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THE VIRGINIA FESTIVAL OF THE BOOK IS BACK

VOL. 30 NO. 10 n MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T WWW.CAAR.COM HE CHARLOTTESVILL E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene,

Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange,

Augusta

One year later: remembering the week the world stopped PAGE 7 Shocking: Dominion Energy overcharging customers PAGE 9

2021

Free and Open to All BY KEN WILSON

INSIDE

IMAGES COURTESY VIRGINIA FESTIVAL OF THE BOOK

MARCH 10 – 16, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

PAGES & PAGES


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March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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S E N TA R A OR T HOPE DIC S

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Staying safe at home doesn’t mean we’re safe from orthopedic injury. Even virtual yoga becomes hazardous with kids zooming through your Zen. If you find yourself injured after being at the bottom of a three-kid pileup, know that Sentara Orthopedics is here to care for all your new injuries in your new normal. Adhering to the strictest COVID protocols, we continue to bring you the highest quality care in the safest possible environment. Same-day appointments available. Call 434-654-5575 to make an appointment, or visit sentara.com/orthopedics for more information.

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#showcvillelove Charlottesville businesses need support right now more than ever before. That’s why Charlottesville Insider is joining with Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine and C-VILLE Weekly to sponsor the Show C’ville Love Gift Card Giveaway. Each week starting February 14, we’ll be giving away two $100 gift certificates to a Charlottesville business of the winners’ choice. It’s easy to enter for a chance to win, and here’s how you do it: Post photos on Instagram and Facebook doing the following things and use #ShowCvilleLove. Tag the local business and location if applicable. Exploring the outdoors | Eating at a local restaurant | Picking up curbside | Shopping or visiting a local business Participating in a class (outdoors/social distancing or virtually) | Visiting outdoor breweries/wineries etc... Staying in a Charlottesville hotel or other lodging | Doing something nice for someone (Showing some love) Anything else you love to do in Charlottesville

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com facebook.com/cville.weekly

#showcvillelove


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No.10

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FEATURE 12

EDITORIAL

For the books

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

Telling tales at this year’s (virtual) Festival of the Book. NEWS 7 8 City finally breaks ground for public housing at South First Street. 9 Why Dominion gets away with overcharging customers. 11 Emotional and monetary cost of canceling UVA graduation.

CULTURE 19 20 In Memoriam: Remembering artist and teacher Beryl Solla. 20 Extra: Fight cabin fever by escaping to a cabin.

21 Screens: The Father gives Anthony Hopkins the role of his life. 26 Sudoku 27 Crossword 29 Free Will Astrology

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Jedd Farris, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Erika Howsare, Meg Irvin, Cortney Meriwether, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Mary Shea Valliant, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

Q&A 30 What book has gotten you through the pandemic?

CLASSIFIED 31

ART DIRECTOR Max March (x16) GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com

Real Estate Weekly Page 35

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C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2021 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

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THIS WEEK

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The final days of “normal” life—this week, one year ago—feel like a hundred million years ago, and yet I remember every detail of that week as though it was yesterday. The last in-person reporting trip I took was to attend a panel on criminal justice reform at CitySpace; the last time I went inside a bar for a beer was Thursday, March 12, 2020, at Three Notch’d. I sat there with my friend, talking about the news and the dizzying stream of event cancellations that had already begun. We agreed that we had a weird month ahead. Ha! The year since has wavered between unspeakably horrific and unspeakably boring. Often it’s been both at once. So, like many, I have searched for escape, listening to dreamy music and watching silly TV and reading fantastical books. I have sucked down a dozen engaging but formulaic murder mysteries from Agatha Christie and her imitators. I have immersed myself in the far-off spycraft of John le Carré’s dour Cold War British agents. I got really into the Captain Jack Aubrey series, in which the epic nautical battles of the 18th century are rendered in such glowing detail that you can almost hear the waves crashing against the hulls of the schooners as you turn the page. (A middle-aged reading list if ever there was one—the pandemic has aged us all.) The end of the pandemic is now in sight, however. The country will have enough vaccines for all adults by the end of May, says President Biden. Just hang in there for a little longer—let the Virginia Festival of the Book (page 12) take your mind off things. We’ve been at sea for months, but now, up in the crow’s nest of one of those imposing Napoleonic sailing vessels, we can see the black hump of land on the horizon.—Ben Hitchcock

3.10.21

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CALL OR EMAIL TO RSVP (REQUIRED) INFO@SIGNATUREMEDSPA.COM | 434.923.4646 Charlottesville.gov/FixALeak

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March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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“We’ll put a mask on the ACC trophy for sure.”

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—UVA men’s hoops coach Tony Bennett, after winning the conference in a COVID-altered season

NEWS IN BRIEF Hopeless Hamilton Charlottesville and Albemarle’s 57th House of Delegates district is, at a low estimate, 85 percent Democrats. But don’t tell that to Philip Andrew Hamilton, Fairfax native and AT&T employee who has announced that he’s running for the district as a Republican. Hamilton is anti-mask and pro-Confederate statue; he invited Richmond pro-Trump agitator Mike Dickinson to speak at his campaign kickoff on Sunday. After Hamilton’s announcement, sitting Delegate Sally Hudson tweeted “The contrast between us could not be more stark.”

One year ago today...

March 11, 2020

March 12, 2020  Governor Northam declares a state of emergency in Virginia.  The City of Charlottesville and Albemarle County issue declarations of local emergency soon after Northam’s declaration, allowing the localities to access emergency reserve resources to mitigate the spread of the virus.  The Charlottesville Ten Miler is canceled, for the first time since it began in the 1970s.  The NCAA men’s basketball tournament is canceled. WHITE HOUSE

March 13, 2020  Northam orders Virginia’s K-12 schools to close for at least two weeks.

Top doc: Anthony Fauci speaks at the White House in April.

I

t’s been a year since the COVID-19 pandemic upended our lives. And how far we’ve come—this time last year, we thought “flattening the curve” would take two weeks, and the medical advice of the moment was “don’t touch your face.” A year later, toilet paper is no longer the hottest commodity on the market, but students continue to learn online, working from home is the new normal for many, and attending a large, in-person event is still incomprehensible. Since Governor Ralph Northam’s state of emergency declaration last year, half a million Virginians have contracted the disease and more than 9,500 have died. In the timeline on the right, we look back at the earliest days of the coronavirus pandemic, and how it unfolded in Charlottesville and around the country.—Emily Hamilton

March 14, 2020  The first COVID-19-related death in Virginia is recorded. The state registers a total of 45 virus cases. March 15, 2020  Northam bans gatherings of more than 100 people in Virginia. March 16, 2020  The first UVA employee tests positive for COVID-19, also marking the first case of the virus in the wider Charlottesville area. March 17, 2020  Northam gives local law enforcement the power to enforce a new limit of 10 people in restaurants, fitness centers, and theaters.  UVA cancels Final Exercises for the Class of 2020. March 23, 2020  Northam orders Virginia schools to close for the rest of the year, along with certain non-essential businesses.  Trump downplays the severity of the virus as states begin to dole out their own stay-at-home orders, stating that “Our country wasn’t built to be shut down.”

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ALBEMARLE COUNTY

 The U.S. records 270 new COVID cases. President Trump says, “Stay calm and it will go away.”  The Virginia Festival of the Book is canceled.

@cville_weekly

A proposed development that would have brought 370 new apartments to Albemarle County—with 75 percent designated as affordable housing—was deferred by the county planning commission last week. A well-organized group of residents from the nearby affluent Forest Lakes community spoke against the project. They’re in favor of affordable housing, they say—just don’t build it anywhere near them.

March 10, 2020

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

Attack of the NIMBYs

COVID-19 TIMELINE

 The World Health Organization officially declares COVID-19 a pandemic—a catalyst that set off many subsequent closures.  UVA moves classes online for the “foreseeable future.”  Tom Hanks announces that he has COVID-19, making him one of the first public figures to contract the virus.  The NBA suspends the rest of its season after Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert tests positive.  Albemarle County Public Schools suspend school-related travel outside the county for students and staff, along with travel inside the county to events with more than 100 people.

Students return to city schools After an entire year away from the classroom, around 2,100 preschoolers through sixth graders in the city school system started inperson classes on Monday. Students must have their temperatures checked, wear masks, and practice social distancing, among other safety measures. Due to a bus driver shortage and rider limits, many students have no choice but to walk or bike to school, reports The Daily Progress. Parents and local nonprofits have stepped up to help supervise students or provide transportation, but remain concerned about safety. In the coming weeks, the division is expected to hire more drivers and add more routes.

Sad grads PAGE 11


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C&F Wealth Management Announces New Planner in Charlottesville for 2021!

NEWS

C&F Wealth Management is pleased to announce the appointment of Chad Davis, Wealth Planner to the Stonefield Financial Center team in Charlottesville. Chad has been employed at TD Ameritrade in Charlottesville for the last 10 years.

“I am extremely pleased to have Chad join our Charlottesville team of C&F Wealth Management. Chad will serve an instrumental role by partnering with other members of the C&F Financial Center team to grow our presence in the Charlottesville area.” says William “Bill” Morrison, President, C&F Wealth Management. About C&F Financial Corporation C&F Bank operates 31 retail bank branches and three commercial loan offices located throughout the Hampton to Charlottesville corridor and the Northern Neck region in Virginia and offers full wealth management services through its subsidiary C&F Wealth Management, Inc. Securities and advisory services are offered through LPL Financial (LPL), a registered investment advisor and broker-dealer (member FINRA/SIPC). Insurance products are offered through LPL or its licensed affiliates. C&F Bank and C&F Wealth Management are not registered as a broker-dealer or investment advisor. Registered representatives of LPL offer products and services using C&F Wealth Management, and may also be employees of C&F Bank. These products and services are being offered through LPL or its affiliates, which are separate entities from, and not affiliates of, C&F Bank or C&F Wealth Management. Securities and insurance offered through LPL or its affiliates are: Not Insured by FDIC or Any Other Government Agency

Not Bank Guaranteed

Not Bank Deposits or Obligations

May Lose Value

EZE AMOS

Chad has provided advice and strategies over the last 14 years in Client Education, Asset Management and Financial Planning for individuals and families and will serve as Wealth Planner at the new C&F Financial Center located in the Stonefield Shopping Complex, 3920 Lenox Avenue. Chad has been working in the Charlottesville market for Chad Davis over 10 years and holds both Chartered RetireWealth Planner Stonefield Financial Center ment Planning Counselor CRPC® and Accredited Wealth Management Advisor AWMA® designations. Chad began his career in Charlottesville with Scottrade, where he served as Branch Manager.

On Sunday, Charlottesville officially kicked off the first phase of the resident-led redevelopment of South First Street.

Promise kept South First Street kicks off redevelopment

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

@cvillenews_desk

facebook.com/cville.weekly

By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

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or more than 25 years, redevelopment and public housing in the City of Charlottesville have been conversations and promises to residents,” said Audrey Oliver, standing on a dirt lot near Oakwood Cemetery downtown. “The promises became broken, and residents became discouraged, because the promises were never delivered.” That string of broken promises will soon be interrupted. Oliver, a public housing resident, was one of the planners who helped design what will become the South First Street public housing complex. On Sunday, Oliver and others gathered at the site of the development to break ground on the 175-plus-unit project. “I want us all to remember that what we are doing today will last longer than any of us will be alive,” said Shelby Marie Edwards, the executive director of Charlottesville’s Public Housing Association of Residents, at the ceremony. “The only thing we know for sure is that we’re going to die, so what are we going to do with our lives while we have it? Are we going to build

systems? Are we going to break down systems? Are we going to do both?” For Edwards, the moment held particular weight. Her mother, Holly Edwards, was Charlottesville’s vice mayor and a PHAR program coordinator who pushed for reinvestment in public housing throughout her career. Sunday would have been Holly Edwards’ 62nd birthday. Mayor Nikuyah Walker, Delegate Sally Hudson, and PHAR board of directors chair Joy Johnson were among the ceremony attendees, joined by several South First Street residents who played an instrumental role in designing the redevelopment. During this first phase, three new apartment buildings will be constructed on the vacant land at the intersection of South First Street at Hartmans Mill Road. They will contain 63 one-, two-, and three-bedroom units, featuring dishwashers, laundry machines, high-speed internet, and other requested amenities. Solar panels will be installed on top of each building. The first phase will cost an estimated $13 million, and is expected to be completed by spring 2022. In phase two, set to begin next year, 58 existing public housing units will be demolished and replaced with 113

“Today we understand that not just some people, but all people deserve to have homes that they can feel and see the love in.” MAYOR NIKUYAH WALKER


NEWS

Bill blues Dominion pockets over-earnings, leaving customers in the lurch By Caroline Challe

Dominion opponents have concerns about those clean energy projects, however. One of Dominion Energy’s newest projects involves building wind turbines off the coast of Virginia Beach. The company says the project requires large over-earnings in order to produce this expensive form of clean energy. “Dominion receives a 10 percent annual rate of return on anything that they’re building. So instead of cost-efficient renewable energy like rooftop solar that is distributed all over Virginia, they’re going to choose to build a much more expensive renewable energy project so that they can get that rate of return as high as possible,” says Craighill. “And that’s how a monopoly works.” As the pandemic rages on and millions of citizens struggle, a bill was proposed that would have required the State Corporation Commission to return 100 percent of the amount of a utility’s earnings back to customers’ bills. On February 1, that bill was killed by the Virginia Senate

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“I’ve met lots of constituents struggling to make ends meet, and between sky-high rent and utilities, just affording safe shelter is a major struggle.” DELEGATE SALLY HUDSON

Carolyn Johnson is one of millions of Virginians burdened by costly energy bills.

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ANNABEL JONES

@cville_weekly

or Carolyn Johnson, a Charlottesville homeowner and care worker, the financial strain of the pandemic has been exacerbated by her high energy bill—almost $300 last month. “Water bill and electric–them the highest thing I got. It’s really hard. I am struggling trying to get it done,” Johnson says. Though her household’s energy habits are typical, Johnson says, “by the time we pay up everything, we end up with maybe $200 left.” Johnson is one of the three-quarters of Virginians who have an unaffordable energy bill according to federal standards, says Cassady Craighill of the climate advocacy organization Clean Virginia. “We have a real crisis in Virginia where our energy bills are too high. They’re the sixth highest in the country,” Craighill says. The prices are all the more galling given that Dominion, Virginia’s energy monopoly, has an enormous cash stockpile. Dominion has near-total control over swathes of the Virginia energy market. In exchange for that power, its profits are traditionally limited to a rate agreed upon with the state—in recent years, 10 percent. Profits above that threshold are supposed to be refunded to customers. In the last three years, however, Dominion pocketed $500 million more than that rate of return, because a 2018 law allows it to keep excess profits as long as it invests the profits in clean energy projects. Delegate Sally Hudson believes that overearnings leave Virginia residents economically vulnerable. “I’ve met lots of constituents struggling to make ends meet, and between sky-high rent and utilities, just affording safe shelter is a major struggle,” say Hudson, who represents Charlottesville and part of Albemarle County. “The burden of electric bills also hits hardest for the families that already struggle most, because they typically live in units without the more modern energy efficiency measures like improved windows, insulation, and thermostats.” Despite the astronomical over-earnings, Dominion claims that its rates are low, and consumer error is the reason many are facing astronomically high prices. “Hopefully, people you know, set their thermostat at the right temperature so that they’re not driving those bills up,” said Rayhan Daudani, Dominion’s manager of media relations. Daudani says the company’s re-investment of the over-earnings winds up benefiting customers. “Instead of charging customers the costs of the projects, we would take the extra revenue and offset those costs, so that they get the benefit of the project without seeing any rate increase.”

Commerce and Labor committee. In an 11-3 vote, the bill was “passed by indefinitely,” effectively terminating its chances. Eight Democrats and three Republicans decided to tank the bill, while three other Democrats voted in favor of it. When the bill failed, many advocacy groups like Clean Virginia cited Dominion’s hefty donations to state officials as the reason why. Dominion has long been the largest contributor of campaign funds to both political parties in the state, although recently some Democrats have sworn off its contributions. “When you have a company like Dominion giving those same legislatures hundreds of thousands of dollars every year, that’s a huge conflict of interest since clearly, those legislators are going to have a hard time convincing their voters and constituents that they’re acting in the best interest of them when they’re routinely passing legislation that favors Dominion,” says Craighill. Hudson, who works with many legislators who have accepted Dominion’s donations, believes the company uses its capital to maintain influence over the General Assembly. “The state guarantees that Dominion will recover its costs for those projects anyway. The company doesn’t need to over-earn to make clean energy investments,” Hudson says. “Dominion writes its own rules, and some legislators just sign off. They don’t want you to understand why you’re not getting a fair deal. Fortunately, there are fewer and fewer of those legislators every year.”

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

multi-family units, including townhouses and apartments with one to five bedrooms. The brand-new site will feature a community center, basketball court, play areas, and office space. It will be backed by lowincome tax credits, city and state funds, and philanthropy. After destroying Black neighborhoods like Vinegar Hill during urban renewal, Charlottesville built its first public housing sites for displaced residents in the 1960s. “There was no intention behind the building of these spaces that honored people and their families,” said Walker during the ceremony. “Oftentimes we want to blame the individuals for not being able to persevere out of an environment that was built and intended to destroy them. If you walk into some of these units, you see cinder block walls and floors.” “Today we understand that not just some people, but all people deserve to have homes that they can feel and see the love in,” she added. “That’s what we’ve been attempting to do with this redevelopment.” According to Edwards, attempts to revitalize public housing go as far back as 2009, but have consistently failed to get off the ground. In 2016, PHAR finally got the ball rolling when it released a vision statement, providing insight on residents’ priorities and desire to spearhead the redevelopment process. From 2019 to 2020, a dozen South First Street residents met with architects on a weekly basis. After receiving training on land use and site planning, they helped to design all aspects of the second redevelopment phase. “Not only did [the residents] present at City Council [and] the Planning Commission, but they presented at the governor’s conference and did an awesome job,” said Johnson. “To say that public housing or lowincome residents don’t know what kind of community they want to build—they proved them wrong.” Hudson emphasized the need for similar resident-led housing projects not just in Charlottesville, but nationwide. “Across the country we are seeing more communities prioritize their public housing…instead of putting community leaders in the driver seat,” she said. “This is one of those places where Charlottesville is really being a leader nationally.” Once the new apartments are constructed, current South First Street residents will have the option to move in, transfer to another public housing site, or receive a housing voucher before redevelopment continues in summer 2022. The final phase of redevelopment is still in the works, but it will involve the land across the street from the original units. All three phases are expected to cost a combined total of $38 million, and be completed by the end of 2024. In the meantime, resident planner workshops and meetings will continue throughout this year and next year, allowing even more residents to have a say in the future of their community. “There’s still lots of work that needs to be done to get all of our families new homes,” said Oliver. “Let’s work together and make it happen.”

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From Classroom to Boardroom MARCH 30— APRIL 8, 2021

Race & Equity Conference Building more equitable communities through inclusive workforce development and workplace action.

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March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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APRIL 2, 1:00—4:00PM A virtual platform for job candidates to explore growing industries in Information Technology and Health & Human Services in the region and receive one-onone industry-specific career coaching in an informal, educational atmosphere.

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NEWS

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Magna cum late UVA graduation delayed, millions in tourism revenue lost By Mary Jane Gore

D

hosts here don’t fully depend on graduation. The season for Charlottesville is spring, summer, and fall weekends.” Caterers and restaurants have been working hard to keep their doors open in a difficult year. Lisa McEwan, owner of HotCakes at Barracks Road, is now in the kitchen six days a week and enjoying a lift in store sales from returning students and warmer weather. “I’m not sure yet how we will market for this year’s graduation period,” she says. “Catering is important to profitability.” Parents, who are not invited to Grounds, pick up most of that tab. Manager Julia Wegman at Farm Bell Kitchen and Dinsmore Boutique Inn is testing materials for the best ways to package to-go brunch foods. She wonders when people will feel comfortable walking into crowded rooms once more, and how businesses will adapt. Optimistic, she says some visitors may still wish to come and organize activities of their own near Grounds. It won’t be the same, however. Davis at Marriott says she feels worst for the Class of 2020’s two-year wait. “Once the students leave, it’s hard to say ‘come back,’” she says.

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DAN ADDISON

COURTNEY CACATIAN, CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

@cville_weekly

This year’s UVA graduation will be held virtually, and will look nothing like 2018’s, pictured above.

“This lost revenue will make recovery that much more difficult.”

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

ashed hopes have become commonplace in this year of the pandemic, but UVA President Jim Ryan’s announcement on March 3 still stung: No friends, family, or guests will be allowed at the university’s 2021 graduation. Last year’s festivities were canceled too, and this year the school had hoped to hold two ceremonies on consecutive weekends for the classes of 2020 and 2021. The university is weighing options for honoring its students—a virtual ceremony will be held this spring, and a visitorfriendly graduation could be in the works for an as-yet unspecified date. The UVA news is especially bitter for the class of 2020, which has now seen commencement ceremonies postponed twice. It’s also tough on area businesses, which have had a difficult year. Courtney Cacatian, executive director of the Charlottesville Albemarle Convention & Visitors Bureau, estimates conservatively that the local economic impact this May for two canceled graduations “is at least $5 million.” A typical graduation weekend accounts for about $2 million in hotel room revenues, with 40,000 guests staying for at least two nights, filling all of the city’s 3,768 rooms hotel rooms. The $5 million figure comprises premium lodging rates plus lost revenues at restaurants, shops, wineries, and other tourist sites. “This lost revenue will make recovery that much more difficult,” Cacatian says. Owners and managers in the hospitality business almost all said they were not expecting a robust graduation month this year. Several used the word “creative” when

asked how they have been getting through the past 12 months. Michelle Davis, general manager of the Courtyard by Marriott near the medical center says she “believed it was probably not going to materialize this year because of the restrictions.” On March 4, the hotel began calling people who had booked rooms, and had also started to receive cancellations. While the past year has also been hard without large football and basketball crowds, she says, “I also believe there is an end in sight.” Across West Main, The Draftsman front desk agent Sharron Smith says the hotel hasn’t made specific plans about graduation weekend. Over the past year, it has only experienced full occupancy during February’s dreadful ice storms. Airbnbs are emerging from hibernation. “Graduation is about three times the usual charge,” says superhost Gail McDermott, who was just getting ready to open hers again when she heard about Ryan’s decision. “It would have been nice, but Airbnb


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It's been the year of the pandemic, yes—but it's also been the year of the book. Since the world shut down 12 months ago, we've turned to books to escape our stressful surroundings and also to explain the cataclysmic shifts outside and inside our homes. Last year's Virginia Festival of the Book was canceled as COVID-19 first took hold in the U.S., so we're doubly excited to dig into this year's programming, which will be held virtually over the next month. Read all about it!

JIM WEST/ZUMA WIRE

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America’s poisoned cities verything is falling apart—and I don’t mean that metaphorically. In Texas, a winter storm recently caused the power grid to fail, leaving millions without heat and icicles dropping from ceiling fans. In Jackson, Mississippi, 96 broken water mains in a 100-year-old system of municipal pipes have dirtied the water for two weeks and counting, and caused schools to shut down. Locally, with a worsening housing crisis, Charlottesville has just begun to redevelop its public housing after decades of deterioration. Oh, and there’s still a global pandemic going on. What’s going on here? Why is this all happening at once? Some answers can be found in Anna Clark’s The Poisoned City: Flint’s Water and the American Urban Tragedy, which traces the story of one of the most famous infrastructure crises of the last decade: the Flint, Michigan, water disaster, when statelevel mismanagement let corrosive river water run through lead pipes, poisoning residents from their own taps. Though the crisis in Flint “escalated in a uniquely dramatic way,” says Clark, readers of the book—especially here in Charlottesville—will doubtless see a lot of their own towns in the history of the Rust Belt city. Clark, a Detroit-based journalist, says she was hesitant to write a book that was “ripped from the headlines,” so The


COURTESY VIRGINIA FESTIVAL OF THE BOOK

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Exalt in the everyday

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COURTESY VIRGINIA FESTIVAL OF THE BOOK

Aimee Nezhukumatathil

Ross Gay and Aimee Nezhukumatathil will discuss the joys of the nature at a panel entitled O Wondrous World! on March 22 at noon.

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Anna Clark will participate in the Environmental Injustice: Reckoning with American Waste panel on March 20 at 7pm.

Ross Gay

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

“We literally built our communities on a separate but unequal basis. And we did it on purpose,” she says. “Lending, development, insurance, real estate, all of that.” And so Flint, like Texas or Jackson or Charlottesville, wound up with huge amounts of “infrastructure that was destined to Anna Clark suffer from neglect,” Clark writes, especially in poor communities, rural communities, and communities of color. And “neglect, it turns out, is not a passive force in American cities, but an aggressive one.” Thus we arrive at these all-too-predictable American crises. Turning the tide, Clark argues in the book, will require proactive measures. Neglect is an aggressive force, and so attempts at redress must be aggressive, too. “It’s no longer legal to put toxic lead pipes in a drinking water system,” she says. “But there’s been no meaningful effort to remove the ones that are already there. It’s continuing to poison people.” The pipes won’t dig themselves up. If Flint sounds familiar to you, I suggest you grab a shovel.—Ben Hitchcock

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Poisoned City, first published in 2018, reaches back into the past to lay the groundwork for our modern decay. It traces Flint’s rise as an auto boom town while also showing how segregated the city became. Decades of racist redlining, explicitly segregated real estate deeds, and other associated policies meant that over time, money fled to the suburbs, and Flint became “a widening circle of wealth with a deteriorating center,” Clark writes.

With the one-year anniversary of hunkering down in our houses approaching, it’s easy to forget about the beauty of the natural world that we still have access to. Ross Gay and Aimee Nezhukumatathil are here to remind us. Poets Gay and Nezhukumatathi will discuss their essay collections—The Book of Delights and World of Wonders, respectively—during a book festival event called O Wondrous World! Nezhukumatathil, whose essays are complemented with gorgeous color illustrations, draws many parallels between the chosen flora and fauna and her own life, whether comparing the defense mechanism of the touch-me-not to her own rejection of sexual predators or comparing her family to a pod of narwhals. But she is also content to simply admire nature’s creations: “The bibliography of the firefly is a tender and electric dress.” Gay’s collection of 102 essays ranges from eating a tomato on a plane to his impressive list of nicknames for himself—but each piece deals in delight. And much of this delight focuses on nature, thanks to Gay’s affinity for gardening, a habit he shares with Nezhukumatathil. Gay has this to say about the relationships between their works: “I think I’ve learned from Aimee so much about staying focused (as much as I do) on what I’m trying to celebrate and study, not ignoring sorrow, never that, but that the training and the practice is to study what you love, if you can, which we can help each other with, and which is one of the ways we care for the world.”—Dan Goff


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Create Your Backyard Oasis... ...now is the time to order outdoor furniture to enjoy this summer!

Work It! It’s all our business. WINTER 2020

DISRUPTED CARE H CARE HOW LOCAL HEALT PROVIDERS HAVE ADJUSTED THIS YEAR

The Martinez family opened Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine and Café in York Place this fall.

Outdoor Dining Sets, Gliders, Rockers, Porch Swings, and more! Crafted from All-Weather Poly Lumber. In Various Colors, Sizes, and Styles!

TAKING A Made in Pennsylvania

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COURTESY VIRGINIA FESTIVAL OF THE BOOK

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Crime writer S.A. Cosby will appear twice to discuss his work: Sunday, March 14 on the panel Rural Noir and Saturday, March 20 with Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Walter Mosley.

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

S.A. Cosby set out to be the next Stephen King. But he soon turned to a life of crime writing, and his latest noir caper, Blacktop Wasteland, may have pulled him in too deep to let him out. “I love writing about crime because it’s something everyone can understand,” Cosby says. “The platform makes it palatable. But I’m trying to talk about identity, tragic and toxic masculinity, the unfortunate inheritance of violence...the way race and class is intertwined in small-town America and how that affects your choices.” In Blacktop Wasteland, we meet Beauregard, a getaway driver trying to go straight. He’s a husband, a father, a legitimate businessman. But his circumstances have made him a criminal, and he needs just one more heist to pay his debts and clean up his act. The conceit may sound familiar—“tropes and clichés are foundational narrative devices,” Cosby says—but in the deft hands of the author it takes us new places. While crime noir is often set in big cities, Cosby brings the genre to his own frame of reference, the rural South. Big cities offer anonymity, Cosby says. In small towns, characters bump each other over and over. The narrative pressure builds. The climax explodes. “Small towns have just as much intensity and just as much drama,” Cosby says. “People in small towns get taken for granted, but there is an intensity that is living in a small town, an uncomfortable intimacy.” Cosby, who’s written one other crime novel and a handful of short stories, S.A. Cosby will present on two panels during the virtual book fest. On March 14, he’ll delve more deeply into his thoughts on rural settings for crime fiction. And on March 20, he’ll sit down for a chat with one of his heroes, Walter Mosley. “I was in the audience for a lecture he gave about eight years ago,” Cosby says. “His two pieces [of advice] were, when you write about a crime, your characters need to be doing a lot of other things besides the crime. And, you need to write every day. I took the advice. Now, me and him are doing a panel. Man, it’s incredible.”—Shea Gibbs

Sadeqa Johnson will discuss Yellow Wife with moderator Beverly Colwell Adams on March 24 at 7pm.

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Crime time

riter Sadeqa Johnson was walking the Richmond Slave Trail when she came across a shocking piece of local history. She’d heard of Robert Lumpkin, a notorious figure who ran a slave jail known as the Devil’s Half Acre, where thousands of Black people were brutally tortured and mercilessly auctioned off. But Johnson hadn’t known that Lumpkin had purchased a biracial teenager named Mary and forced her to become his unofficial wife. The discovery inspired Johnson’s latest novel, Yellow Wife, which tells the tale of 17-year-old Pheby Delores Brown. Born to an enslaved mother and a white plantation owner in Charles City, Virginia, Pheby is afforded certain privileges due to her status and light complexion—she learns how to read, write, and play the piano. Her master promises to free her when she turns 18, but her dreams are crushed when he is injured in a carriage accident, and his spiteful wife sells Pheby into prostitution at Devil’s Half Acre. Before Pheby is auctioned off, jail owner Rubin Lapier steps in and takes her as his own slave. To protect herself and her unSadeqa Johnson born child, Pheby has no choice but to become Lapier’s “yellow wife.” Readers are pulled into Brown’s day-to-day struggles, as she is forced to run her sadistic enslaver’s household and bear his four children while surrounded by violence and death. When her first love, Essex, is captured and brought to the jail, she searches for a way to get him and their son, Monroe, to freedom. Yellow Wife vividly details the horrors of slavery, from family separation to sexual assault, empha-

WIKIPEDIA USER GORICKYRICARDO

COURTESY VIRGINIA FESTIVAL OF THE BOOK

Impossible choices

sizing that Pheby’s relationship with Rubin is not one of love—but of survival. “I wanted the readers to feel up close and personal. I wanted them to experience the world as Pheby was experiencing it,” says Johnson. “I had to go beyond reading textbooks…It was important for me to read slave narratives written by enslaved people, so I could get the full scope of what it was like for them in their head and bodies—the smelling, the tasting, the touching, the feeling.” Remarkably, Pheby does not lose her tenet for kindness and compassion, and finds great joy in motherhood, determined to do whatever it takes to protect her children. Johnson ultimately gives readers a new perspective on the impossible choices enslaved women were forced to make on a daily basis, and Pheby’s acts of courage and resistance are a genuine source of inspiration that parallel the systemic racism and anti-Black violence that continues today.—Brielle Entzminger


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March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

218 West Market Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 434-970-1900 I Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 5pm www.lodgerva.com

This is our town. .com

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1/14/21 4:19 PM

Tiffany Jana doesn’t like the term microaggression. “The very nature of the word puts people on the defensive,” says the diversity and inclusiveness expert. “It definitely is not a place from which people grow very readily.” Jana and co-author Michael Baran both took umbrage with the term and set out on a mission to rebrand it in their 2020 book, Subtle Acts of Exclusion: How to Understand, Identify, and Stop Microaggressions. Subtle acts of exclusion is a much more value neutral descriptor of the phenomenon, says Jana, who assures that everyone does it, just as everyone has unconscious bias, the subject of an earlier book by the author. “Every day, every single solitary day I slip up and commit an SAE in what I call a piece of diversity doo-doo—and I’m considered an expert in the subject matter,” says Jana. Their most frequent offense when talking to a group? The use of “hey guys,” says Jana. “There are gender nonconforming people, nonbinary people, women in this group. I apologize to the people I might have offended. By modeling the behavior and process, I’m engaging with people in a more intentional way.” If you think you may have committed a subtle act of exclusion, Jana advises heeding that funny feeling—if you get one—and to “check in with the person you think you offended” or check in with an observer. “When you call each other in, it’s a sacred gift,” Jana says. Subtle Acts of Exclusion provides strategies for handling the slights, whether one is the initiator, subject, or observer. And Jana firmly believes in the “essential goodness of all people” Tiffany Jana and that most are well-intentioned. Jana’s motto: “Kindness. It’s great for yourself and it’s great for others.” The author also believes a new, more inclusive world order is possible, “because the reality of exclusion and exclusiveness was created with great intention. It was no accident whatsoever in any aspect of society and economically.” Jana says, “It will take an equal amount of intention by inclusive-minded, good-hearted people who recognize the world is not equitable right now and we have an opportunity to course correct.” The anti-racist uprisings during the summer of 2020 led to this point, says Jana. “We are now entering a beautiful, transparent, transformative, and empathetic phase of our development as a society, and that gives me great hope.” “This moment comes to you courtesy of unchecked institutional racism that came to a crescendo and is allowing us to have, for the first time in my lifetime, these honest conversations.”—Lisa Provence Tiffany Jana will discuss Subtle Acts of Exclusion: How to Understand, Identify, and Stop Microaggressions with Kaki Dimock on March 15 at noon.

ANDY MARTIN JR./ZUMA WIRE

Microaggression rebrand


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Gospel according to Harold

SUPPLIED PHOTO COURTESY VIRGINIA FESTIVAL OF THE BOOK

Claudrena Harold will discuss her new book at a panel entitled Reading Under the Influence: Music, History & Race panel on March 15 at 7pm.

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sions, politics and theology—all set in a country violently reshaping its own socioeconomic and cultural framework. In When Sunday Comes, Harold also intends to pinpoint the specific stylistic changes serving as signposts along gospel’s journey from the sanctuary to the spotlight. “Gospel music is not always discussed in terms of classic albums or dominant sonic shifts,” she says. “But there are moments in gospel that compare to Dylan plugging in and going electric. The incorporation of soul or funk...would generate these intense debates about where gospel was going. I wanted to not just highlight those debates, but also those critical records that opened the debates up.” During Harold’s Virginia book festival appearance, she will discuss music, history, and race with two other writers. With one of the other writers focused on southern hip-hop, Harold is excited to explore multiple Claudrena Harold musical genres. “I imagine we will have an interesting conversation about the role of region shaping sound,” she says. “Some of the major sonic invasions and revolutions are from the South. Imagine hip-hop without the 757 and Pharrell and Missy Elliott.” Um, no thank you.—Shea Gibbs

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

etween 1980 and 1994, Christian/gospel music sales grew from $190 million to $390 million. And some folks in the business were uncomfortable with that success. Because gospel music is different. “Were the contemporary gospel artists who experimented with the rhythms of funk, disco, and hip-hop more concerned with selling records than with saving souls?” wonders Claudrena Harold in the introduction to When Sunday Comes: Gospel Music in the Soul and Hip-Hop Eras. “And if so, was gospel music on the same path of decline as its secular sibling R&B, which many music critics insisted had lost its soul?” Harold, a University of Virginia history professor whose academic expertise focuses on African American and U.S. labor history, the civil rights movement, and the Jim Crow South, has made something of a departure to pen her latest book, which chronicles gospel over the last three decades of the 20th century. “Music has always been a passion...but it’s been more of a side gig,” Harold says. “Music is sort of my sanctuary, and I think when you write about something you love and it is a place of refuge, you’re not sure you want to open that space to others.” But open that space, she has. In When Sunday Comes, Harold filters her brief history of gospel through her

own experiences. The daughter of music lovers and the niece of an Atlantic Records songwriter, she obsessed over gospel while growing up. Other genres like the blues, R&B, and hip-hop also found their place, and it is at their intersection that Harold has situated When Sunday Comes. Harold’s book focuses on the years between 1968, when founded the Gospel Music Workshop of America, and 1994, when Kirk Franklin cemented his status as a crossover superstar. She explores gospel’s triumphs and ten-


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All about town.

' M Y P E R F E C T C ' V I L L E DAY' | O N- T HE -S T R E E T S T YLE | S PR I N G HAPPE NI N GS

SENTARA MARTHA JEFFERSON HOSPITAL IS OFFERING A

FREE BREAST HEALTH SCREENING Women, be a good example for your family...Take care of yourself!

Friday, April 9, 2021 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sentara Martha Jefferson Outpatient Care Center 595 Martha Jefferson Drive | Charlottesville

COVID-19 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

• COVID Screening required before allowed to enter the building • Masking required at all times • No children allowed • All visitors asked to wait in the parking lot

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Schedule your screening mammogram before your first COVID-19 vaccine dose or at least 4 weeks after your second vaccine dose.

APPOINTMENT NECESSARY

Free blood sugar and cholesterol screenings will also be offered You may qualify for this service if you: • Don’t have insurance that covers mammograms and cost is a concern • You are 40 or older; and • It’s been over a year since your last mammogram, or you’ve never had one For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 1-800-SENTARA (1-800-736-8272). Special thanks to The Women’s Committee of the Martha Jefferson Hospital Foundation for its support of this important event.

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5 ABODE

5 ABODE

What is 434? It’s recreation, it’s culture, it’s society—it’s how we live in Charlottesville. In this full-glossy quarterly magazine, you’ll meet townspeople from all corners of our area, from creatives to CEOs, each with their own story to tell. Every issue will connect readers with the best things to buy, see, and get involved in that season. This is the 434, and we’re all about town. SPACE RESERVATION DEADLINE FOR SPRING: MONDAY, MARCH 15TH Email advertising@c-ville.com for more information


CULTURE

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O U R G U I D E TO YO U R W E E K

SATURDAY 3/13

STAR POWER

FRENCH CONNECTIONS

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In his four years as the United States minister to France, Thomas Jefferson came to love all things French, especially the cuisine—and the sophisticated culinary palate he developed is still serving us today. In The Art of French Brasserie Cooking at Monticello, the newly appointed Chef David Bastide teaches us about the fine dining of Jefferson’s time, and its influence on American cuisine. $35, 6pm. Registration required. monticello.org.

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Can you feel it? That change in the air? If you follow your weekly horoscope faithfully (p. 29) and align your moods with celestial bodies, local astrologer Ilana Khin’s guided meditation Feeling Into The New (Moon) may be the gentle assist you’re looking for to connect with the cosmos. Khin offers “ritual suggestions for manifesting with this new moon, as well as the astrology forecast for the month ahead.” $29 in-studio, $15 virtual, 8pm. The Elements, The Shops at Stonefield. ecville.com.

FRIDAY 3/12

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TUESDAY 3/9

Looks like we’ll need to celebrate another St. Paddy’s Day with a pint on the couch. But lucky for us, We Banjo 3 will be streaming live from Dublin, Ireland. Since 2012, the Irish quartet has been wowing critics and crowds with its innovative take on traditional Celtic, bluegrass, and American music, a smorgasbord the band likes to call Celtgrass. Known for electrifying live shows, WB3 swings from rollicking jams, to poignant ballads, to pop-folk anthems with infectious energy. On second thought, get off the couch and move to that energy (minus the infection) by grooving to the group’s first gig together since the pandemic closed stages. $25, 5pm. theparamount.net.

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

PUBLICITY PHOTO

PICKIN’ BACK UP


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CULTURE EXTRA

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

“She had a way of lifting you up, and you wanted to prove her right.” LOU HANEY

COURTESY OF PATC

Attempting to sum up a person’s life in worked on it. …She did not have time a few words is often an unreasonable, for people who are full of shit.” But even almost futile, effort. But James Yates that came from nurturing kindness, from has a word for his wife, artist Beryl Solknowing that everyone has something la, who died February 19 after a 13-year to offer the world. It was “remarkable battle against cancer: Yes. mentoring,” says Belle. At some point during their 43Solla believed that art was play. She year marriage, Solla made a wooden made art accessible and she made art folk-art inspired sculpture for Yates, a fun. She painted the walls of PVCC’s cutout wood angel holding a banner basement-level art department in bright that says “yes.” colors and peppered the walls of other “It was mainly in response to my campus buildings with student artwork. tendency to focus on what was wrong For 14 years, she made heaps of banana with the world, to focus on the negabread and hot chocolate for visitors to tive,” says Yates, also an artist. “She the popular “Let There Be Light” winter really encouraged me to focus on solstice outdoor light art show that she what I could say ‘yes’ to in the world. and Yates founded. She started a free I said ‘yes’ to summer, said ‘yes’ to community film series at the school. flowers. I said ‘yes’ to spring, said She held tile art workshops throughout ‘yes’ to a garden.” the state via the Virginia Museum of Best known for her large mosaic Fine Arts. She was funny. She paired murals (including one at McGuffey the annual PVCC student art show with Park), often made in collaboration a “chocolate chow-down” to get more with people of all ages, Solla taught at people in the room. Her favorite band Piedmont Virginia Community College was Talking Heads. Her students and for 15 years. As chair of PVCC’s visual colleagues adored her, and she adored and performing arts department, she them right back. She loved her husband, advocated relentlessly on behalf of their two children, and three grandchilstudents and faculty to ensure that dren deeply. they had what they needed—a flat Solla “was an amazing gardener,” says space for officeless adjunct professors Yates, who plans to continue tending to to grade portfolios, a cup of tea and her patch. But Solla planted more than an ottoman for a pregnant student, a flowers, says photographer Stacey Evans, “yes” to a fantastical idea—to make another longtime friend and colleague of and teach art. Solla’s, and “although she has passed, She went out of her way to believe what she has planted in Charlottesville will in people, says Lou Haney, a multicontinue to grow.” It will. Yes. media artist who Solla brought into the teaching fold at PVCC. “She had a way of lifting you up, and you wanted to prove her right,” she says, adding that people often went beyond the boundaries of what they thought they could do, because Solla believed they could. Solla always spoke her mind, and her honesty was sometimes intimidating, particularly during portfolio critiques, says her longtime friend, colleague, and fellow artist Fenella Belle. “She As an artist and beloved member of the community, Beryl always found something Solla encouraged everyone around her to make art nice to say about even accessible and fun. Donations in her name can be made to the most unimpressive her favorite charities: 350.org, Blue Ridge Area Food Bank, piece…unless you hadn’t and Charlottesville Area Tree Stewards.

COURTESY OF SOLLA’S FAMILY

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Beryl Solla remembered as a remarkable mentor

A cabin within driving distance is a nice change of pace during the ongoing pandemic. Virginia State Park system offers great choices, such as Charlottesville’s own Dunlodge.

Out, out and away

Escape town this spring in a rental cabin By Erika Howsare living@gmail.com

M

ost of us have experienced some degree of cabin fever during the past year. As we near the anniversary of the dramatic upheaval brought on by the pandemic, we look back on a full 12 months lived much closer to home than many folks are used to. At the same time, spring is coming. How can we safely stretch our wings? Hopping a plane to the usual springbreak destinations is not the smartest idea right now. Neither is road-tripping, unless you have an RV or another way to avoid public restrooms and hotel stays. For the COVID-cautious traveler, renting a standalone cabin or cottage might be your best bet. The only caveat is, as with RVs and campgrounds themselves, demand for such rentals is high. Be prepared to plan ahead. We’re lucky to have an excellent state park system in Virginia, and many of our parks offer lodgings. Some of these are as comfortable as your average suburban home. James River State Park, for example, has 16 modern cabins (from $129) with board-and-batten siding, fireplaces, big porches and decks, and conveniences from microwaves to air conditioning. At Belle Isle State Park, the Bel Air “mansion” (a slight exaggeration, though the

1942 Colonial-style home is certainly lovely) and a smaller guesthouse offer refined stays near the Rappahannock River. And Hungry Mother State Park in Marion offers 20 cabins starting at $84, some of which were log-built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression. Though these retain their rustic character, they don’t ask you to give up any of the conveniences of home (except TV—but hey, isn’t this supposed to be a getaway?). A total of 25 state parks contain cabins, and some provide more unusual lodgings. Check out the yurts at places like Lake Anna State Park and First Landing State Park (from $75). Think of the yurt as a big, sturdy tent—it offers no electricity or running water, nor cooking facilities, so plan on

While some do have modern amenities, most are free of electricity, heated by wood stoves, and—in some cases— reachable only on foot, with your gear on your back.


CULTURE SCREENS

Great loss

SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

The Father looks brilliantly inside a decaying mind

Award nominations are piling up for Anthony Hopkins’ portrayal of a man of living with dementia in The Father.

By Deirdre Crimmins arts@c-ville.com

C

The Father PG-13, 97 minutes Streaming begins March 26 (Amazon Prime) feet to hide his confusion, and he sways from charming to hysterical without losing our empathy. His affection and stubbornness are endearing and concerning. Coleman is one of the best actresses working today, and pairing her with Hopkins is one of the best things about the movie. Not many films rise to the task of telling such a difficult tale with as much poise as The Father. It is not easy to watch, though. It is emotionally draining, and its trajectory is tragically unavoidable, but it deserves our attention and admiration.

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Though Anne is the first character on screen, and we see her do her best to stay strong during heartbreaking moments, the film’s genius comes from how the audience connects with Hopkins’ character. Early in The Father, we notice that Anthony is not well. Beyond the argument over the missing watch and the mistreatment of his aide, he and Anne discuss plans for the future, and his struggle with memory loss is evident. He appears cogent and can remember his daughters, but details and placing them in either the present or the past is a challenge for him. He wavers between frail, friendly, and furious as he processes the near-constant barrage of contradictory information and mixed signals from his loved ones. Brilliant editing and compassionate writing allow us to follow Anthony’s timeline: One moment he is making a cup of tea and

then suddenly Anne returns to his flat with the groceries he has already put away. His son-in-law Paul (Rufus Sewell) is sitting in his living room, and the next thing Anthony knows, Anne is telling her dad she met someone and is moving away. It makes him question the solidity of his mind, but he continues to go with the flow. Tinkering with timelines, spatial awareness, and relationships puts us in Anthony’s shoes and gives us a glimpse into what it might feel like to begin to lose our grasp on reality. Hopkins handles the role of the father with agonizing accuracy. He thinks on his

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apturing mental degeneration on screen is no easy task. Last year’s Relic did an excellent job of depicting the crushing effects of dementia on a family but, like so many films, it shied away from the interior life of the person suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. The Father takes a much closer look at both the patient and his family, and the result is a poignant, gut-punching film. Rehashing the plot points of The Father would not only be a confusing and futile exercise, but it would do a disservice to the process of watching the film. Nothing in the movie is certain, even when naming which actor plays which character and where the film takes place. Everything should be viewed with a simmering layer of skepticism and distrust. Everything, that is, except the father himself, Anthony (Anthony Hopkins). The Father, however, is not merely about a solitary man. His daughter, Anne (Olivia Colman), is Anthony’s primary caretaker— and she’s at her wits’ end. Her dad is still charming and can keep himself busy, but he also manages to scare away his nurse when he accuses her of stealing his watch. The watch was easily recovered, but it’s not the first time Anthony has harassed a caregiver to the point of resignation.

He wavers between frail, friendly, and furious as he processes the nearconstant barrage of contradictory information and mixed signals from his loved ones.

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

cooking or grilling outdoors. In the warm months, other parks, like Westmoreland State Park near the mouth of the Potomac, rent “camping cabins” starting at $47—electrified but not heated or cooled, and lacking kitchens and bathrooms. A somewhat clunky reservation system at virginiastateparks.reserveamerica.com is the way to secure your state park cabin—and you’ll have to work around some COVID restrictions, like 24-hour rest periods between visitors. During the pandemic, the parks aren’t providing linens as they usually do. Go anyway; it’s worth it. Our backyard national park, Shenandoah, is another great option, with two rather different sets of cabins starting at $135. Lewis Mountain cabins are off Skyline Drive in the upper elevations of the park. They offer comfy bedrooms and bathrooms, outdoor cooking areas, heat and electricity. Shenandoah River cabins are down in the valley, right on the waterfront, and more luxurious—each one has a hot tub, even the Vintage River Cabin that dates back to the 1700s. Jockey for reservations at nationalparkreservations.com. There’s another way to experience cabin life in Shenandoah and other areas, if you’re not afraid to go primitive. The Potomac Appalachian Trail Club maintains 42 cabins, in an area stretching from the southern end of Shenandoah up into Pennsylvania. While some do have modern amenities, most are free of electricity, heated by wood stoves, and—in some cases—reachable only on foot, with your gear on your back. The closest of these to Charlottesville (besides one called Dunlodge that’s actually located right here in town) is called Doyles River ($45), and it’s less than half a mile off the Appalachian Trail. It’s primitive and, like some of the state park cabins, was built by the CCC. There are other PATC cabins in and around Shenandoah—like the Argow Cabin ($55), boasting big mountain views— and the Vining Cabin ($100), with electricity inside and solar panels on the roof. But Doyles River is one of the select PATC cabins that doesn’t require you to buy a $40 annual membership. Read more, and link to the reservation system, at patc.net. But note: The pandemic has restricted PATC cabin rentals to weekends, and all stays have a two-night minimum. Of course, in the age of Airbnb, we’d be remiss not to point out that there are scores of privately owned rentals scattered throughout the land, representing all manner of styles, price ranges, and quirky amenities. A few that invite a second look: an $84-a-night treehouse in Sandston, just east of Richmond, which has a hot tub, a fire pit, and a cute loft-type bed reached by a ladder. Or a sleek, modern shipping-container house in Forest, near Lynchburg, can be yours for $145 per night. Down in Farmville, a cottage on a goat farm goes for $114 a night. (Baby goats just born on February 8, says the listing!) You may not need to stray very far at all to find an escape. Six miles from downtown Charlottesville is a $125-a-night “Tiny Tree Cottage,” essentially a tiny house with rustic detailing and a roof deck featuring hammock swings. For almost anyone, that sounds like a real change of pace.

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CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

Order up! These local establishments are open and waiting to take your order. (Keep in mind that some information is subject to change, and descriptions may not apply, due to current circumstances.) Email living@c-ville.com to add your restaurant to the list. Asian Cuisine

Bakeries

Afghan Kabob Palace Authentic Afghan cuisine. 400 Emmet St. N. 245-0095. $$.

Albemarle Baking Company Get your ABCs of baked goods. 418 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 293-6456. $.

Asian Express Chinese and Japanese with healthy options. 909 W. Main St. 979-1888. $. Bamboo House Korean and Chinese options. 4831 Seminole Trail. 973-9211. $$. Chimm Thai Thai street food. 5th Street Station. 288-1122. $$. Doma Korean Kitchen Korean-style barbecue, kimchi, and more. 701 W. Main St. 202-1956. $. Kanak Indian Kitchen Offering traditional homemade Indian food, plus cocktails to go. 385 Merchant Walk Sq. Ste. 400. 328-2775. $. Lemongrass Vietnam meets Thailand. Veggie options and delivery, too. 104 14th St. NW. 244THAI. $$. Lime Leaf Thai A tad more upscale than the average Thai place. Rio Hill Shopping Center. 245-8884. $$. Maru Korean BBQ & Grill Traditional Korean food with modern additions. 412 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 956-4110. $.

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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Milan Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with all the standards; beer and wine available to go. 1817 Emmet St. 984-2828. $$. Mochiko Good Hawaiian eats (and suggested Hawaiian beer pairings, too). The Yard at 5th Street Station. $. Monsoon Siam Delicious, unpretentious favorites like pad Thai, tom yum noodle soup, and vegetarian dishes. 113 W. Market St. $$. Now & Zen Gourmet Japanese and sushi spot. 202 Second St. NW. 971-1177. $$. Pad Thai Homestyle Thai cooking from an experienced chef. 156 Carlton Rd. 293-4032. $$. Peter Chang China Grill Authentic Sichuan cuisine by a renowned chef. Barracks Road Shopping Center North Wing. 244-9818. $$. Red Lantern Chinese cuisine by the pint or the quart. 221 Carlton Rd. 979-9968. $. Silk Thai Fresh, authentic Thai, plus specials like marinated wings. 2210 Fontaine Ave. 9778424. $$. Tara Thai Serves up affordable Thai faves, with multiple meat, fish, and veggie options. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-9998. $$. Taste of China Chinese favorites on 29N. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 975-6688. $$. Taste of India Indian fare favorites on the mall. 310 E. Main St, Downtown Mall. 984-9944. $$. Ten Upscale second-floor spot serving modern Japanese and offering its popular cocktails for carry-out. 120B E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-6691. $$$.

Bowerbird Bakeshop Pastries, breads, and cookies using locally sourced ingredients, delivered right to your doorstep. 120 10th St. NW, bowerbirdbakeshop.com. $ Gearharts Fine Chocolates Freshly baked pastries, cakes, cookies, and brownies—plus chocolates! 243 Ridge McIntire Rd. 972-9100. $. Glaze Burger and Donut Housemade donuts, coffee, milkshakes, plus burgers and vegan options. 1001 W Main St. 284-5465. $.

Texas Roadhouse Steaks, ribs, and fromscratch sides. Albemarle Square. 973-4700. $$. Timberwood Grill All-American eatery and after-work watering hole. 3311 Worth Crossing, 975-3311. $$. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery Locally sourced, beer-infused dishes including Southern classics and a kids menu. 520 Second St. SE. 956-3141. $$. The Whiskey Jar Saloon-style Southern spot with, naturally, more than 90 varieties of whiskey (get some in a cocktail to go). 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549. $$. Whistlestop Grill Southern comfort foods in Crozet. 1200 Crozet Ave. 823-9000. $.

Moe’s Original BBQ Alabama-style pulled pork smoked in-house. 2119 Ivy Rd., 244-7427; 200 W. Water St., 202-2288. $. Moose’s by the Creek American favorites, plus mounted moose antlers for photo ops. 1710 Monticello Rd. 977-4150. $. Riverside Lunch Popular joint known for smashburgers. 1429 Hazel St. 971-3546. $. Royalty Eats Soul food goodness including Chicken & Waffles, ribs, and specialties like teriyaki salmon. 820 Cherry Ave. $ Wayside Takeout & Catering Famous Ole Virginia fried chicken and barbecue sandwiches. 2203 Jefferson Park Ave. 977-5000. $. Wild Wing Café Classic wings and beer. 820 W. Main St. 979-WING. $$.

Great Harvest Bread Company Sandwiches, sweets, and bread baked from scratch every day. McIntire Plaza. 202-7813. $.

Breakfast Joints

MarieBette Café & Bakery French pastries for breakfast, more pastries for lunch. 700 Rose Hill Dr. 529-6118. $.

Farm Bell Kitchen New-Southern cuisine with local farm-to-table ingredients. 1209 W. Main St. 205-1538. $$.

Coffee Places with Kitchens

Paradox Pastry Known for the biscuits, European pastry, and the legendary DMB cookies and brownies. 313 Second St. SE #103. 245-2453. $.

First Watch Breakfast, brunch, and lunch chain with locally grown ingredients. 1114B Emmet St. N. 202-5383. $$.

Baine’s Books & Coffee Wide selection of coffee, tea, pastries, and paninis. 485 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-3577. $.

Petite MarieBette MarieBette’s little sister. 105 E. Water St. 284-8903. $.

Villa Diner Mainstay with housemade pancakes, biscuits, roast turkey, soups, sides, and salad dressings. 1250 Emmet St. N. 296-9977. $.

Belle Coffee & Wine Breakfast and lunch sandwiches. Free kids meals with adult meals. 9964919. $$.

The Pie Chest Homemade breakfast and hand pies, plus by-the-slice options (for those who can’t decide). 119 Fourth St. NE., 977-0443; 1518 E. High St., 984-0555. $. Quality Pie In the former Spudnuts spot, exMas tapas chef Tomas Rahal serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 309 Avon St. 284-5120. $$. Sliced. cake bar Mobile bakery offering whole cakes, cake flights, cake pops, and buttercream shots, for delivery or curbside pickup. 242-5501. $.

Bars and Grills Alamo Drafthouse Burgers, pizzas, salads, snacks and desserts prepared fresh from locally sourced ingredients. Served in the cafe or while you watch a movie. 5th Street Station. 326-5056. $. Beer Run Massive tap and packaged beer offerings, killer nachos, three meals daily. 156 Carlton Rd., 984-2337. $$. Fardowners Restaurant Local ingredients liven up pub fare like sliders and sandwiches. 5773 The Square, Crozet. 823-1300. $$. Firefly Craft beer, burgers, salads, vegetarianfriendly menu. 1304 E. Market St. 202-1050. $. Matchbox Restaurant Wood-fired pizzas, salads, salmon & steak dinners, gourmet burgers and a happy hour M-F from 3-6. 2055 Bond St., 284-8874. $$.

Murphy’s Coffee & Bagel House Breakfast spot serves delicious coffee and freshly baked New York bagels. 26 Buck Dr. 939-6033. $$.

Burgers, BBQ, Dogs and Diners Ace Biscuit & Barbecue Breakfast and lunch spot with BBQ and soul food by the biscuit. 600 Concord Ave. 202-1403. $. Blue Moon Diner Beloved local diner serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner options like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and BLTs. 600 W. Main St. 980-6666. $$ Burger Bach New Zealand-inspired gastropub. The Shops at Stonefield. 328-2812. $$. Cavalier Diner Breakfast all day, traditional diner fare, and Greek food. 1403 N. Emmet St. 977-1619. $ Doodle’s Diner Country cookin’ from breakfast to burgers. 1305 Long St. 295-7550. $. Five Guys Two locations for local carnivores. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 975-GUYS; Hollymead Town Center, 963-GUYS. $. Fox’s Café Daily specials, burgers, dogs, and dinners. 403 Avon St. 293-2844. $. Lazy Parrot Backyard BBQ The Lazy Parrot Grill’s sister restaurant. Pantops Shopping Center. 244-0723. $$.

Peloton Station Cycle-centric tavern and bike shop. 114 10th St. NW. 284-7786. $$.

Luv’n Oven Gizzards, livers, fries, and shakes. 162 Village Sq., Scottsville. 286-3828. $.

Thai ’99 II Thai noodle and rice dishes, curries, and stir frys in an inspired interior. Gardens Shopping Center. 964-1212. $.

Sedona Taphouse Lots of craft beers (and sangria to go) and an all-American menu. 1035 Millmont St. 296-2337. $$.

Martin’s Grill Delicious hamburgers, veggie burgers, and fries. Forest Lakes Shopping Center. 974-9955. $.

Thai Cuisine & Noodle House Traditional Thai food, noodle dishes, and vegetarian specials. 2005 Commonwealth Dr. 974-1326. $$.

Selvedge Brewing New brewery in The Wool Factory serves elevated bar fare from Chef Tucker Yoder. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $$.

Mel’s Café Southern soul-soothing food. A longtime favorite on West Main. 719 W. Main St. 971-8819. $.

VuNoodles Fresh, vegetarian Vietnamese noodles, pho, bahn mi, and more. 111 E. Water St. 465-1267. $.

TCO 2go Specialty sandwiches like pulled pork and fried fish from The Catering Outfit in a drive-thru. 221 Carlton Rd. 951-4699. $$.

Mission BBQ Pulled turkey, pork, and chicken, plus racks by the bone. The Shops at Stonefield. 260-7740. $.

C’ville Coffee & Wine Full menu of coffee, sandwiches, and wines. 1301 Harris St. 8172633. $. Greenberry’s Java and specialty drinks, fresh baked goods. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-0200. $. Milli Coffee Roasters Espresso drinks, chai, hot chocolate, light fare, wine. 400 Preston Ave, Suite 150. 270-9706. $. Whole bean delivery available. $ The Workshop A coffee and wine shop featuring Grit Coffee and pastries from Cou Cou Rachou, located in The Wool Factory. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $.

Family-Friendly Ann’s Family Restaurant Good old country cooking. 1170 Thomas Nelson Hwy. (Rte. 29, south of Lovingston). 263-8110. $. The Light Well Coffee-kitchen-tavern serves healthy ingredients in original recipes. 110 E. Main St., Orange. (540) 661-0004. $. Michie Tavern Traditional Southern lunch from an 18th-century tavern. 683 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy. 977-1234. $$.

Frozen Treats Chaps More than 20 years of gourmet homemade ice cream. Diner fare including breakfast and burgers. 223 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4139. $. Corner Juice UVA alum-owned juice spot with cold-pressed options. 1509 University Ave. $. Kirt’s Homemade Ice Cream Ice cream made fresh in the store. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 202-0306. $. La Flor Michoacana Homemade paletas (popsicles), ice cream, and ice cream cakes, plus other sweet treats. 601A Cherry Ave. 984-1603 $.


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Smoothie King Chain features smoothies, supplements, and healthy snacks. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 295-8502; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center, 975-5464. $.

Gourmet Groceries and Gas Stations Batesville Market Sandwiches to order, salads, and baked goods plus cheeses, produce, and packaged goods. 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. $. Bellair Market Gourmet sandwich spot on Ivy Road. 2401 Ivy Rd. 971-6608. $. Blue Ridge Bottle Shop Craft beer store with both bottles and growlers available—plus sample before you buy! 2025 Library Ave, Crozet. 602-2337. $. Brownsville Market Breakfast starting at 5am, plus burgers, sides, and famous fried chicken. 5995 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. 823-5251. $. Feast! Nationally noted cheese, wine, and specialty food shop. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 244-7800. $$.

Crozet Pizza Unpretentious, family-owned pizza parlor with nationally recognized pies. 5794 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet, 823-2132; 20 Elliewood Ave. 202-1046. $. Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie Pizza joint in the Crossroads mini-mall. 4916 Plank Rd., on 29S at North Garden. 245-0000. $$. Fabio’s New York Pizza Pizza, subs, salads, and calzones made by natives of Naples. Get your pie the Sicilian way. 1551 E. High St. 8720070. $. Fellini’s #9 A local landmark featuring Italian favorites plus some inventive new takes. 200 W. Market St. 979-4279. $$. Lampo Authentic Neapolitan pizzeria in Belmont. 205 Monticello Rd. 282-0607. $. Luce Literal hole in the wall serving fresh, handmade pasta to go. 110 Second St. NW. $$. Mellow Mushroom Trippy-themed franchise, with great pizza and even better beer selection. 1321 W. Main St. 972-9366. $. Red Pump Kitchen Tuscan-inspired restaurant. 401 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-6040. $$.

Foods of All Nations Sandwiches, deli, and salads at this gourmet grocery. 2121 Ivy Rd. 296-6131. $.

Tavola Rustic Italian with housemade pastas, craft cocktails, and a Wine Spectator awardwinning list. 826 Hinton Ave. 972-9463. $$.

Greenwood Gourmet Grocery Made-to-order sandwiches, fresh soup, and a deli with macn-cheese, bread pudding, and rotating dishes. 6701 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. (540) 4566431. $.

Vita Nova Creative ingredients on hearty pizza by the slice. 310 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-0162. $.

Hunt Country Market A rotating menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus wine offerings. Call to order. 2048 Garth Rd. 296-1648. $. Integral Yoga Natural Foods All-natural food, organic produce, supplements, plus a deli and juice/ smoothie bar. 923 Preston Ave. 293-4111. $. J.M. Stock Provisions Whole-animal butcher shop with sandwiches to go, great craft beer selection, and nicely curated wine selection. 709 W. Main St. 244-2480. $$. Keevil & Keevil Grocery and Kitchen Belmont grocery with breakfast and lunch sammies, plus takeaway dinners. 703 Hinton Ave. 989-7648. $.

Market Street Market Deli in the downtown grocery serves sandwiches and prepared foods. 400 E. Market St. 293-3478. $. Market Street Wine An expertly curated selection. 305 Rivanna Plaza Dr., Suite 102, 9649463; 311 E. Market St., 979-9463. $$. Mill Creek Market The Southern sister of Bellair Market. Avon Street, across from the Southside Shopping Center. 817-1570. $. Trader Joe’s This grocery chain boasts top quality at low cost, including “Two Buck Chuck” wine (which is actually $3.50). The Shops at Stonefield. 974-1466. $$.

Wyant’s Store Country-store fare like coffee and donuts, with daily specials and a great (cheap!) cheeseburger. 4696 Garth Rd., Crozet. 823-7299. $.

Italian and Pizza Belmont Pizza and Pub Fresh, stone-baked pizza on hand-tossed pies. Beer, too! 211 Carlton Rd., Suite 10. 977-1970. $. Christian’s Pizza The place to get fresh pies, by-the-slice or the whole darn thing. 118 W. Main St., Downtown Mall, 977-9688; 100 14th St. NW, 872-0436; 3440 Seminole Trail, 9737280. $. College Inn Late-night goodness. Pizza, gyros, subs, and its delivery can’t be beat. Breakfast items, too. 1511 University Ave. 977-2710. $.

Latin American Al Carbon Chicken prepared in an Indigenous Mexican coal-fire, flame-roasted rotisserie manner, plus sides like fried yucca and fried plantains. 1875 Seminole Trail. 964-1052. $. Brazos Tacos Austin, Texas-style breakfast, lunch, early dinner, and brunch tacos. 925 Second St. SE. 984-1163. $. The Bebedero Upscale authentic Mexican, plus cocktails and made-to-order guac. Order from sister restaurants Revolutionary Soup and The Whiskey Jar and pick up food from all three, at once. 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2343763. $$. Chipotle Simple menu of made-to-order burritos and tacos. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 8720212; 2040 Abbey Rd. Suite 101, 984-1512. $.

Mediterranean Aromas Café Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. Sandwiches, salads, and famous falafel. 900 Natural Resources Dr. 244-2486. $. Basil Mediterranean Bistro Mediterranean fare from grape leaves to tapas, plus wine. 109 14th St., 977-5700; 5th Street Station, 202-7594. $. Cava Fast-casual Mediterranean with lots of vegetarian options. 1200 Emmet St. N, #110. 227-4800. $. Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar Dishes from Spain to Greece and wines of the world. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 975-6796. $$. Sticks Kebob Shop Everything tastes better on a stick! 917 Preston Ave. 295-5262; 1820 Abbey Rd. 295-5212. $.

Little Star Spanish- and Mexican-inspired food expertly prepared in a wood-fired oven. Great craft cocktails, too. 420 W. Main St. 252-2502. $$. Mas Spanish tapas and wines in the heart of Belmont. 904 Monticello Rd. 979-0990. $$.

Revolutionary Soup Choose from a slew of enticing soups made daily. 108 Second St., Downtown Mall. 979-9988. $. Roots Natural Kitchen Fast-casual salad and grain bowls. 1329 W. Main St. 529-6229. $.

Steaks and Seafood

Miscellaneous Nationalities Bang! Tapas Asian fusion cuisine served tapasstyle. 213 Second St. SW. 984-2264 $$. Bizou Playful French-American bistro with a beloved meatloaf dish. 119 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-1818. $$. Mahana Fresh Tropical themed, fun flavored ingredients in bowls and sweets. 2142 Barracks Rd. 284-5846 $. Pearl Island Caribbean-inspired lunch spot in the Jefferson School City Center. 233 Fourth St. NW. 466-0092. $. The Shebeen Pub and Braai Conjures the South African veldt. Vinegar Hill Shopping Center. 296-3185. $$. Sticks A fast-food alternative: kebobs (veggie options available), sides, salads, desserts. Preston Plaza, 295-5262; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center. 295-5212. $.

Baggby’s Gourmet Sandwiches Satisfying sandwiches, salads, soups, and super-friendly service. 512 E Main St. Downtown Mall. 9841862 $.

La Michoacana Mexican deli serves budgetfriendly burritos, tacos, and enchiladas. 1138 E. High St., 409-9941; 2291 Seminole Ln., 9564299. $.

Panera Bread Co. Ubiquitous chain with casual fare. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 2456192; Hollymead Town Center, 973-5264; Fifth Street Station, 973-5264. $.

Thyme & Co. Traditional Lebanese flatbreads and salads. 104 14th St. NW, Suite 2. 282-2436. $.

Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Fresh, handmade, Bajastyle Mexican food. 435 Merchant Walk Sq., Suite 600. 214-0500. $.

Junction Innovative Southwestern cuisine with locally sourced ingredients in Belmont. 421 Monticello Rd. 465-6131. $$.

Kitchenette Sandwich Shop From meatloaf with cheddar and jalapenos to tofu Reubens, these sammies satisfy. 920 91/2 St. NE. 2607687. $

Which Wich Superior Sandwiches Create your own sandwiches by marking up the pre-printed brown bags. Hollymead Town Center. 977-9424. $.

Soups, Salads, Sandwiches

Guajiros Miami Eatery Food inspired by the everyday meals of Miami, with strong Cuban influence as well as Central and Southern American dishes. 1871 Seminole Trail. 465-2108. $

Jimmy John’s Low-cost sandwiches on 29N. “Freaky fast” delivery. 1650 E. Rio Rd. 9752100. $.

Sultan Kebab Authentic Turkish cuisine with plenty of meat and vegetarian options, and notable appetizers, too. 333 Second St. SE, 9810090. $.

Continental Divide Charlottesville’s favorite hole-in-the-wall spot has delicious tacos and enchiladas. 811 W. Main St. 984-0143. $$.

Guadalajara Family-run Mexican food celebrating 30 years. 805 E. Market St., 977-2676; 395 Greenbrier Dr., 978-4313; 2206 Fontaine Ave., 979-2424; 108 Town Country Ln., 293-3538; 3450 Seminole Trail, 977-2677. $.

Jersey Mike’s Subs Subs from Jersey. 2040 Abbey Rd. #104, 529-6278; 5th Street Station, 328-8694. $.

Bodo’s Bagels Still the king of bagels. Drivethru available at 1418 N. Emmet St., 977-9598; 505 Preston Ave., 293-5224; and outside service at 1609 University Ave., 293-6021. $. Chopt Creative salad chain with ingredients from local purveyors. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 328-8092. $. Citizen Bowl Shop Specialty salads with gluten-free, vegetarian, and paleo-friendly options. Also now selling groceries like yeast, flour, and brownie mix, plus gloves and toilet paper. 223 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 234-3662. $. Durty Nelly’s Down-home pub and deli now offering five subs (except the Dagwood) for $35. 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. $. HotCakes Fancy sandwiches, housemade entrées, and desserts. Delivery available. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 295-6037. $. Iron Paffles & Coffee Pastry dough + waffle iron + savory or sweet insides. 214 W. Water St. 806-3800. $.

Bonefish Grill Sister to mega-popular Outback Steakhouse featuring seafood, grilled non-fish specialties. Hollymead Town Center. 975-3474. $$. Outback Steakhouse Bloomin’ onions and giant steaks. 1101 Seminole Trail. 975-4329. $$. Public Fish & Oyster Simply prepared, responsibly sourced seafood. 513 W. Main St., 995-5542. $$.

Upscale Casual C&O Serving up a three-course $68 prix fixe menu. 515 E. Water St. 971-7044. $$$. Fig Bistro & Bar Mediterranean and New Orleans-inspired dishes with housemade ingredients. 1331 W. Main St. 995-5047. $. Hamiltons’ at First & Main Contemporary American cuisine in the heart of downtown C’ville. 110 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2956649. $$$. Ivy Inn Offering Fine dining in a charming tollhouse. 2244 Old Ivy Rd. 977-1222. $$$. The Local Belmont neighborhood spot featuring comfort favorites. 824 Hinton Ave. 9849749. $$. Maya Upscale Southern cuisine. 633 W. Main St. 979-6292. $$. The Melting Pot Fondue fun for all. 501 E. Water St. 244-3463. $$$. The Mill Room AAA, four-diamond eatery at The Boar’s Head, 200 Ednam Dr. 972-2230. $$$. Oakhart Social Seasonal, creative modern American food for sharing. 511 W. Main St. 995-5449. $$. Oakhurst Inn Coffee & Café Southern style breakfast and lunch. 1616 Jefferson Park Ave. 872-0100. $. Restoration Great views and delicious food, ranging from fried green tomatoes and burgers to crab cakes and pasta. 5494 Golf Dr., Crozet. 823-1841. $$. Southern Crescent Cajun and Creole fare in Belmont. 814 Hinton Ave. 284-5101. $$. Wayland’s Crossing Tavern Pub food, vegetarian plates, and kid-friendly fare. 1015 Heathercroft Cir., Crozet. 205-4669. $$. Zocalo Flavorful, high-end, Latin-inspired cuisine. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4944. $$.

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Anna’s Pizza No. 5 In the family for 35 years. 115 Maury Ave. 295-7500. $.

Vocelli Pizza Pizza, pasta, panini, salads, and stromboli plus antipasti. Woodbrook Shopping Center. 977-4992. $.

Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine & Café Healthy, authentic Mexican cuisine. 112 W. Main St., Suite 6. 979-0212. $.

Jack’s Shop Kitchen Farm-to-table brunch, lunch, and supper spot with elevated classics. 14843 Spotswood Trail, Ruckersville. 939-9239. $$.

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Whole Foods Market Fresh, all-natural sandwiches ranging from classic favorites to vegan delights. 1797 Hydraulic Rd. 973-4900. $$.

Vivace Every kind of pasta imaginable, plus seafood. 2244 Ivy Rd. 979-0994. $$.

Qdoba Mexican Grill Spicy burritos, quesadillas, and Mexican salads made before your eyes. 3918 Lenox Ave. 244-5641. $.

Ivy Provisions Local deli and retail food shop offering fresh, housemade breakfast and lunch all day, plus wine and craft beer by the bottle and on draft. 2206 Ivy Rd. 202-1308. $.

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

Market Street Café Gourmet breakfast, rotisserie chicken, and deli meats. 1111 E. Rio Rd. 964-1185. $.

Vinny’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria This regional chain has pies plus a slew of subs, pastas, and stromboli. Hollymead Town Center. 973-4055. $$.

Morsel Compass Popular food truck’s brickand-mortar spot. 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. 989-1569. $$.


24

The 27th annual Virginia F

Join us March 13-26 for virtual event

I

All events are fre E

MARCH 13 12 PM—The Write Start: Moseley Speed Critiques

Meredith Cole, Jody Hobbs Hesler, BettyJoyce Nash, Deborah Prum

2 PM—Editing and Publishing: Tips & Information You Can Use Right Now Anne Trubek, Kris Spisak

4 PM—Before and After the Book Deal Courtney Maum, Sean Murphy

7 PM—NBF Presents: The Work of Fiction

Rumaan Alam, Megha Majumdar, Deesha Philyaw, Randy Winston Sponsored by the National Book Foundation

MARCH 14 12 PM—Audiobook Publishing 101 for Authors Andi Arndt, Ron Butler, Paul Heitsch, Karen White, Michele Cobb

2 PM—Law and Authors

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Jacqueline Lipton, Jane Friedman

4 PM—Agents Roundtable

April Eberhardt, Cherise Fisher, Rayhané Sanders, Nikki Terpilowski, Gary Dop

7 PM—The Back Room Presents: Rural Noir

S.A. Cosby, Chris Harding Thornton, David Heska Wanbli Weiden, Heather Young, Karen Dionne, Hank Phillippi Ryan

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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25

Festival of the Book starts this week!

III

ts with authors discussing all genres and reading interests.

ee to attend and most events will be available to watch live or on-demand. Explore the full schedule of FREE virtual events at VaBook.org/Schedule.

15

Acts of Exclusion

na, Kaki Dimock d by CFA Institute, Bank of America

Reading Under the Influence: History & Race

. Bradley, Adam Gussow, a N. Harold, Matthew D. Morrison d by W. Tucker Lemon

16 Before the Ever After

e Woodson, Marc Boston d by Dominion Energy, the W.K. oundation, Friends of JeffersonRegional Library

An Evening with Jacqueline n

e Woodson, Lisa Woolfork d by Dominion Energy, the W.K. oundation, Wells Fargo, Friends on-Madison Regional Library

Saunooke Clapsaddle, Kelli Jo Ford, son, Linda LeGarde Grover

ettle, Ann Tucker, William Kurtz d by the Nau Center for Civil War UVA

The Human Cost of One-Click

Gillis, Amelia Pang, amilo Sánchez

4 PM—Filled with Possibility

Brian Teare, Erika Meitner, Kiki Petrosino, Kevin McFadden

7 PM—Double Draw Dare

Tom Angleberger, Dub Leffler, Sarah FitzHenry

MARCH 19

12 PM—UVA Creative Writing Alumni Reading Anna Beecher, Emily Temple, James Livingood

4 PM—Writing Women, Writing Resilience

Susan Abulhawa, Peace Adzo Medie, Diane Zinna, Catalina Esguerra

Louis Chude-Sokei, Nadia Owusu, Kwame Otu—Sponsored by the Charlottesville Sister Cities Commission

MARCH 20

12 PM—Coming of Age in YA Fiction

Mahogany L. Browne, Robin Farmer, Ed Lin, Amber Loyacano

2 PM—Be Holding

Ross Gay, Kaveh Akbar

4 PM—Trouble on the Road S.A. Cosby, Walter Mosley, Stephen Mack Jones

7 PM—Environmental Injustice: Reckoning with American Waste Kerri Arsenault, Anna Clark, Catherine Coleman Flowers

nsor

FICTION

CRIME WAVE

Presented by the Charlottesville Chapter of The Links Incorporated

Bill Clegg, Zeyn Joukhadar, Zak Salih, Adam Nemett—Sponsored by Charlottesville Pride Community Network

African American Literary Tradition

2 PM—Girls in the World: Middle-Grade Fiction

Elizabeth C. Bunce, Hena Khan, Angie Smibert, Hannah Barnaby

4 PM—BIPOC Voices in Speculative Fiction Catherine Hernandez, Jordan Ifueko, Grace D. Gipson

7 PM—Indigenous Poetry: Language as a Map Home

Luisa A. Igloria, Benjamín Naka-Hasebe Kingsley, Lauren K. Alleyne

MARCH 22 12 PM—O Wondrous World!

Ross Gay, Aimee Nezhukumatathil Sponsored by Westminster-Canterbury of the Blue Ridge

7 PM—The Art of the Short Story

John Lanchester, Te-Ping Chen, Courtney Maum

MARCH 23 12 PM—Little Dreamers

Vashti Harrison, Jocelyn Nicole Johnson

4 PM—VAFF Beyond the Screen: A Conversation with Mark Harris Mark Harris, Joe Fab

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7 PM—Yellow Wife

Sadeqa Johnson, Beverly Colwell Adams

MARCH 25 12 PM—Contemporary Romance Major Sponsors

Karen Grey, Tif Marcelo, Lorelei Parker, Priscilla Oliveras

2 PM—Lulu Miller Dives into Curiosity: A Celebration of Nature Writing Lulu Miller

4 PM—I See Myself: Diversity in Children’s Literature Angela Dominguez, Vashti Harrison, Dub Leffler, Mack McLellan

7 PM—Homeland Elegies Ayad Akhtar, Rafia Zakaria

MARCH 26 12 PM—Carol Troxell Reader: Three Hours in Paris

Cara Black, Ellen Crosby Sponsored by the Carol Troxell Fund

2 PM—Seeking More than Salvation: Religious Communities Todne Thomas, Tony Tian-Ren Lin, Joseph Davis

Program Sponsors

Albemarle County Rotary 7 PM—Being Heumann

Jefferson-Madison Regional Libra 4 PM—Coconut & Sambal: Living Community Read Recipes from My Indonesian Kitchen The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Lara Lee, Joe Yonan The Joseph and Robert Cornell M Bank of America Foundation 7 PM—Dark Times &John Mercy Carol Troxell Fund L. Nau III Center for Civil W John Grisham, Ian Rankin CFA Institute University of Virginia Gamma Kni Sponsored by Gamma Knife at UVA Dominion Energy W.K.Center Kellogg Foundation Federation of State Humanities Councils Wells Fargo Friends of Jefferson-Madison Regional Library Westminster-Canterbury of the Bl

Anthology Senior Judith Heumann, John Wodatch

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Albemarle County Rotary Anthology Senior Living The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Bank of America Carol Troxell Fund Charlottesville Pride Community Network Charlottesville Sister Cities Commission

Literary Fiction

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Rachel Beanland, Brian Castleberry, Lauren Francis-Sharma, Lisa Grimes

MARCH 24 12 PM—The Secrets We Keep:

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

Confederate Ambitions: Visions for a New Nation

me Page

12 PM—Historical Fiction

7 PM—Finding Home: Memoirs

17 Indigenous Lit

ors

MARCH 18

MARCH 21 11 AM—Celebration! A Tribute to the


26

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


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CROSSWORD

Lie BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. Beanball, on many diamond scoresheets 4. “Monsters, ____” 7. Civil rights org. whose leaders included John Lewis and Stokely Carmichael 11. Slippery sea creature 12. “The Matrix” hero 13. What you may “drop” on Valentine’s Day, with “the” 15. Goat’s cry 16. Reason for seasonal shots 17. The “O” of AOC 19. Tickle Me Elmo toymaker 21. Opposite of SSE 23. National econ. stat 25. Glassmaker’s oven 26. Smidge 27. Israel’s Meir 29. Mild Dutch cheese 30. DDE’s WWII command 31. Goody-two-shoes 32. Foal’s mother 33. Like some sugar 34. Programmed to, as a thermostat 35. On the same side 36. 1979 Sigourney Weaver film 37. Demolition material 38. Say ____ (refuse) 39. Hosp. heart ward 40. Squiggly mark in “piñata” 42. ____ to one’s ears

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ANSWERS 3/3/21

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

13

#6 solution

10. There are 2.54 in an in. 14. HBO series represented by some of the black (and two white) squares in this puzzle’s grid 18. Miscellany 20. National Radio Hall of Fame inductee who was born Art Ferguson 22. 2009 Grammy winner for her “Still Unforgettable” album 24. History is written in it 27. Lyft drivers consult it 28. Hematite, for one 40. “Have you no shame!” 41. “That’s ____ quit!” 51. Do some voice work 52. ____ Today 54. Weep 56. Daft Punk, for one 57. Chapel Hill sch. 58. The “75” of $1.75: Abbr.

1. Skirt’s edge 2. Fever that reached America in the mid-’60s 3. Put money on the underdog, say 4. Knowledgeable viewpoint 5. First word of Dante’s “Inferno” 6. In a way that produces the opposite effect 7. What “Pay Toll 1 Mile” implies 8. “The Good Place” network 9. Mover’s form for the USPS

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#6 © 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

DOWN

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#5 solution

4

43. Highest-rated 44. 17th-century Dutch painter Jan 45. Hindu god of fire 46. Dockworkers’ org. 47. Ceramists’ needs 48. ____ Francisco 49. Part of DMV: Abbr. 50. Ending with fluor51. “Thank you, Captain Obvious!” 53. Curling surface 55. Draws out 59. Support gp. founded under FDR 60. The NBA’s Magic, on scoreboards 61. Patty and Selma, to Bart, Lisa and Maggie 62. Cave dweller 63. Rival of BAL and BOS 64. Rx writers


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THE

Upcoming for kids: St. Patrick’s Day Arts & Crafts (March 12-14 and March 19-21)

WINE

Open Fri (4-8:30 pm); Sat (12-7 pm); Sun (124:30 pm). Please make reservations on our website or by phone. Our Outdoor tasting room will reopen on Friday, April 2nd. 2531 Scottsville Rd. • Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

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KESWICK VINEYARDS 2019 Cabernet Franc Reserve Beautifully dark and inky in color with a wonderfully aromatic nose showcasing primary tones of white pepper, Provencal herbs and violets. With additional time in the glass, aromas of cherry, spices, graphite, black tea and smoke start coming out. This wine is aromatically complex and intricate. The palate is full bodied with initially lots of oak derived flavors of charred wood, clove, spice and mocha. With additional oxygenation, you get the beautiful spicy and pepper flavors associated with this varietal with secondary flavors of dark berries and chocolate. Grippy tannins are present but there is little astringency and bitterness. As big as this wine, there is a vibrancy and brightness due to good acidity levels. This is beautifully balanced and poised although a bit linear at the moment, requiring some time to fully reach its potential. Our Cabernet Franc Reserve was just awarded a gold medal at this year’s Governor’s Cup competition!

WHAT’S DELISH AT LOCAL WINERIES?

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD

Tall Tails Meritage Reserve Comprising Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc, this traditional Bordeaux-style blend received a Bronze medal at this year’s Governor’s Cup. Notes of violets, black cherries and warm spices make up the bouquet of this particular blend. Meanwhile the palate shows off flavors of black cherry, black peppercorn, dried tobacco leaf, and dusty rose petals. Enjoy this medium-full bodied wine with your Sunday roasts, grilled portobello mushrooms, or outdoors next to a bonfire!

2019 Vidal Blanc

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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A Gold Medal winner of this year’s Governor’s Cup, our Vidal Blanc is perfect for the spring weather approaching. With a nose of orange blossoms and clover honey, the palate has bright acidy, and little sweetness. Orange zest, pineapple and currants round out the palate of this medium bodied wine. Perfect for sipping on the porch, or paired with Asian chicken salad, grilled shrimp, or baked brie. Limited quantities remain, so make sure to grab a bottle before it is gone! We are open 7 days a week 11am to 5pm, offering curbside pickup and for those visiting we have bottle sales only Monday through Thursday and Friday through Sunday offer wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights (four 2 oz pours). The following areas are available for customers: outside tables, deck off tasting room and wellspaced seating inside our Pavilion. Groups greater than 10 not permitted. We ask that customers refrain from moving inside and outside tables. Children and Pets are welcome but pets must remain outside of buildings. Customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs, blankets and glassware. Please note that we cannot pour into glassware brought from home. Please follow entrance and exit signs when coming into the tasting room to purchase wine. Restrooms are available in tasting room and pavilion, one patron at a time. Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our Covid operating procedures. Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm 13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

DUCARD VINEYARDS 2017 Triskele Our Triskele is a Bordeaux-style blend of Merlot, Cabernet Franc, and Petit Verdot and was just awarded a gold medal at this year’s Governor’s Cup competition! Warm aromas of cherry, liquorice, and sweet spices give this wine a cozy bouquet. Rounded and supple on the palate, there is some balanced acidity with flavors of blackberry, peppercorns, and casis. A tannic and strong wine, we recommend decanting Triskele for 30-60 minutes before enjoying. Pair with beef wellington, roasted duck, or a mediumbodied cigar and a beautiful sunset!

Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and lots of beautiful views along scenic back roads. Get some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit on our lawns, or pick up a bottle or three of our award-winning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walk-ups accommodated on a space-available basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website! Open daily – Mon-Thurs. 3-6 PM , Fri-Sun 12-6 PM NEW: Offering tasting flights daily. Table service, well-spaced, led by DuCard staff host, crystal glassware, red, white or mixed flights. An elegant way to get to know our wines. Saturdays- Music on the Patio! (Artists vary each week; 2:30-5:30 pm) Fridays- Friday Night out at Ducard (5:30 - 8:30 pm) come out and kick off the weekend with dinner and live music at DuCard. March 14th- Saint Patrick’s Day Featuring Music by Smokin’ Trout: Join us for a touch of the Irish with the lyrical Celtic rock and ballad/bluegrass music of Smokin’ Trout. Get your green on, grab your favorite DuCard wine, and let the toe tappin’ go! No cover. Reservations are recommended. Make yours here today! March 28th- Vertical Cabernet Franc tasting with owner Scott Elliff! We’ll be pouring vintages from our library – 2011 to present – tasting and talking about the effects of that season’s weather, vineyard practices and winemaking techniques on the finished wine. Nibbles accompany the tasting and the small remaining stock of these wines will be available for sale. Limited seating, advance reservations are required through our website. $49/ person, 2-4pm 40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 • www.ducardvineyards.com

Eastwood is a women-owned business created by a group of wine lovers and agriculture enthusiasts producing awardwinning Virginia wines. We embrace the power of storytelling and the vision that there is no ceiling you can’t break. For Women’s History Month, send us your stories! We would love to highlight you along with some of the amazing women who are building Eastwood. We look forward to toasting you in one of our tasting rooms soon!

Tasting Room Hours We look forward to continuing to serve all of our wonderful guests this spring during our daily hours of 10am-5pm. Reservations can be made for Saturdays at no charge, however reservations are not necessary. We offer first come, first served seating at our outdoor courtyard tables or open seating for those who wish to bring their own blankets and chairs to spread out in our designated lawn area. Please remember face masks are required for all guests ages 5+ when not seated. Wine is available by the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of prepackaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase.

March Happenings: The Barn, home to our indoor Tasting Room, is open on a reservation-basis with a few new menu items including the Red Reserve and Virginia Classics Tastings as well as an assortment of snacks including cheese and crackers, crackers and bars from Good Phyte, fine chocolates from Gearharts, and mixed nuts and clementines. Please make reservations on our website. Our drink offerings also include non-alcoholic options.

1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

WINERY

DUCARD VINEYARD

Guide Map

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MADISON

33 HARRISONBURG

15

STANARDSVILLE

ORANGE

81

340 29 GORDONSVILLE

33 CROZET AFTON

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KESWICK VINEYARDS LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE

EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

ZION CROSSROADS

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD 64

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By Rob Brezsny

Aries (March 21-April 19): Artist Richard Kehl tells this traditional Jewish story: God said to Abraham, “But for me, you would not be here.” Abraham answered, “I know that Lord, but were I not here there would be no one to think about you.” I’m bringing this tale to your attention, dear Aries, because I think the coming weeks will be a favorable time to summon a comparable cheekiness with authorities, including even the Divine Wow herself. So I invite you to consider the possibility of being sassy, saucy, and bold. Risk being an articulate maverick with a point of view that the honchos and experts should entertain.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): Spiritual author Ernest Holmes wrote, “True imagination is not fanciful daydreaming, it is fire from heaven.” Unfortunately, many people do indeed regard imagination as mostly just a source of fanciful daydreaming. And it is also true that when our imaginations are lazy and out of control, when they conjure delusional fears and worries, they can be debilitating. I bring this to your attention, Taurus, because I believe the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to harness the highest powers of your imagination—to channel the fire from heaven—as you visualize all the wonderful and interesting things you want to do with your life in the next nine months.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): “I’m always waiting for a door to open in a wall without doors,” wrote Gemini author Fernando Pessoa. Huh? Pessoa was consistently eccentric in his many writings, and I find this particular statement especially odd. I’m going to alter it so it makes more sense and fits your current needs. Here’s your motto for the coming weeks: “I’m always ready to figure out how to make a new door in a wall without doors, and call on all necessary help to make it.”

Cancer

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): The bad news is that the narrow buffer zone between North Korea and South Korea is laced with landmines. Anyone who walks there is at risk for getting blown up. The good news is that because people avoid the place, it has become an unprecedented nature preserve—a wildlife refuge where endangered species like the red-crowned crane and Korean fox can thrive. In the coming weeks and months, I’d love to see you engage in a comparable project, Pisces: finding a benevolent use for a previously taboo or wasted part of your life. tourist industry. More so before the pandemic, but even now, outsiders have come to paraglide, hunt for bears, and marvel at the scenery. In this horoscope, I am making an outlandish metaphorical comparison of you to the Kamchatka Peninsula. Like that land, people sometimes find it a challenge to reach you. And yet when they do, you can be quite welcoming. Is this a problem? Maybe, maybe not. What do you think? Now is a good time to re-evaluate.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Biting midges, also known as no-see-ums, are blood-sucking flies that spread various diseases. Yuck, right? Wouldn’t the world be a better place if we used science to kill off all biting midges everywhere? Well, there would be a disappointing trade-off if we did. The creepy bugs are the primary pollinators for several crops grown in the topics, including cacao. So if we got rid of the no-see-ums, there’d probably be no more chocolate. I’m guessing that you may be dealing with a comparable dilemma, Leo: an influence that has both a downside and an upside. The central question is: Can you be all you want to be without it in your life? Or not? Now is a good time to ponder the best way to shape your future relationship.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): According to my analysis of your imminent astrological potentials, you already are or will soon be floating and whirling and churning along on an ocean of emotion. In other words, you will be experiencing more feelings and stronger feelings than you have in quite some time. This doesn’t have to be a problem as long as you do the following: 1. Be proud and appreciative about being able to feel so much. 2. Since only a small percentage of your feelings need

to be translated into practical actions, don’t take them too seriously. 3. Enjoy the ride!

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): Poet Wendell Berry says “it’s the immemorial feelings” he likes best: “hunger and thirst and their satisfaction; work-weariness and earned rest; the falling again from loneliness to love.” Notice that he doesn’t merely love the gratification that comes from quenching his hunger and thirst. The hunger and thirst are themselves essential components of his joy. Work-weariness and loneliness are not simply inconvenient discomforts that he’d rather live without. He celebrates them, as well. I think his way of thinking is especially worthy of your imitation in the next three weeks.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Famous and influential science fiction novelist Philip K. Dick relied on amphetamines to fuel his first 43 novels. Beginning with A Scanner Darkly, his 44th, he did without his favorite drug. It wasn’t his best book, but it was far from his worst. It sold well and was made into a movie featuring Keanu Reeves, Robert Downey Jr., and two other celebrity actors. Inspired by Dick’s success without relying on his dependency— and in accordance with current astrological omens—I’m inviting you to try doing without one of your addictions or compulsions or obsessions as you work on your labor of love.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Ninety percent of all apples in the world are descended from a forest of apple trees in southeast Kazakhstan. Most of us have tasted just a few types of apples, but there’s a much wider assortment of flavors in that natural wonderland. You know how wine is described as having taste notes and aromas? The apple flavor of Kazakhstan’s apples may

be tinged with hints of roses, strawberries, anise, pineapples, coconuts, lemon peels, pears, potatoes, or popcorn. Can you imagine traveling to that forest and exploring a far more complex and nuanced relationship with a commonplace food? During the coming weeks, I invite you to experiment with arousing metaphorically similar experiences. In what old familiar persons, places, or things could you find a surprising wealth of previously unexplored depth and variety?

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Author Andrew Tilin testified that he sometimes had the feeling that his life was in pieces—but then realized that most of the pieces were good and interesting. So his sense of being a mess of unassembled puzzle parts gave way to a deeper contentment—an understanding that the jumble was just fine the way it was. I recommend you cultivate and enjoy an experience like that in the coming weeks, Capricorn.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Indian poet Meena Alexander was bon under the sign of Aquarius. She became famous after she moved to the United States at age 29, but was raised in India and the Sudan. In her poem “Where Do You Come From?” she wrote, “Mama beat me when I was a child for stealing honey from a honey pot.” I’m sorry to hear she was treated so badly for enjoying herself. She wasn’t committing a crime—the honey belonged to her family, and her family had plenty of money to buy more honey. This vignette is my way of advising you, in accordance with astrological omens, to carry out your personal version of stealing the honey from the honey pot, dear Aquarius. Take what’s rightfully yours. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, 1-877-873-4888.

We were a meal kit before there were meal kits.

pegssalt.com Sold in local groceries, Whole Foods, and Amazon Prime

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Peg’s Salt. The original every day, easy meal solution.

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

(June 21-July 22): You can’t drive to the Kamchatka Peninsula. It’s a 104,000-squaremile area with a sub-Arctic climate in the far east of Russia. No roads connect it to the rest of the world. Its major city, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, is surrounded by volcanoes. If you want to travel there, you must arrive by plane or ship. And yet Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky has long had a thriving

CULTURE FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

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30

Say “mmm.”

Q&A What book has gotten you through the pandemic? All the 1,200 or so on my Kindle, plus a roomful within arm’s reach. Books: A safe place to park my head. JUDITH MARYMOR/FACEBOOK

The Splendid and The Vile.

Facebook. ERIC HANLY/FACEBOOK

Which “book,” singular? With nothing else to do I burn through 1-2 per week. @STRNR/TWITTER

@BLACKWIDOW65/INSTAGRAM

Writing Down The Bones: Freeing The Writer Within by Natalie Goldberg.

Strangely enough, a book about a pandemic. Life As We Knew It by Susan Beth Pfeffer. @VAFOODIECUTIE/INSTAGRAM

@COACHKB_TENNIS/INSTAGRAM

GADGETS! For spring, a few must-have tools

DRANKS! New booze opps courtesy of Bottle House

ART! Evan Mooney’s candy-inspired series SPRING 2021

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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Let’s do

Taste is everything.

lunch!

MOUTH-TO-FEED Unpacking three foodie ’grams (and their top five local picks!)

It’s Remarkable! Baggby’s classic sammy combines turkey, cream cheese, and avocado (plus a whole lotta other good stuff).

The one I’ve been writing since last May: a memoir! SALENA LEVI/FACEBOOK

Glow by Rick James. True Heritage aims to further Virginia’s wine legacy

Food trucks, bagged sammies, and three-meat platters—your midday options are endless

When it comes to area eats, we let our cravings guide us. And in this quarterly magazine, you’ll find everything from a stack of pancakes to a plate of filet mignon. Each issue of Knife & Fork introduces readers to chefs, food trends, recipes, and, most importantly, the best meals around.

ON STANDS SPRING, SUMMER, FALL, WINTER

@COREYGOREYFUNNYSTORY/ INSTAGRAM

The Friday “Cocktails with a Curator” by The Frick Museum. @JLS5K0/TWITTER

What always helped me, and now more than ever, is the “book” of IQ Radio. Words can’t describe enough all the positives it brings forward. @LUFFAKLEIN/TWITTER

Next week’s question: If you started a commune, who would you want to live on it? Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.


31

New but with an old Soul

If you haven’t been by Minerals & Mystics yet, we can’t wait to meet you!

Be a rock star at Minerals & Mystics!

www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive Charlottesville VA 22901 434-284-7709

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Be sure to ask us about our private shopping experience - the Rock Star hour!

March 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

We are a unique gem in Seminole Square Shopping Center filled with rocks and minerals, sterling silver natural gemstone jewelry and so much more. Each of us here at Minerals & Mystics is on our own path of spiritual discovery and enlightenment. We may have just opened in August, but we have been studying and working with crystals and jewelry for many years, each of us in a different mindset and place on our path just like you. What better way to grow than by sharing that journey with others. Join us for beautiful treasures, interesting conversations, and a like-minded community of different and wonderful seekers.


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c-ville.com

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March 10 - 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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CLINICAL TRIALS Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities: Direct Support Professional Residential and Day Support Services Various shifts available To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/ In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

@CVILLENEWS_DESK @ARTSCVILLE @EATDRINKCVILLE

uvaclinicaltrials.com

Exercise Training and Drug Study

Study for Type 2 Diabetics

Non-smoking, inactive adults aged 21-50 needed for study on the effect of exercise and the drug liraglutide on blood vessels. You must have 3 of the 4 characteristics: overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fasting blood sugar. Study requires three 1-hour and two 9-hour visits over 5 months in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Participants are randomized to one of 4 groups: control, exercise training, study drug, or exercise + study drug. Compensation is $1,500. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, MD.

Men and women with type 2 diabetes aged 18-60 needed for study on the effect of the drug empagliflozin (used to control blood sugar) on blood vessels. Study requires two 1-hour outpatient visits and two 7-hour admissions in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. The study drug is taken for 12 weeks. You must have Type 2 diabetes, be a non-smoker, and not taking insulin. Compensation is $800, paid in installments. Principal Investigator: Eugene Barrett, MD, PhD.

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline CRC 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu HSR #200065

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline CRC 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu IRB-HSR# 21403

How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.


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33

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE

Serving SUSTAINABLY raised and LOCALLY sourced food INSPIRED by

Complainant, v.

Case No. CL20-1579

LOUISE TSUI, et als. Respondents. ORDER OF PUBLICATION

Seasonal Cafe (part-time). Monticello the diverse culturalAssociate influences that shaped life at MONTICELLO seeks a part-time, temporary associate to work in our on-site cafe, Farm Table. The associate will be expected to perform sales transactions, assist guests by both COLD taking orders and BEVERAGES SALADS serving, re-stocking merchandise, washing dishes, and helpTrager Brothers Cold Brews ~ 6 Winter Salad ~ 10 ingSEASONAL keep all areas of the cafe clean. A successful CHOPPED GREENS, Craftcandidate Sodas ~ 2.95 SHAVED BRUSSELS SPROUTS, will have the ability to multitask while delivering superior cus- ~ 3.50 Fair Trade Lemonade ROASTED BEETS, Local Kombuchas tomer service and be able to work independently or with a ~ 5 DRIED CRANBERRIES, CANDIED NUTS, team. Requirements include: the ability to be Organic on yourMilk feet Box for ~ 3 PUMPKIN SEEDS, Spindrift Sparkling Waters ~ 2.50 MOUNTAIN VIEW FARM FETA, of time, occasionally lift up to 50 lbs., and extended periods Sustainably Bottled Water ~ 2.95 RASPBERRY VINAIGRETTE successful completion of background check and drug test. Preferred candidate service experiGrain Bowl ~ 11 will have frontline customer HOT BEVERAGES SEASONALence GREENS & VEGETABLES, and find inspiration in our commitment to organic, local, QUINOA, MOUNTAIN VIEW FARM FETA, Coffee ~will 3 and sustainable food offerings. Normal work schedule JEFFERSON’S TARRAGON VINAIGRETTE Hot Tea ~ 2 include mostly daytime shifts, to include some weekends and Hot Cocoa ~ 2 SOUPS holidays with occasional after-hours events required. Position ASK ABOUT OUR expected to last through October, 2021.

March 10 - 16, 2021 c-ville.com

The object of this suit is to effect a judicial sale of certain real property designated as Tax Map Parcel No. 061W1-00-00-13705 (“61W1-13705”), and which is being assessed on the tax records of the County of Albemarle, Virginia in the name of Louise Tsui, in MADE-FROM-SCRATCH SOUPS ~ 6 BAKED GOODS To apply, please Ham visit: order to subject such property to the lien thereon for Biscuit with Honey Mustard ~ 4 SANDWICHES monticello.applicantpro.com/jobs/ delinquent real estate taxes. Assorted Muffins & Croissants ~ 3 Assorted Cookies ~ 1.50 Turkey & Cheddar ~ 10 It appearing from the Complaint and by the ALL-NATURAL TURKEY BREAST, Brownie ~ 2 Affidavit filed according to law that diligence has TILLAMOOK SHARP CHEDDAR, DUKE’S MAYO, been used without effect to ascertain the location of SEASONAL GREENS, SNACKS LYON BAKERY BAGUETTE Respondent Louise Tsui. Kind Bars ~ 3 It is therefore ORDERED that Louise Tsui, Virginia Ham & Swiss ~ 10 Pirate’s Booty ~ 2 SHAVED VIRGINIA HAM, appear on or before April 12, 2021 and take such action Route 11 Potato Chips ~ 2 LACEY SWISS CHEESE, Stacy’s Pita Chips ~ 1.50 as she deems appropriate to protect any interests she DUKE’S MAYO, WHOLE-GRAIN MUSTARD, may have in the above-described property. SEASONAL GREENS, BEER & WINE It is further ORDERED that the foregoing GOODWIN CREEK FARMHOUSE WHITE Blue Mountain Beers ~ 6.50 portion of this Order be published once a week for Seasonal Veggie Sandwich ~ 8 Monticello Chardonnay ~ 8 two consecutive weeks in the C-Ville Weekly, that a SEASONAL GREENS & VEGETABLES, Monticello Claret ~ 8 ROCKY BRANCH FARM DAMSON PLUM copy hereof be posted on the door of the Courthouse JAM, LYON BAKERY BAGUETTE Tiamo Wine ~ 7 and that a copy be mailed to the last known address, if any, of the Respondent. of our to products contain or may come into contact with common allergens including wheat, peanuts, soy, The Clerk is hereby directed to send this Many Order tree nuts, milk, eggs, fish and shellfish. Please see a cafe employee with any questions or allergen concerns. the C-Ville Weekly and to make the aforementioned 434-984-7586 • farmtable@monticello.org • monticello.org/farmtable posting and mailings. And this cause is continued. ENTER: Claude V. Worrell, II DATE: 3/4/21

Small packages

A planner advises: how to hold a microwedding

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Charlottesville's best spots for your 'something old'

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A two-person dance floor (what a romantic idea!)

S P R I N G 2 02 1

HERE COME THE BRIDES O N

S T A N D S

N O W !

On a love train

We're on board for this Staunton wedding PAGE 62

Love is

patient, love is kind Six couples (finally) get their big day

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WWW.CAAR.COM 35

VOL. 30 NO. 10 n MARCH 10 - 16, 2021

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Free and Open to All BY KEN WILSON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

2021


MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

36

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers WOODLANDS

NORTH DOWNTOWN

Colonial Revival style c. 1913 residence restored to perfection. Flexible and updated floor plan with 2,970 finished square feet. Coveted private backyard and off-street parking. Walk to the amenities of the Historic Downtown Mall and UVA. MLS#608794 $1,549,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

SIX MILES NORTHWEST

Private 4.29 acres, spacious Traditional brick home, built circa 2006, 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths, attached 3-bay garage and detached 2 bays. Meriwether Elementary District, NO HOA, only 6 miles to Barracks Road Shopping Center. MLS#614079 $1,250,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

SWEET RETREAT

4-bedroom mountain home on 14+ acres with gorgeous views of the Rockfish Valley & Blue Ridge Mtns. Oversize windows, heart-pine flooring, soaring ceilings. Minutes from skiing, hiking, excellent food, & beer & wine trail. MLS#610115 $995,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.330GraceGlen.com

Beautifully restored 1760s colonial house located on 293 acres in Northampton County. This historic home has four bedrooms, three full and two half baths, a chef ’s kitchen, and a sunroom overlooking the back patio gardens. Fine details include original millwork, heart pine floors, and five brick fireplaces. Property has access to deep water on the Machipongo River which flows into the Chesapeake Bay. Easy access to the Atlantic. Under conservation easement. MLS#614051 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

ASPIAN LAWN

Gorgeous lake and mountain views from 183 scenic acres within 16 miles of Charlottesville. Circa 1750’s residence, 6 bedrooms, 5 baths, 2 fireplaces, and whole-house generator. Guest cottage, barn, lush pastures, and 11-acre lake. MLS#610431 $1,945,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

KESWICK

Enjoy mountain views of the historic Southwest Mountains from this livable 4-BR residence on 6 private acres. Convenient and quick to Pantops, Historic Downtown Mall, and UVA. Within steps of all the amenities at Keswick Hall. MLS#611672 $989,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

MERIDIEN

Private, peaceful, and perfect—a sophisticated country estate offering stunning Blue Ridge views from just over 40 rolling acres, 9 miles NW of Charlottesville. c. 1840, character-rich yet modernized home with 5 BR and 3.5 BA. Under conservation easement. MLS#613521 $3,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EDNAM FOREST

A true gem perched on 1.5 private acres in Ednam Forest! This stately c. 1963 4-bedroom Georgian is well-located within walking distance to Boar’s Head Inn & Sports Club. Nearly level lawn surrounded by beautifully manicured landscaping. MLS#608474 $1,845,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

KESWICK ESTATES

Exquisite English Country home on premiere 2.5 acres in Keswick Estates. Very private with lovely views of the golf course and distant mountains. The architecturally designed, 7,000+ square foot residence offers a beautiful, lightfilled, spacious living room, dining room, gourmet kitchen, library with limestone fireplace surround, luxurious master complete with dressing room and office, media room, and 4 additional bedrooms. Built with the highest quality materials and workmanship. MLS#611738 $1,695,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

JOHNSON HOUSE

3-BR, 2-BA Virginia farm house nestled in historic district of Covesville, located only 14 miles south of Charlottesville. Mostly open front pasture with nice pond in front. Remainder of acreage is wooded to top of back ridge. Century Link internet. MLS#613228 $516,500 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


37

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CRAWFORD’S KNOB

An opportunity to own a deeded nature preserve protected in perpetuity, a chance to purchase and hold wilderness, and to leave it largely unaltered. This property is ideal for the passive enjoyment of wild lands and the conservation minded buyer. MLS#608893 $1,900,000 Will Carr, 434.981.3065

GREENTREES

188+ acres in Albemarle, 12 miles south of Charlottesville on Rt 20. This wooded tract, mostly in planted pines, offers long road with potential for eight 21-acre lots. There is conservation easement potential. MLS#614109 $1,400,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

KESWICK COUNTRY CLUB

Bordering (Full Cry)Pete Dye golf course and lake, within grounds of Keswick Hall, 5-star luxury resort, is this magnificent 5-bedroom residence constructed of the finest materials with attention to every detail. MLS#603398 $4,200,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.FairwayDriveAtKeswick.com

CHURCH POINT FARM

944 acres along the lower Chickahominy River with 8 miles of shoreline. The property consists of marsh, farmland, woods, and cypress swamp and is managed for waterfowl, deer, turkey, and dove. Features 3-BR brick dwelling. MLS#2036779 $3,960,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325 www.churchpointfarm.com

FACTORY MILL ROAD

Great 36 acre wooded lot with exceptional privacy, ideal for residential construction. Easy access to I-64 and Route 250 and 20 minutes to Short Pump. Good road frontage on state road and mostly level land. NO HOA. MLS#613845 $295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville, 14 miles to CHO Airport. 177 private acres with c.1901 classic Virginia farm house, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BURNLEY ROAD

Choose your builder and build your dream home on one of 3 private lots in Northern Albemarle. 5+ to 9+ acres. Exceptional Blue Ridge Mtn. views with privacy. Close proximity to NGIC, airport, shopping, and University Research Park. Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

EXCEPTIONAL LARGE ACREAGE

2 wonderful estate parcels in coveted Ragged Mtn. Farm. Excellent building sites, complete privacy, beautiful Blue Ridge Mountain views. Murray/Henley/ Western Albemarle school districts. 84.79 acres: MLS#563174 $995,000; 100.22 acres: MLS#563171 $1,100,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

ASHCROFT

Stunning mountain views abound throughout this bright, spacious, 4-BR residence. Privately tucked on 2.26 acres adjoining common space. Located minutes from Pantops, UVA, and all Charlottesville has to offer. MLS#607638 $1,145,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

38

UPCO M I N G

AUCTIONS Lynchburg, VA

March

10

Wednesday

NEWS & VIEWS Local Real Estate News Roy Wheeler Realty Co. Merges with Real Estate Industry Leader Howard Hanna

Investment Property: Duplex BANKRUPTCY AUCTION: 1601 Fillmore St, Lynchburg, VA (auction at courthouse)

Danville, VA

March

11

NEWS & VIEWS

Thursday

45 Acres near Golf Course BANKRUPTCY AUCTION: 1417 Claiborne St, Danville, VA (auction at courthouse)

Appomattox, VA

March

12 Friday

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY

3BR Fixer Upper w/ Shop on 20Ac

ABSOLUTE AUCTION: 13895 Richmond Hwy, Appomattox, VA (auction on site)

TRF

AUCTIONS

Torrence, Read, & Forehand

TRFAuctions.com 434-847-7741 101 Annjo Court, Forest, VA 24551 | VAAF501

Roy Wheeler Realty Co., one of the leading brokers in Charlottesville, is excited to announce that it has joined forces with real estate leader Howard Hanna Real Estate Services. The Roy Wheeler Realty offices will now operate as Howard Hanna Roy Wheeler Realty. “I have so much respect for the Roy Wheeler Realty Co., its leaders and agents. We are eager to welcome them to the Howard Hanna family,” said Dennis Cestra Jr, Southeast President. “Howard Hanna Roy Wheeler Realty is positioned well for the future and we are looking forward to tremendous growth in Virginia.” The merger will allow Roy Wheeler Realty Co. to fully utilize the in-house services offered at Howard Hanna Real Estate Services. These include one-stop shopping offerings that serve homeowners through their entire buying or selling experience. Programs such as the 100 percent Money Back Guarantee are also exclusively available through Howard Hanna Real Estate Services. “We have been proudly serving the Charlottesville and surrounding area for over ninety years and are looking forward to this exciting next chapter for our company and our family of agents,” said Michael Guthrie, owner and CEO of Roy Wheeler Realty Co. “The Howard Hanna marketing and technology tools are a competitive advantage that will enhance our unmatched service and local market understanding. Our clients and agents will benefit from this new affiliation with the Howard Hanna family.” The merger of these real estate companies has enhanced their ability to serve homeowners in Virginia. “The synergies between our cultures made this partnership an easy choice. We are excited to have the Roy Wheeler Realty Co. join the Howard Hanna family. Together we will strive to deliver an unmatched real estate experience across the country consistently,” said Howard W. “Hoby” Hanna, IV, President of Howard Hanna Real Estate Services. “This partnership advances Howard Hanna’s strategic growth plan to be one of the fastest-growing real estate companies in the United States.” Howard Hanna finished 2019 with a closed sales volume of more than $23 billion and over 100,000 homes sold in total, according to an annual research report produced by REAL Trends in March 2020. Roy Wheeler Realty Co. currently has 90 sales associates, operates four real estate offices, and oversees a Farms & Estates Division. The company finished 2020 with

a closed sales volume of more than $250 million. Roy Wheeler Realty will maintain its office locations in Charlottesville, Troy, Crozet and Ruckersville, Virginia. About Howard Hanna: Howard Hanna Real Estate Services is the #1 family-owned and -operated independent broker in the U.S.A. The full-service real estate company has more than 350 real estate, mortgage, insurance, title and escrow service offices across 11 states, including Allen Tate Realtors in the Carolinas, with more than 12,000 sales associates and staff, including many of the industry’s top-producing real estate agents. For more information, visit www. HowardHanna.com.

Local Energy Alliance Program Welcomes Solarize Program Manager

Katie VanLangen Takes on Solarize Program as LEAP Continues to Expand Solar Opportunities Local Energy Alliance Program (LEAP), Central and Northern Virginia’s nonprofit leader for energy-based climate solutions for homes and businesses, is excited to welcome Katie VanLangen to its team as Solarize Program Manager. Solarize, a community-based outreach initiative run by LEAP, brings solar power to people throughout Virginia. LEAP manages the Solarize program and catalyzes Virginia’s clean energy future and climate-resilient communities. Before coming to LEAP, Katie acted as Executive Director for the Charlottesville Renewable Energy Alliance (CVilleREA), where she worked to support the growth of the renewable energy industry in Charlottesville. Katie has spent her career tackling pressing social issues and working with organizations that serve the underserved. Her wide variety of skills and experience make her a great fit to expand the Solarize program and serve more of the community with solar solutions. Katie is looking forward to joining the team, saying, “LEAP has done an incredible job making solar accessible to homeowners and providing weatherization and energy-efficiency services to low-income households. I’m eager to work with localities and other partners throughout the state to not only expand the geographic


39

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reach of the program but also to help low-income households benefit from solar power as well.” With the passage of the Virginia Clean Economy Act in 2020, many new opportunities will soon be available to Virginia residents, especially around community solar. At the same time, technological advances with batteries and electric vehicles are creating a set of more complex solutions for Virginians who want to have more control over their utility bills and mitigate climate change. “I’m excited to have Katie join LEAP at this pivotal time in the expansion of solar as a practical, beneficial source of renewable energy for Virginians,” states Chris Meyer, Executive Director of LEAP. “Katie’s experience in the Virginia renewable energy sector and nonprofit management expertise make her the perfect fit for scaling our Solarize program,” added Meyer. Since 2014, Solarize has helped initiate the installation of more than 4 megawatts of solar capacity valued at more than $12 million. Looking forward, LEAP will be continuing its annual Solarize campaigns in Northern Virginia and the Piedmont/ Central Virginia regions. The Local Energy Alliance Program (LEAP) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit headquartered in Charlottesville, VA. As a trusted nonprofit, LEAP delivers direct education and services for improved energy performance that address climate change; create cost savings for families and businesses; healthier, safer, and more durable buildings; and local jobs and economic growth.

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MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

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Clutter: An Untidy History

FEATURE

Bibliophiles know the frustration of searching for a favorite volume amid stacks, stacks and more stacks. Back in January, former Washington Post columnist and contributing editor Jennifer Howard spoke with historian Meredith Hindley about her new book, Clutter: An Untidy History, an expansive look at our relationships to all our stuff. Howard sets her personal struggles with her own clutter against a meticulously researched history of how the developed world came to drown in material goods. “I hope this book will help people appreciate that the struggle with stuff is a collective problem as much as an individual one,” she says. “It’s worth thinking about where our things come from—and where they will go when we’re done with them.”

2021

Free and Open to All CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

BY KEN WILSON

L

og on, Zoom in, drop out, and pick up a good book, as Timothy Leary might have said. When COVID turns life gray with gloom, the printed page in the hands of Jacqueline Woodson or John Grisham turns it positively psychedelic. So feed your head. Spend three hours in World War II Paris. Peruse an untidy history of clutter that might help you with your own, or a love song to NBA great Julius Erving that’s part meditation on familial love and the Middle Passage. Expand your knowledge of spring bird migrations, and your expertise—surely you have some—in authentic Indonesian cookery. However you like it, make it happen. Assume (or approximate) the Lotus position or settle into a chaise lounge with a strong cup of tea. And from the

posture of your choice, prepare for the 27th Virginia Festival of the Book, March 13 through 26—archived, livestreamed, or Zoomed but as invigorating as ever. Festival programs are free and open to all.

Digital Museum of Broken Relationships with Leslie Jamison and Friends While the Festival won’t begin until the middle of the month, already its website features 15 free-to-stream talks and discussions. The brilliant novelist

and essayist Leslie Jamison, called “a master of blending memoir, criticism and journalism,” teaches non-fiction in the Columbia University MFA program. She sat down last November to discuss an essay in Make it Scream, Make it Burn, her latest book. Inspired by a visit to the Museum of Broken Relationships in Zagreb, Croatia, “Museum of Broken Hearts” explores loss and renewal, and how broken loves live inside of us through the objects we live with and the memories we carry. Jamison spoke with the museum’s cofounder, Olinka Vištica, along with a few fellow writers, who each shared stories they contributed to Jamison’s essay. “Every object,” Jamison writes, “insists that something was, rather than trying to make it disappear.” The conversation was moderated by Allison Wright, Executive Editor of VQR, which ran the original essay in Spring of 2018.

Spring Migrations Author and “extreme birder” Kenn Kaufman has observed bird migrations on all seven continents and edited and coauthored seven titles in the Kaufman Field Guide series. His memoir, Kingbird Highway, was designated a “Classic” by the National Outdoor Book Awards. Late last month Kaufman talked about his newest book, A Season on the Wind: Inside the World of Spring Migration, with Pete Myers who earned a PhD from U.C. Berkeley for studies of the migratory ecology and behavior of sandpipers, work that took him from Arctic Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. He has served as senior vice president for science at the National Audubon Society, and is co-founder of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network, which coordinates conservation plans at over 100 sites in the western hemisphere.

Be Holding—A Meditation “…Erving simply decided in the air to knock on other doors by soaring more —have you ever decided anything in the air?—” Strength, grace, and split-second decision-making are all it took. Has anyone ever made a shot as beautiful as Dr. J’s gravity-defying behind-the-board reverse layup in the 1980 NBA Finals? Indiana University poet Ross Gay’s new booklength work, Be Holding: A Poem, meditates on pick-up basketball, the Middle


Passage, photography and surveillance, music, familial love, and Erving’s legendary Baseline Move. Ross will discuss the poem, and who knows what else, with the Iranian-born poet Kaveh Akbar on March 20 at 2:00 p.m.

The Human Cost of One-Click Orders

The Carol Troxell Reader

Dark Times & Mercy: John Grisham and Ian Rankin in Conversation

Nighttime falls on a drag car racetrack in Virginia, a Native American reservation in North Dakota, a little patch of rural Nebraska, and the mood is uneasy . . . who says “noir” only denotes desperate deeds in a dark narrow alley, or in the eerie glow of a skyscraper? Not S.A.

In Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret, Catherine Coleman Flowers—the MacArthur grant–winning “Erin Brockovich of Sewage”—chronicles the environmental justice movement in rural America. In The Poisoned City: Flint’s Water and the American Urban Tragedy, Anna Clark covers the tragic story of how lead was allowed to poison the water in Flint, Michigan. And in Mill Town, Kerri Arsenault reflects on her rural hometown of Mexico, Maine, where the town’s chief employer, a paper mill, gave economic security to three generations of her family, but also wreaked havoc with their health and their environment. Arsenault, Clark, and Flowers will speak on environmental injustices like these, and the systemic racism and class privilege that keep them from being taken seriously, on March 20 at 7:00 p.m.

Mike Nichols: A Life Mike Nichols was a showbiz renaissance man and a complicated character. The Virginia Film Festival (VAFF) will partner with the Festival of the Book for the next installment of its popular Beyond the Screen: A Virtual Conversation Series on Tuesday, March 23 at 4:00 p.m. This live-streamed conversation with New York Magazine writer and columnist Mark Harris will focus on his biography of film and theater director, producer, actor, and comedian Mike Nichols, entitled Mike Nichols: A Life. It will be moderated by filmmaker and VAFF Associate Programmer Joe Fab. Nichols began his career as an edgy improv comedian with Elaine May before becoming one of America’s leading film and stage directors. His credits include iconic films like The Graduate, for which he won an Academy Award, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, Catch-22, Silkwood, The Birdcage, and Charlie Wilson’s War.

An Evening with Jacqueline Woodson Best-selling children’s author Jacqueline Woodson grew up telling stories, and writing them everywhere: sidewalks, walls, and even shoes. Woodson told

Instagram, TikTok, and apps the average grown-up has never heard of don’t fire every kid’s imagination. Some still dream with a book in their hands. Writer, illustrator, and filmmaker Vashti Harrison has authored a series of illustrated volumes for such old school and super cool primary and secondary school children. She will read from three of them, Little Dreamers, Little Leaders, and Little Legends, and talk about becoming an author-illustrator, on March 23 at noon. Students are invited to submit questions ahead of time.

Girls in the World Hercule Poirot was a clever little man, but it was Agatha Christie who created him. Middlegrade novelists Elizabeth Bunce (How to Get Away with Myrtle), Hena Khan (Amina’s Song), and Angie Smibert (The Truce) know all about girls finding their voices and using their wits to solve mysteries, overcome challenges, and bring people together. They’ll see what else they can figure out in conversation together on March 21 at 2:00 p.m.

Coconut & Sambal: Recipes from My Indonesian Kitchen with Lara Lee Chef and food writer Lara Lee celebrates her Australian and Indonesian heritage at London supper clubs and calls her catering outfit Kiwi and Roo.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Rural Noir

Environmental Injustice: Reckoning with American Waste

Little Dreamers and Future Leaders

FEATURE

Scottish crime writer Ian Rankin’s bestselling novels have garnered him an OBE (Order of the British Empire), along with awards in Germany, France, Denmark, and the United States. Sometime Charlottesville resident John Grisham has written thirty-five novels for adults, six for children, one work of nonfiction, and a collection of stories. He’s also a longtime member of the Board of Directors for the Innocence Project, which works to exonerate the innocent through DNA testing, and reform the criminal justice system. Grisham has given frequent readings at New Dominion Bookshop on the Downtown Mall, which is sponsoring a conversation, likely to be wide-ranging, between Grisham and Rankin on March 26 at 7:00 p.m.

New Dominion Bookshop owner Carol Troxell kept the oldest independent bookstore in the Commonwealth alive on Charlottesville’s Downtown Mall despite competition from big box retailers and online behemoths. Following her death in 2017, the shop and the Festival established the Carol Troxell Reader in grateful memory of Carol and her invaluable contribution to local literary life. In the third annual Carol Troxell Reader, March 26 at noon, acclaimed mystery writer Cara Black will read and discuss her newest book, Three Hours in Paris, a thriller set in occupied Paris. Virginia author Ellen Crosby, who’s latest, The French Paradox, is the 11th in her Virginia wine country series, will moderate.

What price do both blue- and whitecollar workers pay for providing the speed and convenience we’ve come to rely on from online shopping? Award-winning journalists Alec MacGillis (Fulfillment: Winning and Losing in One-Click America) and Amelia Pang (Made in China: A Prisoner, an SOS Letter, and the Hidden Cost of America’s Cheap Goods) discuss the hidden costs of our globalized, internet-driven consumer economy, including China’s forced labor camps, and Amazon’s unethical practices and frightening, quasigovernmental reach, on March 17 at 7:00 p.m.

people she’d be a teacher, lawyer or hair- 41 dresser when she grew up, but her heart said “write.” She did and it has won her ten awards, including the Caldecott Medal, the Coretta Scott King Award and, most recently, the Hans Christian Andersen Award, the highest international recognition given to an author of children’s books. In partnership with the JeffersonMadison Regional Library’s Same Page community-wide reading series on March 16 at 7:00 p.m., Woodson will discuss her work, including her novel Red at the Bone, her memoir-in-verse, Brown Girl Dreaming, and her newest book, a novel-in-verse, Before the Ever After.

MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

Cosby, Chris Harding Thornton, David Heska Wanbli Weiden, and Heather Young. The four popular crime writers discuss criminality, corruption and hushhush intergenerational secrets far away from the big cruel city in conversation with fellow suspense novelists Karen Dionne and Hank Phillippi Ryan on March 14 at 7:00 p.m.


MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

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Annie Gould Gallery Lee is the author of Coconut & Sambal: Recipes from My Indonesian Kitchen, which features gorgeous photos and beguiling tales of island life alongside 80 traditional recipes. On March 26 at 4:00 p.m., Washington Post Food and Dining editor Joe Yonan will join her as she demonstrates a recipe using simple techniques and easy to find ingredients.

needed something soft and warming, Chesnakova discussed her new cookbook, Hot Cheese: Over 50 Gooey, Oozy, Melty Recipes with Sara Adduci, head cheesemonger at Belmont Butchery in Richmond. Before the pixelated screen came the handsomely printed page, and before the 280-character tweet was the well-crafted paragraph. We’re fine with new ways, but we treasure the old. At the Virginia Festival of the Book, old is on stage in all its glory.

Hot Cheese with Polina Chesnakova and Sara Adduci So many cuisines, so little time, but who doesn’t crave a little American comfort food sometimes? Hot cheese on crusty bread, maybe? Or in a fondue pot or a raclette? Seattle-based food writer Polina Chesnakova has been published in The Washington Post, Saveur, Culture, and Virginia Magazine. Back in January when winter had us in its grip and a body

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REALTORS®

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MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

Find Homes Team

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What Kind What of Seller Kind Are What of You? Seller What KindAre Kind of Seller You? of What Seller Are Kind What You? AreofYou? Kind SellerofAre Seller You? A

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MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

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45 MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME IN GREENE COUNTY Madison's Reserve - a conveniently located small development in the community of Quinque (between Ruckersville & Stanardsville). An easy commute to Northern Albemarle County - UVA Research Park / NGIC-DIA / CHO - to Charlottesville. Nearby shopping, schools and recreational opportunities (Skyline Drive access included) make this location so appealing. Bring your own builder or use our recommended - Bethel Builders, LLC. Public water / public sewer / underground electric & telco internet Comcast coming in May James Dr. soon to be maintained by VDOT. Quinque - James & Dolly Madison's 5th choice for a homesite

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CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Dan Conquest (434) 242-8573 dconquest70@gmail.com


MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

46

HOME SALES Live STATS It Up ENDING THE WEEK OF MARCH 7, 2021

THERE WERE 100 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 37 were in Albemarle with an average price of $446,855 n 14 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $531,217 n 22 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $313,031 n 3 were in Greene with an average price of $484,333 n 7 were in Louisa with an average price of $325,220 n 1 was in Madison with a price of $695,000 n 6 were in Nelson with an average price of $329,683 n 1 was in Orange with a price of $179,700 n 2 were in Staunton with an average price of $150,125 n 7 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $214,856

HOMES SOLD

THE 1755 EASY LANE HOLLYMEAD

110 BLINCOE LANE MOORE’S CREEK

85A VIRGINIA AVENUE PALMYRA

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

4615 DAVIS HWY LOUISA

8599 OAK PARK ROAD LOCUST DALE

1313 LYLE AVENUE STAUNTON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

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47

Let an agent who knows guide you.

COMING SOON

GREENE CO

$463,315

Hidden Hills Subdivision

133 BLUE RIDGE DR

MARCH 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3010

A DREAM HOME IS GREAT, BUT THE RIGHT ONE IS BETTER. $424,900

SOLD

Bev Nash

434-981-5560

• Solid 1024 sf, 3 bed, 1 bath home on 5.47 acres • Lush pasture and a separate storage building • Large eat-in kitchen with high ceilings • Year-round water for horses, cattle, or gardens • Mountain and pasture views off back deck • Property line to middle of Swift Run, a trout stream

$589,000

Steger Creek Troy, Va

Ruth Guss

434-960-0414

• 4 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths, 4,588 Fin. Sq. Ft • New Home to be Built on 4.79 Acres • First Floor Master Suite with attached Garden Bath • 5” Engineered Hardwood Floors on Main Level • 2 Car Garage, Crown & Chair Molding • 10’ x 20’ Morning Room, 2 Zone HVAC

4209 HAWKINS LANE

Shannon G. Hudson 540.661.2083 • Classic home in a classy neighborhood • 5 bedrooms w/3 masters, 4.5 baths • Landscaped w/brick courtyard & fountain • Partial basement w/1 car garage • Sunroom, FP, built in bookshelves

$535,000

$99,900

SIMILAR TO PIC

Dan Corbin • • • • • • • •

434-531-6155

To Be Built, Elegant One Level Living on 2 Ac 2800 sq ft. 4 Bed, 4 1/2 Ba Finished Bonus Room Up Open Great Room, Dining and Spacious Kitchen, Walk in Pantry 9ft Ceilings, Granite, Upgrades Galore, 2-Sided Gas Fireplace LVP, Ceramic Tile, Carpet, 20 SEER HVAC, Foam Insulation No HOA, Well and Septic, 6 Miles to I64, 20 minutes to Cville MLS 613824

Piney Mountain Subdivision, Palmyra

10+ acre Lots

GOT PLANS? LET’S BUILD!

434.985.0021 410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 Downtown

• Country Living in Convenient Location. • Private Stocked Pond & almost 5 acres in Albemarle County • Main Level Master Suite • Eat In Kitchen w Stainless Appliances • Covered rear deck & Finished Basement • Covered Front Porch w View of your pond & pasture • MLS# 605931

$599,999

31 ASHLAWN BLVD

Pat Burns

434-465-4444

• OWNER FINANCING considered on this large secluded 21.02 acre parcel with cleared building site on a hill overlooking wooded hillside and small running stream

517 LEXINGTON AVE

$945,000

SALE PENDING

Lori Click

434-326-7593

• Beautiful Lake Monticello Waterfront Property • Location, Location, Location. • 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths • 102 Feet of Water Frontage, Dock is 53’ x 12’, Kayak Rack • Sunroom - Views From Most of the Windows

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • • • • • • • • •

Quintessential Charlottesville Notable Victorians on Lexington Ave Extensively renovated Redesigned character in all bathrooms, Master suite created on 3rd level Tremendous banquette seating & abundant light Ornate fixtures throughout convey Unique shelves, custom art features & organic tile and Onyx detail. Large level fenced yard

434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Gorgeous NEW 10+ Acre Homesites • No HOA, Common Sense C&Rs, Firefly • Close to the Lake, Dining, Shopping, Schools • Ready to Build? Be in Your New Home Summer 2021 • Your Choice of Remaining Lots - $109,000 • Call for A Personal Tour - MLS 602023

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730


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C-VILLE Weekly | March 10 - 16, 2021  

C-VILLE Weekly | March 10 - 16, 2021  

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