberation and revolution,” she says. “It’s the same way those Unite the Right rally ‘protesters’ were protected.” “What will actually be liberating and will actually help us is by focusing on what the issues are and what the sign is raising,” she adds. Before graduating, Azher plans to put up one last sign—but will have to make sure it will not cost her her spot on the Lawn. “Regardless of a little sign or not, I know that this resistance to UVA and these issues that have been brought up by people before me will continue to be brought up after me,” she says.


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WINE

DOWN WHAT’S DELISH AT LOCAL WINERIES?

March 27th- *Wine Release* of the new 2020 Gentle Press Rosé with Graze tasting boxes available from Sauce Catering and live music by Marc Carraway Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm 13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

DUCARD VINEYARDS 2017 Triskele

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

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2019 Vidal Blanc A Gold Medal winner of this year’s Governor’s Cup, our Vidal Blanc is perfect for the spring weather approaching. With a nose of orange blossoms and clover honey, the palate has bright acidy, and little sweetness. Orange zest, pineapple and currants round out the palate of this medium bodied wine. Perfect for sipping on the porch, or paired with Asian chicken salad, grilled shrimp, or baked brie. Limited quantities remain, so make sure to grab a bottle before it is gone! We are open 7 days a week 11am to 5pm, offering curbside pickup and for those visiting we have bottle sales only Monday through Thursday and Friday through Sunday offer wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights (four 2 oz pours). The following areas are available for customers: outside tables, deck off tasting room and wellspaced seating inside our Pavilion. Groups greater than 10 not permitted. We ask that customers refrain from moving inside and outside tables. Children and Pets are welcome but pets must remain outside of buildings. Customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs, blankets and glassware. Please note that we cannot pour into glassware brought from home. Please follow entrance and exit signs when coming into the tasting room to purchase wine. Restrooms are available in tasting room and pavilion, one patron at a time. Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our Covid operating procedures.

Our Triskele is a Bordeaux-style blend of Merlot, Cabernet Franc, and Petit Verdot and was just awarded a gold medal at this year’s Governor’s Cup competition! Warm aromas of cherry, liquorice, and sweet spices give this wine a cozy bouquet. Rounded and supple on the palate, there is some balanced acidity with flavors of blackberry, peppercorns, and casis. A tannic and strong wine, we recommend decanting Triskele for 30-60 minutes before enjoying. Pair with beef wellington, roasted duck, or a mediumbodied cigar and a beautiful sunset! Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and lots of beautiful views along scenic back roads. Get some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit on our lawns, or pick up a bottle or three of our award-winning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walk-ups accommodated on a space-available basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website!

40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 • www.ducardvineyards.com

2019 Cabernet Franc Reserve Beautifully dark and inky in color with a wonderfully aromatic nose showcasing primary tones of white pepper, Provencal herbs and violets. With additional time in the glass, aromas of cherry, spices, graphite, black tea and smoke start coming out. This wine is aromatically complex and intricate. The palate is full bodied with initially lots of oak derived flavors of charred wood, clove, spice and mocha. With additional oxygenation, you get the beautiful spicy and pepper flavors associated with this varietal with secondary flavors of dark berries and chocolate. Grippy tannins are present but there is little astringency and bitterness. As big as this wine, there is a vibrancy and brightness due to good acidity levels. This is beautifully balanced and poised although a bit linear at the moment, requiring some time to fully reach its potential. Our Cabernet Franc Reserve was just awarded a gold medal at this year’s Governor’s Cup competition!

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY Tall Tails Meritage Reserve Comprising Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc, this traditional Bordeaux-style blend received a Bronze medal at this year’s Governor’s Cup. Notes of violets, black cherries and warm spices make up the bouquet of this particular blend. Meanwhile the palate shows off flavors of black cherry, black peppercorn, dried tobacco leaf, and dusty rose petals. Enjoy this medium-full bodied wine with your Sunday roasts, grilled portobello mushrooms, or outdoors next to a bonfire! Eastwood is a women-owned business created by a group of wine lovers and agriculture enthusiasts producing awardwinning Virginia wines. We embrace the power of storytelling and the vision that there is no ceiling you can’t break. For Women’s History Month, send us your stories! We would love to highlight you along with some of the amazing women who are building Eastwood. We look forward to toasting you in one of our tasting rooms soon!

Tasting Room Hours We look forward to continuing to serve all of our wonderful guests this spring during our daily hours of 10am-5pm. Reservations can be made for Saturdays at no charge, however reservations are not necessary. We offer first come, first served seating at our outdoor courtyard tables or open seating for those who wish to bring their own blankets and chairs to spread out in our designated lawn area. Please remember face masks are required for all guests ages 5+ when not seated. Wine is available by the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of prepackaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase.

March Happenings: The Barn, home to our indoor Tasting Room, is open on a reservation-basis with a few new menu items including the Red Reserve and Virginia Classics Tastings as well as an assortment of snacks including cheese and crackers, crackers and bars from Good Phyte, fine chocolates from Gearharts, and mixed nuts and clementines. Please make reservations on our website. Our drink offerings also include non-alcoholic options.

March 30th- Barrel Tasting Cabernet Sauvignons (7 pm)

April 2nd-4th- Easter Egg Trails: Weekend-long egg hunt for kids and adults! Candy for kids and special winerelated treats for those over 21 years of age.

April 3rd- Live Music by Brian Franke (12 - 4 pm)

Open Fri (4-8:30 pm); Sat (12-7 pm); Sun (12-4:30 pm). Please make reservations on our website or by phone. Our Outdoor tasting room will reopen on Friday, April 2nd.

1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

April 4th- CLOSED for Easter

FIND THE WINE-DOWN ONLINE AT

2531 Scottsville Rd. • Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

www.c-ville.com

WINERY

DUCARD VINEYARD

Guide Map

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Open daily – Mon-Thurs. 3-6 PM , Fri-Sun 12-6 PM NEW: Offering tasting flights daily. Table service, well-spaced, led by DuCard staff host, crystal glassware, red, white or mixed flights. An elegant way to get to know our wines.

KESWICK VINEYARDS

April 4th- Easter Music on the Patio (2:30 - 5:30 pm)

MADISON

33 HARRISONBURG

ORANGE

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Saturdays- Music on the Patio! (Artists vary each week; 2:30-5:30 pm) Fridays- Friday Night out at Ducard (5:30 - 8:30 pm) come out and kick off the weekend with dinner and live music at DuCard. March 28th- Cabernet Franc vertical tasting, nibbles accompany the tasting and the small remaining stock of these wines will be available for sale. COVID restrictions are in place and seating is limited to 25, advance reservations are required

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STANARDSVILLE

29 GORDONSVILLE

33 CROZET AFTON

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KESWICK VINEYARDS LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE

EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

ZION CROSSROADS

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD 64

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CULTURE

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OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK THROUGH 3/28

LIGHTING THE WAY In Let Go of Me, playwright, director, and filmmaker Kelley Van Dilla combines pre-recorded and live performances to explore connections and disconnections between people. The virtual play features Van Dilla in an autobiographical reflection on the relationship between a trans nonbinary teen and their mother, who is bipolar. Suggested household ticket price $20, times vary. Zoom required. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org. March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

SATURDAY 3/27

THROUGH 3/28

As a part of the Charlottesville Player’s Guild’s Amplify season, Leslie M. Scott-Jones’ play Thirty-Seven explores living, surviving, and fighting while being Black in America. Jamahl Garrison-Lowe plays Seth, a young Black man struggling with the decision to become an activist, and he asks himself: What will I risk? What will I gain? What does it mean for me as an individual and a part of society? The virtual production is a deep dive into what it means to fight back. $20, 7:30pm. Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, 233 Fourth St., NW. jeffschoolheritagecenter.org.

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PUBLICITY PHOTO

STAYING ACTIVE

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If you’re bummed about missing the high-energy party vibe of Mardi Gras this year, you can beat your blues with the blues at Ultramarine, a showcase featuring the Chickenhead Blues Band and Eli Cook. The Chickenhead’s five-man ensemble features NOLA’s own Aric van Brocklin on guitar, alongside Skip Haga on the keyboards, Granville Mullings on drums, Andy Rowland playing sax, and Victor Brown on bass. Organizers of the outdoor performance give the distanced audience members plenty of room to boogie, and require masks. $10, 4pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St., SE. ixartpark.org.

PUBLICITY PHOTO

GROOVE MOVES


CULTURE EXTRA

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All about town. SPRING 2021

PROLYFYCK RUN CREW | ON-THE-STREET STYLE | COMMUNITY BIKES' MISSION

PORTRAITS ARTISTS

MAKING CONVERSATION WITH FIVE LOCAL CREATIVES

1 ABODE

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

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What is 434? It’s recreation, it’s culture, it’s society—it’s how we live in Charlottesville. In this fullglossy quarterly magazine, you’ll meet townspeople from all corners of our area, from creatives to CEOs, each with their own story to tell. Every issue will connect readers with the best things to buy, see, and get involved in that season.

This is the 434, and we’re all about town. LOOK FOR IT ON STANDS MARCH 22, 2021

SUBMITTED PHOTO

OF THE

Local filmmakers Paul Wagner and Ellen Casey Wagner’s The Tunnel details the history of the newly reopened Blue Ridge Tunnel, located near Rockfish Gap.

Tunnel vision Documentary tells story of creation, re-creation By Lisa Provence living@c-ville.com

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othing happens quickly with the Claudius Crozet Blue Ridge Tunnel. Not its mid-19th-century eight-year construction, nor Nelson County’s nearly 20-year effort to reopen it, nor the documentary recently released by local filmmakers Paul Wagner and Ellen Casey Wagner. “I thought it would only be a few years, weaving the reopening and the history of the tunnel,” says Academy Award-winner Paul Wagner, who directed The Tunnel. “I had no idea it was going to take almost nine years.” When it opened in 1858, the hand-dug Blue Ridge Tunnel was the longest tunnel in North America. About 800 Irish immigrants used star drills and black powder in those pre-dynamite days to carve through Rockfish Gap’s granite, dangerous work that, along with cholera, killed dozens and maimed many more. The idea of intercutting the two stories—the difficult construction of the tunnel and the nearly two-decade effort to reopen it—appealed to Wagner, who describes the film as “the creation and re-creation of the Blue Ridge Tunnel.” Says Wagner, “We’ve made a lot of historical films, and often there are not visual

materials to tell those stories. It was nice in this case to have a present-day story that was directly related to the historical story, that gave a story thread in the present that reverberated against the historical story line.” The film focuses on the Irish laborers who fled the famine in Ireland to find work and who were considered more expendable than enslaved workers. This isn’t the Wagners first Irish-centric film. Out of Ireland traced eight workers in the United States, one of whom worked on the railroad. The Irish in America “have been an interest of ours,” says Wagner, and The Tunnel, which became available on YouTube on St. Patrick’s Day, uses students from the Blue Ridge Irish Music School to help tell the story with music and dancing—and a haunting violin solo. The Tunnel also tells the story of the enslaved workers and the institution of slavery “in such a powerful way,” says Wagner. Engineer Claudius Crozet, who was hired to construct a 17-mile railroad from

“There’s something powerful, almost spiritual about the tunnel.” PAUL WAGNER


CULTURE SCREENS

Golden games

AMAZON STUDIOS

A rundown of this year’s best-picture Oscar nominations

Sound of Metal, starring Riz Ahmed, is nominated for six Oscars, including best picture, best actor, and best sound.

By Deirdre Crimmins arts@c-ville.com

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formances and immersive sound design help bring the audience closer to the drummer’s struggles. Supporting actor Paul Raci was also nominated, and is considered to be the odds-on favorite. Though not intended as a palate cleanser, Minari sort of functions as one in this field. The charming film about a young Korean family in pursuit of the American dream is not without traumas—the family struggles with just about everything, but their perseverance and the film’s gorgeous cinematography combine to instill hope. Perhaps the most classically “Oscar” film on this year’s list is David Fincher’s Mank. Not only does it star previous Oscar winner Gary Oldman, the movie itself is about the making of the Oscar-winning Citizen Kane. Oldman is Herman J. Mankiewicz, the screenwriter for Kane, who struggles with meeting his deadline, pleasing Orson Welles, and combatting alcoholism. It may be a self-indulgent exercise to make a movie about making a movie, but this is a brilliant film that gives us insight into the politics of Tinseltown and its players during the golden age of cinema. The Academy Awards are, of course, self-indulgent, self-congratulatory, and navel-gazing. But, for better or worse, the awards determine who in Hollywood gets money, power, and attention for their next project. Art and film can nudge national and global cultural trends, putting award winners in a position to guide that conversation, and it’s in this role that the Academy Awards are not purely frivolous.

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his year continues to be anything but typical, and yet the march to the 93rd annual Academy Awards ceremony, moved to April 25, feels familiar. While far fewer films played in theaters over the past 12 months, we still have many cinematic achievements to celebrate, and a must-see movie list is a welcome distraction from the doldrums of late winter. This time around, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences selected eight films for best-picture consideration. In the 1930s and ’40s, eight to 12 films were nominated for what was then called the outstanding film of the year. The most nominations was in 1934 with 12 choices in a year that saw the release of It Happened One Night, Cleopatra, The Thin Man, and Imitation of Life. The possible nominees list was honed down to five in 1944, and it stayed that way for 65 years. In 2009, the Oscars’ governing body increased the number of possible best-picture nominations from five to 10. That begs the question: Why aren’t 10 films nominated each year? While sweeping historical films are always considered best picture Oscar fodder, this year the smaller personal dramas have a strong showing. Two of these, The Father and Nomadland, share a few similarities—a minimal number of speaking parts, and each film takes on aging in different ways.

The Father portrays a man coping with dementia, and both lead actor Anthony Hopkins and supporting actress Olivia Colman are nominated for their performances in the unsettling film. Frances McDormand is nominated for her starring role in Nomadland. In terms of setting and atmosphere, the films could not be more different. The Father is claustrophobic by design, and Nomadland is without walls, literally. A third film with nominations for leading actress and best picture is Promising Young Woman. This one takes an unflinching look at misogyny and rape culture, but with a Lisa Frank color palette, and wit so sharp it could cut a man. It is a scathing disassembly of the good guy trope, and easily the most controversial film among the nominations. Director Emerald Fennell is also up for an award, making her and Nomadland director Chloé Zhao only the sixth and seventh women to be put forward as best director in the history of the Academy Awards. Judas and the Black Messiah and The Trial of the Chicago 7 are historical dramas, and both stories, set in late 1960s Chicago, capture the palpable tension of the time. While Trial features an ensemble cast of men portraying the true events during the trial for anti-Vietnam War activists during the 1968 Democratic National Convention, Judas follows the betrayal of Black Panthers leader Fred Hampton. Sound of Metal is a crushing film starring Riz Ahmed as a punk-metal drummer who suddenly loses his hearing. Incredible per-

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

Mechum’s River in Albemarle to Waynesboro, wrote to his board to explain having to pay $2,400 compensation for the deaths of two Black workers. The enslaved laborers contracted out to Crozet could not be used for the black powder blasting, not out of concern for the men but because of their value as property. “It was an insight on the thinking of the institution of slavery and how it worked,” says Wagner. Filming provided some challenges. The eastern portal had waist-high water. “We’re vaguely outdoorsy, but I do not have hip boots in my closet,” says Wagner. “I’d wade into water up to the waist in the dark holding a camera.” Despite that discomfort, Wagner says it was not an arduous shoot. “One of the joys was that you could just walk in there and turn your camera on and end up with these beautiful images,” he says. “Between the light and the dark, the water, the brick walls, the stone, and especially the lighting as you walk in and out of the tunnel. The lighting effects are so beautiful without even trying.” During the 1950s, a 12-foot-thick bulkhead was built in the tunnel for propane storage, and blocked passage through until restoration work began in 2018. Wagner describes the magic of seeing the light at the other end of the tunnel after it was blasted out. “I had been in there many times and never seen light,” he says. He compares the experience to December 29, 1856, when workers broke through the rock. A newspaper clipping said, “Light now shines through the Blue Ridge.” “This is what it was like,” says Wagner. “I had a little emotional reaction.” The image of a tunnel is symbolic in itself and often mentioned in near-death experiences, he says. “There’s something powerful, almost spiritual about the tunnel.” Along with the history, it’s also a great local story, one that ties into the rails-totrails movement, tourism, and recreation, and intersects with the Appalachian Trail and the Route 76 bike trail, says Wagner. “Go with your kids, ride your bike, but there is a real dark and tragic side of the story that’s worth remembering.” The film was a labor of love for the Wagners. “We didn’t raise a lot of money to do it,” he says. “We did it as a side project over the years,” ultimately getting some funding from the Claudius Crozet Blue Ridge Tunnel Foundation, the Virginia Tourism Corporation, and Virginia Humanities. “We want as many people as possible to see it,” he says. Historical preservation isn’t just about places like Monticello or Montpelier, adds Wagner. “This is about historic preservation, too. It’s the common people. It’s landscapes—natural and manmade—that are also valid to think about as historic sites.” Since the Blue Ridge Tunnel opened in November, 35,000 people have gone through it, according to former Nelson County supervisor Allen Hale. “I think the film really captured the spirit of the project and paid tribute to the people who built it,” says Hale. “It was a lost treasure. The film does a wonderful job of re-claiming this lost treasure.”

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CULTURE SMALL BITES

20

FRESH FARE AND SPRING SPECIALS ARE ON THE MENU THIS MONTH Setting new tables

ALL THE NEWS THAT’S

FIT TO EAT

Shell out for this Shadwell’s Restaurant, located on Pantops, hosts its annual Oystravaganza through March 28. The Charlottesville fave will serve up oysters on the half shell, plus oysters stewed, stuffed, and fried. Cast a wide net and get your fill with a threecourse sampler for $44.

Spring for this The Catering Outfit is offering takeout Easter dinners for about $50 a head. Order by March 30 for rosemary-crusted rack of lamb, deviled eggs, and hearty spring vegetables cooked with a locally sourced honey glaze. Á la carte dishes and kosher versions of the meals are available too.

Beer with me Dairy Market continues to grow in popularity and size with the opening of Starr Hill Brewery’s new taproom this month. Starr Hill Downtown offers a curated selection of beers brewed in-house, including well-known classics plus limited-run specials, so there will always be something new to try.

Crust this one Luce is expanding its housemade gelato menu this week with two new flavors: caramel banana bread and almond biscotti, and fans of the Italian take-away spot will be relieved to see both stuffed-crust pepperoni pizza and spaghetti carbonara returning to the Luce lineup.—Will Ham

CRAMER PHOTO

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Whether it’s with our online restaurant listings, our weekly coverage of the local dining scene or Knife & Fork, our quarterly food and drink publication, C-VILLE’s always serving up a heaping helping of the best in local food. Get your fill every Wednesday in print or at c-ville.com/ living, where the kitchen’s always open.

This is our town.

.com

FILE PHOTO

@cville_culture March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

Ivy Road House is a new restaurant that focuses on familiar comfort foods while taking inspiration from a wide variety of cuisines. The menu includes everything from tzatziki-laden lamb meatballs, to roasted chicken with onion jam and maple glaze, to a veggie-based lasagna. Created by Christian Kelley, co-owner and executive chef at Maya, and realized in the kitchen by Chef de Cuisine (and Albemarle native) Malek Sudol, Ivy Road House is open for dining in and takeout. The Ridley—named for Walter N. Ridley, who had to persevere through years and layers of resistance to earn his doctorate in education from the University of Virginia in 1953—opens on April 1. Hospitality partners Warren Thompson and Ron Jordan aim to provide a city dining atmosphere complemented by a sophisticated combination of Southern and coastal cuisines. Located in The Draftsman Hotel at 1106 W. Main St., The Ridley will add to the growing number of local Black-owned businesses, and a portion of profits from the restaurant will go to the Ridley Scholarship Fund, which supports diversity and equity in education. Following a successful preview weekend in February, Broadcloth, the fine-dining addition to the Wool Factory complex, is set to debut March 26. The eatery features locally sourced seasonal fare with options of four and six courses, plus the ultimate chef’s tasting menu, with up to 10 dishes. Chef Tucker Yoder has been rustling up grub in Charlottesville for over 20 years, and he plans to use his decades

of experience to wow the limited number of guests the restaurant will serve each night. Tables are by reservation only.

Shadwell’s Restaurant is shuckin’ things up through Sunday at Oystravaganza.


21

It’s The Best Winter Thing Ever!

Season Passes starting at $

299

Mission: Affordable Is The Best Thing To Happen To Winter... And Now Is The Time To Buy!

HERE’S THE DEAL: • Just $299 for Students/Seniors & $349 for Adults (Full price for Students/Seniors is $499 & Adults is $699) • Offer valid at this price only until Sunday, March 28th and only online • Passes can be used every day Wintergreen is open during the 21.22 season (A high demand $49

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

Owning a season pass at a place like Wintergreen is a special experience. Spending precious time with family and friends, enjoying the beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains, and benefitting from outdoor recreation is what owning a Mission: Affordable Season Pass is all about, especially with rates starting at just $299 through March 28 th. The perks make it that much better! Don’t miss the opportunity to join our mission to keep skiing and snowboarding a vibrant part of your winter routine - it’s the best ski thing ever and the best deal of the year!

surcharge will apply to skiing at Wintergreen prior to 4pm on 12/25 thru 1/1 and on Saturdays in Jan. and Feb.)

wintergreenresort.com | 833.206.1348

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Come join us: Accept the Mission!

@cville_culture

MISSION: AFFORDABLE BENEFITS INCLUDE: • Access to all the four other Pacific Group Resorts across North America • 6 Buddy Tickets valid at any Pacific Group Resort ski area • Access to the slopes without capacity restrictions


22

CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

Order up! These local establishments are open and waiting to take your order. (Keep in mind that some information is subject to change, and descriptions may not apply, due to current circumstances.) Email living@c-ville.com to add your restaurant to the list. Asian Cuisine

Bakeries

Afghan Kabob Palace Authentic Afghan cuisine. 400 Emmet St. N. 245-0095. $$.

Albemarle Baking Company Get your ABCs of baked goods. 418 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 293-6456. $.

Asian Express Chinese and Japanese with healthy options. 909 W. Main St. 979-1888. $. Bamboo House Korean and Chinese options. 4831 Seminole Trail. 973-9211. $$. Chimm Thai Thai street food. 5th Street Station. 288-1122. $$. Doma Korean Kitchen Korean-style barbecue, kimchi, and more. 701 W. Main St. 202-1956. $. Kanak Indian Kitchen Offering traditional homemade Indian food, plus cocktails to go. 385 Merchant Walk Sq. Ste. 400. 328-2775. $. Lemongrass Vietnam meets Thailand. Veggie options and delivery, too. 104 14th St. NW. 244THAI. $$. Lime Leaf Thai A tad more upscale than the average Thai place. Rio Hill Shopping Center. 245-8884. $$. Maru Korean BBQ & Grill Traditional Korean food with modern additions. 412 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 956-4110. $.

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Milan Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with all the standards; beer and wine available to go. 1817 Emmet St. 984-2828. $$. Mochiko Good Hawaiian eats (and suggested Hawaiian beer pairings, too). The Yard at 5th Street Station. $. Monsoon Siam Delicious, unpretentious favorites like pad Thai, tom yum noodle soup, and vegetarian dishes. 113 W. Market St. $$. Now & Zen Gourmet Japanese and sushi spot. 202 Second St. NW. 971-1177. $$. Pad Thai Homestyle Thai cooking from an experienced chef. 156 Carlton Rd. 293-4032. $$. Peter Chang China Grill Authentic Sichuan cuisine by a renowned chef. Barracks Road Shopping Center North Wing. 244-9818. $$. Red Lantern Chinese cuisine by the pint or the quart. 221 Carlton Rd. 979-9968. $. Silk Thai Fresh, authentic Thai, plus specials like marinated wings. 2210 Fontaine Ave. 9778424. $$. Tara Thai Serves up affordable Thai faves, with multiple meat, fish, and veggie options. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-9998. $$. Taste of China Chinese favorites on 29N. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 975-6688. $$. Taste of India Indian fare favorites on the mall. 310 E. Main St, Downtown Mall. 984-9944. $$. Ten Upscale second-floor spot serving modern Japanese and offering its popular cocktails for carry-out. 120B E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-6691. $$$.

Bowerbird Bakeshop Pastries, breads, and cookies using locally sourced ingredients, delivered right to your doorstep. 120 10th St. NW, bowerbirdbakeshop.com. $ Gearharts Fine Chocolates Freshly baked pastries, cakes, cookies, and brownies—plus chocolates! 243 Ridge McIntire Rd. 972-9100. $. Glaze Burger and Donut Housemade donuts, coffee, milkshakes, plus burgers and vegan options. 1001 W Main St. 284-5465. $.

Texas Roadhouse Steaks, ribs, and fromscratch sides. Albemarle Square. 973-4700. $$. Timberwood Grill All-American eatery and after-work watering hole. 3311 Worth Crossing, 975-3311. $$. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery Locally sourced, beer-infused dishes including Southern classics and a kids menu. 520 Second St. SE. 956-3141. $$. The Whiskey Jar Saloon-style Southern spot with, naturally, more than 90 varieties of whiskey (get some in a cocktail to go). 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549. $$. Whistlestop Grill Southern comfort foods in Crozet. 1200 Crozet Ave. 823-9000. $.

Moe’s Original BBQ Alabama-style pulled pork smoked in-house. 2119 Ivy Rd., 244-7427; 200 W. Water St., 202-2288. $. Moose’s by the Creek American favorites, plus mounted moose antlers for photo ops. 1710 Monticello Rd. 977-4150. $. Riverside Lunch Popular joint known for smashburgers. 1429 Hazel St. 971-3546. $. Royalty Eats Soul food goodness including Chicken & Waffles, ribs, and specialties like teriyaki salmon. 820 Cherry Ave. $ Wayside Takeout & Catering Famous Ole Virginia fried chicken and barbecue sandwiches. 2203 Jefferson Park Ave. 977-5000. $. Wild Wing Café Classic wings and beer. 820 W. Main St. 979-WING. $$.

Great Harvest Bread Company Sandwiches, sweets, and bread baked from scratch every day. McIntire Plaza. 202-7813. $.

Breakfast Joints

MarieBette Café & Bakery French pastries for breakfast, more pastries for lunch. 700 Rose Hill Dr. 529-6118. $.

Farm Bell Kitchen New-Southern cuisine with local farm-to-table ingredients. 1209 W. Main St. 205-1538. $$.

Coffee Places with Kitchens

Paradox Pastry Known for the biscuits, European pastry, and the legendary DMB cookies and brownies. 313 Second St. SE #103. 245-2453. $.

First Watch Breakfast, brunch, and lunch chain with locally grown ingredients. 1114B Emmet St. N. 202-5383. $$.

Baine’s Books & Coffee Wide selection of coffee, tea, pastries, and paninis. 485 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-3577. $.

Petite MarieBette MarieBette’s little sister. 105 E. Water St. 284-8903. $.

Villa Diner Mainstay with housemade pancakes, biscuits, roast turkey, soups, sides, and salad dressings. 1250 Emmet St. N. 296-9977. $.

Belle Coffee & Wine Breakfast and lunch sandwiches. Free kids meals with adult meals. 9964919. $$.

The Pie Chest Homemade breakfast and hand pies, plus by-the-slice options (for those who can’t decide). 119 Fourth St. NE., 977-0443; 1518 E. High St., 984-0555. $. Quality Pie In the former Spudnuts spot, exMas tapas chef Tomas Rahal serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 309 Avon St. 284-5120. $$. Sliced. cake bar Mobile bakery offering whole cakes, cake flights, cake pops, and buttercream shots, for delivery or curbside pickup. 242-5501. $.

Bars and Grills Alamo Drafthouse Burgers, pizzas, salads, snacks and desserts prepared fresh from locally sourced ingredients. Served in the cafe or while you watch a movie. 5th Street Station. 326-5056. $. Beer Run Massive tap and packaged beer offerings, killer nachos, three meals daily. 156 Carlton Rd., 984-2337. $$. Fardowners Restaurant Local ingredients liven up pub fare like sliders and sandwiches. 5773 The Square, Crozet. 823-1300. $$. Firefly Craft beer, burgers, salads, vegetarianfriendly menu. 1304 E. Market St. 202-1050. $. Matchbox Restaurant Wood-fired pizzas, salads, salmon & steak dinners, gourmet burgers and a happy hour M-F from 3-6. 2055 Bond St., 284-8874. $$.

Murphy’s Coffee & Bagel House Breakfast spot serves delicious coffee and freshly baked New York bagels. 26 Buck Dr. 939-6033. $$.

Burgers, BBQ, Dogs and Diners Ace Biscuit & Barbecue Breakfast and lunch spot with BBQ and soul food by the biscuit. 600 Concord Ave. 202-1403. $. Blue Moon Diner Beloved local diner serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner options like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and BLTs. 600 W. Main St. 980-6666. $$ Burger Bach New Zealand-inspired gastropub. The Shops at Stonefield. 328-2812. $$. Cavalier Diner Breakfast all day, traditional diner fare, and Greek food. 1403 N. Emmet St. 977-1619. $ Doodle’s Diner Country cookin’ from breakfast to burgers. 1305 Long St. 295-7550. $. Five Guys Two locations for local carnivores. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 975-GUYS; Hollymead Town Center, 963-GUYS. $. Fox’s Café Daily specials, burgers, dogs, and dinners. 403 Avon St. 293-2844. $. Lazy Parrot Backyard BBQ The Lazy Parrot Grill’s sister restaurant. Pantops Shopping Center. 244-0723. $$.

Peloton Station Cycle-centric tavern and bike shop. 114 10th St. NW. 284-7786. $$.

Luv’n Oven Gizzards, livers, fries, and shakes. 162 Village Sq., Scottsville. 286-3828. $.

Thai ’99 II Thai noodle and rice dishes, curries, and stir frys in an inspired interior. Gardens Shopping Center. 964-1212. $.

Sedona Taphouse Lots of craft beers (and sangria to go) and an all-American menu. 1035 Millmont St. 296-2337. $$.

Martin’s Grill Delicious hamburgers, veggie burgers, and fries. Forest Lakes Shopping Center. 974-9955. $.

Thai Cuisine & Noodle House Traditional Thai food, noodle dishes, and vegetarian specials. 2005 Commonwealth Dr. 974-1326. $$.

Selvedge Brewing New brewery in The Wool Factory serves elevated bar fare from Chef Tucker Yoder. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $$.

Mel’s Café Southern soul-soothing food. A longtime favorite on West Main. 719 W. Main St. 971-8819. $.

VuNoodles Fresh, vegetarian Vietnamese noodles, pho, bahn mi, and more. 111 E. Water St. 465-1267. $.

TCO 2go Specialty sandwiches like pulled pork and fried fish from The Catering Outfit in a drive-thru. 221 Carlton Rd. 951-4699. $$.

Mission BBQ Pulled turkey, pork, and chicken, plus racks by the bone. The Shops at Stonefield. 260-7740. $.

C’ville Coffee & Wine Full menu of coffee, sandwiches, and wines. 1301 Harris St. 8172633. $. Greenberry’s Java and specialty drinks, fresh baked goods. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-0200. $. Milli Coffee Roasters Espresso drinks, chai, hot chocolate, light fare, wine. 400 Preston Ave, Suite 150. 270-9706. $. Whole bean delivery available. $ The Workshop A coffee and wine shop featuring Grit Coffee and pastries from Cou Cou Rachou, located in The Wool Factory. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $.

Family-Friendly Ann’s Family Restaurant Good old country cooking. 1170 Thomas Nelson Hwy. (Rte. 29, south of Lovingston). 263-8110. $. The Light Well Coffee-kitchen-tavern serves healthy ingredients in original recipes. 110 E. Main St., Orange. (540) 661-0004. $. Michie Tavern Traditional Southern lunch from an 18th-century tavern. 683 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy. 977-1234. $$.

Frozen Treats Chaps More than 20 years of gourmet homemade ice cream. Diner fare including breakfast and burgers. 223 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4139. $. Corner Juice UVA alum-owned juice spot with cold-pressed options. 1509 University Ave. $. Kirt’s Homemade Ice Cream Ice cream made fresh in the store. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 202-0306. $. La Flor Michoacana Homemade paletas (popsicles), ice cream, and ice cream cakes, plus other sweet treats. 601A Cherry Ave. 984-1603 $.


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Smoothie King Chain features smoothies, supplements, and healthy snacks. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 295-8502; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center, 975-5464. $.

Gourmet Groceries and Gas Stations Batesville Market Sandwiches to order, salads, and baked goods plus cheeses, produce, and packaged goods. 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. $. Bellair Market Gourmet sandwich spot on Ivy Road. 2401 Ivy Rd. 971-6608. $. Blue Ridge Bottle Shop Craft beer store with both bottles and growlers available—plus sample before you buy! 2025 Library Ave, Crozet. 602-2337. $. Brownsville Market Breakfast starting at 5am, plus burgers, sides, and famous fried chicken. 5995 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. 823-5251. $. Feast! Nationally noted cheese, wine, and specialty food shop. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 244-7800. $$.

Crozet Pizza Unpretentious, family-owned pizza parlor with nationally recognized pies. 5794 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet, 823-2132; 20 Elliewood Ave. 202-1046. $. Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie Pizza joint in the Crossroads mini-mall. 4916 Plank Rd., on 29S at North Garden. 245-0000. $$. Fabio’s New York Pizza Pizza, subs, salads, and calzones made by natives of Naples. Get your pie the Sicilian way. 1551 E. High St. 8720070. $. Fellini’s #9 A local landmark featuring Italian favorites plus some inventive new takes. 200 W. Market St. 979-4279. $$. Lampo Authentic Neapolitan pizzeria in Belmont. 205 Monticello Rd. 282-0607. $. Luce Literal hole in the wall serving fresh, handmade pasta to go. 110 Second St. NW. $$. Mellow Mushroom Trippy-themed franchise, with great pizza and even better beer selection. 1321 W. Main St. 972-9366. $. Red Pump Kitchen Tuscan-inspired restaurant. 401 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-6040. $$.

Foods of All Nations Sandwiches, deli, and salads at this gourmet grocery. 2121 Ivy Rd. 296-6131. $.

Tavola Rustic Italian with housemade pastas, craft cocktails, and a Wine Spectator awardwinning list. 826 Hinton Ave. 972-9463. $$.

Greenwood Gourmet Grocery Made-to-order sandwiches, fresh soup, and a deli with macn-cheese, bread pudding, and rotating dishes. 6701 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. (540) 4566431. $.

Vita Nova Creative ingredients on hearty pizza by the slice. 310 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-0162. $.

Hunt Country Market A rotating menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus wine offerings. Call to order. 2048 Garth Rd. 296-1648. $. Integral Yoga Natural Foods All-natural food, organic produce, supplements, plus a deli and juice/ smoothie bar. 923 Preston Ave. 293-4111. $. J.M. Stock Provisions Whole-animal butcher shop with sandwiches to go, great craft beer selection, and nicely curated wine selection. 709 W. Main St. 244-2480. $$. Keevil & Keevil Grocery and Kitchen Belmont grocery with breakfast and lunch sammies, plus takeaway dinners. 703 Hinton Ave. 989-7648. $.

Market Street Market Deli in the downtown grocery serves sandwiches and prepared foods. 400 E. Market St. 293-3478. $. Market Street Wine An expertly curated selection. 305 Rivanna Plaza Dr., Suite 102, 9649463; 311 E. Market St., 979-9463. $$. Mill Creek Market The Southern sister of Bellair Market. Avon Street, across from the Southside Shopping Center. 817-1570. $. Trader Joe’s This grocery chain boasts top quality at low cost, including “Two Buck Chuck” wine (which is actually $3.50). The Shops at Stonefield. 974-1466. $$.

Wyant’s Store Country-store fare like coffee and donuts, with daily specials and a great (cheap!) cheeseburger. 4696 Garth Rd., Crozet. 823-7299. $.

Italian and Pizza Belmont Pizza and Pub Fresh, stone-baked pizza on hand-tossed pies. Beer, too! 211 Carlton Rd., Suite 10. 977-1970. $. Christian’s Pizza The place to get fresh pies, by-the-slice or the whole darn thing. 118 W. Main St., Downtown Mall, 977-9688; 100 14th St. NW, 872-0436; 3440 Seminole Trail, 9737280. $. College Inn Late-night goodness. Pizza, gyros, subs, and its delivery can’t be beat. Breakfast items, too. 1511 University Ave. 977-2710. $.

Latin American Al Carbon Chicken prepared in an Indigenous Mexican coal-fire, flame-roasted rotisserie manner, plus sides like fried yucca and fried plantains. 1875 Seminole Trail. 964-1052. $. Brazos Tacos Austin, Texas-style breakfast, lunch, early dinner, and brunch tacos. 925 Second St. SE. 984-1163. $. The Bebedero Upscale authentic Mexican, plus cocktails and made-to-order guac. Order from sister restaurants Revolutionary Soup and The Whiskey Jar and pick up food from all three, at once. 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2343763. $$. Chipotle Simple menu of made-to-order burritos and tacos. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 8720212; 2040 Abbey Rd. Suite 101, 984-1512. $.

Mediterranean Aromas Café Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. Sandwiches, salads, and famous falafel. 900 Natural Resources Dr. 244-2486. $. Basil Mediterranean Bistro Mediterranean fare from grape leaves to tapas, plus wine. 109 14th St., 977-5700; 5th Street Station, 202-7594. $. Cava Fast-casual Mediterranean with lots of vegetarian options. 1200 Emmet St. N, #110. 227-4800. $. Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar Dishes from Spain to Greece and wines of the world. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 975-6796. $$. Sticks Kebob Shop Everything tastes better on a stick! 917 Preston Ave. 295-5262; 1820 Abbey Rd. 295-5212. $.

Little Star Spanish- and Mexican-inspired food expertly prepared in a wood-fired oven. Great craft cocktails, too. 420 W. Main St. 252-2502. $$. Mas Spanish tapas and wines in the heart of Belmont. 904 Monticello Rd. 979-0990. $$.

Revolutionary Soup Choose from a slew of enticing soups made daily. 108 Second St., Downtown Mall. 979-9988. $. Roots Natural Kitchen Fast-casual salad and grain bowls. 1329 W. Main St. 529-6229. $.

Steaks and Seafood

Miscellaneous Nationalities Bang! Tapas Asian fusion cuisine served tapasstyle. 213 Second St. SW. 984-2264 $$. Bizou Playful French-American bistro with a beloved meatloaf dish. 119 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-1818. $$. Mahana Fresh Tropical themed, fun flavored ingredients in bowls and sweets. 2142 Barracks Rd. 284-5846 $. Pearl Island Caribbean-inspired lunch spot in the Jefferson School City Center. 233 Fourth St. NW. 466-0092. $. The Shebeen Pub and Braai Conjures the South African veldt. Vinegar Hill Shopping Center. 296-3185. $$. Sticks A fast-food alternative: kebobs (veggie options available), sides, salads, desserts. Preston Plaza, 295-5262; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center. 295-5212. $.

Baggby’s Gourmet Sandwiches Satisfying sandwiches, salads, soups, and super-friendly service. 512 E Main St. Downtown Mall. 9841862 $.

La Michoacana Mexican deli serves budgetfriendly burritos, tacos, and enchiladas. 1138 E. High St., 409-9941; 2291 Seminole Ln., 9564299. $.

Panera Bread Co. Ubiquitous chain with casual fare. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 2456192; Hollymead Town Center, 973-5264; Fifth Street Station, 973-5264. $.

Thyme & Co. Traditional Lebanese flatbreads and salads. 104 14th St. NW, Suite 2. 282-2436. $.

Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Fresh, handmade, Bajastyle Mexican food. 435 Merchant Walk Sq., Suite 600. 214-0500. $.

Junction Innovative Southwestern cuisine with locally sourced ingredients in Belmont. 421 Monticello Rd. 465-6131. $$.

Kitchenette Sandwich Shop From meatloaf with cheddar and jalapenos to tofu Reubens, these sammies satisfy. 920 91/2 St. NE. 2607687. $

Which Wich Superior Sandwiches Create your own sandwiches by marking up the pre-printed brown bags. Hollymead Town Center. 977-9424. $.

Soups, Salads, Sandwiches

Guajiros Miami Eatery Food inspired by the everyday meals of Miami, with strong Cuban influence as well as Central and Southern American dishes. 1871 Seminole Trail. 465-2108. $

Jimmy John’s Low-cost sandwiches on 29N. “Freaky fast” delivery. 1650 E. Rio Rd. 9752100. $.

Sultan Kebab Authentic Turkish cuisine with plenty of meat and vegetarian options, and notable appetizers, too. 333 Second St. SE, 9810090. $.

Continental Divide Charlottesville’s favorite hole-in-the-wall spot has delicious tacos and enchiladas. 811 W. Main St. 984-0143. $$.

Guadalajara Family-run Mexican food celebrating 30 years. 805 E. Market St., 977-2676; 395 Greenbrier Dr., 978-4313; 2206 Fontaine Ave., 979-2424; 108 Town Country Ln., 293-3538; 3450 Seminole Trail, 977-2677. $.

Jersey Mike’s Subs Subs from Jersey. 2040 Abbey Rd. #104, 529-6278; 5th Street Station, 328-8694. $.

Bodo’s Bagels Still the king of bagels. Drivethru available at 1418 N. Emmet St., 977-9598; 505 Preston Ave., 293-5224; and outside service at 1609 University Ave., 293-6021. $. Chopt Creative salad chain with ingredients from local purveyors. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 328-8092. $. Citizen Bowl Shop Specialty salads with gluten-free, vegetarian, and paleo-friendly options. Also now selling groceries like yeast, flour, and brownie mix, plus gloves and toilet paper. 223 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 234-3662. $. Durty Nelly’s Down-home pub and deli now offering five subs (except the Dagwood) for $35. 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. $. HotCakes Fancy sandwiches, housemade entrées, and desserts. Delivery available. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 295-6037. $. Iron Paffles & Coffee Pastry dough + waffle iron + savory or sweet insides. 214 W. Water St. 806-3800. $.

Bonefish Grill Sister to mega-popular Outback Steakhouse featuring seafood, grilled non-fish specialties. Hollymead Town Center. 975-3474. $$. Outback Steakhouse Bloomin’ onions and giant steaks. 1101 Seminole Trail. 975-4329. $$. Public Fish & Oyster Simply prepared, responsibly sourced seafood. 513 W. Main St., 995-5542. $$.

Upscale Casual C&O Serving up a three-course $68 prix fixe menu. 515 E. Water St. 971-7044. $$$. Fig Bistro & Bar Mediterranean and New Orleans-inspired dishes with housemade ingredients. 1331 W. Main St. 995-5047. $. Hamiltons’ at First & Main Contemporary American cuisine in the heart of downtown C’ville. 110 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2956649. $$$. Ivy Inn Offering Fine dining in a charming tollhouse. 2244 Old Ivy Rd. 977-1222. $$$. The Local Belmont neighborhood spot featuring comfort favorites. 824 Hinton Ave. 9849749. $$. Maya Upscale Southern cuisine. 633 W. Main St. 979-6292. $$. The Melting Pot Fondue fun for all. 501 E. Water St. 244-3463. $$$. The Mill Room AAA, four-diamond eatery at The Boar’s Head, 200 Ednam Dr. 972-2230. $$$. Oakhart Social Seasonal, creative modern American food for sharing. 511 W. Main St. 995-5449. $$. Oakhurst Inn Coffee & Café Southern style breakfast and lunch. 1616 Jefferson Park Ave. 872-0100. $. Restoration Great views and delicious food, ranging from fried green tomatoes and burgers to crab cakes and pasta. 5494 Golf Dr., Crozet. 823-1841. $$. Southern Crescent Cajun and Creole fare in Belmont. 814 Hinton Ave. 284-5101. $$. Wayland’s Crossing Tavern Pub food, vegetarian plates, and kid-friendly fare. 1015 Heathercroft Cir., Crozet. 205-4669. $$. Zocalo Flavorful, high-end, Latin-inspired cuisine. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4944. $$.

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Anna’s Pizza No. 5 In the family for 35 years. 115 Maury Ave. 295-7500. $.

Vocelli Pizza Pizza, pasta, panini, salads, and stromboli plus antipasti. Woodbrook Shopping Center. 977-4992. $.

Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine & Café Healthy, authentic Mexican cuisine. 112 W. Main St., Suite 6. 979-0212. $.

Jack’s Shop Kitchen Farm-to-table brunch, lunch, and supper spot with elevated classics. 14843 Spotswood Trail, Ruckersville. 939-9239. $$.

@cville_culture

Whole Foods Market Fresh, all-natural sandwiches ranging from classic favorites to vegan delights. 1797 Hydraulic Rd. 973-4900. $$.

Vivace Every kind of pasta imaginable, plus seafood. 2244 Ivy Rd. 979-0994. $$.

Qdoba Mexican Grill Spicy burritos, quesadillas, and Mexican salads made before your eyes. 3918 Lenox Ave. 244-5641. $.

Ivy Provisions Local deli and retail food shop offering fresh, housemade breakfast and lunch all day, plus wine and craft beer by the bottle and on draft. 2206 Ivy Rd. 202-1308. $.

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

Market Street Café Gourmet breakfast, rotisserie chicken, and deli meats. 1111 E. Rio Rd. 964-1185. $.

Vinny’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria This regional chain has pies plus a slew of subs, pastas, and stromboli. Hollymead Town Center. 973-4055. $$.

Morsel Compass Popular food truck’s brickand-mortar spot. 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. 989-1569. $$.


24

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25

The local authority Food (and drink) for thought Q&A

What’s your favorite thing to buy at the farmer’s market? Send your answers to question @c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram

We’re looking for a freelance graphic designer who can step in and help out with newspaper production in times of need. Must be ready to learn on the job and generate and execute creative ideas on the go! See the full job listing at c-ville.com/work-at-c-ville.

lunch! True Heritage aims to further Virginia’s wine legacy

This is our town.

Social scene Connect with us on social media to stay up-to-date on news and events as they happen in real time. Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: Community news: @cville_weekly Arts and living: @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

MOUTH-TO-FEED Unpacking three foodie ’grams (and their top five local picks!)

It’s Remarkable! Baggby’s classic sammy combines turkey, cream cheese, and avocado (plus a whole lotta other good stuff).

Food trucks, bagged sammies, and three-meat platters—your midday options are endless

What you were reading The top five stories on our website last week: 1. All together now: In a year of isolation, co-housers envision a more connected future 2. First look: City Council candidates share their visions in first panel discussion 3. In brief: Northam drops in, superintendent steps down, and more 4. Dancing again: The (still) defending national champs return to the tourney—COVID tests pending 5. Rockin’ stout: Cradle a craft cup ‘o boozy mud this March

.com

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For your complete guide to can’tmiss events (and to submit your own!), visit events.c-ville.com.

Taste is everything.

@cville_culture

What to do?

Let’s do

Make c-ville.com your go-to website for breaking news and trending topics. It’s where you’ll find all of our stories from the newspaper and magazines, as well as web-only exclusives—videos, photo galleries, playlists and more.

alternative voice for everything happening in our city, is your source for news that affects your life. We cover the arts, music, food and community topics you need to know. We’ll tell you where to go, what to see, what to do, what to eat. This is our town—live it up.

ART! Evan Mooney’s candy-inspired series SPRING 2021

Online all the time

C-VILLE Weekly, the

DRANKS! New booze opps courtesy of Bottle House

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

Seeking designer

We're going out for lunch in the spring issue of Knife & Fork, which means Baggby's sandwiches, Pearl Island's Trifecta Platter, Basan's kare pan, and offerings from Feast!, Greenwood Gourmet Grocery, and many more. We also visit with George Hodson and Emily Pelton, the siblings behind True Heritage Wines, and chat with Khadija Hemmati about all kinds of Middle Eastern food. Oh, and we'll let you in on the secret to three local foodstagrammers' success. Dig in!

GADGETS! For spring, a few must-have tools


26

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

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#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


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CROSSWORD

String quartet BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK 69. Garr of “Tootsie” 70. Chocolaty Post cereal

ACROSS 1. Metaphoric acknowledgment 7. Jobs creation 11. Astronaut Jemison 14. In 15. Dress in Delhi 16. “La Cage ____ Folles” 17. Directive to an instrument in need of cleaning? 20. Math measurement 21. Physics 101 subject 22. Wistful feeling about possessing an instrument? 29. Clickable list 30. It breaks in the morning 31. Gangster’s gun 32. Struck down, biblically 34. Some are humble 37. This puzzle’s theme 41. Short poetic tribute 42. Determined to achieve 44. “Get a room!” elicitor, for short 47. Ma that might baa 48. Vibe 49. Settle on certain instruments when no others are available? 55. ExxonMobil brand 56. Metal food containers 57. Succinct reaction when given a list of instruments to choose from? 65. “... you know the rest”: Abbr. 66. Berth place 67. Greet from a distance 68. “How could I be so silly?!”

#3

1

2

3

4

5

DOWN 1. Part of a stable diet? 2. From ____ Z 3. Night that “Friends” aired: Abbr. 4. The Blue Jays, on scoreboards 5. “Er ... well ... um ...” 6. June birthstone 7. Thomas featured in the documentary “The Last Dance” 8. Course number 9. Prints, e.g. 10. Handyperson’s inits. 11. Brand with a lonely repairman 12. ____ borealis 13. Free (from) 18. Susan of “L.A. Law” 19. “Well, ____-di-dah!” 22. Online exchange, in brief 23. Some partners in lesbian couples 24. “What am ____ getting?” 25. Closing section of music 26. Tennis score after deuce 27. Common first word 28. Australia’s ____ Rock 33. Down for a pillow 34. Shoelace tip 35. Hwy. whose name includes two of NYC’s boroughs 36. Pilfer 6

7

9

ANSWERS 3/17/21

PR stunt S A P S

C A B R S E U P R O S E

10

18

23

24

29

49 © 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

#6 solution

11

34

33

R E N F R O

H R E A L T M T A A S S S E A C O S

12

I L M S A D

A T O P

C O Z Y

35

36 39

40

42 47

43 48

50

51

52

53

54

56

55 57

58

59

60

61

65

66

67

68

69

70

62

63

F O A L E D

T R E S

13

31

38

46

A N U N

I N B E T A

28

30

45

G O A B O S T U O U T R E D R A O I C K S H E M A R

J U N E T E E N T H

64

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#5 solution

27

41 44

C K S C I A I A C

21 26

37

A I N T I

19

25

32

B L A N C

16

20

#6

P R E W A R

I M D D E A E G O M A T I P R E K E O N E T E P R P L A Y T O P A A L I N B A S P R O F I N C A

15

17

22

K I R K

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

14

8

38. Small salamander 39. Decorative sewing case 40. Conflicted 43. Rapper Lil ____ X 44. Fed (on) 45. He landed in Florida in 1539 46. Per se 50. “Nice one!” 51. “SNL” alum Cheri 52. By way of 53. Bisected 54. Muppet whose tweets often end with “Scram!” 58. Like the name Mitt for a catcher 59. Conk out 60. The big eau 61. Biblical woman with a palindromic name 62. It’s a sign 63. Thai neighbor 64. NBA tiebreakers


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By Rob Brezsny

Taurus (April 20-May 20): How distraught I was when I discovered that one of my favorite poets, Pablo Neruda, was an admirer of the murderous dictator Joseph Stalin. It broke my heart to know I could never again read his tender, lyrical poetry with unconditional appreciation. But that’s life: Some of our heroes and teachers disappoint us, and then it’s healthy to re-evaluate our relationships with them. Or maybe our own maturation leads us to realize that once-nurturing influences are no longer nurturing. I recommend that sometime soon, you take a personal inventory with these thoughts in mind. I suspect there may be new sources of inspiration headed your way. Get ready for them.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Self-help author Steve Maraboli has useful advice for you to consider in the coming weeks. I hope you’ll meditate on what he says and take decisive action. He writes, “Incredible change happens in your life when you decide to take control of what you do have power over instead of craving control over what you don’t.” To get started, Gemini, make a list of three things you do have power over and three things you wish you did but don’t have power over.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): While he was alive, Cancerian author Franz Kafka burned 90 percent of everything he wrote. In a note to a friend before he died, he gave instructions to burn all the writing he would leave behind. Luckily, his friend disobeyed, and that’s why today we can read Kafka’s last three novels and a lot more of his stuff. Was his attitude toward his creations caused by the self-doubt that so many of us Cancerians are shadowed by? Was he, like a lot of us Crabs, excessively shy about sharing personal details from his life? In accordance with astrological omens, I urge you to at least temporarily transcend any Kafka-like tendencies you have. It’s time to shine brightly and boldly as you summon your full powers of self-expression.

CULTURE FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

29

Aries (March 21-April 19): In the novel House of Leaves, the hero Johnny Truant describes his friend Lude as wanting “more money, better parties, and prettier girls.” But Johnny wants something different. What is it? He says, “I’m not even sure what to call it except I know it feels roomy and it’s drenched in sunlight and it’s weightless and I know it’s not cheap.” In my opinion, that declaration is far too imprecise! He’ll never get what he wants until he gets clearer about it. But his fantasy is a good start. It shows that he knows what the fulfillment of his yearning feels like. I suggest you get inspired by Johnny Truant’s approximation to conjure up one of your own. Gaze ahead a few years, and see if you can imagine what your best possible future feels like. Then describe it to yourself as precisely as possible. I think yearnings like those will be healthy and wise for you to cultivate in the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you need expansive influences that stretch your imagination and push you beyond your limitations. You will benefit from meditations and experiences that inspire you to outgrow overly small expectations.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo actor and director Jean-Louis Barrault aspired to “wake up a virgin each morning.” He wanted “to feel hungry for life,” as if he had been reborn once again. In order to encourage that constant renewal, he regarded going to sleep every night as “a small death.” I recommend his approach to you during the coming weeks. In my astrological opinion, the cosmic rhythms will be conspiring to regularly renew your desires: to render them pure, clean, raw, and strong. Cooperate with those cosmic rhythms!

Libra

(July 23-Aug. 22): To create your horoscope, I’ve borrowed ideas from Leo-born author Cassiano Ricardo. He speaks of a longing “for all that is tall like pine trees, and all that is long like rivers, and all that is purple like dusk.”

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Blobs, spots, specks, smudges, cracks, defects, mistakes, accidents, exceptions, and irregularities are the win-

Scorpio

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Innovative psychologist Carl Jung had a nuanced understanding of the energies at work in our deep psyche. He said our unconscious minds are “not only dark but also light; not only bestial, semi-human, and demonic, but also superhuman, spiritual, and, in the classical sense of the word, ‘divine.’” I bring this to your attention, Sagittarius, because now is a favorable time to get better acquainted with and more appreciative of your unconscious mind. For best results, you must not judge it for being so paradoxical. Don’t be annoyed that it’s so unruly and non-rational. Have fun with its fertility and playfulness and weirdness.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The fantasy drama “Game of Thrones” appeared on TVs all over the world. But the audience that watched it in China got cheated out of a lot of essential action. Government censorship deleted many scenes that featured nudity and sex, fighting and violence, and appearances by dragons, which play a starring role in the story. As you can imagine, Chinese viewers had trouble following some of the plot points. Telling you about this, Capricorn, is my way of nudging you to make sure you don’t miss

on stands now!

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind,” wrote author Rudyard Kipling. Yes, they are. I agree. They change minds, rouse passions, build identities, incite social change, inspire irrationality, and create worlds. This is always true, but it will be especially important for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks. The ways you use language will be key to your health and success. The language that you hear and read will also be key to your health and success. For best results, summon extra creativity and craftsmanship as you express yourself. Cultivate extra discernment as you choose what you absorb.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): Piscean linguist Anna Wierzbicka says the Russian expression Dusha naraspashku means “unbuttoned soul.” She continues, “The implication is that it is good, indeed wonderful, if a person’s ‘soul,’ which is the seat of emotions, is flung open in a spontaneous, generous, expansive, impetuous gesture, expressing full trust in other people and an innocent readiness for communion with them.” I wouldn’t recommend that you keep your soul unbuttoned 24/7/365, but in the coming weeks, I hope you’ll allocate more time than usual to keeping it unbuttoned. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, 1-877-873-4888.

GADGETS! For spring, a few must-have tools

DRANKS! New booze opps courtesy of Bottle House

ART! Evan Mooney’s candy-inspired series SPRING 2021

Let’s do

Taste is everything.

lunch! True Heritage aims to further Virginia’s wine legacy

MOUTH-TO-FEED Unpacking three foodie ’grams (and their top five local picks!)

It’s Remarkable! Baggby’s classic sammy combines turkey, cream cheese, and avocado (plus a whole lotta other good stuff).

Food trucks, bagged samm ies, platters—your midday optio and three-meat ns are endless

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Eat up!

any of the developments going on in your own personal drama. Some may be hidden, as in China’s version of “Game of Thrones.” Others might be subtle or disguised or underestimated. Make it your crusade to know about everything.

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

Leo

(Sept. 23-Oct.22): Is there anything more gratifying than being listened to, understood, and seen for who you really are? I urge you to seek out that pleasure in abundance during the coming weeks. My reading of the astrological omens tells me you need the nurturing jolt that will come from being received and appreciated with extra potency. I hope you have allies who can provide that for you. If you don’t, search for allies who can. And in the meantime, consider engaging the services of a skillful psychotherapist or life coach or some other professional listener.

dows to other worlds,” writes author Bob Miller. I would add that all those things, along with related phenomena like fissures, blemishes, stains, scars, blotches, muck, smears, dents, and imperfections, are often windows to very interesting parts of this seemingly regular old ordinary world—parts that might remain closed off from us without the help of those blobs and defects. I suggest you take full advantage of the opportunities they bring your way in the coming weeks.


30

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Join the C-VILLE community.

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Q&A

31

If you could have dinner with any person, living or dead, who would it be?

It has to be Anthony Bourdain, right? The stories!

Sappho would have a lot to share at the table. Perhaps we would have had more balance in the world should whole pieces of her work survived alongside the men who destroyed it. @COACHKB_TENNIS/INSTAGRAM

Nora Ephron— and she can cook dinner!

Ben Franklin.

My daughter!

@CROZETWX/INSTAGRAM

JUDITH MARYMOR/FACEBOOK

Thomas Jefferson.

Anne Braden.

Ben Franklin.

My mom.

@NPD_BLUE/TWITTER

@WHEELLIAMBLADES/INSTAGRAM

@DULCIMERT/INSTAGRAM

LINDA GILMER/FACEBOOK

The Dalai Lama.

Josephine Baker.

Carl Sagan.

Mick Jagger.

JEREMY SHARP/FACEBOOK

TRACEY BATTS/FACEBOOK

@ALECSPID/INSTAGRAM

@D5SNOWS/INSTAGRAM

Boadicea.

Or Elon Musk.

@TARAMHAIR/INSTAGRAM

@D5SNOWS/INSTAGRAM

Ben Harper and Oprah.

Or maybe Leonardo da Vinci.

MELISSA SHIRLEY-MILLER/FACEBOOK

@D5SNOWS/INSTAGRAM

@MAXMARCH3/TWITTER

I have a lot of questions for Mr. Jefferson. But Taylor Swift could be fun! @DPD2021/INSTAGRAM

@SUZSOREN/INSTAGRAM

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

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A WW II-era home—and its modern-day kitchen redo

Retaining the best of an unfinished Bundoran property, new owners craft their forever home

March 24 – 30, 2021 c-ville.com

Next week’s question: What’s your favorite thing to buy at the farmer’s market?


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Men and women who provide in-home care to their adult loved ones with chronic health conditions are needed for a study about caregiving stress, sleep, and cardiovascular health. Participation involves 1 study visit lasting 90 minutes: completing questionnaires and getting non-invasive cardiovascular tests at the visit, and wearing a wrist-worn sleep tracker for a week and a blood pressure monitor for a day after the visit are required. Compensation: $60 at completion of participating. Principal Investigator: Jeongok Logan, PhD, RN.

Non-smoking, inactive adults aged 21-50 needed for study on the effect of exercise and the drug liraglutide on blood vessels. You must have 3 of the 4 characteristics: overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fasting blood sugar. Study requires three 1-hour and two 9-hour visits over 5 months in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Participants are randomized to one of 4 groups: control, exercise training, study drug, or exercise + study drug. Compensation is $1,500. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, MD.

Men and women with type 2 diabetes aged 18-60 needed for study on the effect of the drug empagliflozin (used to control blood sugar) on blood vessels. Study requires two 1-hour outpatient visits and two 7-hour admissions in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. The study drug is taken for 12 weeks. You must have Type 2 diabetes, be a non-smoker, and not taking insulin. Compensation is $800.00, paid in installments. Principal Investigator: Eugene Barrett, MD, PhD.

UVA School of Nursing Soojung Ahn 434.233.4593 | sa4ve@virginia.edu IRB-HSR #22260

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu HSR200065

Direct Support Professionals Residential Services (FT and PT) We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet and C’ville! To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/ In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A-rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/ year! Call 844-712-6153! (M-F 8am8pm Central) (AAN CAN)

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Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities: Program Manager- Day Support, Louisa County. Part-time 20 hours per week.

SERVICES

EDUCATION

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call 434-566-8660 salesrep@c-ville.com C-VILLECLASSIFIEDS.com

MISCELLANEOUS

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March 24 - 30, 2021 c-ville.com

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UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline CRC 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu IRB-HSR #21403

How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.

AUCTION

“One of Virginia’sLargest Consignment Auctions” Antiques, Farm Equipment, Furniture, Housewares, Toys, Vehicles and MORE! Gray Auctions Co. VA#1104 Friday, March 26, 2021 @ 9 A.M. & Saturday, March 27, 2021 @ 9 A.M. 14089 Robinson Road, Stony Creek, VA 23882 For all info Visit:www.graycoservices.com or

Call Joe Gray at 804-943-3506

GET THE SCOOP ON OUR NEWS, ARTS, AND LIVING CONTENT BEFORE ANYONE ELSE. @CVILLENEWS_DESK @ARTSCVILLE @EATDRINKCVILLE


CLASSIFIEDS

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BACKED BY A YEAR-ROUND

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SERVICES DIVORCE-Uncontested, $395+$86 court cost. WILLS $195.00. No court appearance. Estimated completion time twenty-one days. Hilton Oliver, Attorney (Facebook). 757-490-0126. Se Habla Espanol. BBB Member. https://hiltonoliverattorneyva.com. Up to $15,000.00 of GUARANTEED Life Insurance! No medical exam or health questions. Cash to help pay funeral and other final expenses. Call Physicians Life Insurance Company- 844-509-1697 or visit www.Life55plus.info/vapress

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34

CLASSIFIEDS Small packages

A planner advises: how to hold a microwedding

A guide to vintage

Charlottesville's best spots for your 'something old'

Cheek to cheek

A two-person dance floor (what a romantic idea!)

S P R I N G 2 02 1

On a love train

We're on boar d for this Staunton wedding PAGE 62

Love is

patient, love is kind Six couples (finally) get their big day

A Smarter Way to Power Your Home.

March 24 - 30, 2021 c-ville.com

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CLASSIFIEDS

33

BACKED BY A YEAR-ROUND

CLOG-FREE GUARANTEE

STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED

AD NETWORK

AUCTIONS AUCTION ALERT! ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS! Construction Equipment and Trucks | Selling for VDOT, Contractors, Lending Institutions and Other Consignors. Motleys Industrial | motleyindustrial.com | 804-486-4550 | VAL16

EXCLUSIVE LIMITED TIME OFFER!

15% & 10 %

ATTN. AUCTIONEERS: Advertise your upcoming auctions statewide and in other states. Affordable Print and Digital Solutions reaching your target audiences. C or Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-521-7576, mailto:landonc@ vpa.net, landonc@vpa.net

OFF

+

HOME IMPROVEMENT

G&E Virginia Premium Assured Heifer/Cow Sale. March 27th, 2021 12:00 noon. G&E Test Center Gretna, VA. Call George Winn at 434-489-4458.

REAL ESTATE ATTN. REALTORS: Advertise your listings regionally or statewide. Affordable Print and Digital Solutions that get results! Call Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-521-7576, HYPERLINK “mailto:landonc@vpa.net” landonc@vpa.net

SERVICES DIVORCE-Uncontested, $395+$86 court cost. WILLS $195.00. No court appearance. Estimated completion time twenty-one days. Hilton Oliver, Attorney (Facebook). 757-490-0126. Se Habla Espanol. BBB Member. https://hiltonoliverattorneyva.com. Up to $15,000.00 of GUARANTEED Life Insurance! No medical exam or health questions. Cash to help pay funeral and other final expenses. Call Physicians Life Insurance Company- 844-509-1697 or visit www.Life55plus.info/vapress

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YEAR-ROUND!

TO THE FIRST 50 CALLERS ONLY! **

LIFETIME WARRANTY

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2

ER GUA

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OFF

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D

1

5

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TT

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ATTN. CONTRACTORS: Advertise your business statewide and in other states. Affordable Print and Digital Solutions to reach Homeowners. Call Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-521-7576, HYPERLINK “mailto:landonc@vpa. net” landonc@vpa.net

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Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-614-6667

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Vinyl Replacement Double Hung Window $249* Installed w/Free Trim Wrap. Call 804-739-8207. Siding, Roofing and More! GENERAC Standby Generators. The weather is increasingly unpredictable. Be prepared for power outages. FREE 7-year extended warranty ($695 value!) Schedule your FREE in-home assessment today. Call 1-844-947-1479 Special financing for qualified customers.

SENIORS & MILITARY!

YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE *

Subject to credit approval. Call for details.

1

CALL US TODAY FOR

A FREE ESTIMATE

1-877-614-6667

Mon-Thurs: 8am-11pm, Fri-Sat: 8am-5pm, Sun: 2pm-8pm EST *For those who qualify. One coupon per household. No obligation estimate valid for 1 year. **Offer valid at time of estimate only 2 The leading consumer reporting agency conducted a 16 month outdoor test of gutter guards in 2010 and recognized LeafFilter as the “#1 rated professionally installed gutter guard system in America.” CSLB# 1035795 DOPL #10783658-5501 License# 7656 License# 50145 License# 41354 License# 99338 License# 128344 License# 218294 WA UBI# 603 233 977 License# 2102212986 License# 2106212946 License# 2705132153A License# LEAFFNW822JZ License# WV056912 License# WC-29998-H17 Nassau HIC License# H01067000 Registration# 176447 Registration# HIC.0649905 Registration# C127229 Registration# C127230 Registration# 366920918 Registration# PC6475 Registration# IR731804 Registration# 13VH09953900 Registration# PA069383 Suffolk HIC License# 52229-H License# 2705169445 License# 262000022 License# 262000403 License# 0086990 Registration# H-19114

IT’S TIME TO LOVE YOUR KITCHEN AGAIN

50% OFF INSTALLATION* EXP 3/31/21

Schedule Your FREE Design Consultation Now: Hours: Mon - Fri 9am-9pm, Sat 10am - 4pm EST

facebook.com/cville.weekly

(866) 982-2260

March 24 - 30, 2021 c-ville.com

*Limit one offer per household. Must purchase 5+ Classic/ Designer Shelves.


34

CLASSIFIEDS Small packages

A planner advises: how to hold a microwedding

A guide to vintage

Charlottesville's best spots for your 'something old'

Cheek to cheek

A two-person dance floor (what a romantic idea!)

S P R I N G 2 02 1

On a love train

We're on boar d for this Staunton wedding PAGE 62

Love is

patient, love is kind Six couples (finally) get their big day

A Smarter Way to Power Your Home.

March 24 - 30, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

ACT NOW TO RECEIVE A $300 SPECIAL OFFER!*

(833) 688-1378

*Offer value when purchased at retail. Solar panels sold separately.

Prepare for unexpected power outages with a Generac home standby generator

Here come the brides C-VILLE Weddings provides brides-to-be with a comprehensive guide to planning their big day. Make us the first stop on the road to wedded bliss.

REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

844-947-1479

FREE

7-Year Extended Warranty* A $695 Value!

Offer valid February 15 - June 6, 2021

Special Financing Available Subject to Credit Approval

*To qualify, consumers must request a quote, purchase, install and activate the generator with a participating dealer. Call for a full list of terms and conditions.

NEW ISSUE ON STANDS NOW!


WWW.CAAR.COM 35

VOL. 30 NO. 12 n MARCH 24 - 30, 2021

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Opening this spring: The Ridley, located in The Draftsman Hotel

POISED FOR A COMEBACK BY CARLA HUCKABEE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Commercial Real Estate:


MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

36

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers OLD TRAIL

SWEET RETREAT

4-bedroom mountain home on 14+ acres with gorgeous views of the Rockfish Valley & Blue Ridge Mtns. Oversize windows, heart-pine flooring, soaring ceilings. Minutes from skiing, hiking, excellent food, & beer & wine trail. MLS#610115 $995,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.330GraceGlen.com

GLENDOWER ROAD

PRICED UNDER COUNTY ASSESSED VALUE! Classic, well-built 4-BR home, privately situated on 5 private acres only 15 miles south of Charlottesville & UVA, and only 5 miles from historic Scottsville. MLS#604475 $599,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

KESWICK ESTATES

Exquisite English Country home on 2.5 very private acres with lovely views of the golf course and distant mountains. The architecturally designed, 7,000+ sf. residence offers LR, DR, gourmet kitchen, library, office, media room, and 5 BR. MLS#611738 $1,695,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

Classic brick Georgian, circa 2008, meticulously crafted with the finest materials, 5400+ fin. sf. and 1800 unfin. sf. on the walkout terrace level. 5 BR, including main level master suite, spacious and modern open floor plan with gourmet kitchen adjoining large FR, breakfast room and formal DR. 2 large covered porches for outside entertaining. Surrounding the home is one half acre of expertly landscaped grounds, with views of the adjoining Old Trail Golf Course, buffered by a small woods, views of the Blue Ridge Mtns. MLS#614945 $1,475,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

NORTH DOWNTOWN

Colonial Revival style c. 1913 residence restored to perfection. Flexible and updated floor plan with 2,970 finished square feet. Coveted private backyard and off-street parking. Walk to the amenities of the Historic Downtown Mall and UVA. MLS#608794 $1,549,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville, 14 miles to CHO Airport. 177 private acres with c.1901 classic Virginia farm house, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

GARTHFIELD LANE

Completely renovated! Impeccable condition! Western schools! 3.74 acres 5 minutes to Barracks Road Shopping Center and UVA. Quiet pastoral setting, level open land for recreation, creek, borders large horse farm under conservation easement. NO HOA. MLS#614871 $985,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

EDNAM FOREST

A true gem perched on 1.5 private acres in Ednam Forest! This stately c. 1963 4-bedroom Georgian is well-located within walking distance to Boar’s Head Inn & Sports Club. Nearly level lawn surrounded by beautifully manicured landscaping. MLS#608474 $1,845,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

RUSTLING OAKS

Handsome 2-story Virginia farmhouse, c. 1993, nestled on 4.09 acres in the highly sought-after community of Rustling Oaks on Garth Road just minutes from UVA, Farmington, and Boar’s Head. Private end of cul-de-sac location with stream flowing at back of property. Great floor plan with large well-proportioned rooms, 4,470 fin. sf., gorgeous hardwood flooring, large, master suite, office above 2-car attached garage, large deck for outdoor living and entertaining, full unfinished basement with roughed-in bath. MLS #614704 $1,385,000. Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

JOHNSON HOUSE

3-BR, 2-BA Virginia farm house nestled in historic district of Covesville, located only 14 miles south of Charlottesville. Mostly open front pasture with nice pond in front. Remainder of acreage is wooded to top of back ridge. Century Link internet. MLS#613228 $516,500 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


37

CRAWFORD’S KNOB

An opportunity to own a deeded nature preserve protected in perpetuity, a chance to purchase and hold wilderness, and to leave it largely unaltered. This property is ideal for the passive enjoyment of wild lands and the conservation minded buyer. MLS#608893 $1,900,000 Will Carr, 434.981.3065

BELLAIR

Rare opportunity to purchase a building lot just under 1 acre in sought-after Bellair. Lush, mature landscaping, partly wooded, stream/creek. Minutes from UVA, shopping, dining, and entertainment. Murray/Henley/Western Albemarle school district. MLS#614627 $375,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BURNLEY ROAD

Choose your builder and build your dream home on this 8+ private acre lot in Northern Albemarle. Exceptional Blue Ridge Mtn. views with privacy. Close proximity to NGIC, airport, shopping, and University Research Park. Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CHURCH POINT FARM

944 acres along the lower Chickahominy River with 8 miles of shoreline. The property consists of marsh, farmland, woods, and cypress swamp and is managed for waterfowl, deer, turkey, and dove. Features 3-BR brick dwelling. MLS#2036779 $3,960,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325 www.churchpointfarm.com

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FRAY’S GRANT

4 fabulous home sites mostly in beautiful hardwoods, gently rolling and PRICED BELOW TAX ASSESSMENTS! Lots range from 21 to 44 acres, private settings and frontage on the Rivanna River. Ten minutes to airport, excellent shopping. Call Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 for pricing.

SUNNYSIDE

Large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement, but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FACTORY MILL ROAD

Great 47-acre wooded lot with exceptional privacy, ideal for residential construction. Easy access to I-64 and Route 250 and 20 minutes to Short Pump. Good road frontage on state road and mostly level land. NO HOA. MLS#613846 $375,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EXCEPTIONAL LARGE ACREAGE

2 wonderful estate parcels in coveted Ragged Mtn. Farm. Excellent building sites, complete privacy, beautiful Blue Ridge mountain views. Murray/Henley/ Western Albemarle school districts. 84.79 acres: MLS#563174 $995,000; 100.22 acres: MLS#563171 $1,100,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

GREENTREES

188+ acres in Albemarle, 12 miles south of Charlottesville on Rt 20. This wooded tract, mostly in planted pines, offers long road with potential for eight 21-acre lots. There is conservation easement potential. MLS#614109 $1,400,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

ASPIAN LAWN

Gorgeous lake and mountain views from 183 scenic acres within 16 miles of Charlottesville. Circa 1750’s residence, 6 bedrooms, 5 baths, 2 fireplaces, and whole-house generator. Guest cottage, barn, lush pastures, and 11-acre lake. MLS#610431 $1,945,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


NOW IS THE TIME TO SELL!

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

38

UNDER T C CONTRA

UNDER T C CONTRA

SOLD

FOUR SOLD IN BOVE A S DAY PRICE! ASKING

1825 WICKHAM PLACE

748 EXTON COURT

1120 EDMOND COURT

Welcome home! Stroll down the sidewalks of Wonderful two bedroom town home only 8 this picturesque neighborhood perfectly placed minutes to Downtown. Updated and ready between Charlottesville & Crozet. Enjoy an for you to move in. Walk into the sun filled livopen floorplan with large kitchen overlooking ing room with wood burning fireplace. A few the family room. Separate living room gives steps down you will find your spacious kitchtons of flexibility. The morning room is perfect en with dining area and half bath. Upstairs is as a dining room while allowing beautiful nat- your master suite with attached bath plus an ural light to flood the living space. Go upstairs additional bedroom and full bath. Don’t forget to find your master suite with two additional the storage in the attic. Off your dining area bedrooms. The top floor is finished off with is a wonderful screen porch to enjoy on these a large loft and mountain views to use as a beautiful days. The porch overlooks the open home office, study, or playroom. The basement common area behind the property. Enjoy the has a huge multi-purpose/rec room with full benefit of a big backyard with none of the bath. The big unfinished space has room for maintenance since the HOA includes lawna fitness area and tons of storage. Sit on your care! There is also a pool to enjoy all summer. back patio to enjoy the yard & wooded views. MLS# 614564 $235,000 2142 Avinity MLS# 612202 $445,000 1544 Sawgrass Ct

Price Drop!

Under Contract

Complete 1st floor living, lg MBR & BA w/laundry. Hardwoods on main floor. Gourmet kitchen & loft open to LR. Outside patio. $410,000

434.305.0361 paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/575169 pdmcartor@gmail.com

!

Just a quick walk from Downtown Crozet, you’ll find this wonderful end-unit villa. Walk into the main level to see a wide open floor plan with hardwood floors & natural light flowing throughout. Flexible floor plan has an eat in kitchen & dining room option or you can make the large living room even bigger. Open kitchen with island is ready to entertain guests. Walk out to your large patio with room to grill & socialize. Upstairs you’ll find a master suite with walk-in closet &private bath. A perfect nook is ready for reading or a home office. Two more large bedrooms, full bath, & laundry completes the upstairs. Attic is setup for storage. HOA takes care of the1-3 lawn Sunday pm& snow. MLS# 613574 $289,000

Loop

Open House

2808 Magnolia Dr

2357 Middle River Rd

Peace & tranquility less than 15 minutes from Downtown! Enjoy this wonderful house on over an acre with beautiful mature trees. $469,900

Come enjoy the peace and tranquility of your own lake front retreat! Single floor living home includes both MB & laundry on the main floor. $240,000

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SPECIAL INCENTIVES NOW FOR SPRING LISTINGS! ! N e w L is ti n g

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434.305.0361

pdmcartor@gmail.com HONORABLE MENTION

Best of Cville Real Estate Agents in 2016 & 2017, and a Finalist in 2018

GE T YO UR HO M E SO LD HE RE !

Best of Cville Real Estate Agents in 2016 & 2017!

Under inventory is low and buyers are in the market. If you have thought about selling, now may be the perfect time. Contact me now to explore your options!

Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhouse w/mountain views! Open floorplan, perfect for entertaining with private patio. $365,000

Buyers & Sellers!

FINALIST

PUT YOUR HOUSE HERE: ys! Contract in 6 da

Contact me today to find out about our New Listing Program. Let’s get your home

LISTED, UNDER CONTRACT & SOLD! paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com

Price Drop! 920 GARDENS BLVD #200 CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22901 WWW.AVENUEREALTYGROUP.COM

4161 Presidents Rd

63 Soapstone Ln

Country living 15 minutes of Downtown & within Albemarle County. This single floor home has beautifully updated kitchen & bathrooms. $260,000

Here’s your chance to live in a 1906 farmhouse with all the style and character while enjoying the conveniences of a modern home. $130,000

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/578197

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CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Pre-Construction Sales Now Open! Sales Center Coming Soon! Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 Villa Model in |Old Trail Village | 406 Astel Crozet, 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in Old in434-987-6522 Trail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VAVA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change


Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

LACKEY LANE

AUCTION Friday, Apr.9 at 1PM

April

9

Friday

Unique Fixer Upper! Circa 1930’s Railroad House in Covesville. Lovely double front porches. First floor is a separate apartment. Second floor, which is accessed from the back, is at ground level. Come out to see the possibilities! Can be purchased with 1 acre at $185,000 or with 50 acres for $375,000

601 Bridge St Danville, VA

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

FORECLO S U R E

39

OLD TRAIL DRIVE

Move In Ready! One level living in Old Trail! Energy efficient home with partially finished basement. Looks deceivingly small from the outside yet there is over 5,000 sq. ft. expertly designed to fit a variety of needs. 6” Castilian walnut floors, large rooms, sizable closets, custom master closet, deep front porch and lovely patio. This home is perfect for entertaining, working and learning remotely. Come visit in person or ask for a virtual tour through FaceTime. Owner is RE agent. $626,000

74-Unit Apartment Community Auction will be held at The Institute for Advanced Learning & Research 150 Slayton Ave, Danville, VA

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200

Bridge Street Side

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

Annie Gould Gallery

Prime Location

Attractive Interior

TERMS SUMMARY: A bidder’s deposit of $150,000 (in the form of a cashier’s check payable to “David Lingerfelt, Substitute Trustee”) is required to bid. Successful bidder must execute Foreclosure Sale Agreement immediately after the sale. Closing to occur within 30 days. Closing can be extended an additional 21 days if buyer adds $150,000 to the non-refundable deposit and presents a commitment letter from a lender satisfactory to the Trustee. No buyer’s premium will be charged. Full terms and conditions available online.

CONTACT Mike Torrence TRF Auctions 434-847-7741

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

Features: secured entry access, elevators, community room, patio terrace, 24hr maintenance, on-site mgmt. Location: Very attractive location w/ much to offer tenants • Adjacent to the popular Riverwalk Trail • One block from Averett University’s Riverview Campus • Near restaurants, breweries, shops, & attractions incl. the Science Center, Community Mkt, Carrington Pavilion, etc Tax Assm’t: $7,259,000 Value-Add: Foreclosure removes rent restrictions giving an outstanding opportunity to increase rents to market rate. After 3 years, restrictions are removed completely. AGENT ON SITE (appt req’d - call or visit website) • Tue, Mar.23, Noon-4PM • Tue, Mar.30, Noon-4PM • Tue, Apr.6, Noon-4PM • Other dates avail. by appt. DIR TO PROPERTY: Main St. to Memorial Dr. 1/4mi to L on Newton St to R on Bridge St. Property on left.

TRF

AUCTIONS

Torrence, Read, & Forehand

Rick Read CBC Read & Co. 434-455-2285

Colliers Int’l Multifamily Advisors 804-320-5500

TRFAuctions.com 434-847-7741 101 Annjo Court, Forest, VA 24551 | VAAF501

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Attractive Interior

Selling for David Lingerfelt, Substitute Trustee Property: 601 Bridge St, Danville, VA (tax parcel 21459) Type: Occupied Apartment Building - 74 units Occupancy: 93%, opportunity to fill vacancies at mkt rate Buildings: Two historic buildings adapted for reuse: the Tobacco Company Cigar Factory, circa 1894, and the Waddill Printing Company, circa 1926. Redeveloped into apartments in 2004 with two stair and elevator towers added to connect the buildings and provide full ADA accessibility. Size: 87,704 sq.ft. on 1.7 acres


Commercial Real Es

POISE

FEATURE

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

40

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

T

hese past 12 months have been brutal for many businesses in Central Virginia. And the harm has not been spread evenly. Businesses in the restaurant, hospitality, and events space, have been particularly hard hit. But even there, the burden is uneven. Some large take-out chains are doing fine. Check out the line of cars at Chick-fil-A. Others, who rely on large gatherings, had to press pause. Businesses unable to pivot to new buying and eating patterns closed or are barely hanging on. In many ways, the burden of the pandemic has been carried on the backs of these small businesses. But large or small, national or local, owners are beginning to feel optimistic. With the arrival of spring and good news on the COVID front, many feel the worst may be behind us. These hardest hit sectors may be poised to spark a comeback to a thriving economy and robust commercial real estate market.

Doom and Gloom A walk along Charlottesville’s Downtown Mall reveals a startling number of vacant storefronts. The Downtown Business Association of Charlottesville pegs the Mall’s vacancy rate at nearly 25 percent. While that downturn may be the most dramatic, other business districts are experiencing similar contractions. Experts also predict a continued retrenchment in the office market. Cushman & Wakefield say office vacancy rates will reach almost 16 percent next year, from 10 percent pre-crisis. Pricing and demand for office space in a post-COVID environment may take five years to recover to pre-pandemic levels. Those prone to doom and gloom might look at the seeming glut of new and under-construction Class A office space in Charlottesville and be tempted to think the worst. What looked like a good idea pre-pandemic became a potential liability as COVID worked its way through our


ED FOR A COMEBACK BY CARLA HUCKABEE

Even with that sobering reality, four entrants to the Charlottesville Class A office space are creating a buzz that’s hard to ignore. Jenny Stoner, Associate with Cushman & Wakefield | Thalhimer, says “This is a really exciting time. There is so much optimism with the arrival of spring, the COVID vaccine, and these new developments. It’s sparking great interest.” It’s easy to get swept up in the enthusiasm of the new office buildings: 3Twenty3, Dairy Central, CODE and Apex. At the 120,000-square-foot 3Twenty3 building a block from the Mall, tenants enjoy amenities like the pedes-

41

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Four Gamechangers

trian plaza, rooftop terrace with Blue Ridge views, bike racks and electric car charging stations. Beyond those niceties lies the real advantage of this cohort of buildings. It turns out their timing is perfect. Stoner says, “Based on where these four buildings were in their construction cycle, they have added all the important COVID-related features: touchless entry, operable windows, upgrades to HVAC systems, space to spread out. Those features are much easier to integrate in new construction.” Dairy Central also is open for business. Its 50,000 square feet of office space is set in a remarkable rehab of the historic Monticello Dairy building. The food hall, event space and residences are a true live/ work/play environment. Jodi Mills, Director of Marketing and Public Relations with Stony Point Development Group, says, “10th & Dairy apartments are targeted to open this summer, with leasing beginning in May. We have a great deal of interest for the

Restaurateurs and shop owners who survived 2020 are counting on a much brighter 2021. Across the region, new openings help to spur and support existing businesses and communities. Perfect for post-COVID, Vision BBQ in Vinegar Hill shopping center offers limited seating. Focusing on takeout and delivery takes advantage of a customer base trained by COVID to do exactly that. After a long delay, Broadcloth restaurant is opening at The Wool Factory, joining Selvedge Brewing and The Workhouse, a boutique wine and coffee shop serving oh-so-good pastries from Cou Cou Rachou. Now you can spend all day dining and imbibing at this Woolen Mills historic rehab gem. Two more upscale restaurants open this spring: The Ridley, located in The Draftsman Hotel on West Main Street, and one in Keswick Hall. The Ridley is one of Charlottesville’s Black-owned restaurants, honoring Dr. Walter N. Ridley, the first Black student to receive a graduate degree from the University of Virginia. Keswick Hall’s reopening follows a complete renovation of 80 guest rooms and suites, a new spa, and new restaurant. Dairy Market’s food hall is filling out. Mills reports “Starr Hill opened in February and the community has been so happy to welcome them back home to their roots, which started in downtown Charlottesville. Ten merchants have opened their doors and spring will bring five additional food stalls, including a Citizen Burger stand, GRN BRGR,

FEATURE

economy. Businesses are reexamining their need for office space. Half a million square feet is not easily repurposed if most of the staff is working from home. Case in point: nearly 800 State Farm employees at the Pantops operations center still work from home. It may be a permanent move.

Restaurants and Shops

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

state:

180 units.” Those tenants will be an economic engine for the businesses of Dairy Central and surrounding area. The CODE building (Center of Developing Entrepreneurs) is emblematic of the cohort, presiding over the Downtown Mall. Its potential economic impact on Charlottesville’s core can hardly be overstated. CODE’S CSH Development responded to the pandemic mid-construction by upgrading to operable windows and enhanced air quality controls. The natural ventilation, daylighting and building systems exceed LEED standards, adding to the CODE building’s appeal. Its forward-looking design can reconfigure parking spaces as transportation modes evolve. Systems to harvest rainwater for its green roof irrigation reduce its ecological footprint. The September 1st opening is highly anticipated. CSH Development President Andrew Boninti says, “Since January, interest has picked up. We expect to be at 80 percent when we open in September.” That can’t come soon enough for the restaurants and shops on the Downtown Mall. The fourth gamechanger is Apex Clean Energy headquarters on Garrett Street, slated to open this year. The cross-laminated timber speeds construction and boasts environmental advantages. Apex will put Charlottesville on the map for the largest mass timber building on the east coast. Cradle to Cradle Design™ materials and renewable energy will yield zero net energy use across Apex offices. This quartet of innovative buildings is set to recharge Charlottesville and the entire region.


FEATURE

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

42

Mashu Festival, Manila Street and Maizal, as well as a full-service restaurant.” Charlottesville isn’t the only locality rehabbing a dairy landmark. The former Tastee Freez building in Gordonsville was purchased for renovation by East of Maui Coffee. Nearby Champion Icehouse will open this spring in Gordonsville’s historic Memorial Hall. As Gordonsville shapes itself into a destination location, these new restaurants will be an important draw to the town. Amanda DiMeo, Staunton Economic Development Specialist, reports that Staunton Crossing is filling up, with Chipotle moving into one of three remaining spaces. Some brick-and-mortar retail operations are showing fortitude through the pandemic. Construction on Tractor Supply Company near Lake Monticello is nearly complete with an anticipated April opening. LACED Revival is moving into Orange County’s Locust Grove Town Center, where 12,000 square feet of commercial space is available. Aldi is filling the vacated grocery front in Albemarle Square.

Western State Hospital. This will create a prime industrial or manufacturing site at an ideal location near Interstates 81 and 64. The Staunton Mall was rezoned to include business and multi-family uses, in addition to retail. In Stuarts Draft, The Plant Company of Virginia, based in Crozet, began building a 300,000 square foot greenhouse operation. Work on the former Ladd School site in Waynesboro will accelerate after City Council incentivized timely development. Mitchener Properties, LLC, is expected to demolish the current school and construct six or seven buildings totaling about 70,000 square feet for commercial and retail use. All these moves indicate confidence in the market. Bill Gentry, Broker with Jefferson Land & Realty, sees that optimism play out every day. Concentrating

much of his work in Madison and Greene Counties, Gentry says, “Nobody knows what the future will hold. Some businesses are more resilient than others. I see a certain level of grit in many of the owners here. They have a can-do attitude. I expect most will adjust to whatever this market throws at them and find a way to survive.” Gentry reports “There is brisk interest in the commercial parcels adjacent to the Madison Plaza Food Lion Center. A medical related business has committed, and national retailers are inquiring about the remaining parcels. Directly behind that complex will be a 60-unit Virginia Housing multi-family complex. Also along U.S. 29, the vacated Martha Jefferson medical offices have new physicians’ offices moving in.”

High Density Residential In the category of “they can’t build it

fast enough,” multi-family developments in northern Albemarle and southern Greene Counties continue to explode. According to Gentry, The Knoll on Stone View will open this fall with 212 luxury apartments in Ruckersville. Nearby Terrace Greene is adding apartments and a town center. “You can’t beat the location with easy access to Charlottesville and favorable taxes. Developers are trying to accelerate their projects to beat inflation. There have been significant price jumps in materials. They’re doing their best to stay within budgets.” On the Albemarle County side, 261 apartments at Berkmar Landing are under construction and 320 apartments at the new Brookhill development are fully leased. Stoner says of Brookhill, “They are launching the town center this year with more than 300,000 square feet of office, commercial and retail space, and a hotel. For parking focused businesses, this is a great opportunity to get new Class A space close to Charlottesville. There is strong interest across all sectors in this location.” And nearby, Anthology Senior Living expects to open this fall. From newly planned Wilderness Crossing community in Orange County, complete with an industrial park, to the Rio Hill Shopping Center facelift… From demolitions to cutting edge office towers…Central Virginia’s commercial and business environment is ready to bounce back. Our area is enriched by local start-ups like Apex Clean Energy, DexCom, and Co-Star. As Chris Henry, President of Stony Point Development Group, says, “If we weren’t building these dynamic spaces, we would be at risk of losing these businesses.” And that would be a loss for the entire region. Carla Huckabee writes on high performing real estate.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

A Boost from Richmond Finally, there is good news out of Richmond related to COVID restrictions. “Forward Virginia” is moving into expansion mode. Spring weather and the gradual lifting of public health restrictions are coinciding. Outdoor entertainment venues can host up to 1,000 individuals or 30 percent capacity. Alcohol sales are also extended to midnight. With continued progress on vaccination and disease rates, April will usher in more expansions. State Bill 1471 could be an even bigger shakeup for downtown areas. By allowing localities to designate open container districts, the bill will help restaurant and entertainment districts rebound.

Other Commercial and Industrial Moves In the Staunton-Augusta-Waynesboro market, major developments are in the works. DiMeo reports that demolition began on 18 buildings of the former

The Aldi supermarket is supposed to be built at the site of the former Fresh Market location in Albemarle Square


Commercial and Investment Properties For Sale & Lease

43 MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

Last 36 Months $113 Million Sold/Leased 119&Deals Commercial and• Investment Properties For •Sale Lease Last 36 Months • $113 Million Sold/Leased • 119 Deals , ,

FEATURED PROPERTIES Commercial and Investment Properties For Sale & Lease FEATURED PROPERTIES

For Lease

Available

Last 36 Months • $113 Million AvailableSold/Leased • 119 Deals Available Available

For Lease

,

Charlottesville 5th St. 1,600 SF - 7,000 SF Charlottesville 5th St. 1,600 SF - 7,000 SF AvailableAvailable for Lease Join Starbucks for Lease Join Starbucks

FEATURED PROPERTIES Former Walgreens 11,214 SF

ForLease Lease For SaleFor or Sale or Lease

ForAvailable Sale For Sale

Charlottesville 5th St. 1,600 SF - 7,000 SF Harrisonburg Verona Portfolio of 4 Buildings Harrisonburg 7.23 Ac11,214 Mixed Use Available for Lease Join Starbucks Former Walgreens Verona Portfolio of Co 4 Buildings Harrisonburg 7.23 MixedSF Use by Augusta Government Parcel byAc JMU

by Augusta Co Government

Parcel by JMU

For Sale or Lease

Sold

Downtown by Parking Garage

Sold

Harrisonburg 7.23 Ac Mixed Use Parcel by JMU

Staunton 18,000+ SF Building Downtown by Parking Garage

14,000 SF Former Dealership

6,200 SF UVA Medical Building

Leased

Leased

Sold

Sold

Sold

Sold

2,500 SF New Starbucks Woodstock Charlottesville Bank by High School

Leased

8,415 SF Historic Downtown Building

12,120 SF Flex Property Sold Charlottesville Bank by High School

SFSold Shell Gas C-Store 8,4151,700 SF Historic Downtown Building

5.7 Acres Staunton 18,000+ SF Building Charlottesville Rt. 29 Building Stauntonby 18,000+ Downtown Parking SF Garage

Sold

Sold

Charlottesville Bank by High School

Sold Sold

For Sale For Sale

Sold

Sold Leased

Sold

5.7 Acres Acres 5.7 Charlottesville Rt. 29 Charlottesville Charlottesville Rt. 29

For Sale

For Sale

Verona Portfolio of 4 Buildings by Augusta Co Government

5.7 Acres

Harrisonburg Harrisonburg Harrisonburg Former Walgreens 11,214 SF Former Walgreens 11,214 SF

Leased SF Flex Property 12,120

Sold Sold

14,000 SF Former Dealership

Leased Charlottesville New Starbucks Drive-Thru Sold 14,000 SF Former Dealership

Charlottesville New Starbucks Leased Drive-Thru

6,200 SF UVA Medical Building Sold

30,000 SF Warehouse-Distribution Property 6,200 SF UVA Medical Building

30,000 SF

Sold Warehouse-Distribution Property

Sold Charlottesville Bank by Duners

8,415 SF Historic Downtown Building

12,120 SF Flex Property

6,100 SF Carilion Medical Clinic

Charlottesville Bank by Duners Over $361 Million Sold/Leased in Last 17 Years

44 Bank Branches in VA & NC 30,000 SF Warehouse-Distribution Property

Sold

2 Acres 7-11 C-Store

BankBranches Branches in NCNC 4452 Bank inVA VA& &

Property Types Include: Shopping Centers, Office Buildings, Gas Stations, Apartments, Mini-Storage, Industrial Buildings, Hotels Serving Local, Regional, National Clients Charlottesville Bank by Duners

2 Acres 7-11 C-Store

44 Bank Branches in VA & NC

2903 N. Augusta Street Staunton, VA 24401 • PO Box 5017 Charlottesville, VA 22905 Over $361 Million Sold/Leased in Last 17 Years

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Sold

2 Acres 7-11 C-Store Charlottesville New Starbucks Drive-Thru

Property Types Include: Shopping Centers, Office Buildings, Gas Stations, Apartments, Mini-Storage, Industrial Buildings, Hotels Serving Local,17 Regional, Over $361 Million Sold/Leased in Last Years National Clients 2903 N. Augusta Street Staunton, VA 24401 • PO Box 5017 Charlottesville, VA 22905 Property Types Include: Shopping Centers, Office Buildings, Gas Stations, Apartments, Mini-Storage, Industrial Buildings, Hotels Serving Local, Regional, National Clients 2903 N. Augusta Street Staunton, VA 24401 • PO Box 5017 Charlottesville, VA 22905


Spring Listings

BAREFOOT FARM

• Comfortable, manageable Keswick Estate • 38 acres, 3 separate parcels • English cottage style main residence • Seperate guest cottage • 6 stall shed row barn • Spectacular private setting with pond • Opposite Castle Hill and adjoins Keswick Vineyard • Glorious westward mountain views and sunsets • $1,795,000

FREE UNION

LAKE ANNA WATERFRONT • • • • • • • •

Country elegance Quality craftmanship Custom built Main floor master suite 4,564 sq. ft. finished living space 10 ft ceilings (2) 3 car garages 3,199 sq ft unfinished basement $1,525,000

LLANDAFF FARM

IN D PE N

D

IN

G

• Western Albemarle • Brick 6,189 sq. ft. residence • 6 bedrooms and 5 baths • 9 ft. ceilings and hardwood floors • Main floor master suite • Private rear screened porch • $819,000

PE N

• Lake Anna parcel • 83 acre parcel • Mix of open pasture and mixed hardwoods • 3,500 linear frontage along Lake Anna • Multiple building sites • Farmhouse, barn sold AS-IS • $2,499,000

CNOC TIRIM G

WIND RIVER

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

• Located in Southern Albemarle • 48 acre turnkey horse property • 3 stall barn and 3 board fenced pastures • Stocked 2 acre lake • 4,300 sq. ft. main residence • Hardwood floors and vaulted ceilings • Remodeled kitchen with quartz counters • Main floor master suite with remodeled bath • 1,897 sq. ft. of road frontage with 11 division rights • $1,250,000

EX N C E LU W SI VE

BROOK HOLLOW EX N C E LU W SI VE

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

44

• 25 acre Rivanna river front estate • 14 ft. ceilings and hardwood floors • Renovated gourmet kitchen • Burn / green house • Extensive landscaping • $1,185,000

HILLTOP HOUSE IN SCOTTSVILLE • Located within 10 miles of Charlottesville • 19.80 acres offering privacy • 3 rented cottages • Cell tower lease revenue • Annual gross income $46,000+ • $765,000

• Renovated Cape Cod • 4 bedrooms and 3 baths • Finished basement • Separate 2 story masonry building • Additional lot • $425,000

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com

27 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville


REALTORS®

Did You Buy During the 2006 Boom?

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

Find Homes Team

45

Did YouDid BuyYou During Did BuyYou the During Did Buy 2006 You the During Boom? 2006 Buy the During Boom? Did 2006 You the Did Boom? Buy 2006 You During Buy Boom? DidDuring the You2006 Buy theBoom? During 2006 Boom? the 20

Integrity & Service is Our Motto!

434-337-3216

Cynthia Hash

Associate Broker/Team Leader

Keller Williams Realty 3510 Remson Ct # 301 Charlottesville VA 22901, 434-220-2200. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this is not considered a solicitation. Fair Housing Compliant. Licensed to sell real estate in Commonwealth of VA. Each office independently owned & operated.

Integrity & Service Integrity is Integrity Our Motto! & Service & Service Integrity is Our Integrity is Our Motto! & Service Motto! Integrity & Service is Our &isService Our Motto! Motto! is Our Motto! Cynthia Hash Cynthia Hash

434-337-3216

Associate Broker/Team Associate Leader Broker/Team Leader Associate Broker/Team Leader

New Homes in the City of Charlottesville, Albemarle, and Louisa County Decorated model shown by appointment located at 210 Glenleigh Rd, Charlottesville VA 22911 Evergreenhomebuilders.com | 434.282.4584

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

METICULOUS CRAFTSMANSHIP AND TIMELESS FINISHES


MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

46

HOME SALES Live STATS It Up ENDING THE WEEK OF MARCH 21, 2021 THERE WERE 84 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 32 were in Albemarle with an average price of $603,316 n 10 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $401,994 n 10 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $319,529 n 7 were in Greene with an average price of $338,021 n 3 were in Louisa with an average price of $583,781 n 9 were in Nelson with an average price of $456,667 n 1 was in Orange with a price of $435,000 n 5 were in Staunton with an average price of $218,200 n 7 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $283,543

HOMES SOLD

THE 1928 FOWLER STREET BELVEDERE

928 MONTICELLO AVENUE BELMONT

151 PARK DRIVE VILLAGE OAKS

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

101 CHERRYWOOD CT SPRING CREEK

300 S ELLISON LANE WAYNESBORO

104 JOAN CIRCLE STAUNTON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47

Let an agent who knows guide you.

$199,900

GREENE CO

$463,315

Hidden Hills Subdivision

133 BLUE RIDGE DR

MARCH 24 - 30, 2021 ISSUE 3012

A DREAM HOME IS GREAT, BUT THE RIGHT ONE IS BETTER. $424,900

SOLD

Bev Nash

434-981-5560

• Solid 1024 sf, 3 bed, 1 bath home on 5.47 acres • Lush pasture and a separate storage building • Large eat-in kitchen with high ceilings • Year-round water for horses, cattle, or gardens • Mountain and pasture views off back deck • Property line to middle of Swift Run, a trout stream

$589,000

Steger Creek Troy, Va

Ruth Guss

434-960-0414

• 4 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths, 4,588 Fin. Sq. Ft • New Home to be Built on 4.79 Acres • First Floor Master Suite with attached Garden Bath • 5” Engineered Hardwood Floors on Main Level • 2 Car Garage, Crown & Chair Molding • 10’ x 20’ Morning Room, 2 Zone HVAC

4209 HAWKINS LANE

Shannon G. Hudson 540.661.2083 • Classic home in a classy neighborhood • 5 bedrooms w/3 masters, 4.5 baths • Landscaped w/brick courtyard & fountain • Partial basement w/1 car garage • Sunroom, FP, built in bookshelves

$535,000

$99,900

SIMILAR TO PIC

Dan Corbin • • • • • • • •

434-531-6155

To Be Built, Elegant One Level Living on 2 Ac 2800 sq ft. 4 Bed, 4 1/2 Ba Finished Bonus Room Up Open Great Room, Dining and Spacious Kitchen, Walk in Pantry 9ft Ceilings, Granite, Upgrades Galore, 2-Sided Gas Fireplace LVP, Ceramic Tile, Carpet, 20 SEER HVAC, Foam Insulation No HOA, Well and Septic, 6 Miles to I64, 20 minutes to Cville MLS 613824

Piney Mountain Subdivision, Palmyra

10+ acre Lots

GOT PLANS? LET’S BUILD!

434.985.0021 410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 Downtown

• Country Living in Convenient Location. • Private Stocked Pond & almost 5 acres in Albemarle County • Main Level Master Suite • Eat In Kitchen w Stainless Appliances • Covered rear deck & Finished Basement • Covered Front Porch w View of your pond & pasture • MLS# 605931

$599,999

31 ASHLAWN BLVD

Pat Burns

434-465-4444

• Sitting amidst estates and horse properties this beautiful 5 acre lot in Keswick area for sale to build your dream home. Convenient to Charlottesville, Gordonsville. 99,900.

517 LEXINGTON AVE

$945,000

SALE PENDING

Lori Click

434-326-7593

• Beautiful Lake Monticello Waterfront Property • Location, Location, Location. • 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths • 102 Feet of Water Frontage, Dock is 53’ x 12’, Kayak Rack • Sunroom - Views From Most of the Windows

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • • • • • • • • •

Quintessential Charlottesville Notable Victorians on Lexington Ave Extensively renovated Redesigned character in all bathrooms, Master suite created on 3rd level Tremendous banquette seating & abundant light Ornate fixtures throughout convey Unique shelves, custom art features & organic tile and Onyx detail. Large level fenced yard

434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Gorgeous NEW 10+ Acre Homesites • No HOA, Common Sense C&Rs, Firefly • Close to the Lake, Dining, Shopping, Schools • Ready to Build? Be in Your New Home Summer 2021 • Your Choice of Remaining Lots - $109,000 • Call for A Personal Tour - MLS 602023

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730


L o c a l

12570 Chicken Mountain Rd Orange , VA Home built in 2000 from reclaimed materials - 100 acres is enhanced by being in the middle of a couple of thousand acres

L u x u r y

511 Shelton Mill Rd Charlottesville , VA Fox Haven offers private retreat & convenient location. Minutes to shopping & amenities including Harris Teeter Grocery, UVA Healthcare.

6057 Gordonsville Rd Keswick , VA

Duke & Sharon Merrick (434) 242-8355

Brook Hollow - Comfortable and manageable Keswick estate of 38 acres. Spectacular setting, opposite Castle Hill and adjoining Keswick Vineyards. Steve White (434) 989-4415

2640 North Farmington Hts Charlottesville , VA

616 Baywick Cir Crozet , VA

Outstanding house in highly desirable Farmington, overlooking pond & 3rd hole on Farmington Country Club's East Golf Course.

Extraordinary mountain views and golf frontage in popular Old Trail! Walkable to everything and VIEWS! Low maintenance home includes a home warranty.

4319 Scottsville Rd Charlottesville , VA

Byrd Abbott (434) 953-8045

Susan Cameron Reres (434) 989-4415

Jane Porter Fogleman (434) 242-8355

Llandaff - 19 acres in Albemarle County The southernmost hilltop of Carters Mountain, 8 miles from town, overlooking huge farms, estates, and the Hardware River below. Steve White (434) 989-4415

View These Homes Of Distinction Online

CHARLOTTESVILLE 434.955.5155 | WESTERN ALBEMARLE 434.205.4355 ZION CROSSROADS 434.589.2611 | GREENE COUNTY 434.985.2348

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

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C-VILLE Weekly | March 24 - 30, 2021  

C-VILLE Weekly | March 24 - 30, 2021  

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