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City’s Human Rights Commission needs more support PAGE 11 Black sewists connect through “Stitch Please” podcast PAGE 20

VOL. 30 NO. 6 n FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N OF THE CHA RLOT

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INSIDE

FEBRUARY 10 – 16, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

Love letters Ahead of Valentine’s Day, local romance novelist Jenny Gardiner shares the secrets to her success

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A little

INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No.6

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-817-2749 www.c-ville.com

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FEATURE 15

EDITORIAL EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

Labors of love

All’s well that ends well for local romance novelist Jenny Gardiner. NEWS 9

told

10 Update on the area’s COVID vaccine rollout. 11 Human Rights Commission says it needs more city support. 13 General Assembly passes bill to abolish VA death penalty.

CULTURE 17 19 All You Can Eat: Finding solace in pandemic baking.

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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us...

20 The Works: Weaving Black sewists together through community.

21 Screens: Minari is a moving drama about Korean immigrants. 26 Sudoku 27 Crossword 29 Free Will Astrology

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Jedd Farris, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Erika Howsare, Meg Irvin, Cortney Meriwether, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Mary Shea Valliant, David Levinson Wilk

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Q&A 31 What would the opening sentence to you romance novel be?

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reveals how fear and misunderstandings caused The Charlottesville City Council to condemn and Demolish a 20 Acre Tract (30 Black businesses and 600 residents) from the Downtown area from 1958-1964.

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THIS WEEK

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2.10.21

For me, Friday afternoon often slips away a bit. As the weekend approaches, my co-workers get chattier, my email inbox gets a little less compelling, and I take my foot off the gas. That’s not how the Virginia General Assembly operates, evidently. In the space of just a few hours last Friday, the legislature passed bills that, when signed by the governor this summer, will abolish the death penalty (page 13) and legalize marijuana (page 9). A pretty good day’s work, if you ask me. These changes were possible because Democrats flipped both chambers of the General Assembly in the 2019 elections. Democrats didn’t win control by much—2019 saw the senate flip from a 21-19 Republican advantage to a 21-19 Democrat advantage after two Democrat challengers beat Republican incumbents by a combined 14,000 votes. Despite the close races, Virginia Democrats have spent the last two years making the most of their mandate. They’ve passed a wide variety of progressive reforms that would have been unthinkable just a few years ago. In short, the Democrats have governed like they won. Can you think of another representative body with a newly constituted narrow majority that would do well to adopt the same strategy? I sure can. Right now, though, I’m just happy to see a new side of the Old Dominion.—Ben Hitchcock

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“A year ago, legalizing marijuana and abolishing the death penalty were far-fetched. But Black Lives Matter protests moved the needle, so we just did both.”

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—Delegate Ibraheem Samirah (D-Loudoun) on new laws coming out of the Virginia General Assembly

NEWS IN BRIEF

Likely lieutenants Yet another candidate has announced a 2021 run for lieutenant governor of Virginia, with Fairfax County NAACP leader Sean Perryman becoming the 13th person to declare they’re seeking the office next year. Why’s the job so popular this year? What does the lieutenant governor even do? Not to sound cynical, but one thing the lieutenant governor often does is hold higher office later on. Five of the last nine LGs to leave office have later become governor, and three of those nine have gone on to serve in the U.S. Congress.

Give it a shot PAGE 10

Joint resolution

Running it back

Debate continues over how to properly memorialize the location where enslaved people were bought and sold in Court Square. Last year, local activist Richard Allan illicitly removed a metal plaque from the spot, saying the marker was an insufficient tribute to the atrocities committed there. Now, Allan is leading a group of citizens calling for a more prominent memorial.

The city’s Historic Resources Committee has promised to work on the project, saying that more progress hasn’t been made because COVID has stalled important outreach to the descendants of those who were sold at the spot. Allan and his coalition are eager to see progress made, however, and last Friday the group took matters into their own hands, holding a meeting to announce that

each Wednesday they’ll gather at the spot with a portable, eye-level marker to reflect and remember. “There’s a stain in this corner, caused by our city’s failure to honor the 20,000 people—[whose] spirits are here with us— these enslaved workers who built Albemarle and Charlottesville,” said Allan. “We believe that silence about racism can be the same as violence about racism.”

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Mayor NikuyahWalker is being investigated by the city for unauthorized spending, the mayor revealed in a Facebook live stream over the weekend. In her broadcast, Walker admitted to distributing gift cards to community members. “Speakers come and speak, typically about how to infuse equity in the conversation, and I pay them,” she said. In a February 3 memo to City Council, Acting City Attorney Lisa Robertson wrote that “Even a small unauthorized purchase can have serious legal consequences.” The commonwealth’s attorney’s office did not confirm or deny the existence of an investigation. We’ll keep you posted as the story develops.

Im-plaque-able activists

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Funny money

The state hopes to keep marijuana sales centralized to maximize tax revenue—studies have suggested that $300 million per year in weed taxes could roll into the commonwealth’s pocket after legalization. Jenn Michelle Pedini, director of legalization advocacy group Virginia NORML, praised the “historic vote,” but emphasized that the process isn’t done yet. “There still remains much work to be done by NORML and others to ensure that Virginia gets it right and implements legislation that is expeditious and just,” said Pedini in a press release.

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Brian Pinkston

Let’s start by putting it bluntly: On Friday, Virginia’s legislature voted to legalize marijuana, becoming the first state in the South to do so. Some details of the bill still need to be hashed out, however. Retail sales of legal marijuana to Virginians 21 and up won’t begin until 2024, and the new legislation doesn’t mean we can all go out and become budding gardeners in our backyards. The sale of the drug will be regulated by a new state agency, similar to the Alcoholic Beverage Control, and retail licenses will be passed out sparingly.

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

UVA project manager Brian Pinkston announced this week that he’s once again running for a seat on City Council. Pinkston, who also holds a doctorate in philosophy from UVA, finished fourth in a five-way Democratic Primary in 2019. Two council seats will be available this fall. Longtime school board member Juandiego Wade has thrown his hat in the ring, and Mayor Nikuyah Walker will seek re-election. Councilor Heather Hill hasn’t announced her plans yet.


NEWS

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ith the one-year anniversary of COVID-related shutdowns just a few weeks away, many people in the area and around the country have a pressing question on their minds: When will we be vaccinated? Though distribution in the commonwealth began slowly, Virginia now ranks seventh out of 50 states in percent of citizens who have received at least one dose of the vaccine, according to The New York Times. As of Monday, nearly 900,000 Virginians—or about 10 percent of the commonwealth’s total population—have received at least one dose of either the Moderna or Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, with an average of 35,811 vaccines administered per day in the state during the past week. About 200,000 of those Virginia residents have also received the necessary second dose of the vaccine to be considered fully vaccinated. Closer to home in the Blue Ridge Health District, which includes Charlottesville and Albemarle, Nelson, Greene, Louisa, and Fluvanna counties, per capita vaccination rates rank among the highest in the state— especially in Charlottesville, where roughly 30 percent of the city’s 50,000 residents have received at least one dose of the vac-

cine, according to data from the Virginia Department of Health. Across the district, nearly 70,000 total vaccine doses have been received by local health departments, hospitals, and other care providers since the rollout began. About 50,000 of those doses have been administered, although mostly as first doses thus far. In Charlottesville, almost 4,000 individuals have been fully vaccinated with two doses out of roughly 11,000 across the health district. Ryan McKay, director of policy and planning and COVID-19 incident commander for the district, says that the health district has led the state thanks to logistical success in the distribution process. In an area with so many health workers, it can quickly recruit vaccinators and form partnerships with local governments and hospitals, such as UVA Health and Sentara Martha Jefferson. At one vaccination event held at the Martin Luther King Jr. Performing Arts Center last week, McKay says more than 700 individuals were vaccinated, including many local teachers as well as Charlottesville and Albemarle County staff members. But McKay also notes that the average number of vaccines allotted to the district by the VDH—approximately 2,850 on a weekly basis at the moment—is constrain-

After a post-holiday spike, the number of local COVID-19 cases has begun to drop. The current seven-day positivity rate for the BRHD is 3.2 percent.


NEWS

Rights stuff City human rights organizations work to get a foothold By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

C

Human Rights Commission chair Mary Bauer is glad a new ordinance will allow the commission to move forward with the investigation of three discrimination cases.

While many other commissions are majority—or all—white, the HRC is now one of the most diverse. “I am very, very proud of us being able to have more people of color, more transgender people on the commission, more people who are exactly what the ordinance says it’s meant to protect,” says Bingham. The commission also drafted recommendations for the Charlottesville Police Department on how to improve its practices and policies. “We were never able to actually meet with anyone with the city to discuss the work that we did—but that work was done,” says Laughon. Last year, the commission passed a resolution in support of a local eviction moratorium, and took a stance against the University of Virginia’s decision to bring students back to Grounds last fall. And since multiple commissioners spoke out last year about the need for direct contact with a city representative, at least one City Councilor has attended the commission’s monthly meetings. “[This] has significantly helped,” says Bingham. “But there’s still a lot of work to do with transparency, with the working relationship between the Human Rights Commission, city management, and City Council.” According to Magill, council recognizes the dire need for a new director, and the many challenges it has brought. Under new City Manager Chip Boyles, staffing changes are expected to come soon. “We’re going to have to give him a little bit of time, especially as we’re right in the middle of budget season,” she says. “[But] we know the position is sitting there and needs to be filled.”

“The work of the Human Rights Commission has not been in any way a priority for City Council or other offices of the city,” KATHRYN LAUGHON, HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION MEMBER

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didn’t have time to come together as a commission to evaluate them.” The last-minute changes, which were adopted from a letter co-signed by a collection of social justice organizations in town, include reducing the commission size to nine members, requiring the OHR director to have legal and civil rights credentials, and mandating the director to seek workshare agreements with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Department of Housing and Urban Development. “I worked really hard talking to a number of different people about what the core of the matter was with those changes, what were the fears those changes were addressing. I also made sure those changes were doable,” says Vice-Mayor Sena Magill, who has worked with the commission during her time on council. “If we identify unintended consequences down the road, we will probably just have to change the ordinance again,” she adds. Community advocate Walt Heinecke, who has continuously advocated for the changes listed in the social justice groups’ letter, says he understands the commission’s wariness specifically towards the requirements for the new director, which some fear will restrict people of color from applying. However, he believes it is important to hire an attorney for the position to “[signal] to employers and landlords in the community that this is serious business.” Shantell Bingham, the former chair of the commission and a current member, was also disappointed by the lack of transparency in the revision process, but says she’s proud of some of the work the commission has done in the last few years.

@cville_weekly

ity Hall’s recent struggles have been well-documented. A series of high-profile positions have gone unfilled for extended stretches, and councilors have publicly clashed. Those challenges have prevented the city from carrying out one of its main duties: fully supporting its boards and commissions. Charlottesville’s Human Rights Commission and Office of Human Rights, a volunteer board and a paid city office tasked with investigating complaints of discrimination, have been particularly affected, say group members. “The work of the Human Rights Commission has not been in any way a priority for City Council or other offices of the city,” says Kathryn Laughon, who has served on the commission for two years. “For a year, we’ve had no director...and our work has essentially been put on hold. There’s this domino of [city] appointments that need to be made, and a sense that we should not move boldly forward until all these pieces are in place.” Charlene Green stepped down as OHR director last February, and for the last year the office has been run entirely by outreach specialist Todd Niemeier. Since their inception in 2013, the organizations have been a source of debate for commissioners, community members, city councilors, and city staff, who have different ideas about how the office and board should be structured, and what kind of resources the organizations need. Those debates continued last week, as council passed a new set of rules for the commission with some controversial clauses. The revisions align the commission with the newly passed Virginia Values Act, giving the OHR and HRC significantly more power. The organizations are now allowed to investigate complaints of discrimination based on income, as well as complaints from larger companies. Mary Bauer, the chair of the commission, encouraged the councilors to approve the revised ordinance in order to allow the OHR to move forward with three discrimination cases that fell under the new protected classes granted by the Values Act. However, the final revised ordinance approved by City Council during its February 1 meeting included multiple changes that were not suggested by the commission. “The process was not great or transparent,” says Bauer, who became chair of the commission this year. “There were changes made the Sunday before the City Council hearing on which it would be voted upon...And the commission, although they saw the changes,

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

ing faster progress in getting shots into arms. The district’s weekly dose allocation is based solely on population. “What’s really limiting us right now is the allotment that we get from VDH,” says McKay. “We had a big push last week to clear the inventory that was on hand, but that just makes it a little more difficult to provide greater access this week.” The Blue Ridge Health District is currently overseeing vaccinations for individuals in Phase 1A, which includes frontline health care workers, and limited groups of individuals in Phase 1B, such as law enforcement, fire and other emergency personnel, corrections and homeless shelter employees, as well as teachers and other educators. Individuals 65 years of age and older are also currently eligible to receive the vaccine, and most of that population will be vaccinated by UVA Health. McKay says Phase 1A has been mostly completed, adding that significant progress has been made in recent weeks on the first portions of Phase 1B as well. However, the expectation is that most individuals between the ages of 16 and 64 with underlying health conditions—who are included in Phase 1B—may have to wait several more weeks until they are able to receive the vaccine due to limited supply. All individuals in Phase 1B are still able to indicate their interest in receiving a vaccine by filling out the district’s online survey or calling their hotline at 972-6261. “I think the struggle we’re facing too is that once everything opened up for Phase 1B, that means half of Virginians are now eligible to get vaccinated,” says McKay. “And with only 2,850 doses coming into the health district any given week, that makes it really challenging to try to get people through from all the different categories.” Eric Swensen, public information officer for the UVA Health System, says UVA Health has been recently administering more than 1,000 vaccine doses per day. “Vaccine supplies are expected to be limited during the next few weeks, and we are adjusting our capacity to reflect that change,” says Swensen. Since the vaccine rollout is overseen by the VDH and individual health districts, says Swensen, it is currently unclear whether or not will take the lead on administering vaccines to university employees, faculty, and staff who don’t work in health care. Moving forward, McKay says the health district plans to hire contracted employees to carry out vaccinations, train paramedics and EMTs to administer vaccines, revamp the district’s online appointment system to better schedule second doses, and ensure that the vaccine rollout is equitable by guaranteeing access to communities of color. “We know across the country, in Virginia, and in our own health district, communities of color have had a disproportionate amount of hospitalization, deaths, and cases,” says McKay. “So we want to make sure that we’re providing equitable access [to the vaccine].” To determine if you are eligible to be vaccinated in the near future and see a list of upcoming vaccination events, visit the Blue Ridge Health District’s COVID-19 page on the VDH website.

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#showcvillelove Charlottesville businesses need support right now more than ever before. That’s why Charlottesville Insider is joining with Blue Ridge Outdoors magazine and C-VILLE Weekly to sponsor the Show C’ville Love Gift Card Giveaway. Each week starting February 14, we’ll be giving away two $100 gift certificates to a Charlottesville business of the winners’ choice. It’s easy to enter for a chance to win, and here’s how you do it: Post photos on Instagram and Facebook doing the following things and use #ShowCvilleLove. Tag the local business and location if applicable.

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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Exploring the outdoors | Eating at a local restaurant | Picking up curbside | Shopping or visiting a local business Participating in a class (outdoors/social distancing or virtually) | Visiting outdoor breweries/wineries etc... Staying in a Charlottesville hotel or other lodging | Doing something nice for someone (Showing some love) Anything else you love to do in Charlottesville

#showcvillelove


NEWS

Long time coming Anti-death penalty advocates celebrate abolition

13

Transform your living space into

percent of the state’s population is Black. And since 1973, more than half of the 167 reporter@c-ville.com people on death row who’ve been exonerated across the country have been Black. or decades, activists around the For VADP member Linell Patterson, this state and country have been fightend to the decades-long battle is a healing ing to abolish the death penalty in moment. Virginia. In 2019, the issue rose to the foreR E T A I L After her father and stepmother front when Democrats won control of the E Xwere P E R I E N C E N O B A R S . N O S P R I N G S . P U R E C O M F O R T. brutally murdered by her adopted brother, Virginia General Assembly. Michael Bourgeois, and his friend, Landon On Friday, the House of Delegates voted May, in Pennsylvania in 2001, the prosecut57-41 to end the death penalty, with three E X T E N D E D R E TA I L E R ing attorney sought the death penalty Republicans joining all the Dems in support I N F O R M AT I O N against May, even though Patterson and of the monumental legislation. Two days sister begged him not to. before, the state senate approved a similar E X Pher E“For Rme, I Erevenge, NCE N O B A R S . N O S P R I N G S . P U R E C O M F O R T. a death for a death, was abolition bill with a 21-17 party-line vote. CS-SALE ADS - POLAR BEAR.indd 1 not ever going to be what justice looks like,” While certain details still need to be CS-SALE ADS - POLAR BEAR.indd 1 1/7/20 3:3 R E T A I L E R saysAPatterson, ironed out, Governor Ralph Northam has R E T I L Ewho R now lives in HarrisonE X TtoE think N D E that D R E TA I L E E R X T E N D E D R E TA I L E R burg. “It’s really uplifting promised to sign the final bill into law this Virginia is moving away from IaNsystem I N F O R M AT I O N summer, which will make Virginia the first F O Rthat M AT I O N has failed so many demographics.” ON SALE MARCH 6TH – APRIL 6TH Southern state to ban capital punishment. In 2017, when Virginia executed William Since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated Mora, who murdered Montgomery Counthe death penalty in 1976, Virginia has ty Sheriff’s Corporal Eric Sutphin in Blacksexecuted 113 people, the second most of CS-SALE ADS - POLAR BEAR.indd 1 1/7/20 3:35 PM burg in 2006, Sutphin’s daughter, Rachel, CS-SALE ADS - POLAR BEAR.indd 1 any state (after Texas’ 569). also did not feel any solace—just more pain. Michael Stone, executive director of “Having this bill passed, finally I think Virginians for Alternatives to the Death something good is coming,” says Sutphin, Penalty, says the group is “extremely who has become an outspoken voice pleased” with the new legislation. “Not against the death penalty since her faonly will it abolish the death penalty, but ther’s murder. it will change the sentences of the two As someone who has represented many men still on death row from death to life people charged with capital offenses, atin prison without parole.” torney Matthew Engle says he is filled with During a heated debate, Democratic a range of emotions. legislators emphasized how abolishing the “It’s an enormous relief to see that [the 218 West Market Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 death penalty is a racial justice issue. Alpenalty] is no longer going to be a concern,” EXPE R I E– N CE most half of the people Virginia has exe434-970-1900 I Tuesday – Saturday 11am 5pm he says. “But I also feel sad about some of cuted have been Black, although only 20 T H E O N LY www.lodgerva.com the cases I worked on over the years of L I V ING CHAIR people who were executed...It really was a waste of human life.” Once the bill is signed into law, all four advocates hope to see other Southern states follow Virginia’s lead, and join the 22 other states (plus Washington, D.C.) that have abolished the death penalty. Patterson ultimately hopes that abolition will lead to a greater investment in support systems for crime victims and their families, like therapy and restitution, as well as in programs and services that prevent violence. “There’s a lot of opportunity at this point to redistribute all of that money that was being poured into the system,” she says. “It’s Michael Stone, executive director of VADP, exciting to think about what it actually is “extremely pleased” with the Virginia means to restrengthen individuals, families, General Assembly’s recent vote to ban the death penalty. and communities after trauma.”

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“For me, revenge, a death for a death, was not ever going to be what justice looks like.” LINELL PATTERSON, FAMILY MEMBER OF MURDER VICTIMS

ON SALE NOW FEBRUARY 5-22


14

L VE

IS A FOUR-LEGGED WORD! I'M YOURS

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F F U R I YOU NICE P TAIL L UP O PY VE FREE KISSES E N I L FE OD GO

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Charlottesville, VA 22901


LOVE STORIES

15

Another world Local romance author takes readers to places where love lies By Shea Gibbs

C

“I’m a big fan of happy endings. I like escapist reading, and with the pandemic, I think a lot more people feel the same way.” JENNY GARDINER

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Charlottesville author Jenny Gardiner’s romance novels might be just the escape you’re looking for this Valentine’s season.

another place to put yourself. And it’s helpful to get in the minds of women.” So, what can we learn about love from Gardiner’s characters and their romantic roller coasters? The author, who uses her three brothers as a touchstone for her flawed but forgivable male characters, says she’s learned a lot about herself during her writing journey, which has evolved from women’s fiction to contemporary romance (with a little memoir and mystery thrown in along the way). She says when she wrote her first novel, readers would’ve come away thinking “the most romantic thing you can do is the dishes.” As she’s gone along, though, she’s come to hope her readers simply recognize women are complicated, and that’s okay. Gardiner says she hopes her female readers specifically understand that in love, they just need to be themselves and have fun. “I think the best advice is to trust your gut,” the author says. Hopefully, with Valentine’s Day fast approaching, Charlottesville’s local lotharios won’t decide to mimic Noah Gunderson of Gardiner’s Falling for Mr. Wrong. Where the novel’s smartass female protagonist, Harper Landy, might suggest dudes not dump their dames on V-Day, Gunderson has other ideas. “[He] would recommend, instead, you should do it before Valentine’s Day so you don’t waste money on a gift and dinner,” Gardiner says. Gundersons, be gone.

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COURTESY AUTHOR

come away with the “good sense of yourself you need in any kind of relationship.” And Gardiner swears her lit’s not just for chicks. “I have more male readers than I ever realized I had,” she says. “Everyone wants to get into some other world. Whether you’re reading sci-fi or murder mysteries, you’re trying to find

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

harlottesville’s own rom-com queen Jenny Gardiner loves—like, totally loves—a chance encounter. Whether it’s a Las Vegas waitress literally falling for a prince on an Italian train platform, erstwhile lovers coming face to back-of-head in an Uber, or estranged fiancés pitted against one another in a cooking competition, Gardiner consistently finds ways to bring her characters into comically compromising situations. “Andi rolled over like an upended turtle, dusted street crud from her cheek, then looked up and cringed,” Gardiner writes in Bad to the Throne, her latest in the It’s Reigning Men series. “Because it wasn’t someone. It was him. The naked prince. Decidedly not naked this time around.” For Gardiner herself, the chance encounter that started it all was with a publisher willing to take, well, a chance. “I have a strong writer’s voice,” she says. “You either like it or you don’t like it at all.” In the early part of her career as a romance novelist, Gardiner butted heads with predominantly male editors who just didn’t get her. That all changed when she won a fiction writing contest and found a publisher who fell head over heels for her humor. Now, after publishing three dozen books since 2008, Gardiner’s in a groove. Her latest titillating tale hits the stands on February 28. (She’s also an occasional freelance writer for C-VILLE.) In Hard to Get Lucky, Gardiner will unleash her whimsical style on a new protagonist, Alyssa Heyward, and her hapless-cum-hunky suitor, Josh “The Mad Tooter” Trumbull. Who knows where Heyward and Trumball’s antics might take them. Gardiner admits that she usually doesn’t know what’ll happen until a book is finished—but the couple is likely to come to a cheerful finale. “I’m a big fan of happy endings,” Gardiner says. “I like escapist reading, and with the pandemic, I think a lot more people feel the same way.” Gardiner cites romantic comedy guru Nora Ephron as a primary inspiration for her work, and her laugh-out-loud ludicrous premises might remind some of other delightfully over-the-top writers like Dave Barry or Carl Hiaasen. To wit, in Throne for a Loop, set in Gardiner’s fictional modern-day monarchy of Monaforte, the main character orders a “really huge and hideous penis cake that says ‘Good Riddance to the Big Dick,’” Gardiner explains. But the cake ends up a party favor for a princess—thanks to some sleight of hand from an up-and-coming chef who turns into a love interest with a twist. Penises are often punchlines for Gardiner, who’s reluctantly found herself becoming more racy over the years. She says Fifty Shades of Grey “changed the mandate” for romantic comedy novelists when it was published in 2011. “It became super expected in a novel,” Gardiner says. “Ultimately, I’m a businessperson who wants to sell books.” That doesn’t mean Gardiner doesn’t cringe now and again imagining her mother-in-law reading through a thorough dick description. Fortunately, no one else around town should find anything too cringe-worthy—other than snippets from the news and the occasional personal anecdote, Gardiner promises her plotlines and characters are fully fabricated and never based on real-life acquaintances. Gardiner also seeks to empower women, she says. She hopes readers see her characters in positions of strength, and


16

Come see our great selection of area rugs!

We carry braided rugs in all shapes and sizes! Handmade in North Carolina

5x8 Rugs Start at

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Open Mon-Sat 9:00-5:00 540879-9372

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United Way award for “Above and Beyond Business.”

(434) 202-8565

Work It! It’s all our business. WINTER 2020

DISRUPTED CARE H CARE HOW LOCAL HEALT PROVIDERS HAVE ADJUSTED THIS YEAR

The Martinez family opened Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine and Café in York Place this fall.

TAKING A

LEAP

Icarus Medical takes off on the Downtown Mall Pinnell Leather crafts a thriving business Local shops brace for the holidays

Starting a business in 202ies0 is risky. Here are four storit. from people who did

on stands now!


CULTURE

17

SUNDAY 2/14

SPIRITED MOVE

OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK

MOVIE DATE

February’s Creative Mornings challenges us to think broadly about solving complex problems by contrasting our differences, under the statement: “Moments of divergence can create beautiful futures when we are willing to leave space for change.” Elgin Cleckley, UVA assistant professor of architecture and design thinking, will discuss the intersections of identity, culture, history, memory, and place in a virtual meeting of the local chapter. Free, 8:30am. Reservations and Zoom required. creativemornings.com.

If you think dating during a global pandemic is difficult, consider the plight of Casablanca’s main characters, Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart) and Ilsa Lund (Ingrid Bergman), the ill-fated lovers attempting to escape German-occupied Morocco in the midst of World War II.Yet for all their obstacles, can you think of a more swoon-worthy pair (or film) to spend Valentine’s Day eve with? Here’s looking at you kid! $5-8, 3 and 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 979-1333. theparamount.net

ENTERTAINMENT PICTURES VIA ZUMA PRESS

MIND MERGER

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SATURDAY 2/13

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FRIDAY 2/12

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

Vitae Spirits sweetens its tasting experience with a Valentine’s Day cocktail and chocolate pairing at the distillery’s new downtown location. In a collaboration with the chocolatiers at Cocoa & Spice, the event includes three specially made drinks, served with truffles that incorporate some of Vitae’s modern-flavored liquors. $20, 4-9pm. Seating is limited. Reservations required. Vitae Spirits Downtown, 101 E. Water St. 260-0920. vitaespirits.com.


18

Rocky will be at the Eternal Attic on Friday, March 5th 10 – 4

paying you top dollar for your gold and silver and antiques.

Small packages

A planner advises: how to hold a microwedding

A guide to vintage

Charlottesville's best spots for your 'something old'

Cheek to cheek

A two-person dance floor (what a romantic idea!)

S PRI NG 2 02 1

gold and silver are still up! now is the time to sell!

On a love train

We're on boar d for this Staunton wedding

Rocky pays more for gold, silver and many other items he can resell

PAGE 62

ROCKY BUYS:

Love is

GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM JEWELRY (EVEN BROKEN) GOLD, SILVER PLATINUM COINS, BULLION HE PAYS EXTRA FOR GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS HE CAN RESELL ROCKY WILL PAY UP TO $3000 FOR A GOOD ONE CARAT DIAMOND SOLITAIRE STERLING FLATWARE, HOLLOWWARE ANTIQUE GUNS AND AMMUNITION, SWORDS, CIVIL WAR ITEMS POST CARDS, OLD QUILTS, OLD CLOCKS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE SOME GLASSWARE SOME COSTUME JEWELRY SOME POCKET AND WRIST WATCHES LIKE ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE, OMEGA, AND MORE RUNNING OR NOT SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY

we are now back open regular hoursTuesday – Saturday 9:30 to 5, antiques open at 9 for both buying gold and silver and shopping! jewelry repairs done on the premises often while you wait Bench Jeweler wanted $40,000 to $60,000 a year plus benefits - call for details.

HOURS: tues - sat 9:30 - 5 • 1-800-296-8676 Antiques open at 9:00

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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rockysgoldandsilver.com

ROCK BRANCH Horse and Cattle

patient, love is kind Six couples (finally) get their big day

Here come the brides C-VILLE Weddings provides brides-to-be with a comprehensive guide to planning their big day. Make us the first stop on the road to wedded bliss.

Lessons, Boarding, Trail Rides & Parties www.rbhorseandcattle.com info@rbhorseandcattle.com rbhorse_cattle

NEW ISSUE ON STANDS NOW!


CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

19

Baking connections Local bakers say the pandemic has made their jobs a little less sweet By Julia Stumbaugh arts@c-ville.com

AMY AND JACKSON SMITH

I

The Pie Chest owner Rachel Pennington misses the days when customers would sit and relax in her shop, chatting with friends over coffee and a slice.

ery with his husband, baker Patrick Evans. “Eventually, one day, we’ll come back to that.” With the current closure of MarieBette’s dining room, what Becton misses most is the conversations and connections he used to find with regular customers. But like Pen­ nington, he knows the changes are necessary to keep the business around. “I think any business that’s been able to stay open is a comfort to people in our community, just because we crave that nor­ malcy,” Becton said. “Even though it’s not quite normal, we try to be able to keep it as normal as possible.” Thanks to an endless series of stay-athome orders, home bakers across the Unit­ ed States have turned to their kitchens for comfort, trying viral recipes to make every­

thing from sourdough bread to whipped coffee. But for bakers like Evans and Pen­ nington, who have spent the last year baking to keep their shops afloat, the art is more about sustenance and less about fun. Even so, their influence has led other local bakers to discover their own love of the craft. Pennington held a series of baking classes in 2019; now, she can turn to social media to see her students reap the benefits. One student displayed her fresh-made biscuits, still golden from the cast-iron skillet. An­ other posted an album featuring her Pie Chest-inspired veggie pot pie. “Before I did it for a living, baking at home was absolutely comforting, not just in the process but in knowing that I was able to do something for other people and give

“We’re able to stay open and survive, but it’s become more about commerce than community, which is kind of sad.” JASON BECTON, MARIEBETTE CAFÉ & BAKERY

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

n 2018, Charlottesville residents Jessica Niblo and Samuel Kane met for a first date at The Pie Chest. But they were both too nervous to eat the shop’s signature dish. Instead, they sipped coffee. Three years later, in January 2021, Kane proposed to Niblo at the same spot where they’d first met. But like many of Charlottes­ ville’s bakery/cafés, The Pie Chest had changed drastically. It was forced to pivot from the kind of community gathering spot where Kane and Niblo gazed at each other over cups of coffee to a purely commercial exchange of money for take-away boxes. “I think a big part of The Pie Chest’s iden­ tity was the space we provided for people… it would get full pretty quickly, and a lot of people would end up talking to people they didn’t know,” says Rachel Pennington, baker and owner of the shop. “Losing that, going to fully carryout and takeout, it’s just heart­ breaking. I think of it every time I’m up at the shop now. We’ve lost the buzz that can happen in the room, the connections that can happen...the whole social component is mostly gone.” The Downtown Business Association of Charlottesville told NBC29 in December that COVID-19 had sliced business revenue in half through the 2020 holiday season. Even places that have been able to remain open have felt the sting, both from the loss of in­ come and the loss of a place to gather. In Charlottesville, a town defined by its love for food and drink, bakeries and coffee shops are a core part of the town’s social fabric. “We’re able to stay open and survive, but it’s become more about commerce than com­ munity, which is kind of sad,” says Jason Becton, who opened MarieBette Café & Bak­

them something that they would enjoy,” says Pennington. “So I still know what that feel­ ing feels like.” The search for that feeling helped spark a new addition to the Charlottesville bakery scene—Pear, a stall at the IX farmers’ market that opened in January 2021, is a local col­ laboration by two strangers whose only connection was that they both love to bake for people who love to eat. Myo Quinn, co-founder of Pear, moved to Charlottesville from New York City this summer. Lonely and homesick, the Food Network test kitchen cook headed to the farmers’ market for a sense of normalcy. There she met Holly Hammond, who was working at the Whisper Hill Farm stall. Quinn is a culinary school-trained chef, Hammond a farmer from Arizona. This winter, they opened their own bakery stall at the market where they met. “We’ve had a lot of recurring customers, including friends of Holly’s and customers of Whisper Hill, that keep coming over and over again,” says Quinn. “We had our third week­ end and the faces started looking familiar.” Sharing her baking with newly familiar faces has allowed Quinn to weave herself into the fabric of the Charlottesville com­ munity. She and Hammond have learned through Pear what the owners of The Pie Chest and MarieBette know well: Even in a pandemic that forces people apart, baking can bring strangers together. But for now, most of Charlottesville’s professional bakers are left dreaming of a time when their work involves more leisurely connections with customers. “I long for the first day I can go into a coffee shop and just sit at a table and read the paper,” says Pennington. “I think about it at least once or twice a week. I just want to be part of the food community.”

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Gabriel Ofiesh gabrielofiesh.com | Charlottesville by appointment | Mon-sat 10–5 434.295.9038 | Ofieshstudio@gmail.com

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GABRIEL OFIESH


CULTURE THE WORKS

20

Stitching together

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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BURGeR WeeK May 14th-22nd, 2021

e V A S ! e T A D e TH c-villeburgerweek.com

PUBLICITY PHOTO

Local podcast sews up more than 100k downloads

Lisa Woolfork is the producer of “Stitch Please,” a weekly podcast that explores sewing and social justice.

By Erika Howsare arts@c-ville.com

L

isa Woolfork had been sewing for years when she came to a realization—or, rather, a resolution. “I would never again trade my humanity in exchange for doing something I love,” she says. As a Black sewist, she had too often found herself in a compromising position: trying to participate in white-dominated sewing communities, but unable to “show up as my full, complete, and whole self,” as she puts it. It was fall 2017, and Woolfork had recently had the harrowing experience of being on the ground for the deadly events of August 11 and 12 in Charlottesville. She’d been nearby when Heather Heyer died. But when she arrived at a sewing event in a different Virginia town, she wasn’t intending to discuss those things with the other, mostly white and conservative, participants. “When I got there, people started asking me how I was, asking what it was like,” she

remembers. “I would just answer, and say ‘yeah, it was hard, it was scary.’ I did not walk in to give lectures or speeches or anything. I just wanted to sew my project.” Nonetheless, these conversations got her uninvited to the group’s next event. Woolfork realized that her presence was only accepted in this setting if she remained within very narrow boundaries. A friend told her, “‘This is what happens to Black folks when we go from being a pet to being a threat.’” Woolfork, a professor of English at UVA, decided that she was done playing the role of minority in her creative life. Instead, she would create a new community in which Black makers stood at the center. In 2018, she began using Instagram to organize Black Women Stitch—“the sewing group where Black lives matter,” as she defines it. “Our intention is not to diversify the sewing community,” she says. “The advocacy is to create instead a space where Black women, girls, and femmes are centered in sewing.” BWS gathered steam over the space of about a year, as Woolfork connected online

“I was looking for other Black women who had values similar to mine, including things like radical self-love, interest in Black liberation, and interest in racial justice.” LISA WOOLFORK


CULTURE SCREENS

Sown with hope Minari plows its way into the heart of a familiar story

(Amazon Prime)

By Deirdre Crimmins arts@c-ville.com

F

by a nearby brook. The frequent repetition that minari can grow anywhere, and both the rich and poor eat it, does not distract from the value of the metaphor. All of this drama and parable is artfully displayed, thanks to cinematographer Lachlan Milne. The lush—though occasionally barren—farmland begs for sweeping camera movement and a soaring score. Milne balances the grandeur of the pastoral with the intimacy of the people who shape that land. The camera sits with their faces, and shows

Minari PG-13, 115 minutes Streaming begins February 12

Minari tells the semi-autobiographical story of writer/director Lee Isaac Chung’s childhood on an Arkansas farm. A24

The highs and lows of this family could have easily slipped into saccharine and hellscape, but Minari has a more nuanced view of the past.

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their body language with a sharp attention to both style and substance. We not only hear what they say, but we rest with them and feel the love and the frustration, the kindness and the criticism. Minari premiered at the Sundance Film Festival in 2020, and has been generating Oscar buzz since. Both Yeun and Yuh-jung have racked up plenty of critical praise and year-end awards, as has Chung for both his writing and his directing. This attention is well-deserved. Minari is sweet without being cloying, and allows its audience the time and space to get to know its characters. Such affection is welcome warmth during this cold winter.

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ew things are as American as tales of immigrants pulling themselves up by their bootstraps and making a life through hard work and sacrifice. For better or worse, our national penchant for embracing this narrative is hard to deny. Initially, Minari may seem like one of those all-too-familiar sagas—but Lee Isaac Chung’s keen eye for moments and commitment to affection over nostalgia make the film more substantive than expected. Minari is a semi-autobiographical look at writer/director Chung’s own childhood. Chung was raised on an Arkansas farm by Korean immigrants, and his film uses a vegetable farm in the Deep South as its jumping off point. But this is not your typical corn or wheat plot— patriarch Jacob (Steven Yeun) wants to grow Korean vegetables for his fellow transplants to satisfy both their palates and an untapped market. Not a bad idea, in theory. Chung might be currently closer in age to his father figure in the film, but he is represented on screen by precocious newcomer Alan Kim as David, who is generally well behaved and keeps to himself when not with sister Anne (Noel Cho) or his mother, Monica (Yeri Han). Grandma (Youn Yuh-jung) arrives a few months after the family has moved from California to Arkansas, presumably to help

with the house and children. But instead of getting a strict and buttoned-up matriarch, we get Soonja, a youthful and lively presence. She insists on doing what she wants, when she wants, regardless of what Jacob or Monica might suggest. Monica is happy enough, but she misses her life before living in a trailer on a farm. Jacob wants more—more money and more respect—and he wants to grow something of his own that he can be proud of. When Monica suggests starting their farm slowly and building it over time, he is offended that his new pursuit might be mistaken as a hobby. This is his profession. The highs and lows of this family could have easily slipped into the saccharine and hell­scape, but Minari has a more nuanced view of the past. When things get bad—and they do get bad—hope is not lost. Nor are these people phoenixes, triumphantly emerging from the flames. They are a loving family that needs to mourn and keep moving forward. It is this active resistance of the Hollywoodification of their experiences that keeps Minari firmly rooted in the ground Jacob sows. This is not to say there are no lessons in Minari. Its even-keeled handling of the slightly fictionalized youth of the writer/ director doesn’t prevent it from having a few heavy-handed, teachable moments. Most notably, the film is named after a robust vegetable that grandma insists on growing

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

with other Black women who wanted to talk sewing without leaving their identities or politics at the door. “I was looking for other Black women who had values similar to mine, including things like radical self-love, interest in Black liberation, and interest in racial justice,” Woolfork says. The next big step was to organize an in-person event in early 2019: Beach Week, a week of sewing and togetherness in the Outer Banks. About a dozen people came, from as far as Texas and California. “We all came looking for the same thing: a sewing sisterhood,” Woolfork says. They found a profound fellowship—“A friend described it as lightning in a bottle,” says Woolfork—and they emerged with another idea, too: a podcast. Woolfork uploaded the first episode of “Stitch Please” in September 2019. She conceived of it as a space to talk about sewing craft, Black women makers, and social justice, all at once. “There are podcasts about racial justice, womanism, feminism, all of these important practices for freedom and liberation and building a better society,” Woolfork says. “Then there’s podcasts that talk about sewing techniques, sewing celebrities, patterns, fabrics, all of these things. My podcast is the only one that is able to do both.” Anyone who doubts that these topics belong in the same conversation might start to understand after listening to an episode or two. In one show, Woolfork discusses a controversy that arose within the general sewing community in January 2020 when the National Quilt Museum’s Block of the Month program included a free quilt block pattern that showed a pencil erasing the letters “in-” from the word “injustice.” A number of club members complained about this design, refused to participate, or altered the design with words like “Peace” or a picture of Mickey Mouse. As Woolfork puts it on the show, “It’s a revelation of the white fragility and racism that is prevalent in the sewing community.” The mix of topics on “Stitch Please” has turned out to be a very potent brew. In one year, the podcast has seen an 1,100 percent growth in its audience, with 110,000 downloads representing 95 countries. Tobiah Mundt, also a Black maker and the co-owner of The Hive Cville, says she attributes that success to Woolfork’s authenticity. “She’s so real and she’s just herself,” Mundt says. “She’s not trying to be anything but Lisa, and she inspires us to have the courage to be ourselves and to live unapologetically.” Shana Jefferson, a listener and occasional podcast guest who also attended the BWS Beach Week, agrees. “She’s uncompromising,” she says. “She’s been approached to have different sponsors or partnerships, and she takes very deliberate intentional time to think through those. If you’re not there to support Black women, girls, and femmes, she has no problem saying no.” Woolfork says that sewing—an art she’s practiced for 25 years, and traces back through generations of women in her family—is a metaphor for community building. “This was an ancestral craft for African Americans,” she says. “[Community organizing] is a similar energy of transforming and creating and pulling together and binding.”

21


22

CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

Order up! These local establishments are open and waiting to take your order. (Keep in mind that some information is subject to change, and descriptions may not apply, due to current circumstances.) Email living@c-ville.com to add your restaurant to the list. Asian Cuisine

Bakeries

Afghan Kabob Palace Authentic Afghan cuisine. 400 Emmet St. N. 245-0095. $$.

Albemarle Baking Company Get your ABCs of baked goods. 418 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 293-6456. $.

Asian Express Chinese and Japanese with healthy options. 909 W. Main St. 979-1888. $. Bamboo House Korean and Chinese options. 4831 Seminole Trail. 973-9211. $$. Chimm Thai Thai street food. 5th Street Station. 288-1122. $$. Doma Korean Kitchen Korean-style barbecue, kimchi, and more. 701 W. Main St. 202-1956. $. Kanak Indian Kitchen Offering traditional homemade Indian food, plus cocktails to go. 385 Merchant Walk Sq. Ste. 400. 328-2775. $. Lemongrass Vietnam meets Thailand. Veggie options and delivery, too. 104 14th St. NW. 244THAI. $$. Lime Leaf Thai A tad more upscale than the average Thai place. Rio Hill Shopping Center. 245-8884. $$. Maru Korean BBQ & Grill Traditional Korean food with modern additions. 412 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 956-4110. $.

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Milan Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with all the standards; beer and wine available to go. 1817 Emmet St. 984-2828. $$. Mochiko Good Hawaiian eats (and suggested Hawaiian beer pairings, too). The Yard at 5th Street Station. $. Monsoon Siam Delicious, unpretentious favorites like pad Thai, tom yum noodle soup, and vegetarian dishes. 113 W. Market St. $$. Now & Zen Gourmet Japanese and sushi spot. 202 Second St. NW. 971-1177. $$. Pad Thai Homestyle Thai cooking from an experienced chef. 156 Carlton Rd. 293-4032. $$. Peter Chang China Grill Authentic Sichuan cuisine by a renowned chef. Barracks Road Shopping Center North Wing. 244-9818. $$. Red Lantern Chinese cuisine by the pint or the quart. 221 Carlton Rd. 979-9968. $. Silk Thai Fresh, authentic Thai, plus specials like marinated wings. 2210 Fontaine Ave. 9778424. $$. Tara Thai Serves up affordable Thai faves, with multiple meat, fish, and veggie options. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-9998. $$. Taste of China Chinese favorites on 29N. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 975-6688. $$. Taste of India Indian fare favorites on the mall. 310 E. Main St, Downtown Mall. 984-9944. $$. Ten Upscale second-floor spot serving modern Japanese and offering its popular cocktails for carry-out. 120B E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-6691. $$$.

Bowerbird Bakeshop Pastries, breads, and cookies using locally sourced ingredients, delivered right to your doorstep. 120 10th St. NW, bowerbirdbakeshop.com. $ Gearharts Fine Chocolates Freshly baked pastries, cakes, cookies, and brownies—plus chocolates! 243 Ridge McIntire Rd. 972-9100. $. Glaze Burger and Donut Housemade donuts, coffee, milkshakes, plus burgers and vegan options. 1001 W Main St. 284-5465. $.

Texas Roadhouse Steaks, ribs, and fromscratch sides. Albemarle Square. 973-4700. $$. Timberwood Grill All-American eatery and after-work watering hole. 3311 Worth Crossing, 975-3311. $$. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery Locally sourced, beer-infused dishes including Southern classics and a kids menu. 520 Second St. SE. 956-3141. $$. The Whiskey Jar Saloon-style Southern spot with, naturally, more than 90 varieties of whiskey (get some in a cocktail to go). 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549. $$. Whistlestop Grill Southern comfort foods in Crozet. 1200 Crozet Ave. 823-9000. $.

Moe’s Original BBQ Alabama-style pulled pork smoked in-house. 2119 Ivy Rd., 244-7427; 200 W. Water St., 202-2288. $. Moose’s by the Creek American favorites, plus mounted moose antlers for photo ops. 1710 Monticello Rd. 977-4150. $. Riverside Lunch Popular joint known for smashburgers. 1429 Hazel St. 971-3546. $. Royalty Eats Soul food goodness including Chicken & Waffles, ribs, and specialties like teriyaki salmon. 820 Cherry Ave. $ Wayside Takeout & Catering Famous Ole Virginia fried chicken and barbecue sandwiches. 2203 Jefferson Park Ave. 977-5000. $. Wild Wing Café Classic wings and beer. 820 W. Main St. 979-WING. $$.

Great Harvest Bread Company Sandwiches, sweets, and bread baked from scratch every day. McIntire Plaza. 202-7813. $.

Breakfast Joints

MarieBette Café & Bakery French pastries for breakfast, more pastries for lunch. 700 Rose Hill Dr. 529-6118. $.

Farm Bell Kitchen New-Southern cuisine with local farm-to-table ingredients. 1209 W. Main St. 205-1538. $$.

Coffee Places with Kitchens

Paradox Pastry Known for the biscuits, European pastry, and the legendary DMB cookies and brownies. 313 Second St. SE #103. 245-2453. $.

First Watch Breakfast, brunch, and lunch chain with locally grown ingredients. 1114B Emmet St. N. 202-5383. $$.

Baine’s Books & Coffee Wide selection of coffee, tea, pastries, and paninis. 485 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-3577. $.

Petite MarieBette MarieBette’s little sister. 105 E. Water St. 284-8903. $.

Villa Diner Mainstay with housemade pancakes, biscuits, roast turkey, soups, sides, and salad dressings. 1250 Emmet St. N. 296-9977. $.

Belle Coffee & Wine Breakfast and lunch sandwiches. Free kids meals with adult meals. 9964919. $$.

The Pie Chest Homemade breakfast and hand pies, plus by-the-slice options (for those who can’t decide). 119 Fourth St. NE., 977-0443; 1518 E. High St., 984-0555. $. Quality Pie In the former Spudnuts spot, exMas tapas chef Tomas Rahal serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 309 Avon St. 284-5120. $$. Sliced. cake bar Mobile bakery offering whole cakes, cake flights, cake pops, and buttercream shots, for delivery or curbside pickup. 242-5501. $.

Bars and Grills Alamo Drafthouse Burgers, pizzas, salads, snacks and desserts prepared fresh from locally sourced ingredients. Served in the cafe or while you watch a movie. 5th Street Station. 326-5056. $. Beer Run Massive tap and packaged beer offerings, killer nachos, three meals daily. 156 Carlton Rd., 984-2337. $$. Fardowners Restaurant Local ingredients liven up pub fare like sliders and sandwiches. 5773 The Square, Crozet. 823-1300. $$. Firefly Craft beer, burgers, salads, vegetarianfriendly menu. 1304 E. Market St. 202-1050. $. Matchbox Restaurant Wood-fired pizzas, salads, salmon & steak dinners, gourmet burgers and a happy hour M-F from 3-6. 2055 Bond St., 284-8874. $$.

Murphy’s Coffee & Bagel House Breakfast spot serves delicious coffee and freshly baked New York bagels. 26 Buck Dr. 939-6033. $$.

Burgers, BBQ, Dogs and Diners Ace Biscuit & Barbecue Breakfast and lunch spot with BBQ and soul food by the biscuit. 600 Concord Ave. 202-1403. $. Blue Moon Diner Beloved local diner serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner options like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and BLTs. 600 W. Main St. 980-6666. $$ Burger Bach New Zealand-inspired gastropub. The Shops at Stonefield. 328-2812. $$. Cavalier Diner Breakfast all day, traditional diner fare, and Greek food. 1403 N. Emmet St. 977-1619. $ Doodle’s Diner Country cookin’ from breakfast to burgers. 1305 Long St. 295-7550. $. Five Guys Two locations for local carnivores. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 975-GUYS; Hollymead Town Center, 963-GUYS. $. Fox’s Café Daily specials, burgers, dogs, and dinners. 403 Avon St. 293-2844. $. Lazy Parrot Backyard BBQ The Lazy Parrot Grill’s sister restaurant. Pantops Shopping Center. 244-0723. $$.

Peloton Station Cycle-centric tavern and bike shop. 114 10th St. NW. 284-7786. $$.

Luv’n Oven Gizzards, livers, fries, and shakes. 162 Village Sq., Scottsville. 286-3828. $.

Thai ’99 II Thai noodle and rice dishes, curries, and stir frys in an inspired interior. Gardens Shopping Center. 964-1212. $.

Sedona Taphouse Lots of craft beers (and sangria to go) and an all-American menu. 1035 Millmont St. 296-2337. $$.

Martin’s Grill Delicious hamburgers, veggie burgers, and fries. Forest Lakes Shopping Center. 974-9955. $.

Thai Cuisine & Noodle House Traditional Thai food, noodle dishes, and vegetarian specials. 2005 Commonwealth Dr. 974-1326. $$.

Selvedge Brewing New brewery in The Wool Factory serves elevated bar fare from Chef Tucker Yoder. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $$.

Mel’s Café Southern soul-soothing food. A longtime favorite on West Main. 719 W. Main St. 971-8819. $.

VuNoodles Fresh, vegetarian Vietnamese noodles, pho, bahn mi, and more. 111 E. Water St. 465-1267. $.

TCO 2go Specialty sandwiches like pulled pork and fried fish from The Catering Outfit in a drive-thru. 221 Carlton Rd. 951-4699. $$.

Mission BBQ Pulled turkey, pork, and chicken, plus racks by the bone. The Shops at Stonefield. 260-7740. $.

C’ville Coffee & Wine Full menu of coffee, sandwiches, and wines. 1301 Harris St. 8172633. $. Greenberry’s Java and specialty drinks, fresh baked goods. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-0200. $. Milli Coffee Roasters Espresso drinks, chai, hot chocolate, light fare, wine. 400 Preston Ave, Suite 150. 270-9706. $. Whole bean delivery available. $ The Workshop A coffee and wine shop featuring Grit Coffee and pastries from Cou Cou Rachou, located in The Wool Factory. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $.

Family-Friendly Ann’s Family Restaurant Good old country cooking. 1170 Thomas Nelson Hwy. (Rte. 29, south of Lovingston). 263-8110. $. The Light Well Coffee-kitchen-tavern serves healthy ingredients in original recipes. 110 E. Main St., Orange. (540) 661-0004. $. Michie Tavern Traditional Southern lunch from an 18th-century tavern. 683 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy. 977-1234. $$.

Frozen Treats Chaps More than 20 years of gourmet homemade ice cream. Diner fare including breakfast and burgers. 223 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4139. $. Corner Juice UVA alum-owned juice spot with cold-pressed options. 1509 University Ave. $. Kirt’s Homemade Ice Cream Ice cream made fresh in the store. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 202-0306. $. La Flor Michoacana Homemade paletas (popsicles), ice cream, and ice cream cakes, plus other sweet treats. 601A Cherry Ave. 984-1603 $.


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Smoothie King Chain features smoothies, supplements, and healthy snacks. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 295-8502; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center, 975-5464. $.

Gourmet Groceries and Gas Stations Batesville Market Sandwiches to order, salads, and baked goods plus cheeses, produce, and packaged goods. 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. $. Bellair Market Gourmet sandwich spot on Ivy Road. 2401 Ivy Rd. 971-6608. $. Blue Ridge Bottle Shop Craft beer store with both bottles and growlers available—plus sample before you buy! 2025 Library Ave, Crozet. 602-2337. $. Brownsville Market Breakfast starting at 5am, plus burgers, sides, and famous fried chicken. 5995 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. 823-5251. $. Feast! Nationally noted cheese, wine, and specialty food shop. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 244-7800. $$.

Crozet Pizza Unpretentious, family-owned pizza parlor with nationally recognized pies. 5794 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet, 823-2132; 20 Elliewood Ave. 202-1046. $. Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie Pizza joint in the Crossroads mini-mall. 4916 Plank Rd., on 29S at North Garden. 245-0000. $$. Fabio’s New York Pizza Pizza, subs, salads, and calzones made by natives of Naples. Get your pie the Sicilian way. 1551 E. High St. 8720070. $. Fellini’s #9 A local landmark featuring Italian favorites plus some inventive new takes. 200 W. Market St. 979-4279. $$. Lampo Authentic Neapolitan pizzeria in Belmont. 205 Monticello Rd. 282-0607. $. Luce Literal hole in the wall serving fresh, handmade pasta to go. 110 Second St. NW. $$. Mellow Mushroom Trippy-themed franchise, with great pizza and even better beer selection. 1321 W. Main St. 972-9366. $. Red Pump Kitchen Tuscan-inspired restaurant. 401 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-6040. $$.

Foods of All Nations Sandwiches, deli, and salads at this gourmet grocery. 2121 Ivy Rd. 296-6131. $.

Tavola Rustic Italian with housemade pastas, craft cocktails, and a Wine Spectator awardwinning list. 826 Hinton Ave. 972-9463. $$.

Greenwood Gourmet Grocery Made-to-order sandwiches, fresh soup, and a deli with macn-cheese, bread pudding, and rotating dishes. 6701 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. (540) 4566431. $.

Vita Nova Creative ingredients on hearty pizza by the slice. 310 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-0162. $.

Hunt Country Market A rotating menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus wine offerings. Call to order. 2048 Garth Rd. 296-1648. $. Integral Yoga Natural Foods All-natural food, organic produce, supplements, plus a deli and juice/ smoothie bar. 923 Preston Ave. 293-4111. $. J.M. Stock Provisions Whole-animal butcher shop with sandwiches to go, great craft beer selection, and nicely curated wine selection. 709 W. Main St. 244-2480. $$.

Market Street Café Gourmet breakfast, rotisserie chicken, and deli meats. 1111 E. Rio Rd. 964-1185. $. Market Street Market Deli in the downtown grocery serves sandwiches and prepared foods. 400 E. Market St. 293-3478. $. Market Street Wine An expertly curated selection. 305 Rivanna Plaza Dr., Suite 102, 9649463; 311 E. Market St., 979-9463. $$. Mill Creek Market The Southern sister of Bellair Market. Avon Street, across from the Southside Shopping Center. 817-1570. $. Trader Joe’s This grocery chain boasts top quality at low cost, including “Two Buck Chuck” wine (which is actually $3.50). The Shops at Stonefield. 974-1466. $$.

Wyant’s Store Country-store fare like coffee and donuts, with daily specials and a great (cheap!) cheeseburger. 4696 Garth Rd., Crozet. 823-7299. $.

Italian and Pizza Belmont Pizza and Pub Fresh, stone-baked pizza on hand-tossed pies. Beer, too! 211 Carlton Rd., Suite 10. 977-1970. $. Christian’s Pizza The place to get fresh pies, by-the-slice or the whole darn thing. 118 W. Main St., Downtown Mall, 977-9688; 100 14th St. NW, 872-0436; 3440 Seminole Trail, 9737280. $. College Inn Late-night goodness. Pizza, gyros, subs, and its delivery can’t be beat. Breakfast items, too. 1511 University Ave. 977-2710. $.

Latin American Al Carbon Chicken prepared in an Indigenous Mexican coal-fire, flame-roasted rotisserie manner, plus sides like fried yucca and fried plantains. 1875 Seminole Trail. 964-1052. $. Brazos Tacos Austin, Texas-style breakfast, lunch, early dinner, and brunch tacos. 925 Second St. SE. 984-1163. $. The Bebedero Upscale authentic Mexican, plus cocktails and made-to-order guac. Order from sister restaurants Revolutionary Soup and The Whiskey Jar and pick up food from all three, at once. 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2343763. $$. Chipotle Simple menu of made-to-order burritos and tacos. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 8720212; 2040 Abbey Rd. Suite 101, 984-1512. $.

Mediterranean Aromas Café Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. Sandwiches, salads, and famous falafel. 900 Natural Resources Dr. 244-2486. $. Basil Mediterranean Bistro Mediterranean fare from grape leaves to tapas, plus wine. 109 14th St., 977-5700; 5th Street Station, 202-7594. $. Cava Fast-casual Mediterranean with lots of vegetarian options. 1200 Emmet St. N, #110. 227-4800. $. Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar Dishes from Spain to Greece and wines of the world. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 975-6796. $$. Sticks Kebob Shop Everything tastes better on a stick! 917 Preston Ave. 295-5262; 1820 Abbey Rd. 295-5212. $.

Little Star Spanish- and Mexican-inspired food expertly prepared in a wood-fired oven. Great craft cocktails, too. 420 W. Main St. 252-2502. $$. Mas Spanish tapas and wines in the heart of Belmont. 904 Monticello Rd. 979-0990. $$.

Revolutionary Soup Choose from a slew of enticing soups made daily. 108 Second St., Downtown Mall. 979-9988. $. Roots Natural Kitchen Fast-casual salad and grain bowls. 1329 W. Main St. 529-6229. $.

Steaks and Seafood

Miscellaneous Nationalities Bang! Tapas Asian fusion cuisine served tapasstyle. 213 Second St. SW. 984-2264 $$. Bizou Playful French-American bistro with a beloved meatloaf dish. 119 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-1818. $$. Mahana Fresh Tropical themed, fun flavored ingredients in bowls and sweets. 2142 Barracks Rd. 284-5846 $. Pearl Island Caribbean-inspired lunch spot in the Jefferson School City Center. 233 Fourth St. NW. 466-0092. $. The Shebeen Pub and Braai Conjures the South African veldt. Vinegar Hill Shopping Center. 296-3185. $$. Sticks A fast-food alternative: kebobs (veggie options available), sides, salads, desserts. Preston Plaza, 295-5262; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center. 295-5212. $.

Baggby’s Gourmet Sandwiches Satisfying sandwiches, salads, soups, and super-friendly service. 512 E Main St. Downtown Mall. 9841862 $.

La Michoacana Mexican deli serves budgetfriendly burritos, tacos, and enchiladas. 1138 E. High St., 409-9941; 2291 Seminole Ln., 9564299. $.

Panera Bread Co. Ubiquitous chain with casual fare. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 2456192; Hollymead Town Center, 973-5264; Fifth Street Station, 973-5264. $.

Thyme & Co. Traditional Lebanese flatbreads and salads. 104 14th St. NW, Suite 2. 282-2436. $.

Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Fresh, handmade, Bajastyle Mexican food. 435 Merchant Walk Sq., Suite 600. 214-0500. $.

Junction Innovative Southwestern cuisine with locally sourced ingredients in Belmont. 421 Monticello Rd. 465-6131. $$.

Kitchenette Sandwich Shop From meatloaf with cheddar and jalapenos to tofu Reubens, these sammies satisfy. 920 91/2 St. NE. 2607687. $

Which Wich Superior Sandwiches Create your own sandwiches by marking up the pre-printed brown bags. Hollymead Town Center. 977-9424. $.

Soups, Salads, Sandwiches

Guajiros Miami Eatery Food inspired by the everyday meals of Miami, with strong Cuban influence as well as Central and Southern American dishes. 1871 Seminole Trail. 465-2108. $

Jimmy John’s Low-cost sandwiches on 29N. “Freaky fast” delivery. 1650 E. Rio Rd. 9752100. $.

Sultan Kebab Authentic Turkish cuisine with plenty of meat and vegetarian options, and notable appetizers, too. 333 Second St. SE, 9810090. $.

Continental Divide Charlottesville’s favorite hole-in-the-wall spot has delicious tacos and enchiladas. 811 W. Main St. 984-0143. $$.

Guadalajara Family-run Mexican food celebrating 30 years. 805 E. Market St., 977-2676; 395 Greenbrier Dr., 978-4313; 2206 Fontaine Ave., 979-2424; 108 Town Country Ln., 293-3538; 3450 Seminole Trail, 977-2677. $.

Jersey Mike’s Subs Subs from Jersey. 2040 Abbey Rd. #104, 529-6278; 5th Street Station, 328-8694. $.

Bodo’s Bagels Still the king of bagels. Drivethru available at 1418 N. Emmet St., 977-9598; 505 Preston Ave., 293-5224; and outside service at 1609 University Ave., 293-6021. $. Chopt Creative salad chain with ingredients from local purveyors. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 328-8092. $. Citizen Bowl Shop Specialty salads with gluten-free, vegetarian, and paleo-friendly options. Also now selling groceries like yeast, flour, and brownie mix, plus gloves and toilet paper. 223 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 234-3662. $. Durty Nelly’s Down-home pub and deli now offering five subs (except the Dagwood) for $35. 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. $. HotCakes Fancy sandwiches, housemade entrées, and desserts. Delivery available. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 295-6037. $. Iron Paffles & Coffee Pastry dough + waffle iron + savory or sweet insides. 214 W. Water St. 806-3800. $.

Bonefish Grill Sister to mega-popular Outback Steakhouse featuring seafood, grilled non-fish specialties. Hollymead Town Center. 975-3474. $$. Outback Steakhouse Bloomin’ onions and giant steaks. 1101 Seminole Trail. 975-4329. $$. Public Fish & Oyster Simply prepared, responsibly sourced seafood. 513 W. Main St., 995-5542. $$.

Upscale Casual C&O Serving up a three-course $68 prix fixe menu. 515 E. Water St. 971-7044. $$$. Fig Bistro & Bar Mediterranean and New Orleans-inspired dishes with housemade ingredients. 1331 W. Main St. 995-5047. $. Hamiltons’ at First & Main Contemporary American cuisine in the heart of downtown C’ville. 110 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2956649. $$$. Ivy Inn Offering Fine dining in a charming tollhouse. 2244 Old Ivy Rd. 977-1222. $$$. The Local Belmont neighborhood spot featuring comfort favorites. 824 Hinton Ave. 9849749. $$. Maya Upscale Southern cuisine. 633 W. Main St. 979-6292. $$. The Melting Pot Fondue fun for all. 501 E. Water St. 244-3463. $$$. The Mill Room AAA, four-diamond eatery at The Boar’s Head, 200 Ednam Dr. 972-2230. $$$. Oakhart Social Seasonal, creative modern American food for sharing. 511 W. Main St. 995-5449. $$. Oakhurst Inn Coffee & Café Southern style breakfast and lunch. 1616 Jefferson Park Ave. 872-0100. $. Restoration Great views and delicious food, ranging from fried green tomatoes and burgers to crab cakes and pasta. 5494 Golf Dr., Crozet. 823-1841. $$. Southern Crescent Cajun and Creole fare in Belmont. 814 Hinton Ave. 284-5101. $$. Wayland’s Crossing Tavern Pub food, vegetarian plates, and kid-friendly fare. 1015 Heathercroft Cir., Crozet. 205-4669. $$. Zocalo Flavorful, high-end, Latin-inspired cuisine. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4944. $$.

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Anna’s Pizza No. 5 In the family for 35 years. 115 Maury Ave. 295-7500. $.

Vocelli Pizza Pizza, pasta, panini, salads, and stromboli plus antipasti. Woodbrook Shopping Center. 977-4992. $.

Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine & Café Healthy, authentic Mexican cuisine. 112 W. Main St., Suite 6. 979-0212. $.

Jack’s Shop Kitchen Farm-to-table brunch, lunch, and supper spot with elevated classics. 14843 Spotswood Trail, Ruckersville. 939-9239. $$.

@cville_culture

Whole Foods Market Fresh, all-natural sandwiches ranging from classic favorites to vegan delights. 1797 Hydraulic Rd. 973-4900. $$.

Vivace Every kind of pasta imaginable, plus seafood. 2244 Ivy Rd. 979-0994. $$.

Qdoba Mexican Grill Spicy burritos, quesadillas, and Mexican salads made before your eyes. 3918 Lenox Ave. 244-5641. $.

Ivy Provisions Local deli and retail food shop offering fresh, housemade breakfast and lunch all day, plus wine and craft beer by the bottle and on draft. 2206 Ivy Rd. 202-1308. $.

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

Keevil & Keevil Grocery and Kitchen Belmont grocery with breakfast and lunch sammies, plus takeaway dinners. 703 Hinton Ave. 989-7648. $.

Vinny’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria This regional chain has pies plus a slew of subs, pastas, and stromboli. Hollymead Town Center. 973-4055. $$.

Morsel Compass Popular food truck’s brickand-mortar spot. 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. 989-1569. $$.


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THE

WINE

DOWN WHAT’S DELISH AT LOCAL WINERIES?

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD 2018 Merlot With a rounded nose, this Merlot’s bouquet includes roses and rich red fruit. Balanced with the perfect amount of acidity and tannin structure, you’ll find this merlot to taste of raspberries, red pepper jam, and just a hint of Earth. Perfect to enjoy with a variety of wintery dishes! We are open 7 days a week 11am to 5pm, offering curbside pickup and for those visiting we have bottle sales only Monday through Thursday and Friday through Sunday offer wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights (four 2 oz pours). The following areas are available for customers: outside tables, deck off tasting room and wellspaced seating inside our Pavilion. Groups greater than 10 not permitted. We ask that customers refrain from moving inside and outside tables. Children and Pets are welcome but pets must remain outside of buildings. Customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs, blankets and glassware. Please note that we cannot pour into glassware brought from home. Please follow entrance and exit signs when coming into the tasting room to purchase wine. Restrooms are available in tasting room and pavilion, one patron at a time. Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our Covid operating procedures. Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm 13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

CAVE RIDGE VINEYARDS 2017 Red Silk

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100% Cabernet Franc, red silk was aged for three years in oak, and is finally released! With heavy notes of black and red peppercorn, the wine is balanced with deep dark fruit such as black raspberry and plum. Pair this with a seasoned filet, roasted boar, or a heavy bodied cigar around a fireplace!

WINERY

@cville_culture

CAVE RIDGE VINEYARD

29

Guide Map MADISON

33 HARRISONBURG

15

STANARDSVILLE

ORANGE

81

340

Open Sun-Fri 12 – 6 pm; Sat 12 – 7 pm

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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1476 Conicville Rd • Mt Jackson, VA 22842 www.caveridge.com 540.477.2585

GORDONSVILLE

33 CROZET AFTON

64

Cave Ridge Vineyard is open yearround, seven days a week, except for Thanksgiving and Christmas. We have a large pavilion area, courtyard, decks, and many grassy areas to spread out. At this time there is no indoor seating available, outside only. For the cooler days, we have added heaters and fire tables for guests to cozy up to while enjoying a glass of one of our many wines, or even our seasonally featured Mulled Wine. Join us for live music every Saturday and be sure to visit our website or our Facebook page for up-to-date information and event announcements. COMING SOON: Igloos and a Bistro Menu! Masks are required when entering the building or when interacting with staff.

KESWICK VINEYARDS LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE

EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

ZION CROSSROADS

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD 64

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY Raspberry Rosé With notes of melon, honey, and

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raspberry on the nose, the Tall Tails Raspberry Rosé is refreshingly acidic, light-bodied, and lightly-sweet, with a subtly tart finish. Our raspberry rosé is a blend of Virginia merlot and estate-grown

and hand-picked raspberries. Enjoy a glass with a box of Macarons from Bowerbird Bakeshop in the Tasting Room from February 5-14 to celebrate Valentine’s & Galentine’s Day or pick up curbside from the winery. Orders can be placed on our website or over the phone. We are delighted to announce that the Barn, home to our indoor Tasting Room, will open on Friday, February 5th. While there is ample space for social distancing, out of an abundance of caution, we are currently offering only three reservations per time slot. Please visit our website or phone the winery for availability or to make a reservation. February Happenings: Make your reservations for Valentine’s and Galentine’s Day celebrations (February 5-7 and Feb 12-14). Valentine’s Day card making supplies are available for reservations in the Tasting Room and to take away if you order a Valentine’s or Galentine’s Day Box! Sweet and savory treats are available to preorder via our website. For kids: Card making supplies and Shirley Temples! Open Fri (4-8:30 pm); Sat (12-7 pm); Sun (12-4:30 pm). Please make reservations on our website or by phone. 2531 Scottsville Rd. • Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

KESWICK VINEYARDS 2019 Rose Estate Reserve 100% estate grown Touriga, this rose has a pale, slightly salmon hue. The nose is dry and bright, showcasing initial aromas of citrus, stone fruit and wet stone, but turning to more red fruit with warmth and aeration. The palate has a beautiful entry with the acidity keeping the fruit forward flavors in check. The finish is medium and bright. Additional flavors of baking spice, red apply skin and tart red fruits start coming out with time in the glass. We recommend serving the wine quite chilled and allowing it to warm up naturally in your glass to experience the complexity of the wine. Food pairings include pork dishes, roasted chicken and plank baked salmon. Winter Hours We look forward to continuing to serve all of our wonderful guests this winter during our daily hours of 10am-5pm. There are three options for visiting the vineyard. On Saturdays: reserved table seating (for groups of 6 or less people) under our beautiful, clear-top heated tent in 2-hour blocks (Fee $20). Everyday: first come, first served seating at our outdoor courtyard tables or open seating for those who wish to bring their own blankets and chairs to spread out in our designated lawn area. Please remember face masks are required for all guests ages 5+ when not seated. Wine is available by the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of pre-packaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase. 1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

FIND THE WINE-DOWN ONLINE AT www.c-ville.com


25

The local authority Love is in the air Q&A

What’s the last text you sent? Send your answers to question @c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram

We’re looking for a freelance graphic designer who can step in and help out with newspaper production in times of need. Must be ready to learn on the job and generate and execute creative ideas on the go! See the full job listing at c-ville.com/work-at-c-ville.

Online all the time Make c-ville.com your go-to website for breaking news and trending topics. It’s where you’ll find all of our stories from the newspaper and magazines, as well as web-only exclusives—videos, photo galleries, playlists and more. Social scene Connect with us on social media to stay up-to-date on news and events as they happen in real time. Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: Community news: @cville_weekly Arts and living: @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

On a love train

We're on board for this Staunton wedding PAGE 62

Love is

patient, love is kind Six couples (finally) get their big day

What you were reading The top five stories on our website last week: 1. ‘They were trying to kill me’: Charlottesville police accused of profiling, assault of Black resident 2. Pressing on: In a pandemic-shattered economy, local journalism searches for a way forward 3. Shots that satisfy: Amidst the pandemic, local food still shines on Instagram 4. Feline fine: A toast to my pandemic pal 5. In brief: Affordable apartments denied, vaccine clinic opened, and more

This is our town.

.com

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For your complete guide to can’tmiss events (and to submit your own!), visit events.c-ville.com.

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What to do?

alternative voice for everything happening in our city, is your source for news that affects your life. We cover the arts, music, food and community topics you need to know. We’ll tell you where to go, what to see, what to do, what to eat. This is our town—live it up.

Cheek to cheek

A two-person dance floor (what a romantic idea!)

S P R I N G 2 02 1

In addition to plenty of tips and ideas from area couples who’ve already said “I do,” the spring issue of Weddings offers up suggestions for holding a microwedding; where to find vintage accessories; and a list of local LGBTQ-friendly wedding vendors. You’ll also get the scoop on new wedding trends, pre-ceremony spa treatments, an industrial-chic venue, and a two-person dance floor. Plus, we take you inside six to-die-for weddings, all with romance, beauty, and real-life inspo to spare. On stands now!

C-VILLE Weekly, the

A guide to vintage

Charlottesville's best spots for your 'something old'

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

Seeking designer

Small packages

A planner advises: how to hold a microwedding


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CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


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CROSSWORD

Arson BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. Hollywood’s Hayek 6. Tiny hairs 11. Inspiration for Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” 14. “Rumor has it ...” 15. Literally, “singing place” 16. Debtor’s note 17. Photographer’s bane ... or a good clue for 36-Across 19. Dad ____ 20. Surveyor’s calculation 21. Microscope part 22. Passion ... or a good clue for 36-Across 28. One trading dollars for quarters 29. Manet who painted “Olympia” 31. 2010 Emma Stone comedy set in high school 32. “The People’s Court” prop 34. Sch. whose sports fans shout “Geaux Tigers!” 35. Takes evening courses? 36. Answer to the clues given in 17-, 22-, 44and 50-Across 37. Diminish 38. Depot: Abbr. 39. It’s worth 8 points in Scrabble 40. “____ Subsequent Moviefilm” (2020 mockumentary) 41. TV Guide info 43. Mailed 44. Stealing from a coworker, e.g. ... or a good clue for 36-Across 47. Bit of ancient script 48. Not an orig.

#3

2

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49. “Solve for x” subj. 50. Result of a jealous rage, say ... or a good clue for 36-Across 57. Fighting a fever, say 58. Fill in, as a lawn bare spot 59. City where LeBron James opened the I Promise School 60. The Bronx Bombers, on scoreboards 61. Potato ____ 62. “I’m telling the truth!”


28

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By Rob Brezsny

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): “To heal is to touch with love that which was previously touched by fear,” wrote author Stephen Levine. I propose you make this theme a keynote for your best relationships in the coming days. What can you do to alleviate the anxiety and agitation of the people you care for? How might they do the same for you? If you play along with the cosmic rhythms, you will have extraordinary power to chase away fear with love.

Aries (March 21-April 19): Author Anton Chekhov made a radical proposal: “Perhaps the feelings we experience when we are in love represent a normal state. Being in love shows people who they should be.” In accordance with astrological potentials, my beloved Aries darling, I invite you to act as if Chekhov’s proposal was absolutely true for at least the next two weeks. Be animated by a generous lust for life. Assume that your intelligence will reach a peak as you express excited kindness and affectionate compassion. Be a fount of fond feelings and cheerful empathy and nourishing ardor.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): Poet and filmmaker Jean Cocteau told the following story about Taurus composer Erik Satie. When Satie died, his old friends, many of whom were highly accomplished people, came to visit his apartment. There they discovered that all the letters they had sent him over the years were unopened. Satie had never read them! How sad that he missed out on all that lively exchange. I beg you not to do anything that even remotely resembles such a lack of receptivity during the coming weeks, Taurus. In fact, please do just the opposite: Make yourself as open as possible to engagement and influence. I understand that the pandemic somewhat limits your social interactions. Just do the best you can.

Gemini

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’ve adopted some lines from poet Walt Whitman for you to use in composing a love note. Send it to a person you know and love, or to a person you want to know and love, or a person you will know and love in the future. Here it is: “We are oaks growing in the openings side by side. We are two fishes swimming together. We are two predatory hawks, soaring above and looking down. We are two clouds driving overhead. We are seas mingling, two cheerful waves rolling over each other. We are snow, rain, cold, darkness. We circle and circle till arriving home again, voiding all but freedom and our own joy.” Read them the following words from author Alan Cohen: “Those who love you are not fooled by mistakes you have made or dark images you hold about yourself. They remember your beauty when you feel ugly; your wholeness when you are broken; your innocence when you feel guilty; and your purpose when you are confused.”

Cancer (June 21-July 22): For a while, poet Alfred de Musset was the sexual partner of Cancerian novelist George Sand , also known as Aurore Dupin. He said that after intense love-making sessions, he would fall asleep and wake up to find her sitting at her desk, engrossed in working on her next book. Maybe the erotic exchange inspired her creativity? In accordance with current astrological potentials, I recommend Sand’s approach to you. Vigorous pleasure will coordinate well with hard work. As will deep release with strong focus. As will tender intimacy with clear thinking. (PS: I know your options for pleasure and intimacy may be somewhat limited because of the pandemic. Call on your ingenuity and resourcefulness to work the best magic possible.)

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Leo poet Warsan Shire suggests, “Document the moments you feel most in love with yourself—what you’re wearing, who you’re around, what you’re doing. Recreate and repeat.” This would be an excellent exercise for you to carry out during this Valentine season. You’re in a phase when you’re likely to enhance your lovability and attract extra support simply by intensifying and refining the affectionate compassion you feel and express toward yourself.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I wish the pandemic would give us a short break so we could

celebrate the Valentine season with maximum sensual revelry and extravagant displays of joyful tenderness. I wish we could rip off our masks and forget about social distancing and hug and kiss everyone who wants to be hugged and kissed. But that’s not going to happen. If we hope to be free to indulge in a Lush Love and Lust Festival by Valentine Season in 2022, we’ve got to be cautious and controlled now. And we are all counting on you Virgos to show us how to be as wildly, lyrically romantic as possible while still observing the necessary limitations. That’s your special task.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): Author Raymond Carver wrote, “It ought to make us feel ashamed when we talk like we know what we’re talking about when we talk about love.” That seems like a harsh oversimplification to me. Personally, I think it’s fun and interesting to pretend we know what we’re talking about when we talk about love. And I think that will be especially true for you in the coming weeks. In my astrological opinion, you should be discussing love extensively and boldly and imaginatively. You should redefine what love means to you. You should re-evaluate how you express it and reconfigure the way it works in your life.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I’m turning over this horoscope to psychologist John Welwood. His words are the medicine you need at this juncture in the evolution of intimacy. Study the following quote and interpret it in ways that help illuminate your relationship with togetherness: “A soul connection is a resonance between two people who respond to the essential beauty of each other’s individual natures, behind their facades, and who connect on this deeper level. This kind of

mutual recognition provides the catalyst for a potent alchemy. It is a sacred alliance whose purpose is to help both partners discover and realize their deepest potentials.”

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Transform yourself with the sweetest challenge you can dream up. Give yourself a blessing that will compel you to get smarter and wilder. Dazzle yourself as you dare to graduate from your history. Rile yourself up with a push to become your better self, your best self, your amazingly fulfilled and masterful self. Ask yourself to leap over the threshold of ordinary magic and into the realm of spooky good magic. And if all that works out well, Sagittarius, direct similar energy toward someone you care about. In other words, transform them with the sweetest challenge you can dream up. Dare them to graduate from their history. And so on.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I invite you to compose a message to a person you’d like to be closer to and whom you’re sure would like to be closer to you. Be inspired by what poet Clementine von Radics wrote to the man she was dating, telling him why she thought they could start living together. Here’s her note: “Because you texted me a haiku about the moon when you were drunk. Because you cried at the end of the movie Die Hard on Christmas Eve. Because when I’m sick you bring me fruit, kiss me on the mouth, and hold me even though I’m gross. Because you bring me flowers for no reason but on Valentine’s Day you gave me a bouquet of Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups. Because every time I show you a poem I love you’ve read it already.” Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, 1-877-873-4888.

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(May 21-June 20): On behalf of the cosmic omens, I demand that the important people in your life be reliable and generous toward you in the coming weeks. You can tell them I said so. Tell them that you are doing pretty well, but that in order to transform pretty well into very well, you need them to boost their support and encouragement.

CULTURE FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

29


February 10 – 16, 2021 c-ville.com

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Q&A

31

What would the opening sentence to your romance novel be?

Love may not be what makes the world go ’round, but it sure does make it worth the ride! @LALALALALAFALALALA/INSTAGRAM

He was a distance swimmer.

Forty years and seven children later...

I am your destiny. Look in my eyes and see.

@TARAMLIFE/INSTAGRAM

@NINFAPROFACI/INSTAGRAM

@JMSCOTT5353/INSTAGRAM

Love and loss during the f-ing pandemic.

It was a dark and stormy night.

@MELISSASHIRLEYMILLER/INSTAGRAM

HENRY PAUL HAGENAU JR/EMAIL

I nuzzled my nose in his armpit and suspired his Old Spice Denali.

As the winds blew up from the lowlands, his kilt parted and she gasped.

This is our love story— the way I wrote it.

We were not meant to meet.

HEATHER WALKER/EMAIL

@2BUILDACAMPFIRE/INSTAGRAM

@01010000_01000101/INSTAGRAM

@ERINMCCALLA/INSTAGRAM

I couldn’t have imagined that this is where I’d end up, because nothing about the way I was raised or the society and culture in which I grew up, prepared me for the kind of love I went looking for . . . and found. @ALLIROAD/INSTAGRAM

When she fell on the sidewalk at the resort, he was walking by with a stroller and asked if she needed it. @VINECATXO/INSTAGRAM

And then the world stopped. Might also be the last sentence of the novel.

I saw her from across the room and in that instant I knew my world was about to change.

The school board meeting ended early.

VINNIE REDDEN/FACEBOOK

@ALEXSMITH6617/INSTAGRAM

@KNOTT_KATHERINE/TWITTER

She had always dreamed of owning a small B&B. @ROANOKEBOUTIQUEHOTEL/ INSTAGRAM

Roosters crow as darkness envelopes my mind, my heart beats as massless particles prick and poke the horizon—my mind drifts to the past. @RAMAN.PFAFF/INSTAGRAM

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

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Next week’s question: What’s the last text you sent?


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__ Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: a female child born to Sarah Danielle Calder-Wood v. Sarah Danielle Calder-Wood The object of this suit is to: Terminate the parental rights of The Unknown Father of a female child born to Sarah Danielle Calder-Wood on February 23, 2020. It is ORDERED that the X defendant The Unknown Father, appear at the above-named Court and protect his interests on or before March 23, 2021 at 9:00 a.m. 1/2/2021 DATE

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ESTATE OF VERNELL MARIE SHIFLETT

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C-VILLE Weekly, the alternative voice for everything happening in our city, is your source for news that affects your life. Every Wednesday in print (and every day on c-ville. com), we cover the arts, music, food and community topics you need to know. We’ll tell you where to go, what to see, what to do, what to eat. This is our town—live it up.

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PAGE 62

Love is

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E N T E R TA I N M E N T | H E A LT H & F I T N E S S | F O O D & D R I N K | S H O P P I N G | S E R V I C E S | W E D D I N G S

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WWW.CAAR.COM 35

VOL. 30 NO. 6 n FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

FREE

FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

BY MARILYN PRIBUS

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

A Place to Call Home


FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

36

862 CLUB DRIVE

6255 INDIAN RIDGE ROAD

K E S W I C K , V A | $ 2 ,1 0 0 , 0 0 0

E A R LY S V I L L E , V A | $ 9 9 5 , 0 0 0

Exceptional home built by one of Charlottesville’s top builders, and located the gated community of Keswick Estates. The 4 bed, and 5.5 bath Arts and Crafts style home has all the modern conveniences including a large family room off of the gourmet kitchen, office/library, formal living room, large master, his and hers baths, stunning wood work throughout, coffered ceilings, and elevator. Privately situated on 3 acres, within walking distance to club, and the Pete Dye designed golf course, Full Cry.

In beautiful Amherst County, a private 1,292acre estate with panoramic mountain views. No conservation easement, great potential as family compound/retreat. Brick 1929 manor, open farm fields, hardwood forest and gently rolling topography with streams, ponds, tenant homes and barns.

Architect designed custom home with wonderful proportions and a desirable open floor plan. This single story 3 bedroom and 3.5 bath home boasts 10’ ceilings, oak flooring, coffered ceilings, 8’ doors, gourmet kitchen, great room with wood-burning fireplace, and ADA compliant throughout the whole house. Home also offers a private wing suitable as a two room office / guest suite with separate entrance. Immaculate condition, and very easy to maintain. Convenient to Charlottesville.

J U ST IN W IL E Y | 4 3 4 9 8 1 5 5 28 | M LS 6 0 6 1 3 2

JUSTI N WI LEY | 43 4 98 1 5528 | M L S 6 1 0 1 27

JU ST IN WILE Y | 434 981 552 8 | MLS 608178

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

C H AR LOTTE SVIL L E VA

|

LAUREL CLIFF FARM M O N R O E , VA | $ 5 , 5 0 0, 0 0 0

4 34 293 3900

WILEYPROPERT Y.COM

ORANGE VA

|

5 40 672 3 903

Three exceptional lots in Bundoran Farm! 22 ACRES • BUNDORAN DRIVE

21 ACRES • HIGHTOP DRIVE

42 ACRES • WINSOME ORCHARD LN

N O R T H G A R D E N , VA | $ 4 9 5 , 0 0 0

N O R T H G A R D E N , VA | $ 4 2 5 , 0 0 0

N O R T H G A R D E N , VA | $ 6 1 5 , 0 0 0

Exceptional Bundoran Farm homesite with outstanding views and 15-acre equestrian potential. The elevated homesite looks eastward over rolling pasture to the mountains across Edge Valley. Open market debut for this parcel that boasts direct access to the Farm’s 14-mile trail system. High speed internet, 15 mins to Charlottesville / UVA.

Excellent value in Bundoran. Protected homesite with views across your own horse pasture to the protected forest beyond. Electric and fiber optic to the lot. H7 is designated as an equestrian lot. Owners will have access to 14 miles of riding and hiking trails across 2300 acres of Bundoran Farm. 15 minutes from Charlottesville and UVA.

One of the most spectacular vistas in Bundoran— over the protected Edge Valley to Israel Mountain Range and beyond. Easy access to the Tom Mountain trailhead. Miles of trails, fiber optic internet, complete serenity all within 15 minutes of Charlottesville. Parcel is an equestrian lot which would allow the owner to have horses.

P E T E R W IL E Y | 4 3 4 4 22 20 9 0 | M LS 6 1 0 1 9 6

P ETER WI LEY | 43 4 422 2090 | M L S 6 1 0 3 7 9

PE TE R WILE Y | 434 42 2 2 090 | MLS 6045 34


37

in the sought-after Ragged Mountain neighborhood just 15 minutes west of UVA. 3 acres with winter Blue Ridge views and Ivy Creek along one side. Enjoy having a recreation area in the trees at water’s edge. Builder has a few house plans that can be modified to your liking. 4500 sq ft home and land will cost about $1,295,000.

FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME

EXAMPLE OF BUILDER’S HOME

NEW BARN HOUSE

to be built on 3 acres at the end of a private road. Blue Ridge and large pond views. Land is mostly open with woods on three sides. Enjoy play space, nature and privacy all around. Several customization options are available, including having the exterior siding be stone! 20 minutes to downtown Charlottesville and 5 to Crozet. $1,375,000

5.48 ACRES

of mature hardwoods and lovely privacy in northwest Albemarle. Winter Blue Ridge Mountain views. Slightly elevated lot enjoys a pond view, too. 5 home neighborhood with average value being over $800,000. Well on property produces an outstanding 35 gpm! 15 minutes to shopping, restaurants and more. $185,000.

ALBEMARLE SALES

Jim McVay

Roy Wheeler Realty Associate of the Year 2017, 2018 & 2019 Associate Broker • Charlottesville Realtor since 1978 434-962-3420 • jim@jimmcvay.com Roy Wheeler Realty Co. 1100 Dryden Ln. Charlottesville, VA 22903

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

IN THE LAST THREE MONTHS, JIM SOLD OVER $5 MILLION OF ALBEMARLE COUNTY HOMES.


NOW IS THE TIME TO SELL!

FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

38

UNDER T C CONTRA YS IN 2 DAICE FULL PR

UNDER T C CONTRAAY IN 1 D ICE FULL PR

ROP! PRICE D

1825 WICKHAM PLACE

214 LAMM ROAD

664 DEER DRIVE

Welcome home! Stroll down the sidewalks of Enjoy the picturesque setting from your front this picturesque neighborhood perfectly placed porch over looking your private pond. The first between Charlottesville & Crozet. Enjoy an floor includes the master suite with attached open floorplan with large kitchen overlooking bath &closet. The great room with vaulted ceilthe family room. Separate living room gives ing gives a grand space with open kitchen, tons of flexibility. The morning room is perfect large living room and dining room. The main as a dining room while allowing beautiful nat- floor is completed with a laundry room &home ural light to flood the living space. Go upstairs office/study that could be converted to an adto find your master suite with two additional ditional bedroom. Go upstairs to enjoy two bedrooms. The top floor is finished off with a large bedrooms & full bath. The yard is profeslarge loft and mountain views to use as a home sionally landscaped with beautiful front porch, office, study, or playroom. The basement has a private back deck for entertaining, & there is a huge multi-purpose/rec room with full bath. The custom stone patio with pergola. Several outbig unfinished space has room for a fitness area buildings provide tons of storage and potential and tons of storage. Sit on your back patio to en- including a chicken coup. This home is like livjoy the yard & wooded views. Call now to visit! ing in a postcard. Come see it while it lasts. MLS# 612202 $445,000 MLS# 611595 1544 Sawgrass Ct $425,000 2142 Avinity

Price Drop!

Home sweet home! Situated on a large corner lot with tons of privacy in the wonderful Deer Lake Estates neighborhood. A covered porch welcomes you home. As you enter you’ll find a large, comfortable living room plus separate dining room. The open kitchen with island has plenty of space for multiple cooks and opens to a family room with fireplace. A home office/study/playroom and laundry room complete the first floor. Head upstairs to find four bedrooms including your large master suite with updated master bath and two closets! Don’t miss the cute nook perfect for reading or a desk. The back patio overlooks a beautiful level lawn backing up to trees Sunday 1-3 pm for the added privacy. This well maintained 2808and Magnolia Dr Loop home is move-in ready waiting for you! & tranquility less than 15 minutes from Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhouseMLS# w/mountain 612101Peace $300,000

Under Contract

Complete 1st floor living, lg MBR & BA w/laundry. Hardwoods on main floor. Gourmet kitchen & loft open to LR. Outside patio. $410,000

434.305.0361 paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/575169 pdmcartor@gmail.com

!

2357 Middle River Rd

views! Open floorplan, perfect for entertaining with private patio. $365,000

Downtown! Enjoy this wonderful house on over an

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/575473

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acre with beautiful mature trees. SPECIAL INCENTIVES NOW $469,900 FOR SPRING LISTINGS!

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Under inventory is low and buyers are in the market. If you have thought about selling, now may be the perfect time. Contact me now to explore your options! Come enjoy the peace and tranquility of your own lake front retreat! Single floor living home includes both MB & laundry on the main floor. $240,000

Buyers & Sellers!

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Open House

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Contact me today to find out about our New Listing Program. Let’s get your home

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920 GARDENS BLVD #200 CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22901 WWW.AVENUEREALTYGROUP.COM

4161 Presidents Rd

63 Soapstone Ln

Country living 15 minutes of Downtown & within Albemarle County. This single floor home has beautifully updated kitchen & bathrooms. $260,000

Here’s your chance to live in a 1906 farmhouse with all the style and character while enjoying the conveniences of a modern home. $130,000

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/578197

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/572219

Find Homes Team

LISTED, UNDER CONTRACT & SOLD! paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com REALTORS®

Price Drop!

Make sure you put your prized land in the right hands. Call a Realtor® who has specialized in Farms and Estate Sales for over 20 Years.

$1,249,000 CAARMLS: 597843

6094 Blue Run Rd An oasis in historical Somerset, fashioned after Monticello & Montpelier architecture this beautiful brick mansion is a sight to behold. Placed privately on nearly 100 acres at the mountain's knoll, there's always a breathtaking view. Safe in a conservation easement, the mile long driveway passes a workshop and farm equipment garage with electricity, pole barns, fenced fields, and paddocks with automatic waterers. The 5 car garage has a framed unfinished apartment above which could expand your living space and would be a perfect addition to your own extraordinary AirBnB to get top dollar! Wellmaintained home with gorgeous marble and hardwood floors, wide hallways, cathedral ceilings, elegant living spaces.

Cynthia Hash

Associate Broker & Team Leader

Integrity & Service is Our Motto!

434-337-3216

Each office independently owned & operated. Licensed to sell real estate in the Commonwealth of VA. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this isn't a solicitation.

Real Estate Weekly

CAAR

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Somerset, VA 22972

Find previous and current issues online at caar.com and on c-ville.com!


39

C U O N N D TR E AR C T

FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

NEW YEAR OPPORTUNITIES

• • • • • • • • •

CNOC TIRIM

Private estate with Rivanna River frontage Custom-built, one level brick residence Fantastic gourmet kitchen Hardwood floors and vaulted ceilings Spectacular gardens and pathways Greenhouse and barn 25.35 acres Albemarle County MLS# 609126 $1,185,000

LAKE ANNA

• • • •

189.40 acres Mature hardwoods and planted loblolly pines Trails and a stream with pond possibilities Great access to I-64; convenient to Charlottesville and Richmond Frontage on 2 state roads Current timber value in excess of $600,000 MLS # 612319 $1,195,000

LLANDAFF FARM

HILLTOP HOUSE

• 8 miles South of Charlottesville • Investment Opportunity • 3 Cottages; cell tower • $46,500 per year income • Private setting; beautiful views • 19.80 Acres • MLS# 609461 • $765,000

FREE UNION

• Country elegance • Quality craftmanship; custom built • Main floor master suite • 4,564 sq. ft. finished living space • 10 ft ceilings • (2) 3 car garages • 3,199 sq ft unfinished basement • MLS 611677 • $1,525,000

• Renovated cape cod • Overlooking downtown Scottsville • 4 Bedrooms; 3 Baths • 2,795 finished sq.ft. • Hardwood floors • Basement apartment • MLS# 608408 • $425,000

SOUTH RIVER MEADOWS

• Gorgeous Blue Ridge Mountain views • South River frontage • 40.70 dividable acres • Create your own family compound • Privacy • Mature hardwoods and open pasture • MLS# 600761 • $595,000

C U O N N D TR E AR C T

• Development possibilities • 3,500 +/- linear feet of frontage on Lake Anna • Mix of rolling pasture and hardwoods • Frontage along 2 state roads • “As-Is” farmhouse • 82.91 acres • MLS# 610245 • $2,499,000

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

• • • •

FLUVANNA COUNTY

• Two 4+ acre parcels • Close to town but at the end of quiet country lane • Near Old Lynchburg Road • Rare find in Albemarle • MLS# 611083, 611084 • $94,500, $104,500

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com

SOMERSET, VA

• Two 21 acre parcels • Spectacular Blue Ridge Mountain views • Open pasture • Bold stream • Area of large estates • MLS# 609719, 609720 • $239,500 each!

Steve White

WESTERN ALBEMARLE • Wooded 5 acres • Level building site • Mountain views with clearing • Minutes from Crozet • MLS# 610420 • $164,500

(434) 242-8355

info@stevewhiterealtor.com

1100 Dryden Lane • Charlottesville

28 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

• Two 10 acre parcels • Private location, yet close to Lake Monticello • Privacy and bold stream frontage • 30 minutes to UVA • MLS# 611081, 611082 • $84,500, $144,500

ALBEMARLE COUNTY


40

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

“I

A Place to Call Home

grew up in Albemarle County,” declares Georgia Lindsey, lifelong county resident and REALTOR®. Lindsey is an Associate Broker with the Nest Realty Group in Charlottesville. “I went to Monticello High School and UVA.” She attended graduate school at the University of Georgia and she and her husband headed back to Virginia. “There has been so much growth since I was little,” she says. “It’s interesting to see how much has changed.” Clearly Lindsey is speaking of relatively recent changes, but Albemarle County has seen many others since it was originally created in 1744 from the western reaches of Goochland County. In 1761, the county was carved up to create Buckingham and Amherst Counties and at the same time, the county seat was relocated to Charlottesville from Scottsville. In 1777, a final division lopped off land to create Fluvanna County. Today, Albemarle County is a top destination for homebuyers.

Why Homebuyers Head to Central Virginia “Even before COVID, I was seeing that people were leaving larger metropolitan areas,” observes REALTOR® Jim McVay, Associate Broker with Roy Wheeler Realty

BY MARILYN PRIBUS

Co. “We are a chosen destination for a lot of people and now with COVID, you have to work remotely anyhow. That brings many people to this area.”

“Some buyers are out-of-towners,” he says, “but at the same time there are local residents looking to upgrade and some looking to downsize.”

What People? Where From?

Why Do They Come?

“Well, I see people coming from the D.C. area, but even as far away as California,” he says. “A fair number are coming because of UVA—as employees—and also we see returning alums and those who attended graduate programs and the JAG School.” The JAG School, or Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School is a graduate-level federal service academy located on the UVA grounds. Accredited by the American Bar Association, it serves all our military service branches.

“It’s really hard to separate Charlottesville and the county,” McVay points out. “Albemarle’s proximity to work and the University in Charlottesville is important. There are two major hospitals and The Children’s Hospital in the UVA Health System is especially remarkable. And there are so many activities.” The area, he says, is often on “Top of” lists. A tennis fan himself, he mentions that a tennis magazine recently listed the area as a top place for tennis. The

region is also recognized for running and for races such as the Charlottesville Marathon. Other recognitions have included a top place to visit in the spring as well as a top place to view fall foliage, a top livable place, a top place to retire, a top college town, a top healthy city and more. Along with this, says McVay, entertainment venues such as UVA’s John Paul Jones Arena, the Sprint Pavilion on the Downtown Mall and the historic Paramount Theater draw surprisingly “big” names from the Dalai Lama to the Rolling Stones. The reason for this, the staff at the Paramount Theater explains, is the proximity to large cities like Washington, Norfolk and even Baltimore and Philadelphia. Although our entertainment venues are smaller than in larger cities, being only a couple hundred miles away makes us a relatively nearby place to perform and thus a profitable little side trip on entertainment schedules. Various popular annual events are also on the calendar and bring visitors from a distance and volunteers from the city and Albemarle County. For example, the Tom Tom Festival & Summit, the Festival of the Book and the Virginia Film Festival are big draws. “It’s all about quality of life,” McVay says. “Education, health care, recreational and social activities, all of it. We aren’t a sleepy little Southern community anymore. As a university town with retirees


What Makes Albemarle a Popular Place to Call Home Many areas of Albemarle County actually have “Charlottesville” as their mailing address and county residents enjoy their proximity to the city’s cultural offerings. Historical sites in the county—like Monticello and Highland—add to the charm and are wonderful places to take visitors. Numerous vineyards, breweries, and cideries also welcome visitors. There is convenient shopping in the county. The new Fifth Street Station complex is home to Wegman’s, movies, restaurants, sporting goods, spa treatments, a walk-in medical clinic, and other facilities. Located just off I-64, it’s especially convenient for the southern portions of the county and areas near the Interstate.

“Homebuyers with children ask about the schools,” says REALTOR® McVay. “Our public schools are very good and we have excellent private schools also.” The county’s 15 elementary schools and five middle schools feed into three high schools—Albemarle, Western Albemarle, and Monticello which have regular sports programs and other extracurricular activities. In addition, four “academies” accept high school students from anywhere in the county. These academies have been designed for students who seek to concentrate in specific fields and include Environmental Studies; Health and Medical Sciences; Information and Communication Technology; and Math, Engineering and Science. There is also a Dual Credit program where any high school or homeschool student can concurrently take classes through Piedmont Virginia Community College at a campus location or online. Students earn credits toward college graduation requirements and since these courses are free in this program, it is an excellent money-saving strategy.

Homebuyers’ Big Question: What about housing? “Generally,” says REALTOR® Lindsey, “Albemarle is more affordable than Charlottesville for similar properties and has a great variety both in price ranges and in the type of property. The lots tend to be more spacious, too.” The reason for this, of course, is that with more than 700 square miles, the county has more open area for development while Charlottesville is more likely to see denser new development in the form of apartments and condos. What kind of properties can be found in Albemarle? Large individual homes with acreage. Older developments with mature trees and landscaping. Spanking new town home developments as well as age-restricted developments for those 55 and older. The latter two typically have clubhouses, pools, and fitness centers. (And no yards to tend.) These days, some developments combine townhomes with single-family or duplex dwellings to maximize greenspace. Golf course properties include Glenmore in the east and Old Trail in the west. Some development is on extra-large lots allowing for barns and pastures—often called horse properties. These often include or are adjacent to horse trails. “Just look at the range in the 84 Albemarle County properties that went under contract in just the first three weeks of 2021,” Lindsey says. “Prices ranged from $133,000 for a centrally located condo to

Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

BRAEMAR COURT

One story, custom designed home with unique U-shape and full terrace level. Set on a quiet cul-de-sac. 10’ ceilings on the first floor and 9’ on the terrace level. Beautiful cherry floors. Great room, family room and master bedroom all open to the deck. Stunning kitchen with light cherry cabinets and updated appliances. Large, bright rooms and great storage make this home special. An open staircase leads to the terrace level which offers a family room & office. Fenced yard overlooks the woods. Club options include golf, pool/tennis or social memberships. $675,000

OLD TRAIL DRIVE

Move in Ready! One level living in Old Trail. Energy efficient home with partially finished basement and loads of storage, ready for you to make it home. Looks deceivingly small from the outside yet there is over 5,000 sq.ft. expertly designed to fit a variety of needs. Features include; 6 “ Castilian Walnut floors, large rooms, sizable closets, custom master closet and more. This home is perfect for entertaining, working and learning remotely. Undeniable value at this price. Come visit in person or ask for a virtual tour through FaceTime. Owner is RE agent $626,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

Annie Gould Gallery

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. Offering an assortment of works by local artists as well as those from throughout the country.

109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Residents to the north patronize shops at Hollymead Town Center which is home to Harris Teeter, Wells Fargo, eateries, salons, and shops. The Shops at Stonefield include Trader Joe’s, a number of national businesses, eateries, movie theaters and Costco. Then there are numerous smaller shopping centers, restaurants and shops along Route 29, which is also known by its longtime moniker of Seminole Trail. (Factoid: “Auto trails” were named before they were numbered. In 1928, the Virginia General Assembly gave the Seminole Trail name to the through route from Danville to Warrenton. It was later numbered 29.) With three large regional parks and many smaller neighborhood playgrounds, there’s plenty of chance for recreation. In fact, Albemarle County maintains more than 80 miles of trails in parks and on greenways and what are now dubbed blueways. These are available for walking, running, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, swimming, rafting, and kayaking. Check online for information about nine specific county park trails including printable maps. Four boat launch sites within the county provide river access and there are lakes for canoeing, kayaking, and swimming. For many, the proximity of Shenandoah National Park gives wonderful access to camping, hiking on portions of the Appalachian Trail, or simply enjoying the scenery at the many overlooks of Skyline Drive.

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

FEATURE

GROWTH WILL HAPPEN AND WE WANT IT TO HAPPEN WITHOUT TAKING AWAY THE THINGS THAT MAKE OUR AREA SPECIAL.

41 FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

and others coming here, we have become a broader culture.” Other significant factors: an airport with non-or-one stop flights to many destinations, the AMTRAK station with increasing rail routes, and easy access to I-64 and I-81.


FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

42

2640 NORTH FARMINGTON HEIGHTS

2630 NORTH FARMINGTON HEIGHTS

A must-see! Outstanding house in highly desirable Farmington, overlooking pond & 3rd hole on Farmington Country Club’s East Golf Course.Conveniently located 7 min to UVA, 10 min to Downtown, & close to shopping/dining. This charming traditional home with slate roof has been lovingly updated &maintained. Home offers sweeping views of golf course; gorgeous Sunroom w/ wet bar; dramatic Dining Rm; warm, inviting Family Rm w/ fireplace; & convenient HomeOffice. 5 BR, 3.5 BA & 3 FP. Terrific flow for everyday living & entertaining. Beautifully updated kitchen & baths. Inviting w/o lower level opens to covered porch; couldbe fabulous in-law or nanny suite w/ Game Rm, Kitchenette & lovely BR with en suite BA. MLS# 609182 $1,695,000

Must see in person! One-level living in brick home with incredible potential in Farmington, overlooking pond and 3rd hole on Farmington Country Club’s East Golf Course. Home offers large Living Room and Dining Room with beautiful moldings perfect for entertaining, and enclosed Sun Porch to enjoy the views. Lightfilled, eat-in Kitchen with excellent storage. Walk-out terrace-level offers BR w/ Full Bath, Rec Room w/ FP and wet bar; opens to rear stone patio. Abundant storage on both levels. Attached garage has interior architectural features that could easily convert to finished living space. Conveniently located 7 min to UVA, 10 min to Downtown & close to shopping/dining. 4 BR (3 on main level) 3.5 BA, & 2 FP. MLS# 613359 $1,335,000

5BR | 3.5 BA | 4387 SQ FT | 1.66 AC.

4 BR | 5 BA | 3746 SQ FT | 1.40 AC.

Byrd Abbott ASSOCIATE BROKER, ABR, CRS, GRI, SRES

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

434.242.9600 byrd@byrdabbott.com www.byrdabbott.com

1100 Dryden Lane, Charlottesville, VA 22903

nearly $1.8 million for an estate on close to 75 acres in the northern part of the county. The oldest is a 1792 post-andbeam home with a guest cottage near Scottsville. The newest is a townhome that is still under construction.” In fact, she says, 19 of those 84 contracts are for homes that will be completed in 2021. “This includes at least 11 homes in the Crozet/Old Trail area in the western part of the county” she says, “and there’s lots of construction in new neighborhoods north, south and east of town, too. This really drives home for me (no pun intended!) how building is happening in all areas of the county right now.” She explains that as an area we have limited inventory for people wanting to buy homes here. “We have lots of buyers ready to go,” she says, “so we need builders and building right now. It’s a pretty healthy situation.”

Albemarle County’s Comprehensive Plan The county, she says, is working hard to have a handle on development. “Things are being planned thoughtfully for people who need and want to be in our area for jobs or retirement.” To this end, the Board of Supervisors has developed a Comprehensive Plan, which is a guiding document for longterm plans for land use and resource protection. This plan guides staff, committees and boards and the Board of Supervisors in framing public policies related to private land use and the utili-

zation of resources. It also includes planning for capital improvements such as schools, parks, libraries, and transportation, while guiding environmental and historic resource protection. The county is divided into designated Development Areas which cover about 5 percent of the county and Rural Areas which encompass the remaining 95 percent. The strategy is to focus growth into the Development Areas to create quality

living while avoiding sprawl. In the Rural Areas, the goal is to improve access to services (such as broadband expansion) while protecting the rural way of life. Various areas within the county have individual Community Advisory Committees (CACs) which meet, generally monthly, to provide input and feedback to the county. Each committee has a liaison from the Planning Commission, Board of Supervisors, and County Planning staff.

“Growth will happen,” concludes Lindsey, “and we want it to happen without taking away the things that make our area special.” Lindsey and her family are in Albemarle County to stay. “Our family is here,” she says. “This is what I know. This is what I love. I just want to be here.” Marilyn Pribus and her husband have lived in Albemarle County since 2007 when they moved from California. They live in a singlefamily home in an older development with families of all ages.


43 FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

TO LIVE WELL

FEATURE

Call Today! Christian Liberal Arts & Sciences Pre-K—Grade 12 Day School 434.220.7330 | www.covenantschool.org

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

admissions@covenantschool.org


FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

44

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers TOTIER HILLS FARM

NORTH DOWNTOWN

Colonial Revival style c. 1913 residence restored to perfection. Flexible and updated floor plan with 2,970 finished square feet. Coveted private backyard and off-street parking. Walk to the amenities of the Historic Downtown Mall and UVA. MLS#608794 $1,549,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

AVENTADOR

Magnificent Georgian home with over 10,000 finished square feet, 6 bedrooms, 6 full and 2 half baths, main-level master, eat-in kitchen. Guest home, and 296+ acres with panoramic pastoral and mountain views. MLS#602894 $4,750,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.AventadorVA.com

KESWICK ESTATES

Exquisite English Country home on 2.5 acres. Very private with lovely views of the golf course and distant mountains. The architecturally designed, 7,000+ sf. residence offers LR, DR, gourmet kitchen, library, office, media room, and 5 BR. MLS#611738 $1,650,000 C. Dammann, 434.981.1250

Exquisite brick residence, over 9,000 finished square feet, privately situated on almost 100 acres within 15-20 minutes of Charlottesville. Built circa 2001 of best quality materials with expert craftsmanship and meticulously maintained by current owners. Rolling land invites many agricultural and recreational opportunities. Other improvements include a pond, swimming pool with extensive terraces and pool pavilion, detached garage/shop. MLS#600284 $2,700,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.TotierHillsFarm.com

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville, 14 miles to CHO Airport. 177 private acres with c.1901 classic Virginia farm house, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

ASPIAN LAWN

Gorgeous lake and mountain views from 183 scenic acres within 16 miles of Charlottesville. Circa 1750’s residence, 6 bedrooms, 5 baths, 2 fireplaces and, whole-house generator. Guest cottage, barn, lush pastures, and 11-acre lake. MLS#610431 $1,945,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EDNAM FOREST

A true gem perched on 1.5 private acres! This stately c. 1963 4-BR Georgian is well-located within walking distance to Boar’s Head Inn & Sports Club. Wooded lot, bluestone patios, & nearly level lawn surrounded by beautifully manicured landscaping. MLS#608474 $1,845,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

KESWICK

Enjoy mountain views of the historic Southwest Mountains from this livable 4-BR residence on 6 private acres. Convenient and quick to Pantops, Historic Downtown Mall, and UVA. Within steps of all the amenities at Keswick Hall. MLS#611672 $989,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

VERULAM FARM

Premier country estate on 500+ acres just minutes west of UVA off of prestigious Bloomfield Road. Classic manor home of timeless architecture and design with over 10,000 square feet of living space. Complete renovation with formal and informal living spaces, 10’ ceilings, 5-bedroom suites, center hall and spacious family room and kitchen. Lovely gardens, pool, pool house, 2-bedroom guest cottage, full equestrian facilities, and event barn/business. The farm is surrounded by over 2000 protected acres in green spaces. MLS#597954 Andrew Middleditch, 434.981.1410

SWEET RETREAT

A retreat for all seasons! Enjoy total privacy from this mountain home offering distant Blue Ridge Mountain views across the Rockfish Valley. Sited on 14+ acres, the home offers 4 BR and 4.5 BA. MLS#610115 $995,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.330GraceGlen.com

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


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BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

MILTON VILLAGE

EDNAM

Sophisticated living just seconds from amenities and conveniences of Charlottesville and UVA. Brick residence has gracious main level with inviting entrance hall, large LR with FP, DR, gourmet kitchen with sitting/breakfast area. MLS#606719 $925,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RICHMOND

Nearly two acres in the City of Richmond on desirable Rothesay Circle with potential river views. Open woodland with mature hardwoods and small fields. Minutes from Carytown, James River Park, and downtown. MLS#2031412 $449,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

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21-acre lot minutes east of Charlottesville. Level building site has well already drilled & soils tested for drain field. Fenced with 4-board along road frontage. Creek, small pond, and automatic waterers. Close to public Rivanna River access. MLS#612288 $375,000 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610

BELLAIR

Beautifully constructed, circa 1953 brick home, private 1 acre lot, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, living room, kitchen, dining room, and hardwood floors. Convenient, close-in location minutes west of the city limits. More acreage available. MLS#601140 $595,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

CHURCH POINT FARM

944 acres along the lower Chickahominy River with 8 miles of shoreline. The property consists of marsh, farmland, woods, and cypress swamp and is managed for waterfowl, deer, turkey, and dove. Features 3-BR brick dwelling. MLS#2036779 $3,960,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325 www.churchpointfarm.com

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GARTH ROAD

Foxfield area building lot. This 4.5-acre, nearly level parcel sits at the end of a short, private lane directly across from the main entrance to Foxfield Races. Quiet and private, it is only 8 minutes west of town and in the Western school districts. MLS#613093 $449,500 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

TILMAN ROAD

Lovely mature 2-acre parcel of land in the Meriwether Lewis Elementary School District. Wonderful views with privacy in beautiful rural setting. Great location just minutes west of Charlottesville and UVA. MLS#585959 $249,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

EXCEPTIONAL LARGE ACREAGE

2 wonderful estate parcels in coveted Ragged Mtn. Farm. Excellent building sites, complete privacy, beautiful Blue Ridge Mtn. views. Murray/Henley/ Western Albemarle school districts. 84.79 acres: MLS#563174 $995,000; 100.22 acres: MLS#563171 $1,100,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

KESWICK COUNTRY CLUB

Bordering (Full Cry)Pete Dye golf course and lake, within grounds of Keswick Hall, 5-star luxury resort, is this magnificent 5-bedroom residence constructed of the finest materials with attention to every detail. MLS#603398 $4,200,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.FairwayDriveAtKeswick.com


FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

46

HOME SALES STATS

Life Is A Team Sport. Life Is A Team Sport.

ENDING THE WEEK OF FEBRUARY 7, 2021 THERE WERE 63 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS

n 26 were in Albemarle with an average price of $489,520 n 5 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $731,180 n 10 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $568,256 n 7 were in Greene with an average price of $285,046 n 1 was in Louisa with a price of $479,903 n 1 was in Madison with a price of $489,000 n 4 were in Nelson with an average price of $297,975 n 1 was in Orange with a price of $175,000 n 4 were in Staunton with an average price of $184,375 n 4 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $302,100

HOMES SOLD

You don’t even have to choose sides. You don’t even have to choose sides. But you should try to surround yourself with as much talent as possible on the field...and in your neighborhood. Encouraging and accepting diversity in your community But you should try to surround yourself with as much will promote a greater sense of engagement, better prepare your talent as possible on the field...and in your neighborhood. Enchildren for the global community they will inhabit... couraging and accepting diversity in your community give us all a richer life. To better understand how neighborhood diwill promote a greater sense of engagement, better prepare your versity will benefit you and your family, please log onto children for the global community they will inhabit... www.ARicherLife.org. give us all a richer life. To better understand how neighborhood di-

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act

versity will benefit you and your family, please log onto www.ARicherLife.org.

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act

THE 714 ACORN LANE PEACOCK HILL

1614 RIALTO STREET VILLAGE OF MOORE’S CREEK

271 TWO RIVERS DRIVE TROY

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

564 PASTURE LANE STANARDSVILLE

629 LAKELAND LANE FABER

LOCAL GOVERNMENT CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

1761 ENGLEWOOD DRIVE STAUNTON

(Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY.

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®.

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered.

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47

Let an agent who knows guide you.

$458,900

RIVANNA VILLAGE

$463,315

Hidden Hills Subdivision

133 BLUE RIDGE DR

$424,900

FEBRUARY 10 - 16, 2021 ISSUE 3006

A DREAM HOME IS GREAT, BUT THE RIGHT ONE IS BETTER. SOLD

Bev Nash

434-981-5560

• 3 or 4 bedrooms, 3 baths • 440 sf garage • 2,372 sq ft plus a finished screen room • Main level master suite and dining room • Granite kitchen counters on white cabinets • Extensive main level floor tile, gas fireplace • Community trails with Glenmore facilities close by

36.59 acres E River Rd

$129,500

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Long Frontage on Rt 6 east • Rolling Wooded Land with Creek • Multiple Home Sites • Future Development Hunting, Recreation • No HOA, No Restrictions • 3 parcels, Frontage on Bryants Ford Rd • MLS 600148 Piney Mountain Subdivision, Palmyra

10+ acre Lots

GOT PLANS? LET’S BUILD!

434.985.0021 410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 Downtown

434-960-0414

• 4 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths, 4,588 Fin. Sq. Ft • New Home to be Built on 4.79 Acres • First Floor Master Suite with attached Garden Bath • 5” Engineered Hardwood Floors on Main Level • 2 Car Garage, Crown & Chair Molding • 10’ x 20’ Morning Room, 2 Zone HVAC

4209 HAWKINS LANE

$535,000

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • Country Living in Convenient Location. • Private Stocked Pond & almost 5 acres in Albemarle County • Main Level Master Suite • Eat In Kitchen w Stainless Appliances • Covered rear deck & Finished Basement • Covered Front Porch w View of your pond & pasture • MLS# 605931

$599,999

Shannon G. Hudson 540.661.2083 • Classic home in a classy neighborhood • 5 bedrooms w/3 masters, 4.5 baths • Landscaped w/brick courtyard & fountain • Partial basement w/1 car garage • Sunroom, FP, built in bookshelves

31 ASHLAWN BLVD

$99,900

Pat Burns

434-465-4444

• OWNER FINANCING considered on this large secluded 21.02 acre parcel with cleared building site on a hill overlooking wooded hillside and small running stream

517 LEXINGTON AVE

$945,000

SALE PENDING

Lori Click

434-326-7593

• Beautiful Lake Monticello Waterfront Property • Location, Location, Location. • 4 Bedrooms, 3 Baths • 102 Feet of Water Frontage, Dock is 53’ x 12’, Kayak Rack • Sunroom - Views From Most of the Windows

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • • • • • • • • •

Quintessential Charlottesville Notable Victorians on Lexington Ave Extensively renovated Redesigned character in all bathrooms, Master suite created on 3rd level Tremendous banquette seating & abundant light Ornate fixtures throughout convey Unique shelves, custom art features & organic tile and Onyx detail. Large level fenced yard

434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Gorgeous NEW 10+ Acre Homesites • No HOA, Common Sense C&Rs, Firefly • Close to the Lake, Dining, Shopping, Schools • Ready to Build? Be in Your New Home Summer 2021 • Your Choice of Remaining Lots - $109,000 • Call for A Personal Tour - MLS 602023

Ruth Guss


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