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Another Charlottesville resident alleges police brutality PAGE 7

VOL. 30 NO. 5 n FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N OF THE CHA RLOTT

ESVILLE AREA A S S O C I AT I O N

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O F R E A LT O R S ®

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Local foody photographers serve up a feast for the eyes PAGE 15

CAAR Home Sales Report 4th Quarter 2020

In 2021’s Hot Mar ket:

New Homes

DELIVER BY CARLA HUCKABEE

Pink is always in season.

CREATURE COMFORTS We’re all hanging on by a whisker—and our pets are helping us make it through

TRISTAN WILLIAMS

FEBRUARY 3 – 9, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

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TAKE TIME TO PAWS & REFLECT


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No.5

Staff pets: Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-817-2749 www.c-ville.com ZACK WAJSGRAS

Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly Mahogany

EDITORIAL

FEATURE 10

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

The Pets Issue

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com

From record-breaking adoptions to a cat on a leash, our animal attraction is undeniable.

CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com

NEWS 6

CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Jedd Farris, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Erika Howsare, Meg Irvin, Cortney Meriwether, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Mary Shea Valliant, David Levinson Wilk

7 Local rapper says cops racially profiled, injured him. 9 City school students lobby for healthier lunches.

CULTURE 13 14 Sound Choices: Album reviews 15 All You Can Eat: Gramming the area’s best dishes. 17 The Works: Aja Gabel’s short story becomes a feature film.

19 Sudoku 19 Crossword 22 Free Will Astrology

COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen

Isaac

Q&A

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23 If you could ask your pet any question, and get a reply, what would it be?

ART DIRECTOR Max March (x16) GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

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Real Estate Weekly

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THIS WEEK

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2.3.21

My dog, Luna, is getting old. She doesn’t like to get her feet wet when we take walks in the rain. She can’t manage the stairs anymore. She’s pretty deaf. But mostly, she’s still herself. She loves sniffing anything and everything. She lurks behind me whenever I pour a bowl of cereal, in case any pieces fall (or get dropped on purpose). She looks me right in the eyes when I scratch her behind the ears. Like the animals on page 11, Luna was a shelter dog, and like our cover model Morris, she’s been a source of invaluable support as the humans in her life have hunkered down for 10 months and counting of social distancing. Okay, I’ll admit it—this week’s feature is a little bit fluffy (pun intended). It’s not the hardesthitting journalism we’ve ever put out. Even so, part of what we seek to do each week is highlight those who make a positive impact in the community—and during this year of upheaval, it’s impossible to deny that our animals have been doing just that. They calm us down, they pick us up, they keep us sane. So I hope this paper will encourage you to curl up with your pooch or kitten or tropical fish or lizard or parakeet or goat or whatever other creature you harbor in your home and—just for a moment—press pause.—Ben Hitchcock

Luna

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“Playing baseball games will help kids have the fun we all missed— and we really missed having fun this past year.” ­—Walker Upper Elementary student Abraham Jaspen asking City Council to allow little league baseball to play games again

NEWS IN BRIEF

Big shot Another long-vacant store has finally been put to good use. The Blue Ridge Health District—in partnership with UVA Medical Center—opened a second COVID-19 vaccine clinic inside the former Big Lots in Seminole Square Shopping Center on Sunday. CAT and JAUNT are providing free transportation to the site, which also has ample parking. As the district receives a lot more vaccines over the next few months, the large facility will help to vaccinate people more quickly and efficiently.

Food for thought PAGE 9

Nothing special

@cville_weekly

City Council denied a special use permit for construction of a Belmont apartment complex, which would have included five affordable units.

FILE PHOTO

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

Charlottesville Commonwealth’s Attorney Joe Platania is officially vying for reelection. In a video announcement last week, the prosecutor, who was elected in 2017, touted his progressive track record, including the establishment of a therapeutic docket and a drop in incarceration rates. Platania will face off against public defender Ray Szwabowski in a Democratic primary on June 8. In an interview with C-VILLE in January, Szwabowski said, “It seems like criminal justice reform is happening far too slowly here in Charlottesville.”

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

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Face off

Joe Platania

Crowded room Just like the other side of the aisle, the race for the Republican nomination for governor is getting more and more crowded. Millionaire investor Glenn Youngkin threw his hat in the ring last week, describing himself in an announcement video as a conservative businessman from a humble background— with no mention of his Washington-based private equity firm The Carlyle Group, and its $230 billion in assets. Retired Army officer Sergio de la Peña, entrepreneur and former Fox News contributor Pete Snyder, Virginia state Senator Amanda Chase, and state Delegate Kirk Cox are also competing to be the GOP nominee.

Charlottesville’s fraught debates over how to address the city’s affordable housing crisis continue. At Monday night’s meeting, in a 3-2 vote, City Council denied a special use permit that would have allowed a modest number of new affordable units to be constructed in Belmont. The proposed apartment complex at 1000 Monticello Rd. would have contained 11 apartments, with five priced for those making 65 percent or less than the area median income. The land is currently a vacant parking lot. The permit is required in order to construct new units on the site—as things currently stand, without the permit, the only development allowed by-right would be commercial. Last month, the city planning commission recommended the project move forward in a 4-3 vote. Those in favor of the proposal argued that some affordable housing was better than none, while those opposed pointed out that half-measures wouldn’t be enough to dig the city out of its housing hole.

Those same philosophical fault lines appeared at the council meeting. “The five units that are affordable offer a significant subsidy to folks that are trying to get into affordable housing,” said developer Justin Shimp. “It’s very difficult to get affordable housing into developer projects.” Councilor Michael Payne cited community feedback against the project. “There’s a lot of history here,” he said, referring to a 2019 renovation of the Belmont Apartments, directly next door and owned by the same developer, that had displaced several long-time tenants. “I think there’s a strong case to be made that there are adverse impacts on the surrounding neighborhood, including displacement of existing residents and businesses,” said Payne, before moving to deny the permit. He was joined by Mayor Nikuyah Walker and ViceMayor Sena Magill, with Councilors Lloyd Snook and Heather Hill in support of the project.


NEWS

‘They were trying to kill me’ Charlottesville police accused of profiling, assault of Black resident By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

L

A little

birdie

EZE AMOS

told LaQuinn Gilmore claims a group of Charlottesville police officers racially profiled and brutally assaulted him.

“The pressure they were putting on my body, I could feel stuff cracking. They were trying to kill me.” LAQUINN GILMORE, LOCAL MUSICIAN

us...

There’s a whole bunch of news you’re missing! Follow @cville_weekly, and @cville_culture to get the latest scoop on what’s going down in Charlottesville.

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room, where he was diagnosed with a closed head injury, a concussion, contusions on his legs, acute bilateral lower back pain, and acute post-traumatic headaches. Because he does not have the money to pay for rehab, Gilmore plans to do it on his own from home. He’s also had to delay a planned new album release. Since the alleged assault, Gilmore has filed an internal affairs complaint with the Charlottesville Police Department. The department has 45 days to complete its investigation and announce its findings. If the complaint is found unfounded, exoner­ ated, or not resolved, it can then be inves­ tigated by the Police Civilian Review Board. According to police spokesman Tyler Hawn, the department does not plan to release the body cam footage of the incident, and cannot comment on Gilmore’s allega­ tions at this time. With the assistance of his lawyer, outspo­ ken local criminal justice reform advocate Jeffrey Fogel, Gilmore plans to sue the de­ partment. He’s also started an organization called Capture Cops, encouraging people to record police activity. Gilmore has set up a GoFundMe to help support himself and his family over the next few months. “It still bothers [Gilmore] a lot physi­ cally and mentally. He’s still having prob­ lems with his back. He’s in and out of the hospital, taking a lot of medication,” says Rush of the aftermath. “He’s making it through, but it still bothers him.”

@cville_weekly

searched his entire body and pockets, Gil­ more claims. After seeing Gilmore’s livestream, his friend Morris Rush, who lives nearby, drove to help him, arriving shortly after the of­ ficers yanked Gilmore up off the ground. “When I first got there, they were standing. There were several officers around [Gilm­ ore], I would say four to five,” says Rush. According to both men, the white officer who first confronted Gilmore then brought him across the street to speak with the shift commander, who had arrived on the scene. “[Gilmore] was still in handcuffs and upset about what had happened,” says Rush.“I asked [the officers] was he under arrest, and they said no. I asked them why was he still in handcuffs then, so they took them off of him.” Gilmore says the shift commander then asked him about what happened. The com­ mander apologized multiple times, but claimed that the officer who initially con­ fronted him was a “good officer.” “I could tell by the officer’s body language that he was very frustrated,” says Rush. “He knew he had done something wrong.” The shift commander then let Gilmore leave. He was never arrested or charged. “I’m glad I came down there, because I don’t know what could have happened,” adds Rush. Following the incident, Rush drove Gilm­ ore to his house. By the next morning, Gilmore could barely walk. He went to the emergency

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

aQuinn Gilmore felt sick to his stomach. He had not eaten enough before taking the antibiotics his doctor had prescribed him for a hand infec­ tion, and knew he needed to throw up. While driving down Monticello Avenue on the night of January 11, Gilmore pulled over, got out of his car, and leaned over next to the vehicle. He soon saw a car pull up beside him, and a man asked him if he was all right. “I’m thinking it’s just a concerned citizen or something, and I’m like ‘Yeah, I’m all right man. I just took some antibiotics,’” says Gilmore, a local musician. After he started dry heaving, the man repeated his question, “and I’m like hold up—this can’t be no concerned citizen.” When Gilmore again said that he was fine, the man ordered him to get back into his car and stepped out of his own vehicle. Through the brightness of the headlights, Gilmore finally realized the man was a Charlottesville police officer. The officer, who is white, approached Gilmore and asked to see identification. Gilmore, who felt he was being racially profiled, pulled out his phone and started recording. From there, Gilmore says the incident escalated into a violent altercation that left him with serious injuries. A brief Facebook livestream shows Gilm­ ore say “stop walking behind me” and “I haven’t done anything.” He accuses the of­ ficer of harassing him and claims that he knows his rights, while the officer continues to follow him down the sidewalk. In the video, the officer orders Gilmore to calm down and put his phone away, and tries to snatch or knock down the device. When Gilmore refuses, the officer handcuffs him and the livestream stops. While he was being pursued and detained by the officer, Gilmore says that four or five more police cars arrived on the scene. “The way I see that they were set up, I thought they were going to shoot me,” he says. After body slamming Gilmore to the ground, six to nine officers “jumped all over his body,” he says. Gilmore was already wearing a splint on his injured hand. “The pressure they were putting on my body, I could feel stuff cracking,” he adds. “They were trying to kill me.” They also

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UC050-2021_CVILLEWeekly_Print | .125” bleeds | 9.25” W x 6.25” H finished | CMYK | 1 of 4

8

The Agony & Ecstacy of the Black Experience Benita Mayo

Benford Stellmacher

Benford Stellmacher

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

February 3 to March 28, 2021 A multi-medium

@cville_weekly

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WATER:

exhibition exploring the interconnection of water & the Black experience, featuring the work of 25 Black artists from Virginia. The exhibition takes Ellis Finney

Jackie Merritt

Bolanle Adeboye

place on all floors of the McGuffey Art Center

201 2nd Street Northwest, Charlottesville, VA, 22902 434-295-7973 mcguffeyartcenter.com

HOURS Wed - Sunday 1 - 5 pm

and is curated by The Charlottesville Black Arts Collective.


NEWS

9

Eat up By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

S

ince the spring, Charlottesville City Schools has given out hundreds of free to-go breakfasts and lunches daily. But for many students, particularly those with special dietary needs, these meals have not been enough to alleviate food insecurity—now at an all-time high. “Families are struggling to put enough nutritious fresh foods on the table...and the meals that come out of the nutrition department aren’t as wholesome as they could be,” says Shantell Bingham, program director of the Food Justice Network, a branch of Cultivate Charlottesville. Last week, the network launched its Healthy School Foods campaign, advocating for the Charlottesville School Board and City Council to allocate an additional $125,000 per year over the next five years to the district’s nutrition department. The funding would go toward providing more fresh nutritious meals, as well as expanding the available dietary options. “This is a campaign that’s mostly been ignited by youth and students in the schools,”

Bingham says. “Our job as a greater coalition and community is to put our full force and support behind them.” If the funding is approved, Cultivate Charlottesville, the PB&J Fund, Culinary Kitchen, and other local nonprofits plan to provide matching funds and assist with meal planning. Students have already begun trying new recipes and creating menus, says Bingham. In addition to spreading awareness about the campaign on social media, the Food Justice Network invited several of its student interns to share their personal struggles and concerns with the school board and City Council during a joint budget work session on Thursday evening. As a vegetarian, Aina Hidayat, a 10th grader at Charlottesville High School, has very few food options at school, she explained to the school board. Before the pandemic, she had to eat salads almost every day. And if she did not get to the cafeteria early, it would run out, leaving her with little else to eat. “During the pandemic I haven’t been able to eat the school lunches,” she said. “The only vegetarian options are the peanut but-

COURTESY CULTIVATE CHARLOTTESVILLE

Students advocate for better school lunches

Cultivate Charlottesville’s Shantell Bingham talks with a student about nutritious lunches.

ter and jelly. I would really like to see more options for people like me.” Ninth grader Hallie Good used to eat school lunch every day, but eventually decided to pack her lunch because the meals were not healthy enough. She remains

concerned for the students who do not have the same privilege and resources, and have no choice but to eat whatever their school serves—or go hungry. To manage her ulcerative colitis, Jayleana Lovely Brown, a third grader at Clark Elementary, requires certain foods. The school lunches have been inconsistent in meeting her needs, often forcing her mother to “cook up something better” with the meals delivered to their home. “I’m lucky to have a mother who can work from home, but not every kid has this,” Brown said. “Even before the pandemic, I didn’t have my mom in school to magically change my meal to something good. When this happens during school, I may skip a meal and only eat snacks that day.” Several school board and council members commended the students for speaking out, and agreed to further discuss the campaign with Cultivate Charlottesville, most likely during the school board’s next meeting on February 4. “The school board and the City Council, young people of CCS, are going to work to address your issues,” said board member Leah Puryear.

from local Author William A. James, Sr.

In, A MURDER ON FIFTH AND DICE AND THE RUIN OF FIFEVILLE,

IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, James

reveals how fear and misunderstandings caused The Charlottesville City Council to condemn and Demolish a 20 Acre Tract (30 Black businesses and 600 residents) from the Downtown area from 1958-1964.

James relates His Story and the Reader learns what He means when He Says: “Do not GiveIn to Adversity, but overcome it by Steady and Constant Perserverance.”

A great way to celebrate Black History Month Sold at Books Bound2please Call or Write, William A. James, Sr. 132 West Main Street, Orange VA 22960 Kathy Judge, Owner, 540-672-4000 434-985-8987 PO Box 6991, BooksBound2please.com Charlottesville, VA 22906 bound2plzbooks@gmail.com Wjpublications@aol.com

Sold at The University of Virginia Bookstore, 400 Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (on UVA Grounds). Patsy Goolsby, Manager, 434-924-1075 bookshop@virginia.edu

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Local Author William A. James, Sr.

@cville_weekly

James shows how drug-dealing and gang violence led to the condemnation, demolition, and gentrification of Fifeville. It is a Sequel to his IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, 2007. (He is writing a play based upon this latest Book)

In, HARD TIMES AND SURVIVAL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN AFRICANAMERICAN SON,

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

TWO LATEST BOOKS & MORE


10

@cville_weekly February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

Like so many pets around the world, Morris the cat has helped his owner get through a tumultuous year.

TRISTAN WILLIAMS

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THE PETS ISSUE

Feline fine

A TOAST TO MY PANDEMIC PAL By Samantha Baars

O

ne of the best things about my cat is that he can’t read a newspaper. Nearly half a million people have contracted COVID-19, and the body count of this global health crisis continues to climb. The planet is warming at an alarming rate. And a certain white supremacist ex-president staged a literal attempted coup at the symbolic center of American democracy. But Morris doesn’t know about any of it. When I’m stuck at home curled up in the fetal position beside a phone that’s flooded with New York Times push notifications, he crawls onto the fattest part of me he can find and we share a special moment: I look at him like all 15.7 pounds of my orange, anxiety-reducing cat blanket are God’s greatest gift to earth—and he thinks curling up on me is slightly more comfortable than the floor. Plenty of times in this year of social unrest, it’s felt bad to be of the same species as the people still making the world so unjust and ugly. But there were some days when I got to press pause, and feel with Morris the simple thrill

of rediscovering the dust-covered Satan’s Pony cap he’d batted under the fridge. His innocence keeps me grounded, and even if just for a moment, life feels really good. We’re living in a kitty world where bottle caps are king, fluffy tummies are celebrated, and civilization isn’t falling down around our ears. I cherish the days we’ve spent trapped inside together while hiding out from the coronavirus, but we go outside, too.

“There were some days when I got to press pause, and feel with Morris the simple thrill of rediscovering the dust-covered Satan’s Pony cap he’d batted under the fridge.”

Fifty-eight percent of respondents to a recent study conducted on behalf of the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation said they didn’t appreciate nature as much as they should have before the COVID-19 crisis, and 32 percent said they’re participating in more outdoor activities than ever. Morris isn’t one of them. Though he may look like a meager house cat, he’s a longtime outdoor enthusiast and my go-to guy when it’s time for some fresh air. The way he shrieks by the front door when he wants to get out is almost endearing. The way he slinks like a caterpillar down the sidewalk definitely is. And the heads a leashed cat and his disheveled mother can turn in town are the cherry on top. When I took this handful of fur home from the shelter eight years ago, I’ll admit I didn’t know what I was getting myself into. But I’ve learned a lot from the tabby cat who’s worried only about where his next quarter cup of Science Diet is coming from. Now I know the weight of the world isn’t only mine to carry, and while ignorance is a privilege it truly can be bliss, too. Sometimes a quick bite and a short walk are a cure-all. And one can never be too finicky.


Furry friendships

11

Lesli DeVito’s colorful pet portraits show your best buddy’s personality.

PUPPY PAINTINGS THAT POP

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Ten years ago, Lesli DeVito created a unique birthday gift—an original painting of a friend’s dog. Things went from there, and now DeVito paints a dog a day. These aren’t traditional, stuffy pet portraits. DeVito, who is based in the area, has an eccentric style, blending bright colors to exemplify each pooch’s personality. “I’m more trying to get the painting not to look exactly like the dog, but to kind of come alive, so that you feel like you can sort of see a little bit of your own,” she says. To achieve that effect, customers send DeVito photographs of their pets— but also describe the pup’s personality. From there, she creLesli DeVito ates life on canvas. She often adds personal touches like tennis balls or favorite toys. She was once asked to paint a sleeping bulldog, because the customer said that’s all the dog ever did. But even when painting a dozing animal, DeVito creates excitement. She says she was drawn to bright colors from her earliest days as an artist, when she worked with simple house paint. Over the last decade, she’s upgraded to acrylic paint, and her work has continued to improve. “I felt like I was painting with mittens on and all of the sudden I got fingers,” DeVito says. “That growth process, I wouldn’t trade it for anything.” And her business has grown, too. Her art Instagram (@lesli_devito_art) has 7,000 followers. She’s expanded her range to include other animals like cats—and, on a few occasions, cows. DeVito had tons of time on her hands this past summer, and ended up painting more than she ever had. It was a way of connecting with others in a time of isolation. “It gives me a community of people where we are talking about something really neutral,” DeVito says. “This is an animal that we really love or loved, and all the other B.S. that exists in the world right now doesn’t matter.”—Maddie McNamee

@cville_weekly

ZACK WAJSGRAS

T

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

eral, but especially living alone in quarantine. I needed a companion during this tough time.” he past year has been one of unforeseen circumGoetzinger had considered adopting a pet for some time, stances and challenges. But an unexpected outbut her work schedule kept her out of the house for long come worth celebrating is that pet adoptions stretches. After transitioning to working from home in March, around the country—and right here in the Charlottesville she saw it as a perfect time to adopt. “It gave me an opportuarea—are at an all-time high. And now, almost a year into nity to bond with her,” says Goetzinger. “I really urge anyone the pandemic, it seems like these adoptions are sticking. who is looking at animals to not overlook a senior. I don’t In 2020, the Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA processed think I could have gotten a sweeter cat.” 3,758 pet adoptions—more than any previous year in the For those who may find the long-term commitment of organization’s history. Chief Executive Officer Angie Guntadoption to be overwhelming, fostering is a great alternative er says, “We are incredibly grateful to have continued to place that provides temporary solace for both the person and pet, animals with families despite the extraordinary circumsay the shelter directors. Similar to the upward trend in stances brought on by the pandemic.” adoptions, more people in the community have volunteered Another no-kill sanctuary in town, Caring for Creatures, to foster dogs and cats in the past year. saw a similar increase in adoption applications, particularly Increased fostering has been especially vital, as shelters in the early months of the pandemic. “In April, we easily did have had to limit volunteering for safety reasons related to four times the adoptions that we normally do,” says CFC the pandemic. More fostering has also been a wonderful President and Founder Mary Birkholz. “We couldn’t keep development for the animals, who benefit from being in home up with the adoption applications.” environments rather than institutions. At the CASPCA, more These facilities don’t expect the pace to slow any time than 70 percent of pets have been placed into foster care soon. “We are optimistic that pet adoptions will continue to since March 2020. “Not only did they thrive in their foster remain steady throughout 2021,” Gunter says. “We have homes, but they were also more likely to be adopted due to placed 47 more pets in homes so far this year compared to promotion by their fosters,” says Gunter. the same time last year.” “This has been the type of sheltering that has needed to Increased pet adoptions haven’t just benefited shelters happen for years,” says Humane Society/SPCA of Nelson and sanctuaries. For pet adopters, their new furry comCounty Director Lindsey Huffman. “Integrating fosters into panions are the bright spots in otherwise tumultuous times. the community and having them be part of everyday lives Charlottesville resident Lauren Goetzinger adopted Beawhile they’re waiting for permanent homes has been the most trice, a 15-year-old black cat, from the CASPCA in May beautiful thing to come out of the past year.” The HS/SPCA is 2020. “Life has greatly improved,” says Goetzinger. “The working to expand its adult dog fostering program in 2021 to first few months of the pandemic were really hard in genget even more pets out of the shelter and into temporary homes. While increased adoptions and fosters have been good things during COVID-19, there has been concern about the possibility of a rise in animal surrenders and returns. Potential factors include financial hardship brought on by the pandemic and hasty decisions to adopt pets. Fortunately, area shelters and sanctuaries have not reported increases in surrenders or returns. In fact, these numbers have decreased. At the CASPCA, for example, 204 fewer pets were surrendered in 2020 than in 2019, according to Gunter. While Caring for Creatures has also not reported an increase, it has received calls from concerned pet owners about behavior changes. “People being home with their animals can be a positive thing, but it is also a shift in routine for the animal. Some are acting out a little bit, reflecting the state of mind of their humans,” says Birkholz. (You’re not imagining it: Your cat really does want you to get out of its way.) In most cases, these behavior shifts can be managed without the animals having to be rehomed. While it has been a banner year for pet adoptions, the needs of these nonprofit organizations remain great, particularly for supplies and monetary donations. “We are incredibly appreciative of the support from our community, as none of the work that we do would be possible without their continued support,” says Gunter. If you are interested in adopting a pet, the CASPCA, CFC, and HS/SPCA are accepting adoption applications online. Each facility is open by appointment only. Check their websites for details about adopting, fostering, and donating (caspca.org; caringforcreatures.org; Local no-kill shelter Caring for Creatures says it’s been a banner year for adoptions. nelsonspca.org).

COURTESY ARTIST

By Laura Drummond

COURTESY ARTIST

PET ADOPTIONS UP, PET RETURNS DOWN DURING THE PANDEMIC


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L VE

IS A FOUR-LEGGED WORD! I'M YOURS

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F F U R I YOU NICE P TAIL L UP O PY VE FREE KISSES E N I L FE OD GO

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CULTURE

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MONDAY 2/8

OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK

LOOKING UP Do you need some pandemicfree space? Astronomy on Tap Charlottesville takes a break from life on Planet Earth with a star-studded discussion led by UVA astronomy experts Dr. Michael Küffmeier, Abby Waggoner, and Dr. Jeffrey Bennett. The “suds and space” virtual talk reaches for the sky by examining the formation of stars, the use of “dancing” molecules to observe objects in space, and a cosmic perspective on global warming. There will be trivia and prizes too, while you quaff your beverage of choice. Free, 7pm. Zoom required. aotcville.com.

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Spice things up for yourself and/ or someone special with a few lap dance lessons in preparation for Valentine’s Day—or simply because you’re bored silly at home during a pandemic. Phoenix Dance Studio offers Playful Girl beginner classes to get things going, and for those more experienced with the bump ‘n’ grind, the intermediate Wild Thing option adds “skills for the couch.” Pre-registration required, as well as an oversized button down shirt and tie. 18plus, ladies only. $40, 11:45am. thephoenixdancestudio.com.

One of the many gems of our arts community is the Virginia Film Festival’s year-round series Beyond the Screen: A Virtual Conversation Series, which offers more of what we love about VAFF’s programming: special access to film industry bigwigs who discuss their work. Writerdirector John Lee Hancock and producer Mark Johnson log in to talk about The Little Things, starring Denzel Washington, Rami Malek, and Jared Leto in a psychological thriller set in Los Angeles (now playing in theaters and on HBO Max). Emmy Awardwinning journalist, author, and documentary filmmaker Elizabeth Flock moderates. Free, 3pm. Zoom required. virginiafilmfestival.org.

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

WARNER BROS.

THURSDAY 2/4


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SOUND CHOICES

Uphol Uphol

Transform RETURN TO FORM THE ARTFUL L THROUGH FUNCTION

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DJ Williams

fan of poetry, and held an affinity for nature writers like Ralph Waldo Emerson. When Short Stories, Projekt Music she moved to California to pursue music in 2009, her penchant for poems and the For a musician who’s spent over a decade outdoors never waned. The up-and-comer playing countless live shows, teaming up signed to indie stalwart Sub Pop Records with industry heavy hitters from in the fall of 2020, and is making her label Questlove to Karl Denson, you wouldn’t debut with Acquainted with Night, a think there’d be much ground left to cover. collection that gives as much of a nod to But Williams’ latest project, Short Stories, T AVirginia I Las itEdoesRto the West Coast. is something of a rebirth. It showcasesR E central XT ENDED RET Last April, Neale returned toEher family’s his first time mixing and engineering an farm to ride out part of quarantine. There, entire album at home. Across the disc’s six I N F O R M AT I O she picked up an old Sony Handycam and tracks, labeled “chapters,” Williams began shooting grainy videos to accompany recorded all of the instruments himself. He the album’s songs, which were all written bought all the gear and watched YouTube and recorded in Los Angeles. The video for tutorials to achieve the sounds he wanted. “For No One For Now” is filled with Only later did he add appearances by CS-SALE ADS - POLAR BEAR.indd 1 Southern imagery: wide shots of an old Denson, Deshawn “Dvibes” Alexander R E T A(EricI Krasno L EBand), R Kenneth Crouch (Eric church, scenes of the countryside viewed E X T E N D E D from R Ea T ILER carA window, and a protagonist Clapton), and more. cutting up peaches and spreading jam on In essence, it’s Williams’ first official solo I N to F O R Mtoast. A TThis I Otrack, N alongside other singles album (and his first release pressed like “Every Star Shivers in the Dark,” has vinyl). But it’s not chock full of the familiar a sonic uniformity rooted in minimalism, guitar riffs and solos that fans have come harkening back to Neale’s love of poetry. to know and love from him. Instead, each Recorded on a cassette recorder, the songs chapter is its own funky landscape with possess a gauzy, lo-fi quality that features catchy melodies. Playful chapters like CS-SALE ADS - POLAR BEAR.indd 1 Neale’s voice front and center, accompanied “Athleisure Wear,” “Quarantine Dreams,” by a drum machine and an Omnichord (an and “Y’all Accept Bitcoin” boast humorous, 1/7/20 3:35 PM instrument she didn’t pick up until 2019). By good-natured fun to keep you dancing. channeling the breadth of her surroundings, (Released February 1) Neale has crafted a coast-to-coast dreamscape. (Release date: February 9) 6TH —Desiré Moses

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218 West Market Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 434-970-1900 I Monday - Saturday 10 am - 6 pm

Free Union hasn’t been dormant through­ 1/7/20 3:35 PM out this elongated season of quarantine. Over the past several months, the band has maintained a Quarantunes Series, releasing live versions of original songs like “Good Day to Cry” and “It Gets Better,” alongside holiday tunes and spirited covers of current pop hits by the likes of Harry Styles and Billie Eilish. Spearheaded by Michael Coleman and Rob Dunnenberger, Free Union also stayed true to form by digging deep for two new tracks. Released as a double single, Somethin’ + The Other Side, each offers a glimmer of hope in the face of the harsh realities of white supremacy and deepseated division displayed in 2020. “Somethin’” is the funkier of the two, a bop meant to embolden, while “The Other Side” is a smooth meditation on getting past struggle and strife. With special guests including Morgan Burrs of Butcher Brown and mixing by Adrian Olsen at Montrose Studios, the Charlottesville-based group looked to Richmond for this release—even the cover art by Spanish artist Fredingrado reflects the changing tides, depicting the graffitiadorned Robert E. Lee statue on Monument Avenue, which has been the site of public demonstrations and protests. It’s proof that uniting our communities through arts and advocacy paves the way for positive change. (Released January 22)

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CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

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Shots that satisfy Amidst the pandemic, local food still shines on Instagram It’s been a tough year for restaurants, and it remains a serious challenge for many to stay open. Sadly, we’ve already lost some local favorites, and there may be more to come. However, in the midst of it all, there are amazing stories of adaptation, re-invention, pivoting, and even new businesses opening against the odds. Here are some recent Instagram favorites that offer a glimpse of not just delicious eats, but the resilience and heart of our food community. —Paul H. Ting

@cville.foodie

The fried chicken and mac’n’cheese from Iron Paffles and Coffee is a must-try dish. The paffle is unique to Charlottesville, and an invention of resilient chef-owner Kathryn Matthews. During the last week of 2019, Matthews was involved in a serious car accident that left her unable to perform even simple tasks, and just one week after she returned to work, the coronavirus shutdowns began. Her dining room remains closed, but online ordering, delivery, and takeout are keeping the business going.

Little Star was really coming into its own as it celebrated one year in business at the beginning of 2020. With the onset of colder weather, tents have been installed over the restaurant’s outdoor patio. This monkfish, beans, and clam dish is representative of chef Ryan Smith’s food, which features unique ingredient combinations, sauces with impactful flavor, and beautiful plating.

Zynodoa in nearby Staunton has installed heaters for diners who want to enjoy dishes like this one outdoors. Featuring a beautiful pork chop from Autumn Olive Farms (@autumn_olive_farms), a local farm best known for supplying high-quality products to many area restaurants. The farm went through its own pivot during the pandemic, and started selling directly to consumers.

Our local farmers’ markets and food trucks have provided many of us with a variety of delicious options. Two favorites are Sweet Jane’s Kitchen (@sweetjaneskitchen_va) and Tacos Gomez (@tacos_gomez). Sweet Jane’s offers freshly made crab cakes at markets in Charlottesville and Richmond, either cooked and ready to eat or ready to prepare at home. Tacos Gomez food truck has a devoted following, and looking at their Torta Cubana it’s easy to see why.

@sshanesy

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@coucourachou

@fowlmouthedchicken

The Wool Factory (@the_wool_factory) planned to open its multi-use space by hosting two weddings in April 2020. Despite the setback of having its first several events canceled, the property pressed on with a socially distanced opening of Selvedge Brewing (@selvedgebrewing) in the summer. The kitchen at Selvedge, helmed by chef Tucker Yoder, serves an elevated version of brewpub food. The Selvedge Burger is made with local beef and is as satisfying as it looks.

Chef Rachel DeJong, who earned her diplôme de pâtisserie in Paris, and serves as the executive pastry chef for The Wool Factory, recently launched her own project, a bakery called Cou Cou Rachou, which will open soon. Until it does, her classic French breads and pastries are available at The Wool Factory, Grit Coffee, and Brasserie Saison. These perfect canelés are beautiful to look at, taste even better than they look, and, like all of her products, have received rave reviews.

Chef Harrison Keevil deserves special mention—and not just for his delicious food, like this boneless fried half chicken with black pepper honey. Keevil started a free meal program in response to COVID-19 to combat food insecurity and feed area residents in need. At last count, he has cooked and delivered over 31,000 meals locally. Bravo Harrison!

As much effort and courage as it takes to keep a restaurant going right now, it takes perhaps more courage to open a new restaurant during a pandemic. In January 2020, brothers John and Scott Shanesy announced plans to partner in Belle (@bellecville), and move from coffee to a restaurant and bakery with a focus on breakfast and lunch. It’s truly heartening to see them go from selling baked goods out of a dining room that was closed before it even opened, to becoming a beloved Belmont neighborhood small business.

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February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

@ironpaffles


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#showcvillelove Charlottesville businesses need support right now more than ever before. That’s why Charlottesville Insider is joining with Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine and C-VILLE Weekly to sponsor the Show C’ville Love Gift Card Giveaway. Each week starting February 14, we’ll be giving away two $100 gift certificates to a Charlottesville business of the winners’ choice. It’s easy to enter for a chance to win, and here’s how you do it: Post photos on Instagram and Facebook doing the following things and use #ShowCvilleLove. Tag the local business and location if applicable.

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

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Exploring the outdoors | Eating at a local restaurant | Picking up curbside | Shopping or visiting a local business Participating in a class (outdoors/social distancing or virtually) | Visiting outdoor breweries/wineries etc... Staying in a Charlottesville hotel or other lodging | Doing something nice for someone (Showing some love) Anything else you love to do in Charlottesville

#showcvillelove


CULTURE THE WORKS

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‘Little Fish’ goes big Aja Gabel’s short story gets the Hollywood treatment By Dan Goff arts@c-ville.com

IFC FILMS

Y

the story to nearly two hours of screen time. Gabel, who has seen the final product, says “it’s not a deviation so much as it is an extrapolation.” The filmmakers took the original story and delved further into each plot point, expanding upon the global implications as well as more deeply detailing the couple’s relationship. The result is bound to be different than the story—Jude, one half of the couple, seems to have more dialogue in the trailer alone than he does in the original story—but Gabel says she’s more than satisfied with this interpretation of her work. “There are so many details of the world and the couple and the situation…made cinematic. It’s really incredible.” Gabel had little creative oversight during the actual production of the movie, which is just how she wanted it. “‘Little Fish’…was optioned with a screenwriter already attached,” she says. “That was what was really appealing to me about the deal.” Mattson Tomlin, the film’s screenwriter, is as yet unknown but has several other projects in the works, including 2022’s The Batman, for which he’s credited as a writer.

DARCIE BURRELL

Little Fish, which premieres as a feature film on IFC this week, is about a couple afflicted with a memory-destroying illness.

Aja Gabel

Little Fish is far from an effects-heavy blockbuster. If the trailer—with its shakycam shots and moody instrumental soundtrack—is any indication, the adaptation will fit in with IFC’s other indie films. Gabel says IFC came on last year to distribute the movie, after its actual creation. Financed and made without a distributor or a studio, her story was first optioned in 2016 and officially shot in early 2019. She guesses that Little Fish might’ve caught IFC’s atten-

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

ears before COVID-19 became a worldwide reality, Aja Gabel had pandemics on the mind. In 2011, Gabel—a fiction writer who earned her MFA at UVA two years prior—wrote and published “Little Fish,” a devastating short story that tracks a couple’s deterioration as both partners become afflicted with a mysterious, memory-destroying contagion. The story was an award-winning success—and a decade later, it remains relevant for reasons other than the obvious real-life parallel. On February 5, a film adaptation of “Little Fish,” starring Olivia Cooke and Jack O’Connell as the couple, will be released by IFC. Gabel has a novel (2018’s The Ensemble) under her belt and another in progress, but she continues to cite “Little Fish” as “my favorite story I’ve ever written.” Although it’s one of her more dystopian works—The Ensemble, conversely, follows four competitive classical musicians and takes inspiration from the author’s musical childhood—Gabel maintains that all of her work is dominated by the question: “What does it mean to love?” In the case of “Little Fish,” she narrows the question: “Does love have any place in your life if there is no memory or nostalgia?” Gabel’s not convinced she “answered it completely,” but it’s undeniable that the story is an intimate, albeit achingly sad, exploration of love pushed to the limit. “Little Fish” is also clearly a labor of love, a simultaneously minimalist and jam-packed creation whose gorgeous, lean prose hints at a myriad of revisions and prior iterations. Gabel gives brief glimpses of a world ravaged by the NIA (neuroinflammatory affliction) pandemic, leaving the reader to imagine the wider implications of the tragedy. Given the pared-down style of “Little Fish,” it’ll be interesting to see how IFC inflates

tion in 2020 because of its sudden timeliness, but emphasizes that the movie “definitely was not made or conceived of during any kind of COVID time.” Now Gabel is making a conscious choice to stay away from pandemic fiction—not wanting, she says, to write about something so relatively recent. Instead, she’s turning to her home state of California, where she currently resides, to write about an issue that’s been raging there for years: climate destruction. Her output on this subject has been nonfiction. “I don’t know what to do about it, but there’s an impulse to document it,” she says. “It feels like the one thing I can do.” Gabel maintains an air of mystery when discussing another project, her novel-in-progress. Like “Little Fish,” it has “an element of sci-fi in it,” she says, but emphasizes that her initial preoccupations as a writer remain. “It’s still about love, still about memory, still about the nature of how we remain connected to people when things become difficult.” Much as Gabel continues to be drawn to similar themes in her writing, she’s also drawn to the memory of “where I learned to write.” Virginia, she says, keeps an alluring hold on her from across the country. She attributes this pull to the beautiful geography of the place, and also the people she met while living in Charlottesville. Gabel cites professors Deborah Eisenberg and Christopher Tilghman as enormously influential, saying the latter was the “very first person who really took my work seriously.” Virginia has been the site of some of the most significant moments of Gabel’s writing career—whether reading “Little Fish” to an audience of students during a 2012 teaching stint at Sweet Briar, presenting The Ensemble to a crowd at New Dominion Bookshop, or her friendships with fellow writers in the MFA program. “My family’s out here, but I always think about coming back to Charlottesville,” says Gabel. “I hope to come back someday. It’s a special place.”

@cville_culture

Gabriel Ofiesh gabrielofiesh.com | Charlottesville by appointment | Mon-sat 10–5 434.295.9038 | Ofieshstudio@gmail.com

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GABRIEL OFIESH


February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

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| Virtual Event


CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU

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CROSSWORD

Zero G

Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. Any of 150 in the Bible 6. Ban competitor 11. “Have you no shame!” 14. Discombobulated 15. “Yankee Doodle Dandy” songwriter 16. Safe Drinking Water Act enforcer, for short 17. “Star Wars” character’s physical makeup? 19. “Your fly is open” 20. Auntie played by Angela Lansbury 21. Walked (on) 22. Tennis rival of Roger, familiarly 23. Increase, with “up” 24. Question one might ask upon arriving in Vegas? 27. Others, in Oaxaca 29. Hit head-on 30. “____ is someone who stands outside in the rain hoping to be struck by lightning”: James Dickey 31. Sealing fan? 37. Sister channel of AMC and BBC America 38. Weightlessness ... or, save for this answer’s last letter, a description of this puzzle’s answered grid 39. “It’s ____ state of affairs” 40. Shin coverers 42. Bygone Toyota model 43. “It’s a Wonderful Life” studio 44. “I ____ idea!” 45. Confident attitude from someone attracted to both sexes? 51. Many I.C.U. workers 53. Extremities

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54. “2 funny!!!” 55. Bringing up the rear 56. ____ school 57. Attila is putting his laundry on the clothesline? 60. Friend 61. Little brats 62. Ingredient in a Denver omelet 63. Machiavellian 64. Post-its, e.g. 65. Semiconductor device with two terminals

32. Planet where the cry “Shazbot!” is said to have originated 33. Start of many California place names 34. Big purveyor of sports talk 35. Tall flowering plant 36. Nutritional fig. 38. ____ suit 41. Move among moguls 42. “Blueberries for ____” 44. Sword handle 45. Subs at the office 46. Shaquille who appears DOWN in Netflix’s “Tiger King” 47. “Strange to say ...” 1. Italian city known for 48. “... but maybe I’m wrong” its cheese 49. Civil War historian 2. Unseal without tearing Shelby 3. Math term taken from 50. Something that’s a Greek word meaning kicked up or raised “not intersecting” 52. “Don’t Rain on My 4. ____-majesté Parade” composer 5. Goat’s bleat 55. Anderson of “WKRP in Cincinnati” 6. Without ____ in the world 57. QVC alternative 7. Helicopter part 58. Card game whose 8. ____ Island name is shouted 9. Translation of “je suis” during play or “yo soy” 59. Browning who directed 10. Letters after Chuck 1931’s “Dracula” Schumer’s name 11. State with a panhandle 12. “Mission: Impossible” ANSWERS 1/27/21 genrwe 13. “On the Waterfront” director C A S I O S U M N O U N C 18. Extreme degrees B E C A L M N E A L N E H 22. French author whose C R I M E A I R M A S W E last name sounds like B E L I E V E Y O U M E M T M L L C E N O S Stallone role 24. Cambodia’s Angkor ____ NA RI NE AY O U K RI DE DD SI N G M E 25. “Don’t be a ____, just be Y O U H A D M E A T H E L L O G R A N R E A R a queen”: Lady Gaga C A N Y O U H E A R M E N O W 26. Viking ship need O T O E P O E T S E 28. Recording studio effects Y O U A N D M E B O T H O M G O R E O M E A N T O 30. Parrot’s cry T I A I N O N B R Y S O N E C T R O W S A S S A Y S 31. Pride for a gym rat

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian author Alice Walker writes, “In nature, nothing is perfect and everything is perfect. Trees can be contorted, bent in weird ways, and they’re still beautiful. In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll adopt that way of thinking and apply it to every aspect of your perfectly imperfect body and mind and soul. I hope you’ll give the same generous blessing to the rest of the world, as well. This attitude is always wise to cultivate, of course, but it will be especially transformative for you in the coming weeks. It’s time to celebrate your gorgeous idiosyncrasies and eccentricities.

By Rob Brezsny

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): “Though the bamboo forest is dense, water flows through it freely.” I offer that Zen saying just in time for you to adopt it as your metaphor of power. No matter how thick and complicated and impassable the terrain might appear to be in he coming weeks, I swear you’ll have a flair for finding a graceful path through it. All you have to do is imitate the consistency and flow of water.

Aries (March 21-April 19): Herman Hesse’s novel Siddartha is a story about a spiritual seeker who goes in search of illumination. Near the end of the quest, when Siddartha is purified and enlightened, he tells his friend, “I greatly needed sin, lust, vanity, the striving for goods, and the most shameful despair, to learn how to love the world, to stop comparing the world with any world that I wish for, with any perfection that I think up; I learned to let the world be as it is, and to love it and to belong to it gladly.” While I trust you won’t overdo the sinful stuff in the coming months, Aries, I hope you will reach a conclusion like Siddartha’s. The astrological omens suggest that 2021 is the best year ever for you to learn how to love your life and the world just as they are.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): Taurus physicist Richard Feynman said, “If we want to solve a problem we have never solved before, we must leave the door to the unknown ajar.” That’s always good advice, but it’s especially apropos for you in the coming weeks. You are being given the interesting and fun opportunity to solve a problem you have never solved before! Be sure to leave the door to the unknown ajar. Clues and answers may come from unexpected sources.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): When we want to get a distinct look at a faint star, we must avert our eyes away from it just a little. If we look at it directly, it fades into invisibility. (There’s a scientific explanation for this phenomenon, which I won’t go into.) I propose that we make this your metaphor of power for the coming weeks. Proceed on the hypothesis that if you want to get glimpses of what’s in the distance or in the

future, don’t gaze at it directly. Use the psychological version of your peripheral vision. And yes, now is a favorable time to seek those glimpses.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): If the apocalypse happens and you’re the last human left on earth, don’t worry about getting enough to eat. Just find an intact grocery store and make your new home there. It’s stocked with enough non-perishable food to feed you for 55 years—or 63 years if you’re willing to dine on pet food. I’M JOKING! JUST KIDDING! In fact, the apocalypse won’t happen for another 503 million years. My purpose in imagining such a loopy scenario is to nudge you to dissolve your scarcity thinking. Here’s the ironic fact of the matter for us Cancerians: If we indulge in fearful fantasies about running out of stuff—money, resources, love, or time—we undermine our efforts to have enough of what we need. The time is now right for you to stop worrying and instead take robust action to ensure you’re well-supplied for a long time.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): “Judge a moth by the beauty of its candle,” writes Coleman Barks in his rendering of a poem by Rumi. In accordance with astrological omens, I am invoking that thought as a useful metaphor for your life right now. How lovely and noble are the goals you’re pursuing? How exalted and bighearted are the dreams you’re focused on? If you find there are any less-than-beautiful aspects to your motivating symbols and ideals, now is a good time to make adjustments.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I invite you to try the following experiment. Select two situations in your world that really need to be reinvented, and let every other glitch and annoyance just slide for now. Then meditate with tender ferocity on how best to get the transformations done. Summoning intense focus will generate what amounts to magic! PS: Maybe the desired reinventions would require other people to alter their behavior. But it’s also possible that your own behavior may need altering.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): Author Marguerite Duras wrote these words: “That she had so completely recovered her sanity was a source of sadness to her. One should nev-


Q&A er be cured of one’s passion.” I am spiritually allergic to that idea. It implies that our deepest passions are unavailable unless we’re insane, or at least disturbed. But in the world I aspire to live in, the opposite is true: Our passions thrive if we’re mentally healthy. We are best able to harness our most inspiring motivations if we’re feeing poised and stable. So I’m here to urge you to reject Duras’ perspective and embrace mine. The time has arrived for you to explore the mysteries of relaxing passion.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Author Karen Barad writes, “The past is never finished. It cannot be wrapped up like a package, or a scrapbook; we never leave it and it never leaves us behind.” I agree. That’s why I can’t understand new age teachers who advise us to “live in the now.” That’s impossible! We are always embedded in our histories. Everything we do is conditioned by our life story. I acknowledge that there’s value in trying to see the world afresh in each new moment. I’m a hearty advocate of adopting a “beginner’s mind.” But to pretend we can completely shut off or escape the past is delusional and foolish. Thank you for listening to my rant, Scorpio. Now please spend quality time upgrading your love and appreciation for your own past. It’s time to celebrate where you have come from—and meditate on how your history affects who you are now.

Sagittarius

Capricorn

Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, 1-877-873-4888.

Do you love pizza crust?

Who’s a good boy??

MELISSA SHIRLEY-MILLER/FACEBOOK

@WHATSNEXTPHYSICALTHERAPY/INSTAGRAM

I just wish they could tell their humans that eating the same old crap dry food every single day is a bad idea.

Do you know how much you are loved?

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I would ask my greyhounds to tell me about their lives before we adopted them. Put to rest once and for all the conflicting facts by the pro- and anti-racing communities.

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What do you dream about?

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Belly rubs or ear rubs?

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Do you need to go out, more food, or what? Just TELL me. @SUSANSCOFIELD7/INSTAGRAM

Do you love me as much as I love you? RENEE TEMPLETON ROBERTS/ FACEBOOK

Why do you uncontrollably bark at times? @DOCJQ/TWITTER

Why do you eat poop? @CASTAWAY_TEARS/INSTAGRAM

Do you really expect to catch the deer you are chasing or is it merely sport? @THEONEBRIDALSALON/INSTAGRAM

What hurts, and how can I make you feel better? (He’s 13 and has arthritis.)

What can I do to make you happier?

@SWINGINPOET/TWITTER

@BROWNFAYEM/INSTAGRAM

Did you start the coffee? JOHNNY FRANKENBERGER/FACEBOOK

Next week’s question: What would the opening sentence to your romance novel be? Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

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(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Perhaps we should know better,” wrote poet Tony Hoagland, “but we keep on looking, thinking, and listening, hunting that singular book, theory, perception, or tonality that will unlock and liberate us.” It’s my duty to report, Capricorn, that there will most likely be no such singular magnificence for you in 2021. However, I’m happy to tell you that an accumulation of smaller treasures could ultimately lead to a substantial unlocking and liberation. For that to happen, you must be alert for and appreciate the small treasures, and patiently gather them in. (PS: Author Rebecca Solnit says, “We devour heaven in bites too small to be measured.” I say: The small bites of heaven you devour in the coming months will ultimately add up to being dramatically measurable.)

If you could ask your pet any question, and get a reply, what would it be?

February 3 – 9, 2021 c-ville.com

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Luisah Teish is a writer and priestess in the Yoruban Lucumi tradition. She wrote a book called Jump Up: Seasonal Celebrations from the World’s Deep Traditions. “Jump up” is a Caribbean phrase that refers to festive rituals and parties that feature “joyous music, laughter, food, and dancing.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, you’re due for a phase infused with the “jump up” spirit. As Teish would say, it’s a time for “jumping, jamming, swinging, hopping, and kicking it.” I realize that in order to do this, you will have to work around the very necessary limitations imposed on us all by the pandemic. Do the best you can. Maybe make it a virtual or fantasy jump up. Maybe dance alone in the dark.

23


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Bid packages and scopes will be posted on 1/25 through Building Connected (https://bit.ly/361t3vZ). Bid packages included are: Site Services, Demolition, Site Utilities, Concrete, Steel, Masonry, Millwork, Roofing, Doors, Glass & Glazing, Drywall & Ceilings, Flooring, Painting, Division 10 Specialties, etc. Bid dates vary by package and are due to Skanska, through Building Connected, on 2/15 and 2/19 at 10:00am. For information/pre-qualification/bid list information questions please contact: Chris Littlefield Chris.Littlefield@skanska.com (919) 482 5853

Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities: Direct Support Professional Residential and Day Support Services Various shifts available To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/ In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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In 2021’s Hot Market:


FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers FARMINGTON

VERULAM FARM

Landmark estate just west of University of Virginia on 500 acres. Classic home of the highest standards with elegant spaces, 5 bedroom suites, formal gardens, pool, cottage, event barn, and bold mountain views creating a one-of-a-kind offering. MLS#597954 Andrew Middleditch, 434.981.1410

SWEET RETREAT

A retreat for all seasons! Enjoy total privacy from this mountain home offering distant Blue Ridge Mountain views across the Rockfish Valley. Sited on 14+ acres, the home offers 4 BR and 4.5 BA. MLS#610115 $995,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.330GraceGlen.com

AVENTADOR

Magnificent Georgian home with over 10,000 finished square feet, 6 bedrooms, 6 full and 2 half baths, main-level master, eat-in kitchen. Guest home, and 296+ acres with panoramic pastoral and mountain views. MLS#602894 $4,750,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.AventadorVA.com

Exceptional 1954 Milton Grigg 8-BR residence carefully sited on over 2.5 manicured acres. Beautifully maintained, the original brick home has been enlarged, creating an elegant yet livable floor plan with open living and entertaining spaces, kitchen, and master suite on the main level. Pool, 2-story pool house, and 3-bay garage with fully equipped 1-BR apartment above. Fronting the 17th fairway in Farmington, this property offers a quality-built home, gorgeous setting, and prime location only minutes to UVA and Downtown. MLS#606911 $4,950,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

KESWICK

Enjoy mountain views of the historic Southwest Mountains from this livable 4-BR residence on 6 private acres. Convenient and quick to Pantops, Historic Downtown Mall, and UVA. Within steps of all the amenities at Keswick Hall. MLS#611672 $989,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville, 14 miles to CHO Airport. 177 private acres with c.1901 classic Virginia farm house, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

EDNAM FOREST

A true gem perched on 1.5 private acres in Ednam Forest! This stately c. 1963 4-bedroom Georgian is well-located within walking distance to Boar’s Head Inn & Sports Club. Nearly level lawn surrounded by beautifully manicured landscaping. MLS#608474 $1,845,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

TOTIER HILLS FARM

Exquisite brick mansion, superb quality construction and features in over 9,000 finished square feet. On 98 gently rolling acres with total privacy, a stream, and pond. Only 5 minutes to shops, 15 miles to UVA. MLS#600284 $2,700,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.TotierHillsFarm.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

KESWICK COUNTRY CLUB

Bordering a lake and the newly finished Pete Dye golf course, & within the gated community of the 5-star resort, Keswick Estates, is this magnificently crafted European-style home with 5 BR including spacious guest suite & 11,000+ fin. sf. Constructed with the finest materials, built with expert craftsmanship & attention to every detail. Features large open spaces, inside & outside, a generous main level master suite, & a fabulous lower level for lavish entertaining, plus a health & wellness center. MLS#603398 $4,200.000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.FairwayDriveAtKeswick.com

KESWICK ESTATES

Exquisite English Country home on 2.5 acres in Keswick Estates with lovely views of the golf course and distant mountains. Architecturally designed, 7,000+ square foot residence with 5 bedrooms. MLS#611738 $1,695,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


29

CRAWFORD’S KNOB

An opportunity to own a deeded Nature Preserve protected in perpetuity, a chance to purchase and hold wilderness, and to leave it largely unaltered. This property is ideal for the passive enjoyment of wild lands and the conservation minded buyer. MLS#608893 $1,900,000 Will Carr, 434.981.3065

RICHMOND

Nearly two acres in the City of Richmond on desirable Rothesay Circle with potential river views. Open woodland with mature hardwoods and small fields. Minutes from Carytown, James River Park, and downtown. MLS#2031412 $449,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325

GILBERT STATION ROAD

Wonderfully private, 67-acre tract of land approximately 11 miles north of Charlottesville in Barboursville. Mostly wooded with a creek and road frontage. Tremendous views. MLS#552156 $565,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WALNUT HILLS

HISTORIC Georgian Revival mansion built c.1878 by Gov. James Kemper on 373 splendid acres, guest cottage, and a complement of farm buildings. Long frontage on Rapidan River. MLS#574009 $3,490,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455 www.WalnutHillsVa.com

EDNAM

Sophisticated living just seconds from amenities and conveniences of Charlottesville and UVA. Brick residence has gracious main level with inviting entrance hall, large LR with FP, DR, gourmet kitchen with sitting/breakfast area. MLS#606719 $925,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

LONESOME MOUNTAIN ROAD

5-acre lot with road frontage only 4 miles from Charlottesville. This country but close-to-town location is conveniently located with quick access to Historic Downtown Mall, Martha Jefferson Hospital, UVA, NGIC, airport and North Fork Business Park. MLS#593160 $250,000 C.Dammann,434.981.1250

CHURCH POINT FARM

944 acres along the lower Chickahominy River with 8 miles of shoreline. The property consists of marsh, farmland, woods, and cypress swamp and is managed for waterfowl, deer, turkey, and dove. Features 3-BR brick dwelling. MLS#2036779 $3,960,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325 www.churchpointfarm.com

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

JACKS SHOP ROAD

155+ acres, level to gently rolling mature pine forest with long frontage on the Rapidan River. Excellent for retreat or permanent residence. Views, long road frontage, and privacy. Convenient to Madison County, Ruckersville, and Charlottesville. MLS#572541 $985,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FRAY’S GRANT

2 fabulous home sites mostly in beautiful hardwoods, gently rolling and PRICED BELOW TAX ASSESSMENTS! The first lot has 21 acres, the second lot has 44+ acres, private settings and frontage on the Rivanna River. Call Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 for pricing.

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

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CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

MILTON VILLAGE

21-acre lot minutes east of Charlottesville. Level building site has well already drilled & soils tested for drain field. Fenced with 4-board along road frontage. Creek, small pond, and automatic waterers. Close to public Rivanna River access. MLS#612288 $375,000 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610

ASHCROFT

Stunning mountain views abound throughout this bright, spacious, 4-BR residence. Privately tucked on 2.26 acres adjoining common space. Located minutes from Pantops, UVA, and all Charlottesville has to offer. $1,145,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

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CAAR Homes Sales Report 4th Quarter 2020 Market Report Key Takeaways Economic Conditions • In the 4th quarter of 2020, economic conditions continued to improve in Virginia, as well as in the Charlottesville region. There have been steady gains in employment and a consistent decline in the unemployment rate since the summer. • Consumer confidence dropped in December, reflecting uncertain political and economic conditions at the end of 2020. • Mortgage rates remained at historically low levels throughout the 4th quarter, fueling strong home sales activity. Housing Market Conditions

REAL ESTATE NEWS

• Sales are surging in the CAAR area housing market. There were 1,278 sales in the 4th quarter, a 23% jump from last year. • Home prices are rising rapidly in all local markets. The overall median sales price for the region was $348,050 in the 4th quarter, a 13% increase from last year, a gain of nearly $40,000. • There were 671 active listings on the market at the end of the 4th quarter in the CAAR footprint, which is about half of what the inventory level was last year.

Key Trends Dashboard, CAAR Economy • 3.7% | Is the November-2020 unemployment rate in the CAAR footprint, which is down from October-2020 • 2.65% | Is the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rate during the 1st week of January 2021, which is down 1.07 percentage points from a year ago Housing Market • 236 |More home sales in the CAAR footprint in Q4-2020 compared to last year.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

• 13% | Percent change in median sales price in the CAAR region in Q4-2020 compared to a year ago • $168 | Million dollars more in total sold volume in the CAAR footprint in Q4-2020 compared to last year • -50% | Percent change in active listings at the end of Q4-2020 in the CAAR market compared to a year ago • 1.7| Months of supply in the CAAR footprint in Q4-2020, which is down from a year ago

Economic Overview The economic recession officially began 10 months ago. Economic conditions continue to improve, although the pace of recovery has slowed in recent months. Looking ahead, the 2nd round

of Federal assistance and the ramp-up in the distribution of the COVID-19 vaccine will be critical for strengthening the economy in 2021. Economic conditions have rebounded faster in Virginia than in many other parts of the country. In the Commonwealth, the economy has added jobs for 7 consecutive months. The Statewide unemployment rate fell to 4.6% in November. Despite steady job gains, the State has regained only about 56% of the jobs that were lost during the spring. It is likely that it will take years for the economy to fully regain the jobs that have been lost during this recession.

Like the rest of the Commonwealth, the Charlottesville area has seen economic conditions improve through the end of 2020. The regional unemployment rate was 3.7% in November, falling steadily from the peak unemployment rate of 9.4% in April. While unemployment remains slightly elevated compared to a year ago, the downward trend in the region’s unemployment rate is a positive sign. New residential construction activity remained steady during the 3rd and 4th quarters of 2020. Over the months of July through November, there were permits issued for a total of 483 residential units, which is down slightly from the same period a year ago. This fall, permits were issued consistently for around 100 new housing units per month. In September, October, and November, nearly 80% of new housing units constructed were single-family homes and 20% were multifamily homes or townhomes. Measures of consumer confidence reflect how people feel about economic

conditions. As a result of economic and political uncertainties, as well as rising numbers of COVID-19 cases, consumer confidence dropped in December. The measure of confidence in the present economic situation was 101.1, but the future consumer confidence index fell to 92.2. A consumer confidence index below 100 indicates people are feeling more pessimistic. During the 4th quarter, historically low mortgage rates continued to support strong refinance and purchase activity. According to data reported by Freddie Mac, the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rate has been below 3% for 23 consecutive weeks. In the 1st week of January, the average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage rate was 2.65%, which is a full percentage point lower than the same time last year.

Housing Market Overview The CAAR area housing market had a very strong quarter. Growth in sales, median price, and sold dollar volume all reached multiyear highs. Pent-up demand from earlier in the year and attractive interest rates continue to drive market growth and expansion in the region. Homes sold faster on average this quarter, which reflects strong buyer demand and the increasingly low inventory of homes on the market. The overall supply in the CAAR footprint has now dipped below 2 months for the first time in more than 5 years.

Sales Sales activity in the CAAR market was very busy at the end of 2020. There were 1,278 sales across the region during the 4th quarter, a 23% jump in sales from last year, which is 236 additional sales. This represents the largest increase in sales in more than 5 years and reflects continued pent-up demand from earlier in the year. The number of home sales Statewide was up 28% in the 4th quarter compared to a year ago.

Sales Prices As buyer demand continues to surge and the inventory of active listings remains very low, home prices in the CAAR region are climbing at an increasingly fast pace. The 4th quarter median sales price in the area was $348,050, which is nearly $40,000 higher than this time last year, a 13% jump. This is the largest price gain for the region’s housing market in more than 5 years. The Statewide median sales price in the 4th quarter was $329,000, an 11% increase from a year earlier.

Sold Volume The CAAR housing market had its strongest 4th quarter of sold volume in more than 5 years as both sales and home prices surged to multiyear highs. There was approximately $565 million of sold volume throughout the footprint in the 4th quarter, a dramatic 42% jump from last year, which is a gain of about $168 million. Other than a slowdown in the spring of 2020, the sold dollar volume in the region’s housing market has been rising consistently for about 2 years.

Days on Market Homes sold faster on average in the CAAR area housing market this quarter.


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Homes that sold in the 4th quarter were on the market for 52 days, on average, which is 12 days faster than a year ago. Prior to this decrease, the average days on market in the region had increased for 2 straight quarters. Statewide, homes were on the market for an average of 33 days in the 4th quarter.

Inventory

About VR The Virginia REALTORS® (VR) association is the largest professional trade association in Virginia, representing nearly 34,000 REALTORS® engaged in the residential and commercial real estate business. The Virginia REALTORS® association serves as the advocate for homeownership and private property rights and represents the interests of real estate professionals and property owners in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

About CAAR The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® (CAAR) represents more than 1,300 real estate professionals in Charlottesville and Albemarle and the surrounding areas of Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, and Nelson counties. If you have a question about today’s market, contact a REALTOR® today using mycaar.com for residential properties and cvcmls.com for commercial properties. NOTE: The term REALTOR® is a registered collective membership mark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of the National Association of REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics.

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The inventory in the CAAR regional housing market is plunging. The supply has been trending down for several years; however, the pace has accelerated dramatically in 2020. There were 671 active listings on the market across the CAAR footprint at the end of the 4th quarter, which is about half the level it was a year ago (-50%), a reduction of 667 active listings. This represents the largest decrease of any quarter in more than 5 years. At the end of the 4th quarter, there was a total of 17,537 listings Statewide, a drop of more than 38% from a year ago. There was just 1.7 months of supply at the end of the 4th quarter in the CAAR region, down from 3.5 months a year ago. The months of supply is calculated by taking the average monthly sales over the preceding 12-month period and dividing it by the inventory of active listings.

REAL ESTATE NEWS

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FEATURE

FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

32

A

re you asking your home to do more and be more than ever before? Can it deliver? The good news is yes, it can! Particularly if your home is brand new. To deliver what buyers want today, some long-standing trends are slowing or reversing. Many of these changes are in response to the COVID pandemic. As work and school moved home, and sources of entertainment shut down for many, homes suddenly had to fill the void. The result is a major shift in where people choose to live and what size home and lot they find to be ideal. Buyers are questioning open concept living, or at least augmenting it with private spaces and rooms with specific functions. Features that enhance physical and mental health have moved way up on the priority list. And there’s nothing hotter on the market now than new construction. According to Greg Slater, Associate Broker with Nest Realty, “The main reason is the lack of inventory currently available. Buyers are anxious there will not be a home for them in the spring or summer. Demand for parcels suitable for custom design build projects in Albemarle County is as high or higher than I can recall in my career.”

Now that some segments of the population are free of the commuter leash, they are leaving behind the smaller lots of urban areas near employment centers. The push outward is fueled by having the flexibility to live where they always wanted to live but couldn’t because the commute was too long. The desire to put space between their home and the neighbor’s is another driver pushing buyers out of towns and cities and onto larger lots.

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A similar pattern holds for outlying counties. Area builders and developers are in tune with increased demands that buyers are putting on their homes and are scrambling to deliver.

Bigger is Better For the past few years, both lot and home sizes in new construction have been

shrinking. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, in 1995 the median lot size for a new home was 10,000 square feet. In 2019 it had dropped to 8,177 square feet, a record low. Since 2015, median home sizes have also declined. Both trends look to have hit a wall as space—both inside and out—becomes more important.

There is much speculation the COVID pandemic will be the death of the open floor plan. It first became popular in the 1970s as doors disappeared from adjoining living, dining, and kitchen spaces. In the 1990s, no doors evolved into no walls. Since then, the open living concept has become entrenched in buyers’ expectations. In 2020, though, anyone trying to keep their remote work under control with kids attending school from home, questioned the sanity of the open floor plan. Kids and adults scrambled to find private space once work, school, gyms and other places shut down. Suddenly, the combined kitchen, dining, and great room lost some of its luster. While open floor plans may not disappear altogether, designers have reconfigured plans to fill multiple needs. Given everything that goes on at home includ-


33 FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

FEATURE

Your Vision. Your Home. Our Pleasure.

Simply put, your vision is our vision. With Peak Builders, Design/Build means Design/Build. From start to finish, every detail—every inch of your home—is as you dream it. Whether you have Pinterest boards for every room or an old folder full of magazine clippings, we welcome it all. We immerse ourselves completely in new design projects, working to get a full understanding of your design aesthetic, your budget and your wish list. As a true design/build firm, we have the experience and resources to bring your vision to reality.

Partner with Peak. www.buildwithpeak.com

Rebecca White 434.531.5097 rebecca@loringwoodriff.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Building a custom home is significant. Partner with a builder you can trust.


FEATURE

FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

34

ing sleeping, eating, relaxing, playing, and now working and school, today’s new designs must accommodate functions that work best outside of an open floor plan. Finding the right combination of open and private spaces is the key. Not all buyers can afford to have a custom-built home, but the next best thing is to start with home plans offering built in flexibility. Ben Davis, Vice President of Sales at Craig Builders, says “Our niche in the new construction market is offering quality semi-custom homes to ensure that the design provides the flexibility to deliver what our customers want.” Flex space is important across all demographics. Millennials, with or without kids, the Boomer generation and everyone in between has their own take on what to do with a few extra rooms. “Home offices have been upgraded from ‘nice to have’ to ‘must have’ as many customers are able to work remotely almost full time,” according to Davis. “Some customers are requesting that we custom draw a second home office when both owners plan to work from home.” Demand for space for exercise also ticked up after gyms closed. Andrea Akers, Sales Manager with Southern Development Homes, agrees. “Some of our newest designs have what I would call, not-so-open floor plans. And nearly everything comes with ample flexible space with doors, windows, and some privacy. Call this your home office or any other name, but it is a critical element in today’s design.”

Another corollary to the open floor plan is a desire for space to hide kitchen clutter. Once reserved for luxury homes, “messy kitchens” are growing in popularity in all price ranges. These larger pantries with space for some food prep and appliance storage relieve pressure on the homeowner to have an immaculate kitchen while entertaining. Eating out of sight of a messy kitchen may be reason enough to bring back dining rooms. They can also be repurposed. And libraries can become the perfect Zoom rooms. These spaces, with doors and walls, can serve a homeowner under

a variety of conditions during and after a pandemic.

Bringing the Outside In As our world effectively shrank into “COVID bubbles,” having access to our very own outdoor space became important. Yes, lot sizes are becoming larger to provide that bit of elbow room that just feels safer in a pandemic. And by reconfiguring space and rethinking doors and windows, designers are bringing the outside in and the inside out. Courtyards and other private outdoor spaces are attracting new buyers. Kate

Colvin, REALTOR® with Roy Wheeler Realty Co., points to the popularity of home designs at Belvedere. “The courtyard layout in Belvedere intrigues folks. The privacy allows people to freely enjoy the space. And with people spending most of their time at home, nothing is more attractive than a functional backyard.” Recreation also moved home as pools and parks closed. “The demand for inground pools is sky-rocketing,” says Jodi Mills, Director of Marketing and Public Relations at Stony Point Development Group. “We recently modified HOA regulations for a new community in Crozet to allow inground pools because of how that is ranking in buyer demand.” Exterior light and views are especially helpful to combat cabin fever as people hunker down at home. Larger lot sizes and rural settings allow for windows that don’t feature your neighbors’ walls. Floor to ceiling glass installations are popular wherever there is a view worth seeing. Suzie Pace, Broker with Pace Real Estate Associates, LLC, relays that some R.L. Beyer Custom Homebuilders homes in Ashcroft feature massive glass installations, flooding the room with natural light and playing up the magnificent views. “Using exceptionally wide doors blends the outdoors with the interior of the home. Our goal is to have the design merge with the natural beauty of the area.” Another strategy to provide more outdoor living is decks and porches. “Craig Builders recently added vaulted or ca-

R E A L E S TAT E A P P R A I S E R S & C O N S U LTA N T S Accurity Fincham & Associates, Inc. is the premier appraisal firm in the Charlottesville Area. As an independently owned and operated franchise of Accurity Valuation, one of the largest appraisal firms in the nation, Accurity Fincham & Associates, Inc. offers their clients a wide variety of appraisal services both locally and nationally. Our knowledge, expertise, and high-quality appraisal services is unmatched in the profession. We Bring Value Home.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Accurity Fincham & Associates offers a broad spectrum of services for residential properties including; appraisals for loan origination, forensic and valuation fraud reviews, litigation support, statistical analysis and collateral valuation reviews. Woody and his staff service a diverse property type range that includes green homes, rural property large acreage estates, new construction, complex designs and custom homes, high value estates, as well as typical residential homes. Our clients include government agencies, GSEs, law firms, risk management firms, mortgage lenders, CPAs and others who rely on the firm’s specialized services and high level of expertise.

Woody Fincham SRA, AI-RRS, RAA wfincham@accurity.com (757) 750-7877

14 Lafayette Dr • Palmyra, VA 22963 accuritycville.com


35

DAN CORBIN

To Be Built - The Camden. This Craftsman Style Beauty (similar to pic) will be built with Your Colors and Your Touches, on 2.47 acres - 15 Minutes to Pantops. Visit Steger Creek, on Union Mills Rd. in Fluvanna County. Lot 10 sits up off the road with room to stretch out, plant the garden and enjoy Big Sky Views. Traditional 3 bedrooms up, 2 1/2 ba, Owner Suite w/Luxury Bath. Open Kitchen thru Breakfast area to Great Room with Gas FP. Formal Dining & Open Foyer. Granite Counters, Solid Wood Cabinets, Upgrade Lighting and Appl pkg. Finished Bonus Room for Home Office or Away Space. LVP, Carpet & Tile Floors. 9ft Ceilings, 20 SEER HVAC, Conditioned Crawl, Hardie Plank and Stone Exterior. No HOA. Well & Septic. MLS# 612857

$419,000

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DanCorbinHomes@gmail.com

Cell: 434-531-6155 Office: 434-974-1500

943 Glenwood Station Ln. #203 Charlottesville, VA 22901

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

BRAEMAR COURT

One story, custom designed home with unique U-shape and full terrace level. Set on a quiet cul-de-sac. 10’ ceilings on the first floor and 9’ on the terrace level. Beautiful cherry floors. Great room, family room and master bedroom all open to the deck. Stunning kitchen with light cherry cabinets and updated appliances. Large, bright rooms and great storage make this home special. An open staircase leads to the terrace level which offers a family room & office. Fenced yard overlooks the woods. Club options include golf, pool/tennis or social memberships.$675,000

FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

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Move in Ready! One level living in Old Trail. Energy efficient home with partially finished basement and loads of storage, ready for you to make it home. Looks deceivingly small from the outside yet there is over 5,000 sq.ft. expertly designed to fit a variety of needs. Features include; 6 “ Castilian Walnut floors, large rooms, sizable closets, custom master closet and more. This home is perfect for entertaining, working and learning remotely. Undeniable value at this price. Come visit in person or ask for a virtual tour through FaceTime. Owner is RE agent $626,000

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Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 New Model Home Now Available toBelvedere Tour


FEATURE

FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

36 thedral ceilings to screened in porches

as part of our main level living home designs,” according to Customer Representative Marc Ammons, and REALTOR® with Nest Realty. Craig Builders and Southern Development Homes are the chosen builders for the upcoming North Pointe development near the airport on U.S. 29 North. Phase one includes commercial space and 100 single family homes on one-quarter acre lots.

Health Makes the List It is a pandemic, after all. So, it only makes sense that healthy living features moved up on buyers’ priority lists for new homes. New technologies make it easier for new home builders to compete with existing homes lacking these features. Touchless entries and sink faucets aren’t just for the workplace anymore. They make just as much sense at home. Some designs include a transition room, a dedicated space serving as a buffer between outside and the living areas. This multifunctional space combines laundry room, cleaning center, and storage for masks and supplies. A counter doubles as a folding station and settling area for groceries and deliveries. And someone coming inside can throw dirty clothing right into the wash. Heightened awareness of indoor air and water quality is going mainstream. Low-VOC materials that eliminate dangerous chemicals from the building process are commonplace. The new emphasis is on upgraded whole-house air and water filtration systems to remove contaminants and improve the quality of air and

water your family uses. Third-party agencies can verify whether a home is built to and meets certain standards to improve comfort and performance. These include Pearl Certification, EarthCraft, and LEED for Homes. Certifications can also improve the resale value of your home.

In or Out White kitchens will always be classic. But color and natural woods like ash and warm-toned oaks are making a comeback. The all gray-on-gray or gray-on-white modes are shifting to allow pops of bold colors. Aegean Teal is Benjamin Moore’s 2021 Color of the Year. Using brighter jewel tones on lower kitchen cabinets or the kitchen island is trending. Farmhouse décor and rustic looks may be coming to the end of the line, following Joanna Gaines’ long-standing

HGTV show, Fixer Upper. If you still love that look but want to stay current in your new home, a mix of traditional and modern looks with some darker woods can replace the whitewashed shiplap and other rustic features.

Forever Homes More than ever, builders hear customers refer to this new home purchase as their “forever home.” Forever is a long time and includes the possibility of declining levels of ability. One aging-in-place feature that can be added now or built into the design for a later add-on is an elevator. The Vuelift Mini is a new compact home elevator with just a 50-inch footprint, allowing for maximum flexibility in placement. More new-home buyers are including an in-law suite in the home design, either under-roof or as an accessory unit dwelling on the lot. Patti Dixon Lillard,

517 LEXINGTON AVENUE

Carla Huckabee still has a white kitchen and just installed whitewashed shiplap in her basement.

4209 HAWKINS LANE

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REALTOR® with Montague, Miller & Co. – Madison, says, “This pandemic has changed everything. Millennials are welcoming extended family to help with the burdens this has brought on. People are rethinking their way of life and gathering family close is a significant part of that. Buyers want a better quality of life, a better quality of home. This is creating a permanent shift in everything we do.” As new construction prices for singlefamily homes reach or exceed an entry point of $300,000, more features that were once preserved only for luxury homes are included, making it easier to commit long-term. Buyers are following their guts and chasing a feeling. They want safety, comfort, and permanence, their forever home.

Stroll quintessential Charlottesville among the notable Victorians. Lexington Ave is pristine and adored by all who visit. This charming city home hasbeen extensively renovated; featuring redesigned character in all bathrooms, master suite created on 3rd level with tremendous banquette seating & abundant light.Ornate fixtures throughout the home convey. All rooms feature unique shelves, custom art features & organic tile and Onyx detail. Large level fenced yard with playstructure, abundant parking in both the front and rear. MLS# 611555 $ 945,000

Country Living in Convenient Location. Close to NGIC, Hollymeade, Pantops. Private Stocked Pond & almost 5 acres in Albemarle County. Main Level Master Suite, Tiled Dual Head Shower, Bamboo Hardwoods in Living Room, Eat In Kitchen w Stainless Appliances & Granite Counters. Covered Front Porch w View of your pond & pasture. Covered rear deck & Finished Basement with HUGE Family Room, 2nd Full Laundry Room, 3rd Full Bathroom & 4th Bedroom. 6 miles to Proffitt Rd.9 Miles to Hollymeade Town Center. MLS# 605931 $535,000

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JUST LISTED Inspiration, simplicity & inherent beauty of this Arts & Crafts Home will leave Buy and Sell Cville Team you in awe. Walk to Nominees: Candice & Bert Downtown Cville, Passionate about Helping favorite local restauPeople SELL & BUY Residential rants & parks. The Real Estate in the core characteristics Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you & inspiration of the & Share Some of our Best original 1945 built Adventures! Buypresent and Sell in Cville Team home are Nominees: Candice & Bert this newly completed 943 Glenwood Station Ln #203 about Helping Buy andMain Sell Cville Team masterpiece. Home features 1st Floor Master Suite. Eucalyptus & SlatePassionate Flooring; OrigCharlottesville, VA 22901 People SELL & BUY Residential inal Exposed Brick Chimney & Rafters. Custom Kitchen w Blue Atlas CountertopsReal harvested Nominees: Candice & Bert Estate in the Charlottesville in Montpelier. Separate Cottage provides master suite, full kitchen & mountain views Area. off We can’t wait to connect with you Passionate about Helping dual covered decks. Private Driveway for tenant. Detached Office/Studio w dramatic vaulted & Share Some of our Best Candice van der Linde, Realtor @Candice_Realtor ceiling,SELL overflowing sunlight& privacy. Garden nestled behind rustic pallet fence. $550,000 Adventures! People & BUY Residential

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HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF JANUARY 31, 2021 THERE WERE 83 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 27 were in Albemarle with an average price of $442,137 n 10 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $336,315 n 6 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $258,462 n 4 were in Greene with an average price of $323,738 n 7 were in Louisa with an average price of $401,689 n 2 were in Madison with an average price of $445,500 n 12 were in Nelson with an average price of $339,917 n 3 were in Orange with an average price of $373,333 n 11 were in Staunton with an average price of $197,336 n 1 was in Waynesboro with a price of $185,000

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THE 1926 FOWLER STREET BELVEDERE

1034 CARLTON AVENUE BELMONT

3 CHICKASAW PLACE LAKE MONTICELLO

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

170 GLEBE LANE MADISON

500 STONEGATE LANE NELLYSFORD

117 COLLINSWOOD DRIVE STAUNTON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


39 FEBRUARY 3 - 9, 2021 ISSUE 3005

RWR

R O Y W H E E L E R R E A LT Y C O . SINCE 1927

BACK ON MARKET

GORGEOUS VIEWS FROM AFTON ESTATE!

10053 Critzers Shop Road 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 7.75 ACRES $599,000 mls 605922 Susan Reres, 434-953-5552

ENJOY EARLYSVILLE

OLD TRAIL VILLAGE

4545 Turkey Sag Road 5 BR, 5.5 BA, 5015 SQ FT $1,100,000 mls 610096 Logan Wells Klalo, 434-981-3097

WESTERN ALBEMARLE

SOUTHERN ALBEMARLE COUNTY

Lot 3 Chimney Rock 5.48 acres of beautiful nature and privacy $185,000 mls 608093 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

B Greenwood Road 2.41 wooded acres $144,900 mls 532642 Mike Peters, 434-981-3995

REDUCED

VIEW THESE LISTINGS ONLINE

PERFECT 4.12 ACRE RETREAT

Porters Road Great building site of 2 acres $19,500 mls 588646 Gavin Sherwood, 434-962-0226

CUSTOM-DESIGNED BARN HOME ON 3 ACRES

0 Miller Farm Lane 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 4000 SQ FT $1,375,000 mls 611856 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

www.roywheeler.com/rwr-rew-weekly-listings/ charlottesville 434.951.5155 | Greene 434.985.2348 | zion crossroads | 434.589.2611 | Western Albemarle 434.205.4355

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

1345 Owensville Road 4 BR, 4 FULL/2 HALF BA, 5397 SQ FT $1,375,000 mls 598102 Jane Porter Fogleman, 434-981-1274

10 ACRES IN BLUE RIDGE VISTA

1614 Old Trail Drive 2 BR, 2.5 BA, 2 CAR GARAGE $319,000 mls 610542 Dan Conquest 434-242-8573


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C-VILLE Weekly | February 3 - 9, 2021  

C-VILLE Weekly | February 3 - 9, 2021  

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