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THE VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL IS BACK IN THEATERS THIS WEEK

VOL. 30 NO. 43 n OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 WWW.CAAR.COM A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A RLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOC I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA

ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Witch and Wizard Candy Paddle on Lake Monticello Photo by Joyce Foley

Lake Monticello: Resort-Style Living, Great Friends, and Nonstop Trees BY CARLA HUCKABEE

Provocative playwright JEREMY O. HARRIS opens up about his VIRGINIA ROOTS

THROUGH THE LENS OF GORDON PARKS ON THE FRONT LINES OF THE OPIOID CRISIS FAMILY DRAMA DOWN SOUTH

DEPTH of field

McAuliffe hits Charlottesville for star-studded rally PAGE 13

Unite the Right trial kicks off with jury selection PAGE 15

GEN NOW!

A monthly guide to aging gracefully in C’ville PAGE 29

VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL BEGINS TODAY!

MARECHAL AURORE / ABACA VIA ZUMA PRESS

OCTOBER 27 – NOVEMBER 2, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

INSIDE


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BROWN PRESENTS: BROWNCOLLEGE COLLEGEUVAPRESENTS:

HAUNTINGS ON THE HILL 2021

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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SUPPORTING THE CHARLOTTESVILLE CLIMATE COLLABORATIVE

OCTOBER 29TH & 30TH: 7PM-12PM WHERE: MONROE HILL FAMILY HOUR: 7-8PM TICKETS: $5 PER PERSON 252 McCormick Rd., (across from the amphitheater.)

We accept cash and credit cards


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FALL Festival

Charlottesville’s Largest Multi-Vendor Marketplace 1747 ALLIED STREET - NOW OPEN DAILY

OCTOBER 30TH

Charlottesville’s favorite spot for antiques, vintage decor and one-of-a-kind treasures.

1700 Allied St. near 250/McIntire Rd. Interchange.

434.295.5760

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Charlottesville’s favorite spot for antiques, vintage decor and one-of-a-kind treasures.

Charlottesville’s bulk refill and zero waste shop Make the transition to a low-waste lifestyle by refilling your bottles

1700 434.295.5760 Allied St. near 250/McIntire Rd. Interchange. 434.295.5760 www.circainc.com www.circainc.com 10–5:30 • 1–5 Tuesday-Saturday 10-5:30

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MONDAY–SATURDAY

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1700 Allied St. near 250/McIntire Rd. Interchange.

434.295.5760

1700 Allied St. near 250/McIntire Rd. Interchange.

434.295.5760

www.circainc.com

MONDAY–SATURDAY 10–5:30 • SUNDAY 1–5

Charlottesville Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu Judo • Krav Maga • Muay Thai

www.cvillebjj.com • (434) 825-6202

www.gryphon gymnastics.com (434) 284-7364

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www.circainc.com Curated Apparel, Accessories + Gifts. For Every Body, sizes XS to 3X. Preloved, vintage, handmade, upcycled + new.

MONDAY–SATURDAY 10–5:30 • SUNDAY 1–5

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

MONDAY–SATURDAY 10–5:30 • SUNDAY 1–5


October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No. 43

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-817-2749 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

EDITORIAL

FEATURE 19

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

VAFF

Screen time There’s something for everyone at the (in-person!) 2021 Virginia Film Festival. NEWS

11

13 Dave Matthews and Stacey Abrams help get out the C’ville vote.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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13 Thousands of local early voters have cast their ballots. 15 Unite the Right organizers’ trial is finally underway.

Eat up! SWIRL! on wants to Mark Harm we do wine reinvent how

SIP! with apples? What to do gria 4ever Cider and san

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com

CULTURE

33

35 Write On: The best twosentence horror stories. 37 Screens: Our critic’s mustsees at this year’s VAFF.

39 The Working Pour: Autumn wines to fall in love with. 48 Sudoku 49 Crossword 51 Free Will Astrology

Q&A 53 What do you think of the candidates for governor?

CLASSIFIED 54

Real Estate Weekly Page 57

CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Kristin O’Donoghue CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Amelia Delphos, Carol Diggs, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Max March (x16) GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Gabby Kirk (x36) classifieds@c-ville.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Chloe Heimer, Lisa C. Hurdle (x30), DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman (x39) REAL ESTATE WEEKLY Beth Wood (x56) PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson (x25)

TASTE! to satisfy Foodie news ving every cra FALL 2021

BUSINESS PUBLISHER Anna Harrison (x51)

rything.

Taste is eve

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Debbie Miller (x28)

! Just kidding n-up palates, ves for grow Childhood fa —duh—ranch dressing from pizza to

CIRCULATION MANAGER Billy Dempsey (x32)

C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly rella, Melty mozza roni, spicy peppe and a crispy charred crust: What’s not to love about ’s Oakhart Social wood-fired pies?

on Fernando Dizeet takes his strrket food to Ma

A/R SPECIALIST Nanci Winter (x33)

C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle, and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions.

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ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL

THESOUTHERNCVILLE.COM

JEFFERSONTHEATER.COM

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28

FLATLAND CAVALRY

October 30

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SPECIAL HALLOWEEN DRAG BONANZA & COSTUME DANCE PARTY!

A portion of the proceeds will benefit Chris Long Foundation and Waterboys

A N EV ENING W ITH

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29

THE MOUNTAIN GOATS

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 31

ANDY FRASCO & THE U.N.

JUST ANNOUNCED!

SAVED BY THE 90’S

WITH NICK GERLACH’S CULT CONFERENCE

MARCH 15-ON SALE FRIDAY

JUST ANNOUNCED!

JANUARY 22-ON SALE FRIDAY

THE WAY DOWN WANDERERS

FEBRUARY 12-ON SALE FRIDAY

SUSTO

APRIL 4-ON SALE FRIDAY

CAR SEAT HEADREST

SUN JUNE

WITH DAPHNE TUNES

RESCHEDULED

11-03 | CHRIS SMITHER 11-06 | ELBY BRASS + TYLER DICK BAND 11-10 | MURDER BY DEATH 20TH ANNIVERSARY SOLD OUT

APRIL 22, 2022

WITH DAVID WAX MUSEUM (DUO)

WITH SHAWN JAMES

11-06 | DONNA THE BUFFALO 11-10 | CIRCLES AROUND THE SUN 11-12 | SHAKEY GRAVES WITH SUN JUNE SOLD OUT 11-13 | JAKE SHIMABUKURO 11-14 | LETTUCE 11-17 | ANDREW MCMAHON: THE THREE PIANOS TOUR WITH ZAC CLARK 11-20 | DELTA RAE WITH WYN STARKS AND

11-12 | MARTIN SEXTON 11-14 | DELTA MAE WITH DORI FREEMAN 11-16 | WILLIE WATSON WITH VINCENT NEIL EMERSON

11-17 | THE NUDE PARTY

WITH GOOD DOG NIGEL

11-27 | 14 STORIES

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12-03 | DARLINGSIDE 12-07 | SIERRA FERRELL LONG TIME COMING TOUR

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01-30 | LOST DOG STREET BAND WITH CASPER ALLEN

EAT AT THE SOUTHERN CAFÉ look for our daily specials!

café opens 2 hours prior to performances RENT THE SOUTHERN!

(434) 977-5590 or rentalinfo@thesoutherncville.com

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11-22 | HOUNDMOUTH WITH ONA 11-24 | THANKFUL DEAD: BIGFOOT COUNTRY + SISTERS & BROTHERS 11-26 | THE LEGWARMERS: THE ULTIMATE 80’S TRIBUTE BAND PRESENTED BY GENERATIONS 102.3 12-04 | MIPSO WITH LOWLAND HUM 12-08 | ROBERT EARL KEEN’S CHRISTMAS SHOW

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

10-29 | THE MOUNTAIN GOATS 10-30 | TAUK WITH LITZ 11-04 | MONSTER ENERGY UP & UP FESTIVAL PRESENTS LOUD LUXURY SOLD OUT 11-05 | STEEP CANYON RANGERS

NOVEMBER 27-ON SALE NOW


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THIS WEEK

I dove into Dune this week. I found the new blockbuster riveting—it’s weird and wonderful in all the right ways. It’s got space-travel-augmenting desert drugs, warring feudal houses, cyborgs, espionage, and gigantic sand worms. (When I looked up author Frank Herbert and found that he was a big fan of hallucinogenic mushrooms, I was not at all surprised.) The movie—and the books it’s based on—are overflowing with ideas. It’s always fun to feel like you’re in the hands of a creator with a real vision, and that you can just sit back and let his creativity carry you away. I can’t wait for the sequel. In the meantime, though, there’s a great selection of movies to be seen right here in Charlottesville. This year’s Virginia Film Festival kicks off on Wednesday, October 27, and is full of talented filmmakers exploring settings that are much closer to home than the distant worlds of Arrakis and Caladan. Writer and actor Jeremy O. Harris is a Martinsville native, and in our Q&A with him this week, he reflects on how his Virginia roots have influenced his groundbreaking work (p. 19). Journalist Beth Macy helps track the effects of the opioid epidemic in Virginia and West Virginia (p. 21). A new documentary looks at the legacy of tennis player, activist, and Richmond native Arthur Ashe (p 25). The list goes on and on. Sit back, relax, and get your popcorn ready.—Ben Hitchcock

10.27.21

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Halloween on the Mountaintop Sunday October 31st 12-5pm

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Only 5 Miles from the Downtown Mall eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

Enjoy a glass of our award-winning Apple Pear wine, Trick-or-Treat Trails, S'mores, Mulled Wine, and locally made pies.


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DID YOU K NOW W E A LWA Y S O F F E R 2 0 % O F F H O L I DAY CA R D S A N D I N V I TAT I O N S? S e t u p yo u r a ppo i n t me n t t o day t o l o o k at N EW H O L I DAY CA R D DES I GN S! #SHOPLOCAL

Life at UVA in the ‘70s.

Lit±l= S|ster.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

Big S|ster.

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The perfect gift for the UVA student or alum. Available at New Dominion Bookshop and online.

your holiday headquarters . gifts, wrapping, décor & cards 321 east main street . downtown mall . 434.979.6366 . hey@thinkrockpaperscissors.com @rps_cville . www.thinkrockpaperscissors.com

Open for Breads, Pastries, Cof fee, and Takeout Breakfast, Lunch & Br unch. MarieBette Café & Bakery · 700 Rose Hill Drive, Charlottesville · 434.529.6118 Petite MarieBette · 105 E Water Street, Charlottesville · 434.284.8903 mariebette.com


“This case reminds me that we are not powerless as we face this seemingly relentless campaign of violence and hatred. And that constant reminder over the last four years has helped me move forward.”

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—Liz Sines, plaintiff in the Unite the Right case, in a statement to The Washington Post

NEWS

Tipping point PAGE 15

Redistricting commission on brink of collapse

IN BRIEF

Unknown package was false alarm A suspicious package drew attention from the Virginia State Police bomb squad last Friday night. The package was left outside the federal courthouse on West Main Street. The bomb squad cordoned off the area for an hour and a half, but the package ultimately turned out not to be a safety threat, and was later described as a “personal item” by the city.

Civilian watch dogs get a new toy

Virginia’s bipartisan redistricting committee is coming apart at the seams. The bipartisan commission—composed of four Democratic legislators, four Democratic citizens, four Republican legislators, and four Republican citizens—was supposed to create fair, even maps. But the commission can’t agree on anything, and it missed its October 25 deadline to submit Congressional map proposals to the General Assembly. Last year, Democrats in the legislature voted to create this commission rather than draw their own congressional lines, an at-

tempt at good-faith mutual disarmament that could go belly-up if the commission continues its stalemate. (“Democrats Supported Redistricting Reform in Virginia. Was it a mistake?” asked a provocative Slate headline.) If the commission can’t agree on maps, the Virginia Supreme Court will hire its own consultant to draw the lines. “It’s frustrating but also predictable,” said Delegate Marcia Price, a Democrat who opposed the amendment, in The Washington Post. “I just think inherently when you have a partisan and political process you’re going to have gridlock.”

COVID cases declining locally

The seven-day moving average of new local COVID cases is the lowest it’s been since July.

New cases have declined on Grounds as well. The rolling seven-day average of cases is 3.1 per day, down from a late September high of 23.3. UVA has mandated that all university faculty and staff must be vaccinated by December 8. If they refuse, they face unpaid leave or possible termination. The rule comes after a federal government order stipulated that employees working for organizations that have contracts with the federal government must get the shots. Currently, over 95 percent of UVA faculty and staff are fully vaccinated, and the admin is urging all employees to take action as soon as possible in order to meet the December 8 deadline.

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BLUE RIDGE HEALTH DISTRICT

After a September surge, COVID cases in the Blue Ridge Health district have fallen steadily in the last month. October 25 saw the seven-day moving average of new cases drop to 25.3, the lowest it’s been since July. Vaccination rates locally have largely stagnated: In Charlottesville, 58.7 percent of the population is fully vaccinated, and in Albemarle, that number is 68.1 percent. The Blue Ridge Health District has also begun offering booster shots, by appointment, to those age 65 and older, immunocompromised individuals, or people who work in high-risk environments.

@cville_weekly

The City of Charlottesville has launched a Budget Explorer so that curious citizens can dig deeper into the FY22 adopted budget and compare it to previous years’ budgets. The interactive dashboard allows viewers to review the last four budgets “in line item detail” for most city departments that are part of the general fund. Find yourself wondering how much money the Charlottesville city government spent on small hand tools in 2022 compared to 2019? Have no fear, the Budget Explorer is here!

Virginia’s current congressional map, pictured above, yielded seven Democratic representatives and four Republicans in the 2020 election. A bipartisan panel convened to adjust the lines has struggled to make headway.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

UVA’s marching band won a fight with the administration last week. The band had been banned from playing their instruments in the stands at football games, a regulation purportedly to prevent the spread of COVID. But the band disagreed: “The energy of Scott Stadium is being subdued for the sake of optics,” stated a petition urging the admin to let them play. Eight thousand signatures later, the university relented, and the “Hey Song” once again blared from the stands during Virginia’s victory over Georgia Tech last Saturday.

US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Banned band takes a stand


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Italian Lessons for Adults and Children Learn Italian! Improve your knowledge of Italian! Develop confidence in speaking Italian!

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Tuesday evening ConCerT series 2 0 21 / 2 0 2 2 s e a s o n

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10-week Courses for Children: Designed to introduce kids to the Italian language, culture, and geography. Basic Italian for Ages 7-9 Sat 10-11:15 (Jan 8th-March 12th)

Basic Italian for Ages 10-12 Sat 12-1:15 (Jan 8th-March 12th)

Class size limited to 12 students for adults and 10 students for children.

“Technically, there was no feat he couldn’t master, and he did it all with effortless beauty and pristine intonation.” — Cincinnati Enquirer

Visit italianwithadina.com to register and reserve your spot today. Email adina_galan@yahoo.com or call (434) 882-1888 for more information.

Works by J.S. Bach, Coleridge-Taylor Perkinson & Ysaÿe

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THE ANNUAL

THE ANNUAL

CHARLOTTESVILLE

BENEFITING THE ARC OF THE PIEDMONT

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REGISTRATION

TICKET PRICES $39 (orchestra) $30 (loge & balcony) $12 (partial-view & students) $5 (student one-hour rush tickets)

Underwriter: David Sansone Underwriter: Alison Weber in memory of Michael Weber UVA ARTS BOX OFFICE ONLINE: WWW.TECS.ORG or call 434-924-3376

www.cvillesantarun.com BE A CLAUS FOR A CAUSE!

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

$25 and • Children 3-12 $15 All proceeds support theAdults programs services Underin3our FREE he Arc of the Piedmont provides for people community Ask About Our Virtual Option with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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NEWS

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Crash into November 2 Governor campaigns heat up as election day nears By Kristin O’Donoghue

EZE AMOS

V

Bringing out the big guns: Dave Matthews, Jaime Harrison, and Stacey Abrams joined Terry McAuliffe for a Charlottesville campaign stop.

October polling averages 50%

48.8%

47.0%

McAuliffe

Youngkin

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

Abrams—the first Black woman in American history to be nominated by a major party to run for governor—underscored the important role that young people and people of color play in Democratic politics, though the gathered crowd was predominantly middle-aged and white. “The commonwealth has the power to set the course of this nation for the next decade,” Abrams said. When asked what might motivate young people to vote for someone they might perceive as yet another establishment candidate, Harrison talked about the ways in which McAuliffe represents progress for young people and for the nation.“What young people want is the freedom to be able to live

their American dream…We don’t need neanderthals like Glenn Youngkin to drag us back into some bygone time.” All the speakers warned against the “radical Republicans” who, if elected, would roll back all the progress the state has made in recent decades. “There is such a profound threat to our democracy, and we’ve got to show up for Terry to change the future for the better,” Matthews said before ginning up the crowd with a performance that included his hits “Mercy” and “Bartender.” “The Avengers are not coming in November,” said Harrison. “It’s up to all of you.” Addressing the young people in the crowd, Abrams pleaded: “Don’t let us screw this up.”

Charlottesville heads to the polls Over the past year, Charlottesville—along with counties across the state—has experienced severe mail delays. Some residents have gone weeks without receiving any mail at all, largely due to staff shortages and poor management at area post offices. “We have a lot of voters concerned over that, and have had to reissue quite a few ballots, due to them not receiving the initial one when it went out with a large batch,” says Yowell. To make sure their ballot gets counted, “a lot of voters, rather than sending them back through the mail... they are dropping them in our drop boxes here in our office,” she adds. Though some residents chose to vote early this year due to pandemic concerns, Yowell does not think voters are as wary of large crowds as they were last year, and expects a significant turnout on Election Day. “So many people are vaccinated now, so they feel comfortable being around a crowd,” she says. “Some people that I talked to are actually excited to go to the polls on Election Day and see people out there voting.”—Brielle Entzminger

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Still, this election’s turnout pales in comparison to the 2020 national election, which is typical. Eighteen-thousand residents voted early in Charlottesville last November, with the majority pulling the lever in person. In 2016, around 3,400 voters headed to the polls before Election Day. Last week, between 130 and 150 voters cast their ballots downtown each day, according to Yowell. Because the city now has four ballot-marking stations, the average wait time has been only a couple of minutes. “Last year, we were only able to have two [stations]... and we had between 300 and 400 people a day, so of course there was a line there,” says Yowell. But this election, “the lines have been moving very quickly.” Things haven’t been going quite as smoothly for those voting by mail. Election officials sent 2,500 absentee ballots to Charlottesville voters this year, and less than half of those have been sent back, says Yowell. “It’s still a good amount of mail ballots going out and coming back in, but it just doesn’t compare to last year,” when only around 590 ballots were not sent back.

@cville_weekly

Over half a million Virginians have already cast their ballots in the gubernatorial election. Early voting has been open since September 17, and will close Saturday, October 30. In Charlottesville, as of October 24, nearly 3,600 residents have voted early. About 1,200 cast their ballots by mail, and more than 2,300 lined up at the City Hall Annex to vote in person. “Our voters that are coming out have been very enthused to come out [and] support a specific candidate,” says Taylor Yowell, acting general registrar and director of elections for Charlottesville. “The energy definitely picked up this past week, and we’ve had a higher turnout.” Compared to the last gubernatorial election, early voting has drastically increased statewide—in 2017, around 1,450 residents cast their ballots early in Charlottesville. This year’s spike is thanks in part to Virginia’s new voting laws, which have made voting much easier. Last year, the Democrat-controlled General Assembly lifted decades-long restrictions on absentee voting, allowing voters to cast their ballots early by mail or in person without an excuse.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

a felony, and his efforts to protect women’s reproductive freedom. In reference to abortion rights, McAuliffe said, “This is no longer a talking point. This is real.”

REALCLEARPOLITICS

irginia’s November 2 gubernatorial election is rapidly approaching, and the two campaigns are ramping up their efforts to energize voters. Last Sunday, Democratic candidate Terry McAuliffe hosted a star-studded get-out-the-vote rally at the Ting Pavilion. Voting rights activist Stacey Abrams spoke alongside McAuliffe and DNC chair Jaime Harrison, while Dave Matthews played an acoustic set for the hundreds who had gathered. Glenn Youngkin will wrap up a 10-day “Win for Glenn” bus tour on October 28. Youngkin has held a number of meet and greets at inns, restaurants, and convention centers, especially in rural areas. The bus tour did not include a stop in Charlottesville, a Democratic stronghold. McAuliffe also held an event with former president Barack Obama in Richmond on Saturday. “You can’t run, telling me you’re a regular old hoops-playing, dish-washing, fleece-wearing guy, but quietly cultivate support from those who seek to tear down our democracy,” Obama said of Youngkin. In Charlottesville on Sunday, Harrison told the crowd that “Virginia is a blueprint for so many other states. That only happened because of the leadership in the governor’s mansion and at the state house.” The DNC committed $5 million to Virginia, a testament to just how significant the upcoming race is. Introduced by Harrison as the “Energizer Bunny of American politics,” McAuliffe hopped on stage to talk about his “proven leadership.” He highlighted a few achievements from his time in office, including the restoration of voting rights to those who had committed


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Village School Middle School for Girls

OPEN HOUSE Saturday, November 6 10 am - 2 pm

* Please email info@villageschool.us to reserve an Open House time slot Accepting applications for rising 5th graders Village School is a warm and welcoming place for girls to discover their strengths, find their own voices, and grow into confident, self-reliant, and intellectually curious learners.

215 East High Street, Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-984-4404

www.villageschool.us

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

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Scholarships are available

TWO LATEST BOOKS & MORE from local Author William A. James, Sr.

In, A MURDER ON FIFTH AND DICE AND THE RUIN OF FIFEVILLE,

IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, James

James shows how drug-dealing and gang violence led to the condemnation, demolition, and gentrification of Fifeville. It is a Sequel to his IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, 2007. (He is writing a play based upon this latest Book)

reveals how fear and misunderstandings caused The Charlottesville City Council to condemn and Demolish a 20 Acre Tract (30 Black businesses and 600 residents) from the Downtown area from 1958-1964.

In, HARD TIMES AND SURVIVAL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN AFRICANAMERICAN SON,

James relates His Story and the Reader learns what He means when He Says: “Do not GiveIn to Adversity, but overcome it by Steady and Constant Perserverance.”

Fall into a good book! Local Author William A. James, Sr. Call or Write, William A. James, Sr. 434-985-8987 PO Box 6991, Charlottesville, VA 22906 Wjpublications@aol.com

SOLD AT: The University of Virginia Bookstore 400 Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (on UVA Grounds). Patsy Goolsby, Manager, 434-924-1075 | bookshop@virginia.edu 2nd Act Books 214 East Main Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 Daphne Spain, Owner, 434-202-0754 | daphnespain@gmail.com


NEWS

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Unite the Right trial begins Sines v. Kessler kicks off with jury selection By Courteney Stuart

EZE AMOS

W

Alt-right leader Richard Spencer leaves the courthouse after the first day of the civil suit against the organizers of Unite the Right.

best known for her 2013 victory in the landmark Supreme Court case United States v. Windsor, a watershed moment in the quest for marriage equality. On the opposite side of the courtroom, several attorneys representing defendants were present, while Christopher Cantwell and alt-right leader Richard Spencer represented themselves. Negative views of Nazis and white supremacists were frequent among the prospective jury pool but weren’t the only strong feelings expressed. “You have unfavorable views against antifa?” Moon said to a female prospective juror. “Honestly, I think they’re all a terrorist organization. They’re trying to hurt people,” the woman responded. “Realizing that all the plaintiffs will say they are not members of that organization,

“These people are terrorists.” A PROSPECTIVE JUROR WHO WAS ULTIMATELY DISMISSED

do you think you can give the plaintiffs a fair hearing and make decisions based on law and evidence?” Moon asked. “Yes,” the woman replied. While jury selection took the majority of the time on Monday, the day started with a motion by plaintiffs to sever the case for Cantwell. If granted, the motion would create a separate lawsuit with Cantwell as the only defendant. “The reason why we’ve done it just now is we were here for the first time with Mr. Cantwell, and we saw how he was given documents that he had never seen before,” said Kaplan. Kaplan noted that Cantwell’s present

Read more: We’ll be posting daily updates from the courtroom at c-ville.com for the duration of the trial.

Area activist groups are keeping a very close eye on the goings-on in Charlottesville’s federal court building.

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claim to want change but refuse to take risks to alter the racist status quo.” During the trial, “We ask those who oppose racism to join us in solidarity, supporting each other and the plaintiffs in the Sines v. Kessler trial,” the statement continues. “We will protect the safety and well-being of those risking their comfort and their lives to dismantle white supremacy.” Meanwhile, UVA religious studies professor Jalane Schmidt tweeted out a message warning media outlets not to conduct interviews with white supremacists. “The statements by the fascists circulate online and are available; there’s no need for a fresh interview that breathes life into their words,” she wrote. “If you wanna interview [Richard Spencer], I don’t wanna talk with you. And neither do my Charlottesville comrades.”—Ben Hitchcock

EZE AMOS

Sines v. Kessler is attracting attention from across the country—national reporters are again parachuting in to Charlottesville to get the story—and some of our city’s activists and activist groups have shared their thoughts on the proceedings. The Charlottesville Anti-Racist Media Liaison issued a statement co-signed by a variety of organizations in town, including Showing Up for Racial Justice, Charlottesville Democratic Socialists of America, and others. “Four years ago, white supremacists planned and carried out violence and murder in and against the Charlottesville community. Since that time, Charlottesville antiracists have continued to fight racism in all its forms,” the statement reads. “To dismantle white supremacy, we must go beyond prosecuting white supremacists in court and commit to holding accountable those who

@cville_weekly

Local activists weigh in

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

ith heightened security outside the courthouse, the courtroom closed to the public, and media restricted to a live feed of proceedings in a separate room inside the federal court building in downtown Charlottesville, Sines v. Kessler got underway on Monday morning. The lawsuit is aimed at disrupting and bankrupting the hate groups responsible for the August 2017 Unite the Right rally. Difficulty seating a jury in the civil case emerged almost immediately. “These people are terrorists,” said the first prospective juror questioned in court about his ability to be objective about the defendants, a who’s who of white supremacists and neo-Nazis. “Do you think you can set aside that opinion,” asked presiding Judge Norman K. Moon. “I’m sorry, but I don’t think I can,” the man replied, prompting Moon to release him from the jury pool. Moon released another prospective juror over advanced age and a heart condition (jury service is optional for those 70 and over). Several others who are selfemployed requested release from jury service due to the length of the trial, which is scheduled to last four weeks. The court also released a school bus driver who noted that the nationwide shortage in her field would make a four-week absence a hardship for students. By mid-afternoon, 12 prospective jurors had been questioned and nine had been released for reasons ranging from age and health to self-professed bias. As court wrapped up at 6pm, several more had survived challenges from the defense or plaintiffs. The plaintiffs in the case are represented by a phalanx of high-powered attorneys led by Roberta Kaplan and funded by the nonprofit Integrity First for America. Kaplan is

incarceration for threatening rape has prevented timely communication with him. “It’s not about any newfound empathy for Mr. Cantwell,” said Kaplan. “There does appear to be an issue with respect to Mr. Cantwell getting pleadings in this case, documents in real time.” Requesting the court’s permission to speak, Cantwell, who earned the moniker “the crying Nazi” after the Unite the Right rally for a self-posted video of him weeping over his impending arrest, asked the court to sanction the plaintiffs, but Moon swiftly interrupted. “The court is willing to sever the case and allow you the time you want for your case,” said Moon. He denied the plaintiffs’ motion after Cantwell told the court he didn’t want his own legal proceeding. Sines v. Kessler accuses Cantwell and two dozen other individuals and groups of conspiring to commit racially motivated violence before and during the weekend of the Unite the Right rally in August 2017. Defendants include the KKK, Vanguard America, League of the South and the National Socialist Movement. Individual defendants include rally organizer Jason Kessler, anti-Semitic conspiracy theorist Elliott Kline (aka Eli Mosley), Matthew Heimbach, who co-founded the Traditionalist Worker Party with fellow lawsuit defendant Matthew Parrott, and James Fields, who was convicted of murder and maiming in the August 12 car attack. The suit’s ambitious goal goes beyond simply punishing individuals; it seeks to financially cripple groups and people who promote bigotry, hate, and violence, preventing future Unite the Right-like rallies in Charlottesville or anywhere else in the country. Jury selection will continue into Tuesday.


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A SORT OF HO ME COM ING chronicle that took the internet by storm in 2015, resulting in the highprofile Rolling Stone magazine feature, “Zola Tells All: The Real Story Behind the Greatest Stripper Saga Ever Tweeted.” For his foray into film, Harris teamed up with writer/director Janicza Bravo to co-write an honest, raw look at sex work in America while maintaining the singularity and humor of Wells’ voice. In conversation with C-VILLE Weekly, Harris reflects on his rise to success, and what it means to him to return to Virginia. C-VILLE: You went to high school in Martinsville, VA. Can you talk about how your experience growing up in the South, particularly in Virginia, impacts your current work?

JH: It’s impacted every facet. The tradition of Southern storytelling is very rich. The thing that’s special about the South is its sort of wild, complex history with both the slave trade—Virginia being the hub of the domestic CONTINUED ON PA GE 20

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laywright Jeremy O. Harris made history this year when his provocative Slave Play garnered the most Tony nominations ever for a single work (12, including Best Play). He began writing Slave Play while attending the Yale School of Drama, where he earned an MFA in playwriting, but his inspiration was intrinsic, stemming from his experiences growing up in Martinsville, Virginia. Unpacking the harsh realities of sexual and racial violence and trauma, Slave Play stirred controversy with its brash and graphic nature. At times generating a sense of discomfort for the audience, the work forces theatergoers to face ugly truths, reckon with the past, acknowledge its impact on the present, and assess their own place within the trajectory. The same is true for Harris’ film, Zola, the adaptation of Aziah “Zola” Wells’ viral Twitter

VAFF

By Desiré Moses

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

Celebrated writer Jeremy O. Harris ponders the influence of his Virginia roots


20 And me existing there might be something that could change that, right? Me existing there as someone who is very excited and proud to have co-written a movie directed by a Black woman...might make people have a different relationship to gender, and who gets what jobs in that area, because now they might not feel as though there’s some wild imposition of masculinity the minute that a woman is involved in any sort of project that a man is involved in. That brings me to Zola, which you cowrote with director Janicza Bravo. What first attracted you to this project?

VAFF

I was actively on Twitter as it was happening. [A’Ziah “Zola” King] had written maybe like 15 of the 145 tweets and I was at tweet 15 thinking, “This is the funniest line ever—who is this?” And I think that I was captivated immediately then by the ferocity of her voice and the newness of her voice in the sense that her voice felt similar to the ways in which I process the world.

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C O N TINUE D F ROM PAGE 1 9

Can you talk about your writing approach to the film? It’s a unique undertaking in that you’re adapting tweets. Many lines in the movie were lifted directly from Zola’s tweets—but how did you maintain her voice?

not coming back, right? And being like, this is a safer place for me to exist and explore and become the human being that I want to be. I’ve done that and it’s been phenomenal for me, but it’s been tinged with some sadness because I would prefer to be able to grow with people that I grew up with; I would have preferred to have shared the lessons I was learning with everyone around me, and not feel as though I had abandoned my community and taken away a resource that you know, Virginia helped foster. I was watered and planted in Virginia, and then I was uprooted, and went somewhere else and became a grand, surprisingly large flower, right, that beared fruit. And that fruit is being beared and shared with people in New York and people in L.A. So it’s really exciting to have this step of me being brought back and welcomed back in some small way to a community I left because I didn’t know if I would ever feel welcome there.

slave trade in America once the Transatlantic slave trade was ended—and also the fact that Virginia specifically was sort of like the hub between the North and the South...but the Confederacy capital is in Richmond, right? There’s a lot of complexities that come from this area that teaches one, without even knowing it, the value of what you want, and how you tell your story, and how you know your history. It takes a lot of nuance to explain to someone, as a Black person, that one of your best friends was the owner of the largest plantation in southwestern Virginia. What does that mean that we played there together? Just the fact that we played doesn’t absolve that person of anything. These are the kind of questions that are at the core of Faulkner stories, right? These are at the core of so many of the bedrocks of American literature and literary traditions. Those things have very much been like a fuel to the fire of the stories I’ve told. Do you feel a responsibility to take the For a lot of people in the North, this year was one lessons you’ve learned and the success of the first times they’ve actually reckoned with race— you’ve achieved and channel it back into even though Trayvon Martin happened [almost 10] your community in some way? years ago. There have been a litany of other things that I think that’s a complicated thing. There are moments have happened in our lifetime, for even someone as where I feel like I owe everything to everyone down there and then moments where I’m like “I owe them young as I am, that they could have pointed to as a moment of racial reckoning. But it liternothing.” Oh, do I owe the cousin that ally took George Floyd and a pandem- Zola called me the F-word, do I owe the ic for them to recognize it in the North. October 31 students that called me the F-word And for people in the South, that Culbreth Theater anything? No. sort of delayed recognition...I’ve alThere’s that question of, is it up to ways felt like racism, the questions around white the person who’s been historically disenfranchised supremacy, questions about privilege, even if the or othered to do the work? language wasn’t there, the ideas were very much there That’s what gives me pause about coming back. because they were ingrained in the architecture of But on the flip side, I think of the fact that there where we were. are people there who opened their homes to me, who shared things with me, and taught me things We’ve been dealing with our own racial that I would have never known. And there’s also reckoning here in Virginia. In Charlottessome other little boy or other little girl who feels ville, everything came to the forefront in a lot like I felt there, who probably feels alone. I also do think that it’s very easy to abandon comthe wake of the white supremacist rally in munities that you think haven’t evolved fast enough 2017—and most recently in Richmond with without trying to help them evolve. And again, that’s the removal of the Robert E. Lee statue on a lot of labor. But a part of me is like, it’s easier to Monument Avenue. What does it mean to evolve when you see it right in front of you; it’s you to screen one of your works here, harder when you can’t see it at all. given the sociopolitical context? I think it’s exciting; it’s a sort of a homecoming. I Maybe I do owe it to my community to be this out, proud, Black, successful gay man in Virginia, who can feel like myself, and a lot of people from Virginia, be a model for people who maybe have never even specifically, who feel othered—whether it’s because they’re Black, whether it’s because they’re gay, whethseen a gay person that’s out. I mean, they’ve definitely er it’s because they’re a woman with too much amseen a gay person, they just maybe haven’t seen one bition—they end up going to some faraway city and who feels comfortable telling the world who they are.

Isn’t it so funny [the opening line of the film]: “Y’all wanna hear a story about why me and this bitch here fell out?” Isn’t it such a Southern turn of phrase? That line just feels like home to me. And it’s immediately captivating. It feels like sitting around the table talking to your friends.

Exactly. It does feel exhilarating. The thing that made it very easy for me was that she told the story with such conviction, with such an innate and natural understanding of the rhythm of the storytelling that I didn’t have to do anything. It was basically like plug and play. So every beat that’s in the movie is from her actual Twitter thread, right. And so we just went through it and wrote them all down as the outline. And we filled in the beats in between the tweets. Anything that could have happened between a pair of tweets—like there’s a tweet where they got in the car, and the next tweet, they’re in Florida— we filled out what happened on the ride to Florida, then. And that became a really important process. And then outside of that, we went through her actual history—some of the things she had told [David Kushner], the man who wrote the [Rolling Stone] article about her and used those things to add further flavors to the story. This movie is categorized as a comedy, but it takes on a very serious subject. And I felt like it challenged me. There were certain scenes that I thought were funny, and there were other scenes that made me uncomfortable. Then there were scenes that I appreciated, but I felt like I wasn’t the intended audience. As a viewer, I felt very self-aware and my interpretation was that that was intentional. Was it? Jeremy O. Harris will appear at the The Virginia Film Festival to screen Zola, discuss his work, and accept the American Perspectives Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cinema.

I believe very strongly that an audience who is aware of itself, aware of its presence, are able to take on bigger ideas, even inside of a comedy, than they would if they aren’t aware of themselves. You do enough to remind people that what they’re watching is a movie that has an idea and the ideas are X, Y, and Z, so that they’ll notice things like the Confederate flag or the fact that a Black woman who doesn’t look anything like Whoopi Goldberg is being called Whoopi Goldberg. And even if they don’t understand what that means in the moment, they’ll think about it for longer because the movie has done a lot to destabilize the relationship to what they’re seeing.


DEALING WITH DOPE S

ince 2012, Roanoke-based writer Beth Macy has been at the forefront of reporting on the opioid epidemic, covering the toll that the drugs have taken on people and communities in the Appalachian region. In that time, she’s tracked the story of one drug in particular: the painkiller OxyContin. Macy works in western Virginia, but the harrowing stories she’s told aren’t geographically unique. “The story could have been told anywhere,” she says. “It’s bad everywhere.” The result of Macy’s research is her 2018 New York Times bestseller Dopesick, which Hulu has adapted as an eight-episode limited television series starring Michael Keaton. Macy is an executive producer and contributing screenwriter, and actor-turned-writer Danny Strong is the showrunner and executive producer. “Dopesick” reveals how the Sackler family’s Purdue Pharma preyed on poor, pain-afflicted laborers and their families. By selling the lie that their drug OxyContin was seldom addictive, Purdue caused widespread addiction, ruined communities, and left over 450,000 Americans dead. The Sackler family is currently claiming bankruptcy. That’s not enough, says Macy. “There should be criminal prosecution of this family...well over half a million Americans are dead now and we know that OxyContin was the taproot of this epidemic. And they’re going to walk away richer than they are right now after they pay their fine. That’s wrong.” The real-life heroes of “Dopesick” are the lawyers and activists—particularly opioid victims’

family members—who have bravely, relentlessly crusaded in court against the billionaires’ white-collar drug-pushing. Macy enthuses about Strong as a showrunner. “Woe be it to the person who tries to fight Danny Strong, because there is no better fighter,” she says. “He was just determined to tell this story.” The series takes the epidemic’s complex backstory and assembles it in a palatable way. And during the production process, fresh information kept pouring in, from sources like leaked documents and conference calls with forThe cast was thoroughly invested in the story, mer Purdue employees. “It’s a little bit thrilling, and worked hard to grasp every aspect of the says Macy. “It’s a legal investigative story. I would epidemic. Macy describes a particularly intense have no idea how to do that, but Danny knew scene where Dr. Samuel Finnix (Keaton) faces a exactly what he wanted.” grand jury. “I could watch that scene a hundred For someone used to working alone in a home times—it gives me goosebumps! He can do so office, Macy says that working on “Dopesick” was many things with his face in three seconds.” an entirely new experience—like getting paid to Ultimately, “Dopesick” delivers the message that get a graduate degree in screenwriting. “The scriptAmerica desperately needs to value human beings writing itself was really hard at first because, all of over profits. “The infrastructure has to be the health a sudden, you don’t have the tool of exposition,” of Americans,” Macy says. “We’ve got to get these she says. “You have to show it or tell it in dialogue. two-plus million people who are addicted to opioids You can’t just drop in a 20-minute the care they need. Because we’re not PowerPoint presentation.” “Dopesick” going to be able to build roads and “Dopesick” was largely filmed in October 30 bridges if we can’t find employees to Virginia, with Richmond serving as The Paramount Theater do it.” a headquarters, and Clifton Forge “Why can’t we hold power accountrepresenting the fictional town of Finch Creek. able? The show asks that question. America has Although the setting was ultimately Disney’s decigot to stand up and demand that we have humansion—it owns Hulu—Macy says she made an ity in our institutions again.” impassioned speech to Strong about filming in An episode of “Dopesick” will be screened on Virginia, because it’s one of the states hardest hit October 30, followed by a Q&A with Macy and by the epidemic. Strong.—Justin Humphreys VAFF

Beth Macy on her coverage of the opioid epidemic as a TV series

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ART F O R HEART’S SAKE

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VAFF

Richmond-based artist Hamilton Glass wasn’t just the mural project and set about producing the upset about the George Floyd killing by police in documentary Mending Walls in real time. Minneapolis on May 25, 2020. He was upset about “They wanted to create something for the the nation’s reaction to it. city that was a reflection of their conversation,” “I was getting really frustrated about why so Hervey says. “We tried to tell the story of how many people were now seeing this...as different,” they were able to accomplish that—the deep conGlass says in the 2020 documentary Mending Walls. nections that emerged. In a lot of cases, the artists “It’s been carnage after carnage after working together didn’t even know Mending Walls each other.” carnage, and I was upset about it.” Glass reached out to fellow artist Culbreth Theatre Produced and directed by Hervey Matt Lively early last summer. Glass October 28 for 19Red, Mending Walls features is Black. Lively, white. They had a conthe team on-scene with Glass, versation that inspired Glass to launch a project Lively, and the others artists as they create each of the racial justice-focused murals that emerged bringing together 32 artists to create 16 outdoor murals in 16 weeks—all in an effort to connect around Richmond in the summer of 2020. The and heal the interracial wounds opened by the film includes conversations with the artists, tragic events of May 25. as well as striking visuals as each of the works At about the same time that Glass sat down comes to life. with Lively, Richmond-based filmmaker Pam “The documentary is not about art but about Hervey was looking for her own way to process getting to know each other,” Hervey says. “It’s about and respond to Floyd’s murder. She heard about understanding where we come from.”—Shea Gibbs

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

“I could watch that scene a hundred times—it gives me goosebumps! He can do so many things with his face in three seconds.”


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Discussion with producer Pam Hervey, co-producer Hamilton Glass, and subject Matt Lively, moderated by Marc Cheatham (The Cheats Movement)

Discussion with director Eric Hurt and actor Cora Metzfield, moderated by producer Jack Steinberg

Discussion with filmmakers Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren and story advisor and descendant Joseph Rogers, moderated by VPM news anchor Angie Miles

Presented by VPM and support by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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QUEER COUNTRY

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scapegoated for a lot of the country’s problems.” McGuire says there’s a lot to love. “The largest percentage of LGBTQIA people exist in the Southeast. I just wanted to hold a mirror up to the South. You are a place that believes in original storytelling, where we’re queer, weird, out there, and different.” A story about the disputed settling of an estate could have been bitter, but McGuire says he took care not to bully his aunt, who was his favorite growing up. “I would like people to see the love,” he says. The Parton influence factored again when McGuire cooked breakfast for his crew and played generous host so that people wanted to collaborate and were excited about what he was doing. “Being nice is Dolly Parton know-how,” explains McGuire. “You can get away with a lot more if you’re kind and generous.”—Lisa Provence

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

I

f there was one guiding light throughout His telling has poetry—and pyrotechnics. director Bo McGuire’s near-zero-budget Local drag queens reenact parts of the family filming of Socks on Fire, his tale of family drama. And family members and friends appear division over his beloved Nanny’s house, on camera, turning the story into an homage to it would be Dolly Parton know-how. the important women in McGuire’s life. From the country icon, McGuire learned to “I was trying to capture what was going on “work with what you have.” He was at NYU, and and where I come from, somehow, in some mystical way.” had the equipment to make a film, but no fundHis mother didn’t understand why people ing. Meanwhile, his Aunt Sharon had kicked his drag-queen Uncle John out of his grandmother’s would want to watch “our family being our famhouse in his hometown of Hokes Bluff, Alabama. ily,” he says. “Then you have my Uncle John, who “This drama was going down in my family, who has been waiting for this moment. He loves the are characters in their own right,” he says. He also camera.” knew the local landscapes, which “look beautiful Growing up in eastern Alabama, McGuire had on film.” He decided to take a camera and couple no model for going into film. Instead, he studied talented friends down to Alabama to creative writing and got an MFA in “see what happens.” poetry. “I didn’t want to be an acaSocks on Fire Until the day of filming, McGuire October 28 demic,” he says—he wanted to make hadn’t decided if he was going to Violet Crown Cinema music videos. At NYU, he studied with appear on screen. “I went to my Spike Lee, who, it turns out, is a big closet and pulled out the brightest colors I could Alabama football fan. “He was very encouraging,” says McGuire. find—and I made sure I had accessories.” That, “I think he wants to see young filmmakers be he says, is Dolly Parton know-how: making do rebellious.” with what you have. Home videos interspersed throughout the film Making a movie in his hometown offered are evidence of the close-knit family McGuire grew some production benefits in housing, locaup in. “It was emotional for me,” he says. “I felt very tions, and feeding his crew. “People in Gadsden, possessive and responsible for my grandmother’s Alabama, were excited about shooting a film, legacy, while watching my family implode.” and they’re willing to let you do things for free,” notes McGuire. He stresses that Socks on Fire, which refers to Ultimately, he wants people to see a new kind the airing of one’s dirty laundry—or in this case, the torching of it—is his own version of the event. of South. “Narratives of the South are often spun “This is how I feel about it,” says McGuire. by people not from here,” he says. “The South gets

VAFF

VAFF

Bo McGuire spins a different tale of the South


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DEVELOPING STORIES

OF F T H E C OU RT Citizen Ashe, by award-winning director Sam Pollard and Rex Miller, chronicles the life of tennis great and Virginia native Arthur Ashe, a trailblazing figure on the court and activist off. Ashe was the first Black man to win a singles championship at Wimbledon, the U.S. Open, and the Australian Open. He was also the first Black man named to a U.S. Davis Cup team. But it was a heart attack at age 36 and subsequent bypass surgery that in many ways defined Ashe’s career. Over the nine years following his first cardiac episode, Ashe embarked on a mission to advocate for heart health. But health issues continued to plague him. In 1988, Ashe was hospitalized yet again. Tests revealed he was HIV positive. Doctors said he likely contracted the disease from a blood transfusion received during his 1979 quadruple bypass. As an activist, Ashe took on not only heart health and AIDS awareness but racial justice. He visited South Africa as part of a delegation promoting racial integration, and later, in 1985, was arrested for protesting during an anti-apartheid rally. Ashe protested mistreatment of Haitian Citizen Ashe refugees in 1992 and was again Violet Crown Cinema arrested for speaking out. October 30 Born and raised in Richmond, Ashe was honored with a statue along the city’s Monument Avenue in 1996. Because of its location among Richmond’s many confederate memorials, the bronze sculpture showing Ashe holding a book and tennis racket and surrounded by children has become a touchpoint in the ongoing conversation about antiquity and historical injustice in modern American life. Citizen Ashe is narrated by Ashe and features Johnnie Ashe, Stephanie Cookie Carson, and Donald Dell. The film attempts to put Ashe’s life into sociological context, examining the racial issues surrounding the predominantly white sport of tennis.—Shea Gibbs

Documentary details the influence of Gordon Parks’ artistry and humanity

VAFF

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VAFF

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

ince the 1940s, documentary photographer and Jamel Shabazz, who create affirmation and filmmaker Gordon Parks has remained in their work, Maggio says. As a young man hanging around his relevant as both a visual chronicler of injuspainter-sculptor father’s studio, Maggio tice and an example to aspiring artists every“absconded with a Time-Life photo compenwhere. “He could turn an ordinary life into something extraordinary,” says John Maggio, the director of dium” that captivated him as he studied A Choice of Weapons: Inspired by Gordon Parks, which takes Parks and the photos that elicited strong emotions. Today, he says he admires Parks’ its name from Parks’ memoir. Among Parks’ famous works is his 1967-68 Life magazine bright and colorful series shot in the South. photo documentation of the Fontenelle family’s struggles in Full of life and joy, the photos defy the the Bedford-Stuyvesant section of Brooklyn. “Not to diminharsher stereotypes of the region. ish the importance of covering the Fontenelle family in a Maggio, who was once a journalist, won run-down tenement, but he also got the beauty of the coman Emmy for “The Untold Story of the 2008 Financial Crisis.” He says now is a golden position,” Maggio says. “Parks is the perfect amalgam of both artist and journalage for documentaries because of the reist,” says Maggio, showing a photograph of a sources that streaming platforms woman sitting with some of her children, A Choice of provide for stories that tell us pleading silently with a poverty bureau work- Weapons: about our society and world. er. “That makes him great. Look at the mother’s Inspired by Maggio cites the Unite the eyes—so grave.” Right rally as an inspiration for Gordon Parks Born into poverty himself, Parks saw power in October 28 his work on A Choice of Weapons. photography and taught himself how to operate Culbreth Theatre “There was an eerie intimacy to a camera. He worked his way onto the masthead the tiki-torch march, and it felt of Life magazine, and was the first African American to shoot like something out of a Nazi propaganda for Vogue, as well as the first Black director of a major Holfilm. It was chilling,” he says, before expressing gratitude for the filmmakers and jourlywood studio movie, Shaft. He also was a noted writer and nalists on the scene at the time. The two days composed music for films. In addition to discussing Parks, Maggio’s documentary of violence in Charlottesville were part of a showcases the trajectories of three newer artists who wield pattern that includes the deaths of Sandra cameras to tell stories. “I didn’t want to keep Gordon Blanton, George Floyd, and others. “The sad encased in amber. I wanted to see his legacy in play today,” part of this is that it’s a conversation we continue to have,” he says, adding that there says Maggio. He calls Baltimore’s Devon Allen the nearest extension of is still a need for potent imagery, as young artists evolve. “It is their story to tell, the Parks. Finding a camera pulled Allen away from a perilous place to the cover of Time magazine. Other artists influenced important narrative work that can effect by Parks and featured in the film are LaToya Ruby Frazier change.”— Mary Jane Gore


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O TW ay 3-d ions s ses

9 am - 1 pm (drop-off 8:30) www.frontporchcville.org

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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20% Off Early Bird

Saturday, October 30 8:00pm Following the viewing of Citizen Ashe at 6:00pm Violet Crown Theater @unitedwaycville unitedwaycville.org/envision

A program of the 2021 Virginia Film Festival


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SOCKS ON FIRE THURSDAY, OCT. 28 | 5:30 PM VIOLET CROWN 5 TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00

Discussion with filmmaker Bo McGuire, moderated by Chandler Ferrebee (VAFF) Supported by IX Art Park

LGBTQIA+ FOCUS

JUMP, DARLING FRIDAY, OCT. 29 | 8:45 PM VIOLET CROWN 6 & 7 TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00

FLEE SUNDAY, OCT. 31 | 11:15 AM CULBRETH THEATRE TICKETS: $12.00

MAYOR PETE

FRIDAY, OCT. 29 | 5:45 PM CULBRETH THEATRE TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00 Discussion with filmmaker Jesse Moss, moderated by Ted Johnson (Deadline) Supported by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

The Brick Cellar host your holiday party in

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

charlottesville's new event space downtown in the dairy market dairymarketcville.com/brickcellar

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SENTAR A MAR THA J E F F E R S O N HO S P IT A L

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For more information visit sentara.com/mammogram.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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Follow us on Facebook @SentaraMarthaJeffersonHospital, and Twitter @MarthaJefferson.


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GEN

NOW

C-VILLE’s Monthly Guide to Navigating Senior Living Options in Central Virginia

Our staff can assist in answering your questions about:

Make JABA’S Senior Helpline your first call. (434) 817-5253

jabacares.org

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Jefferson Area Board for Aging

@cville_culture

• Home delivered meals • Affordable senior housing options • Adult care centers • Home care • Medicare and ACA counseling • Caregiver support • Many other resources in the community

October 27 - November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

There’s no place like home.

Are you a senior looking for options to help you maintain your independence?


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OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

JOIN US FOR AN EXCITING

October 27 - November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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November 11 & 12 3 - 6 PM Join us either day for the unveiling of our brand-new independent living, assisted living and memory care community. Bring your friends and family to our uplifting celebration and tour the accommodations and amenities that make up our remarkable community. NOVEMBER 11 Ribbon-cutting with champagne toast Hors d’oeuvres and refreshments Live music Community tours NOVEMBER 12 Hors d’oeuvres and refreshments Live music Community tours

RSVP TO RESERVE YOUR TIME

434-218-5102 ANTHOLOGY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE 343 Archer Ave. / Charlottesville, VA AnthologyCharlottesville.com INDEPENDENT LIVING / ASSISTED LIVING / MEMORY CARE

This will be a socially distanced event. Masks are required.


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At Our Lady of Peace, the health and well-being of our residents remains—as always—our top priority. Welcoming new residents! Call today to learn more about the compassionate care, lovely apartments, wonderful amenities, and active, family-oriented lifestyle that makes our community one-of-a-kind. What Residents Are Saying “Here I feel safe, loved, respected, and not alone.” Barbara Allison, Our Lady of Peace Resident

Residential Living • Assisted Living Memory Care • Nursing Care

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Charlottesville’s premium in-home care provider “We found Commonwise after struggling to find reliable care. We felt the difference immediately and they have provided a consistently high level of service ever since. Every caregiver has been delightful and professional.” To learn more about Commonwise, call 434-202-8565 or visit commonwisecare.com

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David McNair handles communications, media relations, and social media efforts for the Jefferson Area Board for Aging.

OV

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Indeed, for many people, the ongoing dynamic they have with their aging parents is one fraught with unexpressed or passively expressed worry. While you don’t want to interfere with their independence, their diminishing mobility might have you anticipating accidents, both at home and about, especially if they are still driving and doing their own errands. What’s more, if our aging parents refuse to accept additional help, people may feel there’s little they can do except wait for something bad to happen. In fact, the Penn State study found that changes in communication between aging parents and their adult children often don’t happen until there is an “inciting incident,” such as being hospitalized, new health problems that require new medications, or perhaps a sudden fall or accident. According to experts, however, getting your aging parents to accept help is worth a try. Especially if you want to avoid things that could have been prevented. One strategy is to find a third-party influencer, like a

R

October 27 - November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

According to experts, however, getting your aging parents to accept help is worth a try. Especially if you want to avoid things that could have been prevented.

doctor, nurse, or other healthcare expert or professional (or an article in your local paper!) who might be willing to share information. For example, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), one out of four older people have a fall and don’t tell anyone, even though 95% of hip fractures, and over half of traumatic brain injuries, are caused by falls. What’s more, falling once doubles the risk of falling again. Also, falling can be caused by other things that need to be talked about, like medications, lack of sleep, and even the kind of shoes a person is wearing. Once an older person understands the dangers and risks, and that they can be a threat to their independence, it can be easier to have discussions about getting extra help with things that require mobility and balance, like laundry, changing sheets, and vacuuming, or installing grab bars and removing clutter. Of course, it’s important to present these things as solutions that can help older parents have more control, not as scare tactics, and that older parents feel that they are making these decisions for themselves. Indeed, experts say, a lot of the resistance for help that older people can display simply means they are having difficulty with role reversal or are fearful of losing their independence and becoming a burden on their children. So it’s important to show empathy. Finally, it’s important for the adult children of older parents to know their limits. You have a life to live, perhaps kids to raise, and a career to nurture, and if you’re older parents are still being stubborn and refusing to accept help, you may have to come to terms with the fact that only an “inciting incident” is going to change things. That can be scary, of course, but it can also tip the balance toward a solution. As researchers in the Penn State study discovered, breakthroughs in family conversations about difficult health and independence issues often required such incidents, and that being prepared to provide solutions when that happens, rather than freaking out, can lead to positive changes.

V SER ING S IORS

Everyone talks about the challenges of being a caregiver, but there are actually challenges to becoming a caregiver. A 2020 study by Penn State University found that 77% of adult children believe their parents are resistant to taking their advice and getting help with daily tasks. Indeed, the study found that that 91% of those 65+ who are living independently don’t share information with their adult children about how they’re sleeping and 82% don’t share information about their medications. Meanwhile, 71% of adult children reported they don’t discuss this information with their parents. “Health of family members is inherently a realm of collaboration, but also of tensions around personal boundaries and established family roles,” said Prof. John Carroll, the lead investigator on the study.

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What To Do When Older Parents Won’t Accept Help

FO

Oh, I’m fine, Honey:

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LEADERSHIP

EZE AMOS

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KAYE MONROE

Founder of KDM Coaching & Associates

QUINTON HARRELL Founder of Heritage United Builders

ANDREA D. COPELAND

Chamber Minority Business Alliance Liaison

ALEX URPI

Emergent Financial Services, LLC CEO & Investment Advisor

October 27 - November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

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WE ARE THE MINORITY BUSINESS ALLIANCE LEADERSHIP TEAM

KDM Coaching & Associates partners with visionary leaders, organizations and communities to provide strategic planning and executive coaching services. Customized programs are available to create culturally inclusive corporate awareness, authentic people engagement, assessment and group facilitation. (804) 491-8088 gr8tcoach39@outlook.com

He’s not a businessman; he is a business, man. A serial entrepreneur and budding investor passionate about developing opportunities in the Black community creating value for all, Quinton is a connector and ecosystem architect specializing in business and relationship development. His upstart Heritage United Builders (H.U.B.), is building a network of minority subcontractors for the construction industry.

www.hubuilders.com

The Minority Business Alliance (MBA) convenes, supports and promotes minority businesses in the greater Charlottesville community. We leverage local business and nonprofit partners to expand community wealth building. MBA membership investments include professional development and training, networking and resource connections, competitive funding opportunities and a full membership to the Charlottesville Regional Chamber of Commerce.

cvillechamber.com/mba

andrea.whitsett@cvillechamber.com

Emergent Financial Services is a Hispanic-owned, fee-only, independent investment advisor supporting the financial life of families, businesses, and institutions in Charlottesville. We combine years of knowledge with research to ensure that our customized financial plans and investment portfolios fit your specific needs. Our first consultation is free of charge. (434) 260-1690 alex@emergentfs.com


CULTURE

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SATURDAY 10/30

POE KNOWS Darkly funny with a dash of the macabre, Catherine BaabMuguira’s debut book, Poe for Your Problems, depicts Edgar Allan Poe as a self-help guru. Baab-Muguira walks readers through Poe’s life, in tandem with self-reflection that allows you to say “nevermore” to your problems, and discover the difference between positive and poe-sitive thinking. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

SATURDAY 10/30

OU R G U I D E T O YO U R W E E K

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Halloweekend fun awaits at the Witch’s Ball, a late-night soirée full of occult oddities and chilling curiosities. Ships in the Night celebrates a new album, Latent Powers, along with performances by Synthetic Division and Solemn Shapes. DJ Cadybug provides nonstop dance tracks, accompanied by witchcrafted cocktails and unearthly delicacies from a variety of food trucks. A tarot reader is on hand for those who dare to discover what fate has in store. $20-26.66, 9pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE., ixartpark.org.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

MAGIC GATHERING

OAR STORIES

@cville_culture

During the ’90s on Chicago’s West Side, Arshay Cooper became captain of the first all-Black high school rowing team, an experience he claims saved his life. A Most Beautiful Thing, the humorous and inspiring documentary based on Cooper’s award-winning memoir of the same name, chronicles the team’s journey and a reunion 20 years later. Cooper will be joined by Olympian Jim Dietz, UVA’s rowing director Frank Biller, and local crew coach Craig Redinger for a discussion before a screening of the film. Free, 6:30pm. Western Albemarle High School, 5941 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. 823-8700.

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SUPPLIED PHOTO

WEDNESDAY 10/27


Hang Out...

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CULTURE SPOOKY SPECIAL

All fright

Gorgeous Boutique Winery in a Majestic Mountainside Setting just North of Charlottesville

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This month, we asked you to scare us silly with your spookiest horror stories. Here’s the catch: They had to be just two sentences long. Below, we’ve printed the 10 most frightful submissions, which will be performed by the actors at Live Arts. (Look out for the video later this month on our social media.) Read on—if you dare.

First place: Robert tenderly kissed the palm of Jennifer’s small, delicate hand. Then he turned to hang it on his Christmas tree with the others. Judith Dianne Anderson

As satisfying as it was to push him drunk and dazed off the cliff, she found even greater delight when she climbed down to look at his corpse. Who knew that carrion beetles could be so tasty?

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When he first awoke to complete darkness and utter silence, and was unable to move any part of his body in any direction, he thought maybe he was dead. Then, as he felt hundreds of tiny little insect feet crawling all over his body and into his ears and eyes and nose, biting and stinging as they ran into his mouth and down his throat when he screamed, he wished he was.

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Mark Ehlers

Michael Urpi

The dinner was a cheery one, with all the guests smiling brightly. But the only noise was that of the host’s scraping steak knife, stained a deep maroon, and the buzz of flies circling the guest’s forgotten faces.

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She holds her husband’s hand every night while watching the local news. He’s been dead for 10 years, but she doesn’t mind his boney grip between her fingers. Kathleen Richard

Chloe Root

It’s so good to have a mask mandate on campus. My peers would finally assume that everyone has a mouth. Hans Bai

Brenna Kidd-Bania

The eerie quiet of midnight coated the Downtown Mall, except for a plump rat that nibbled gleefully on a half-eaten Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup. Suddenly, a crescendoing shriek pierced the silence, and the feasting rat jerked his gaze upward to see a ghost rising above the rubble of the Landmark Hotel and chanting: “Build me, build me.” Matt Deegan

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UNIVERSITY VILLAGE - STUNNING VIEWS FROM THE 5TH FLOOR This unique Condo is a Just less than 10 minutes to the real gem at University Village because Hollymead Town Center, where it captures both beautiful Blue Ridge and SouthColdinSpring Charlottesville west and is located one of Hollow, Charlottesville's premier independent retirement youMountains can find shopping,restaurants Gracious living in aThe Western Albemarle county neighborhood off Bloomfield Rd.floor less than 15 minutes from city. Thefloor owner custom communities. discerning buyer will find this 5th home with antheopen plan and Starbucks. Another 10 minutes designed this estate home with inspiration from a beloved SC farmhouse to seamlessly merge traditional southern style with contemporary that includes a separate dining room, living room, eat in kitchen and 2 bedrooms and 2 down the road there is a Sentara Private 2.58 spaces for the modern lifestyle. Formal entertaining spaces meet an open family kitchen, secluded office andacres playrooms, and ample baths a rarebuilding. find. There is also storage, convenient parking, exceptional amenimedical Close toexcellent NGIC. storage. The home was imagined with its surroundings in mind- enjoy the mountain, wooded and pastoral| views of its 21 acres with MLS 623112 $150,000 ties andwindows services including dining, fitness center w/75' heated pool, & a chauffeur. plentiful and skylights throughout and a partially screened mahogany wraparound porch. Yard islibrary, partially fenced, surrounding acreage with creeks and hiking woods. Attention to details make for a high end quality. MLS# 557041 $1,390,000 MLS#570017, $375,000 For more information and photos, visit www.anitadunbar-realtor.com Call or email for a private showing.

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My ex mistress keeps visiting me throughout the day, and I don’t want my wife to find out about her. Maybe I shouldn’t have buried her in the backyard.

027A2 Advance

@cville_culture

I started picking up speed through a haunted corn maze on Halloween when a man started chasing me. Then I thought to myself, fake chainsaws don’t usually have the chains on them.

Private 3.42 acres in Landon Woods subdivision MLS 591221 | $145,000

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October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

Desperately this deformed, unsightly creature stares back at me, armed with eyes that have seen 1,000 lost worlds and shrieking silent howls that carry enough horror to crush any mortal soul, casting its agony upon those who dare see or hear it. I hate my mirror.


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$10/6

Benjamin Rous, Music Director

HEAR.TOGETHER

The PVCC Pottery Club Presents

Saturday, November 6 8:00pm

Old Cabell Hall Mask required

Sunday, November 7 3:30pm

Martin Luther King, Jr. Performing Arts Center

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

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Mask, proof of vaccination or negative test result, valid photo ID required

MAZZOLI Dark with Excessive Bright with Peter Spaar, Double Bass GERSHWIN Lullaby

BoMbA y PlEnA

BEETHOVEN Op. 18, No. 4 in C minor

AFRO-PUERTO RICAN ORCHESTRA

Tickets

UVA Arts Box Office artsboxoffice.virginia.edu 434.924.3376

saturday nov. 13 7:30 pm $15/12 SCAN FOR TICKETS

This performance is supported in part by the Virginia Commission for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts. Media support generously provided by CBS19.

The 2021-2022 season is generously supported by

www.pvcc.edu/performingarts Box Office: 434.961.5376

Main Stage Theatre, V. Earl Dickinson Building 501 College Drive, Charlottesville, VA, 22902


CULTURE S CREEN S

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Picture this Our critic’s picks for the 2021 Virginia Film Festival By Deirdre Crimmins arts@c-ville.com

T

he lineup for the 34th edition of the Virginia Film Festival is stacked with movies that are already getting Oscar buzz, like The French Dispatch, The Power of the Dog, Spencer, and Belfast. These films are bound to do big box office business for weeks to come, but this year’s fest also features several less-hyped films that are especially worthy of attention in an exciting, crowded program.

The Machinery of Dreams

The Machinery of Dreams

Monkey Beach

Zola

Mass

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

This fantasy film is firmly anchored in reality through a horrible tragedy. When Lily’s mother is hurt in a terrible car crash, her grandmother tells her tales of fantasy to pass the time. The more tales she tells, however, the blurrier the lines between imagination and real life become. At its core, film is storytelling. From Pan’s Labyrinth to The Fall, it is easy to fall in love with fantasy when reality is too hard to bear. The Machinery of Dreams is presented as a part of the festival’s focus on Virginia filmmakers. The screening will be accompanied by a discussion with director Eric Hurt and actor Cora Metzfield.

Stories of heroes returning home to save their communities and families are culturally ubiquitous. Monkey Beach takes the framework of the prodigal son and gives the age-old story a brand new voice. Highlighted as a film directed by an indigenous woman, this tale is told from the perspective of a young indigenous woman who is trying to save her brother. Along her journey she encounters what seems to be a menagerie of cryptids and supernatural elements that reconnect her with her past.

Zola

The directorial debut of actor Fran Kranz, better known as the stoner in Cabin in the Woods, is not about Kranz once again flexing his comedy muscles. Mass takes place mostly

in a single room as a group of grieving parents talk through an unthinkable tragedy. Franz might be a newcomer, but he’s been getting major critical kudos since premiering Mass at Sundance in January. The film stars Ann Dowd, Martha Plimpton, Jason

A Suite of Short Films by Kevin Jerome Everson

Isaacs, and Reed Birney. Plimpton will be on hand for a discussion at the screening.

Memoria Heady and artistic, Memoria has already garnered big industry buzz—and it won’t

Short film programs In addition to many feature films being paired with a short film, VAFF also has four stand-alone blocks of shorts. Loosely sorted into Being Human, Facing Reality, a repertoire of Sudanese film, and the films of Kevin Everson, there is plenty of variety in these collections. Short films are an artform unto themselves, and outside of film festivals it’s rare to get the opportunity to sit and enjoy them all on their own.

be released in theaters until the end of December. The film earned the Jury Prize at this year’s Cannes Film Festival and it’s Colombia’s submission for Best International Feature at the 94th Academy Awards in 2022. Director Apichatpong Weerasethakul is known for taking an architectural and paced approach to his visual design, and Memoria is no different. Starring Tilda Swinton as a Scotswoman living in Colombia who hears sounds, namely a loud boom, that others may not hear, the film deals with this disconnect as she begins to visualize these sounds. Synesthesia might not be the easiest phenomenon to put on the big screen, but Weerasethakul nails it.

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Mass

Memoria

@cville_culture

The first feature film based entirely on a Twitter thread, Zola goes far beyond gimmick and social media references (see our interview with Jeremy O. Harris, the movie’s co-writer, on page 19). It is at times hilarious, terrifying, and confounding. What began as a simple road trip to make some extra cash dancing in Florida quickly turns into a cautionary tale that proves why your mother told you not to trust strangers. And it is all true—or at least that’s what Zola wants you to believe. The film looks at the lives of exotic dancers, peering behind the curtain into the less glamorous side of the business.

IMAGES COURTESY VAFF

Monkey Beach


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Dream team

Wedding pros work together at The Bradbury downtown

Copy this

How to use styled shoots for inspo

Forever love

Don't toss the bouquet— a new way to keep it 'alive'

FALL/WINTER 2021

Plan on!

HERE COME THE BRIDES

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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O N

S T A N D S

S O O N !

A month-bymonth guide to the big day PAGE 23

So much

joy

Four weddings—from itsy bitsy to Italian-inspired—that got every detail just right

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CULTURE THE WORKING POUR

Drink in color Autumn wines to enjoy by your firepit By Paul H. Ting living@c-ville.com

A

Stinson Vineyards’ Tannat has an earthy, complex flavor—perfect for fall.

The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s® is full of flowers — each carried by someone committed to raising funds and awareness to help end this disease. It’s time to add your flower to the fight.

2019 Gabriele Rausse Winery Roussanne $26 for a 750ml bottle gabrieleraussewinery.com 2017 Hark Vineyards Spark Red Blend $42 for a 750ml bottle harkvineyards.com 2017 Stinson Vineyards Tannat $37.99 for a 750ml bottle stinsonvineyards.com Afton Mountain Vineyards VDN (non-vintage) $32 for a 325ml bottle aftonmountainvineyards.com

Wine as an option during, or even in place of, the dessert course is often overlooked. While some may tend toward harder spirits like bourbon or brandy around a fire, an interesting option might be the many dessert wines produced by adding brandy to wine. This is an old and traditional winemaking technique that stops fermentation to maintain sweetness, and at the same time fortifies the wine (increases alcohol) to give it body and concentration. The Afton Mountain Vineyards VDN (non-vintage) takes its name from the vin doux naturel style of winemaking that originated in southern France. Although these wines are sweet, the process of making them does not involve added sugar. Instead, brandy is added to grapes to stop fermentation, preventing the yeast from converting all the sugar from the grapes into alcohol and thus leaving residual sweetness in the wine. The Afton version comes in at 20 percent alcohol and is made from a blend of malbec and tannat grapes. It is full of deep plum and berry flavors combined with a pleasant sweetness. Try it paired with a blackberry cobbler, caramel-pecan pie, or anything chocolate.

Charlottesville

November 6, 2021 | 10 a.m. CFA Institute parking lot located at 915 East High St. 2021 NATIONAL PRESENTING SPONSORS

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Visit alz.org/walk for more information about this year’s event and to register or scan this QR code with your phone camera.

2020 Keswick Vineyards Rives White Blend $27.95 for a 750ml bottle keswickvineyards.com

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THESE FLOWERS HAVE A LOT OF FIGHT IN THEM.

75 percent of the wine is aged in French oak barrels and 25 percent is aged in Italian terracotta amphorae for one year. The resulting wine has an elegant floral nose that hints at orange blossoms, a palate that is broad and full, with flavors of tangerine and vanilla that are almost reminiscent of a baked pastry. It finishes without sweetness and just a hint of textural astringency. Try this with a pork roast, smoked turkey, or roasted sweet potatoes. When the temperatures are too high, even dedicated red wine drinkers have a hard time thinking about consuming big-bodied tannic wines. So, the transition into autumn is an exciting time because it’s a chance to bring out wines with more flavor and complexity. In Virginia, as in other parts of the world, varieties such as petit verdot and tannat are often utilized in blends with other red grapes to achieve deeply colored, structured, and boldly flavored wines. The 2017 Hark Vineyards Spark is a red blend of cabernet franc, merlot, and petit verdot that was aged in oak barrels for 20 months. Deeply garnet colored, the nose is full of sweet tobacco, black fruit, and vanilla. The taste follows the aromas, with black plum and blackberries combining with smoke, leather, and baking spices. While this has enough structure that it should age well, it also would pair well now with a steak, a smoked brisket, or a venison stew. In addition to being used in blends, petit verdot and tannat are also being made in Virginia as single varietal wines. The 2017 Stinson Vineyards Tannat is an outstanding example of this. While tannat is a grape that brings very prominent tannins, Stinson has produced a version that reveals a lifted and elegant fruit structure of cherry and plum on top of those tannins. Aged 27 months in oak, there are also flavors of smoke, tobacco, and earth that add complexity and weight. The combination of fruit with a smoky, earthy backbone makes this a great match for barbecue, smoked sausage, or a spicy black bean soup.

Fall for these local bottlings

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

STAFF PHOTO

s summer disappears and temperatures begin to drop, wine drinkers look for more weight, more depth, and more complexity in their glass. This is, in part, to temper the chill in the air, but it also means wines that will better pair with the food of the season. Autumn leads to more roasting, smoking, stews, and heavier desserts. It also means more cooking over coals, hanging out on the deck, and time spent around open fire. Almost all red wines fit naturally into the seasonal shift. If you stick strictly to white wines, the lean, crisp whites and rosés that were a mainstay of the beach and poolside won’t feel as substantial as wines with more weight and texture. Look to flavors that tend

toward stone fruits and tropical fruits, as opposed to just citrus notes. Here are some new locally produced wines suited to your autumn tailgate, barbecue, or firepit. The 2020 Keswick Vineyards Rives White is a blend of pinot gris and chardonnay that has lighter citrus fruit notes combined with deeper flavors of white peaches and apricots. The fruit is complemented nicely by hints of vanilla. A medium weight on the palate yields easily to a crisp, acidic finish, and it would be a perfect pairing with roasted chicken or a root vegetable gratin. The 2019 Gabriele Rausse Winery Roussanne is produced from 100 percent Virginia-grown roussanne grapes, an unusual variety for the state that is not widely known or planted. Rausse’s European roots are obvious here. After fermentation is complete,

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CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

Order up! These local establishments are open and waiting to take your order. Email living@c-ville.com to add your restaurant to the list. Asian Cuisine Afghan Kabob Palace Authentic Afghan cuisine. 400 Emmet St. N. 245-0095. $$. Asian Express Chinese and Japanese with healthy options. 909 W. Main St. 979-1888. $. Bamboo House Korean and Chinese options. 4831 Seminole Trail. 973-9211. $$. Chimm Thai Thai street food. The Yard at 5th Street Station. 288-1122. $$. Coconut Thai Kitchen Curries, noodles, fried rice, soups, salads and vegetarian dishes from the Monsoon Siam team. 1015 Heathercroft Ln., Crozet. 205-4292 $$. Doma Korean Kitchen Korean-style barbecue, kimchi, and more. 701 W. Main St. 202-1956. $. Kanak Indian Kitchen Offering traditional homemade Indian food, plus cocktails to go. 385 Merchant Walk Sq. Ste. 400. 328-2775. $. Lemongrass Vietnam meets Thailand. Veggie options and delivery, too. 104 14th St. NW. 244THAI. $$. Lime Leaf Thai A tad more upscale than the average Thai place. Rio Hill Shopping Center. 245-8884. $$.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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Maru Korean BBQ & Grill Traditional Korean food with modern additions. 412 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 956-4110. $.

Milan Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with all the standards; beer and wine available to go. 1817 Emmet St. 984-2828. $$. Mochiko Good Hawaiian eats (and suggested Hawaiian beer pairings, too). The Yard at 5th Street Station. $. Monsoon Siam Delicious, unpretentious favorites like pad Thai, tom yum noodle soup, and vegetarian dishes. 113 W. Market St. 971-1515. $$. Mashumen Japanese ramen and rice bowls. 2208 Fontaine Ave. 400-9007. $$.

Now & Zen Gourmet Japanese and sushi spot. 202 Second St. NW. 971-1177. $$. Pad Thai Homestyle Thai cooking from an experienced chef. 156 Carlton Rd. 293-4032. $$. Pineapples Thai Kitchen Thai favorites from the Monsoon Siam team. 722 Preston Ave. 2021682. $$. Peter Chang China Grill Authentic Sichuan cuisine by a renowned chef. Barracks Road Shopping Center North Wing. 244-9818. $$.

Vu Noodles Fresh, vegetarian Vietnamese noodles, pho, bahn mi, and more. 111 E. Water St. 465-1267. $.

Bakeries Albemarle Baking Company Get your ABCs of baked goods. 418 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 293-6456. $. Bowerbird Bakeshop Pastries, breads, and cookies using locally sourced ingredients, delivered right to your doorstep. 120 10th St. NW, bowerbirdbakeshop.com. $ Gearharts Fine Chocolates Freshly baked pastries, cakes, cookies, and brownies— plus chocolates! 243 Ridge McIntire Rd. 9729100. $. Great Harvest Bread Company Sandwiches, sweets, and bread baked from scratch every day. McIntire Plaza. 202-7813. $. MarieBette Café & Bakery French pastries for breakfast, more pastries for lunch. 700 Rose Hill Dr. 529-6118. $. Paradox Pastry Known for the biscuits, European pastry, and the legendary DMB cookies and brownies. 313 Second St. SE #103. 2452453. $.

Petite MarieBette MarieBette’s little sister. 105 E. Water St. 284-8903. $. The Pie Chest Homemade breakfast and hand pies, plus by-the-slice options (for those who can’t decide). 119 Fourth St. NE., 977-0443; 1518 E. High St., 984-0555. $. Quality Pie In the former Spudnuts spot, exMas tapas chef Tomas Rahal serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 309 Avon St. 284-5120. $$. Sliced. cake bar Mobile bakery offering whole cakes, cake flights, cake pops, and buttercream shots, for delivery or curbside pickup. 242-5501. $.

Bars and Grills Alamo Drafthouse Burgers, pizzas, salads, snacks, and desserts prepared fresh from locally sourced ingredients. Served in the cafe or while you watch a movie. 5th Street Station. 326-5056. $. Beer Run Massive tap and packaged beer offerings, killer nachos, three meals daily. 156 Carlton Rd., 984-2337. $$.

Red Lantern Chinese cuisine by the pint or the quart. 221 Carlton Rd. 979-9968. $.

Fardowners Restaurant Local ingredients liven up pub fare like sliders and sandwiches. 5773 The Square, Crozet. 823-1300. $$.

Silk Thai Fresh, authentic Thai, plus specials like marinated wings. 2210 Fontaine Ave. 9778424. $$.

Firefly Craft beer, burgers, salads, vegetarianfriendly menu. 1304 E. Market St. 202-1050. $.

Tara Thai Affordable Thai faves, with multiple meat, fish, and veggie options. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-9998. $$.

Kardinal Hall An extensive list of brews, plus bocce on the patio. 722 Preston Ave. 295-4255. $$

Texas Roadhouse Steaks, ribs, and fromscratch sides. Albemarle Square. 973-4700. $$. Timberwood Grill All-American eatery and after-work watering hole. 3311 Worth Crossing, 975-3311. $$. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery Locally sourced, beer-infused dishes including Southern classics and a kids menu. 520 Second St. SE. 956-3141. $$. The Whiskey Jar Saloon-style Southern spot with, naturally, more than 90 varieties of whiskey. 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2021549. $$. Whistlestop Grill Southern comfort foods in Crozet. 1200 Crozet Ave. 823-9000. $.

Breakfast Joints Farm Bell Kitchen New-Southern cuisine with local farm-to-table ingredients. 1209 W. Main St. 205-1538. $$. First Watch Breakfast, brunch, and lunch chain with locally grown ingredients. 1114B Emmet St. N. 202-5383. $$. Villa Diner Mainstay with housemade pancakes, biscuits, roast turkey, soups, sides, and salad dressings. 1250 Emmet St. N. 2969977. $.

Moe’s Original BBQ Alabama-style pulled pork smoked in-house. 2119 Ivy Rd., 244-7427; 200 W. Water St., 202-2288. $. Moose’s by the Creek American favorites, plus mounted moose antlers for photo ops. 1710 Monticello Rd. 977-4150. $. Multiverse Kitchens Digital food hall that’s home to six different restaurants. 1747 Allied St., 989-8807. $ Riverside Lunch Popular joint known for smashburgers. 1429 Hazel St. 971-3546. $. Royalty Eats Soul food goodness including Chicken & Waffles, ribs, and specialties like teriyaki salmon. 820 Cherry Ave. $ Vision BBQ Meats smoked the old fashioned way with wood and a match. 249 Ridge McIntire Rd. 443-4352. $ Wayside Takeout & Catering Famous Ole Virginia fried chicken and barbecue sandwiches. 2203 Jefferson Park Ave. 977-5000. $.

Coffee Places with Kitchens Baine’s Books & Coffee Wide selection of coffee, tea, pastries, and paninis. 485 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-3577. $.

Murphy’s Coffee & Bagel House Breakfast spot serves delicious coffee and freshly baked New York bagels. 26 Buck Dr. 939-6033. $$.

Belle Coffee & Wine Breakfast and lunch sandwiches. Free kids meals with adult meals. 9964919. $$.

Burgers, BBQ, Dogs and Diners

C’ville Coffee & Wine Full menu of coffee, sandwiches, and wines. 1301 Harris St. 8172633. $.

Ace Biscuit & Barbecue Breakfast and lunch spot with BBQ and soul food by the biscuit. 600 Concord Ave. 202-1403. $.

Greenberry’s Java and specialty drinks, fresh baked goods. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-0200. $.

Blue Moon Diner Beloved local diner serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner options like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and BLTs. 600 W. Main St. 980-6666. $$

Milli Coffee Roasters Espresso drinks, chai, hot chocolate, light fare, wine. 400 Preston Ave, Suite 150. 270-9706. $. Whole bean delivery available. $

Burger Bach New Zealand-inspired gastropub. The Shops at Stonefield. 328-2812. $$.

The Workshop A coffee and wine shop featuring Grit Coffee and pastries from Cou Cou Rachou, located in The Wool Factory. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $.

Cavalier Diner Breakfast all day, traditional diner fare, and Greek food. 1403 N. Emmet St. 977-1619. $ Dairy Market Find something for everyone at this food market, from burgers to barbecue to pulpo con brasa. 946 Grady Ave. 326-4552. $-$$$.

Doodle’s Diner Country cookin’ from breakfast to burgers. 1305 Long St. 295-7550. $. Five Guys Two locations for local carnivores. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 975-GUYS; Hollymead Town Center, 963-GUYS. $. Fox’s Café Daily specials, burgers, dogs, and dinners. 403 Avon St. 293-2844. $.

Family-Friendly Ann’s Family Restaurant Good old country cooking. 1170 Thomas Nelson Hwy. (Rte. 29, south of Lovingston). 263-8110. $. The Light Well Coffee-kitchen-tavern serves healthy ingredients in original recipes. 110 E. Main St., Orange. (540) 661-0004. $. Michie Tavern Traditional Southern lunch from an 18th-century tavern. 683 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy. 977-1234. $$.

Taste of China Chinese favorites on 29N. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 975-6688. $$.

Matchbox Charlottesville Wood-fired pizzas, salads, salmon and steak dinners, gourmet burgers, and a happy hour. 2055 Bond St., 2848874. $$.

Taste of India Indian fare favorites on the mall. 310 E. Main St, Downtown Mall. 984-9944. $$.

Peloton Station Cycle-centric tavern and bike shop. 114 10th St. NW. 284-7786. $$.

Ten Upscale second-floor spot serving modern Japanese. 120B E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-6691. $$$.

Sedona Taphouse Lots of craft beers and an all-American menu. 1035 Millmont St. 2962337. $$.

Thai ’99 II Thai noodle and rice dishes, curries, and stirfrys in an inspired interior. Gardens Shopping Center. 964-1212. $.

Selvedge Brewing New brewery in The Wool Factory serves elevated bar fare from Chef Tucker Yoder. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $$.

Mel’s Café Southern soul-soothing food. A longtime favorite on West Main. 719 W. Main St. 971-8819.

Kirt’s Homemade Ice Cream Ice cream made fresh in the store. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 202-0306. $.

Thai Cuisine & Noodle House Traditional Thai food, noodle dishes, and vegetarian specials. 2005 Commonwealth Dr. 974-1326. $$.

TCO 2go Specialty sandwiches like pulled pork and fried fish from The Catering Outfit . 221 Carlton Rd. 951-4699. $$.

Mission BBQ Pulled turkey, pork, and chicken, plus racks by the bone. The Shops at Stonefield. 260-7740. $.

La Flor Michoacana Homemade paletas (popsicles), ice cream, and ice cream cakes, plus other sweet treats. 601A Cherry Ave. 984-1603 $.

Lazy Parrot Backyard BBQ The Lazy Parrot Grill’s sister restaurant. Pantops Shopping Center. 244-0723. $$. Luv’n Oven Gizzards, livers, fries, and shakes. 162 Village Sq., Scottsville. 286-3828. $. Martin’s Grill Delicious hamburgers, veggie burgers, and fries. Forest Lakes Shopping Center. 974-9955. $.

Frozen Treats Chaps More than 20 years of gourmet homemade ice cream. Diner fare including breakfast and burgers. 223 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4139. $. Corner Juice UVA alum-owned juice spot with cold-pressed options. 1509 University Ave. $.


CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT Smoothie King Chain features smoothies, supplements, and healthy snacks. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 295-8502; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center, 975-5464. $.

Gourmet Groceries and Gas Stations Batesville Market Sandwiches to order, salads, and baked goods plus cheeses, produce, and packaged goods. 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. $. Bellair Market Gourmet sandwich spot on Ivy Road. 2401 Ivy Rd. 971-6608. $. Blue Ridge Bottle Shop Craft beer store with both bottles and growlers available—plus sample before you buy! 2025 Library Ave, Crozet. 602-2337. $. Brownsville Market Breakfast starting at 5am, plus burgers, sides, and famous fried chicken. 5995 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. 823-5251. $. Feast! Nationally noted cheese, wine, and specialty food shop. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 244-7800. $$. Foods of All Nations Sandwiches, deli, and salads at this gourmet grocery. 2121 Ivy Rd. 296-6131. $. Greenwood Gourmet Grocery Made-to-order sandwiches, fresh soup, and a deli with mac-n-cheese, bread pudding, and rotating dishes. 6701 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. (540) 456-6431. $. Hunt Country Market A rotating menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus wine offerings. Call to order. 2048 Garth Rd. 296-1648. $. Integral Yoga Natural Foods All-natural food, organic produce, supplements, plus a deli and juice/ smoothie bar. 923 Preston Ave. 293-4111. $. J.M. Stock Provisions Whole-animal butcher shop with sandwiches to go, great craft beer selection, and nicely curated wine selection. 709 W. Main St. 244-2480. $$.

Market Street Market Deli in the downtown grocery serves sandwiches and prepared foods. 400 E. Market St. 293-3478. $. Market Street Wine An expertly curated selection. 305 Rivanna Plaza Dr., Suite 102, 9649463; 311 E. Market St., 979-9463. $$. Mill Creek Market The Southern sister of Bellair Market. Avon Street, across from the Southside Shopping Center. 817-1570. $. Trader Joe’s This grocery chain boasts top quality at low cost, including “Two Buck Chuck” wine (which is actually $3.50). The Shops at Stonefield. 974-1466. $$. Whole Foods Market Fresh, all-natural sandwiches ranging from classic favorites to vegan delights. 1797 Hydraulic Rd. 973-4900. $$. Wyant’s Store Country-store fare like coffee and donuts, with daily specials and a great (cheap!) cheeseburger. 4696 Garth Rd., Crozet. 823-7299. $.

Anna’s Pizza No. 5 In the family for 35 years. 115 Maury Ave. 295-7500. $. Belmont Pizza and Pub Fresh, stone-baked pizza on hand-tossed pies. Beer, too! 211 Carlton Rd., Suite 10. 977-1970. $.

College Inn Late-night goodness. Pizza, gyros, subs, and its delivery can’t be beat. Breakfast items, too. 1511 University Ave. 977-2710. $. Crozet Pizza Unpretentious, family-owned pizza parlor with nationally recognized pies. 5794 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet, 823-2132; 20 Elliewood Ave. 202-1046. $. Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie Pizza joint in the Crossroads mini-mall. 4916 Plank Rd., on 29S at North Garden. 245-0000. $$.

Luce Literal hole in the wall serving fresh, handmade pasta to go. 110 Second St. NW. $$. Mellow Mushroom Trippy-themed franchise, with great pizza and even better beer selection. 1321 W. Main St. 972-9366. $. Red Pump Kitchen Tuscan-inspired restaurant. 401 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-6040. $$. Tavola Rustic Italian with housemade pastas, craft cocktails, and a Wine Spectator awardwinning list. 826 Hinton Ave. 972-9463. $$. Vita Nova Creative ingredients on hearty pizza by the slice. 310 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-0162. $. Vinny’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria This regional chain has pies plus a slew of subs, pastas, and stromboli. Hollymead Town Center. 9734055. $$. Vivace Every kind of pasta imaginable, plus seafood. 2244 Ivy Rd. 979-0994. $$. Vocelli Pizza Pizza, pasta, panini, salads, and stromboli plus antipasti. Woodbrook Shopping Center. 977-4992. $.

Latin American Al Carbon Chicken prepared in an Indigenous Mexican coal-fire, flame-roasted rotisserie manner, plus sides like fried yucca and fried plantains. 1875 Seminole Trail. 964-1052. $. Brazos Tacos Austin, Texas-style breakfast, lunch, early dinner, and brunch tacos. 925 Second St. SE. 984-1163. $. The Bebedero Upscale authentic Mexican, plus cocktails and made-to-order guac. Order from sister restaurants Revolutionary Soup and The Whiskey Jar and pick up food from all three, at once. 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2343763. $$. Chipotle Simple menu of made-to-order burritos and tacos. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 872-0212; 2040 Abbey Rd. Suite 101, 984-1512. $. Continental Divide Charlottesville’s favorite hole-in-the-wall spot has delicious tacos and enchiladas. 811 W. Main St. 984-0143. $$. Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Fresh, handmade, Bajastyle Mexican food. 435 Merchant Walk Sq., Suite 600. 214-0500. $. Guadalajara Family-run Mexican food celebrating 30 years. 805 E. Market St., 977-2676; 395 Greenbrier Dr., 978-4313; 2206 Fontaine Ave., 979-2424; 108 Town Country Ln., 293-3538; 3450 Seminole Trail, 977-2677. $. Guajiros Miami Eatery Food inspired by the everyday meals of Miami, with strong Cuban influence as well as Central and Southern American dishes. 1871 Seminole Trail. 465-2108. $ Junction Innovative Southwestern cuisine with locally sourced ingredients in Belmont. 421 Monticello Rd. 465-6131. $$. La Michoacana Mexican deli serves budgetfriendly burritos, tacos, and enchiladas. 1138 E. High St., 409-9941; 2291 Seminole Ln., 9564299. $. Little Star Spanish- and Mexican-inspired food expertly prepared in a wood-fired oven. Great craft cocktails, too. 420 W. Main St. 252-2502. $$. Mas Spanish tapas and wines in the heart of Belmont. 904 Monticello Rd. 979-0990. $$. Morsel Compass Popular food truck’s brickand-mortar spot. 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. 989-1569. $$. Qdoba Mexican Grill Spicy burritos, quesadillas, and Mexican salads made before your eyes. 3918 Lenox Ave. 244-5641. $. Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine & Café Healthy, authentic Mexican cuisine. 112 W. Main St., Suite 6. 979-0212. $.

Basil Mediterranean Bistro Mediterranean fare from grape leaves to tapas, plus wine. 109 14th St., 977-5700; 5th Street Station, 202-7594. $. Cava Fast-casual Mediterranean with lots of vegetarian options. 1200 Emmet St. N, #110. 227-4800. $. Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar Dishes from Spain to Greece and wines of the world. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 975-6796. $$. Otto Turkish Street Food Go for the doner kebabs and stay for the rosemary fries. 111 W. Water St. 328-8786. $ Sticks Kebob Shop Everything tastes better on a stick! 917 Preston Ave. 295-5262; 1820 Abbey Rd. 295-5212. $. Sultan Kebab Authentic Turkish cuisine with plenty of meat and vegetarian options, and notable appetizers, too. 333 Second St. SE, 981-0090. $. Thyme & Co. Traditional Lebanese flat­­ breads and salads. 104 14th St. NW, Suite 2. 282-2436. $.

Miscellaneous Nationalities Bang! Tapas Asian fusion cuisine served tapasstyle. 213 Second St. SW. 984-2264 $$. Bizou Playful French-American bistro with a beloved meatloaf dish. 119 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-1818. $$. Mahana Fresh Tropical themed, fun flavored ingredients in bowls and sweets. 2142 Barracks Rd. 284-5846 $. Pearl Island Caribbean-inspired lunch spot in the Jefferson School City Center. 233 Fourth St. NW. 466-0092. $. Sticks A fast-food alternative: kebobs (veggie options available), sides, salads, desserts. Preston Plaza, 295-5262; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center. 295-5212. $. Soul Food Joint A homecooked meal made up of your favorite Southern staples, sides, and fixin’s. 300 E. Market St. 465-2969. $

Soups, Salads, Sandwiches Baggby’s Gourmet Sandwiches Satisfying sandwiches, salads, soups, and super-friendly service. 512 E Main St. Downtown Mall. 9841862 $.

Bodo’s Bagels Still the king of bagels. 1418 N. Emmet St., 977-9598; 505 Preston Ave., 293-5224; and 1609 University Ave., 2936021. $. Chopt Creative salad chain with ingredients from local purveyors. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 328-8092. $. Citizen Bowl Shop Speciality salads, grainbased bowls, and burritos with gluten-free, vegetarian, and vegan options. Full bar too! 223 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 234-3662. $.

Jimmy John’s Low-cost sandwiches on 29N. “Freaky fast” delivery. 1650 E. Rio Rd. 9752100. $. Kitchenette Sandwich Shop From meatloaf with cheddar and jalapenos to tofu Reubens, these sammies satisfy. 920 91/2 St. NE. 260-7687. $ Panera Bread Co. Ubiquitous chain with casual fare. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 2456192; Fifth Street Station, 973-5264. $. Revolutionary Soup Choose from a slew of enticing soups made daily. 108 Second St., Downtown Mall. 979-9988. $. Roots Natural Kitchen Fast-casual salad and grain bowls. 1329 W. Main St. 529-6229. $. Which Wich Superior Sandwiches Create your own sandwiches by marking up the pre-printed brown bags. Hollymead Town Center. 977-9424. $.

Steaks and Seafood Bonefish Grill Sister to mega-popular Outback Steakhouse featuring seafood, grilled non-fish specialties. Hollymead Town Center. 975-3474. $$. Outback Steakhouse Bloomin’ onions and giant steaks. 1101 Seminole Trail. 975-4329. $$. Public Fish & Oyster Simply prepared, responsibly sourced seafood. 513 W. Main St., 9955542. $$.

Upscale Casual C&O Serving up a three-course $68 prix fixe menu. 515 E. Water St. 971-7044. $$$. Café Frank French-influenced café with special attention to its wine and cocktail lists. 317 E. Main St. 825-9496. $$ Fig Bistro & Bar Mediterranean and New Orleans-inspired dishes with housemade ingredients. 1331 W. Main St. 995-5047. $. Hamiltons’ at First & Main Contemporary American cuisine in the heart of downtown C’ville. 110 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2956649. $$$. Ivy Inn Fine dining in a charming tollhouse. 2244 Old Ivy Rd. 977-1222. $$$. The Local Belmont neighborhood spot featuring comfort favorites. 824 Hinton Ave. 9849749. $$. Marigold Committed to sustainable and seasonal dishes by an acclaimed chef. 701 Club Dr. 2844200. $$$.

Maya Upscale Southern cuisine. 633 W. Main St. 979-6292. $$. The Melting Pot Fondue fun for all. 501 E. Water St. 244-3463. $$$. The Mill Room Upscale resort eatery with an American menu. 200 Ednam Dr. 972-2230. $$$. Oakhart Social Seasonal, creative modern American food for sharing. 511 W. Main St. 995-5449. $$. Oakhurst Inn Coffee & Café Southern style breakfast and lunch. 1616 Jefferson Park Ave. 872-0100. $.

Durty Nelly’s Down-home pub and deli now offering five subs (except the Dagwood) for $35. 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. $.

Restoration Great views and delicious food, ranging from fried green tomatoes and burgers to crab cakes and pasta. 5494 Golf Dr., Crozet. 823-1841. $$.

HotCakes Fancy sandwiches, housemade entrées, and desserts. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 295-6037. $.

Riverbirch Restaurant Fresh and local American-style cuisine on Pantops. 630 Riverside Shops Way. 465-2421. $$

Iron Paffles & Coffee Pastry dough + waffle iron + savory or sweet insides. 214 W. Water St. 806-3800. $.

Southern Crescent Cajun and Creole fare in Belmont. 814 Hinton Ave. 284-5101. $$.

Ivy Provisions Local deli and retail food shop offering fresh, housemade breakfast and lunch all day, plus wine and craft beer by the bottle and on draft. 2206 Ivy Rd. 202-1308. $. Jack’s Shop Kitchen Farm-to-table brunch, lunch, and supper spot with elevated classics. 14843 Spotswood Trail, Ruckersville. 939-9239. $$.

Tonic Seasonal, local café fare with craft cocktails and curated wine list. 60≠9 E. Market St. 226-4270. $$ Wayland’s Crossing Tavern Pub food, vegetarian plates, and kid-friendly fare. 1015 Heathercroft Cir., Crozet. 205-4669. $$. Zocalo Flavorful, high-end, Latin-inspired cuisine. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4944. $$.

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Christian’s Pizza The place to get fresh pies, by-the-slice or the whole darn thing. 118 W. Main St., Downtown Mall, 977-9688; 100 14th St. NW, 872-0436; 3440 Seminole Trail, 973-7280. $.

Lampo Authentic Neapolitan pizzeria in Belmont. 205 Monticello Rd. 282-0607. $.

Aromas Café Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. Sandwiches, salads, and famous falafel. 900 Natural Resources Dr. 244-2486. $.

Jersey Mike’s Subs Subs from Jersey. 2040 Abbey Rd. #104, 529-6278; 5th Street Station, 328-8694. $.

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Italian and Pizza

Fellini’s #9 A local landmark featuring Italian favorites plus some inventive new takes. 200 W. Market St. 979-4279. $$.

Mediterranean

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

Market Street Café Gourmet breakfast, rotisserie chicken, and deli meats. 1111 E. Rio Rd. 964-1185. $.

Fabio’s New York Pizza Pizza, subs, salads, and calzones made by natives of Naples. Get your pie the Sicilian way. 1551 E. High St. 872-0070. $.

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YOUR FESTIVAL GUIDE! 34TH ANNUAL

SPOTLIGHT FILMS

OCTOBER 27-31, 2021 PASSING

C’MON C’MON

THE WORST PERSON IN THE WORLD

HOW THE MONUMENTS CAME DOWN

THE ADDAMS FAMILY

CITIZEN ASHE

TRUTH TELLERS

THE KIDS

FLEE

END OF THE LINE: THE WOMEN OF STANDING ROCK

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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THE ELECTRICAL LIFE OF LOUIS WAIN

Presenting Sponsor

SPENCER: GALA SCREENING

SPECIAL GUESTS

JEREMY O. HARRIS

MARTHA PLIMPTON


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SPECIAL GUESTS A TRIBUTE TO MARTHA PLIMPTON SATURDAY, OCT. 30 | 4:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $12.00

Award-winning actress Martha Plimpton will be celebrated in a tribute event highlighting her remarkable career, in a conversation moderated by Brian Truitt (USA Today) following a screening of her latest film, Mass. Plimpton has consistently wowed audiences and critics alike for her work on stage, screen, and television. First rising to prominence for her role in Richard Donner’s The Goonies, her many film credits have included the Disney sequel Frozen 2, The Mosquito Coast, Running on Empty, Parenthood, and Small Town Murder Songs. She was nominated for an Emmy Award for her role as Virginia Chance in the FOX sitcom Raising Hope and won the Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series for her appearance on CBS’s The Good Wife. On Broadway, Plimpton has received Tony nominations for her roles in The Coast of Utopia, Top Girls, and Pal Joey. Plimpton’s latest film, Mass follows a private talk between two sets of parents as they attempt to move forward, years after an unspeakable tragedy tore their lives apart.

SUNDAY, OCT. 31 | 5:30 PM CULBRETH THEATRE TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00

The Virginia Film Festival will present award-winning writer and actor Jeremy O. Harris with the 2021 American Perspectives Award for Outstanding Achievement in Cinema, following a screening and discussion of Zola. A graduate of the Yale MFA Playwriting Program and currently residing in New York City, Harris is an award-winning playwright and actor best known for Slave Play, which broke the record for the most Tony nominations for a non-musical play in 2020. He has been honored with the Kennedy Center Rosa Parks Playwriting Award, the Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award, and the Lotos Foundation Prize in the Arts and Sciences in 2018. In his first foray into screenwriting, Harris co-wrote A24’s 2021 film Zola with director Janicza Bravo. He has an overall deal with HBO and is a co-producer for the second season of the hit series Euphoria. He recently appeared on HBO Max’s Gossip Girl reboot.

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Based on the greatest true story ever tweeted, Zola follows a self-assured waitress and exotic dancer from Detroit, Zola (Taylour Paige), who is convinced by a stranger, Stefani (Riley Keough), into a weekend of stripping in Florida that quickly takes a nefarious turn.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

AMERICAN PERSPECTIVES AWARD RECIPIENT JEREMY O. HARRIS

Supported by 101 Jamz and UVA Department of Drama

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A PREVIEW OF THE 34TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL OCT 27-31. VIEW ALL 85+ FILMS AND EVENTS, OUR COVID-19 POLICIES, AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG.


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GALA SCREENINGS

CENTERPIECE FILM

THE POWER OF THE DOG LAST NIGHT IN SOHO

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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THURSDAY, OCT. 28, 5:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00

SATURDAY, OCT. 30, 8:30 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $20.00

Supported by Woodard Properties

Presented by Truist This film will be presented with Open Captions and the on stage presentations will include ASL interpretation.

THE HARDER THEY FALL

THE ELECTRICAL LIFE OF LOUIS WAIN

THURSDAY, OCT. 28, 8:30 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $20.00

SUNDAY, OCT. 31,10:00 AM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $12.00

Pre-recorded discussion with director Jeymes Samuel

Presented by Watermark Design. Supported by Wells Fargo

PASSING FRIDAY, OCT. 29, 5:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00 This film will be presented with Open Captions and the on stage presentations will include ASL interpretation.

SPENCER FRIDAY, OCT. 29, 8:30 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $20.00 Introduction by Jody Kielbasa (VAFF) Presented by UVA Gamma Knife Center This film will be presented with Open Captions and the on stage presentations will include ASL interpretation.

THE LOST DAUGHTER SUNDAY, OCT. 31, 4:30 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $12.00 This film will be presented with Open Captions

CLOSING NIGHT FILM

C’MON C’MON SUNDAY, OCT. 31, 8:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $20.00 Preceded by the short film Blush. Introduction by Jody Kielbasa (VAFF) Presented by The Paramount Theater

A PREVIEW OF THE 34TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL OCT 27-31. VIEW ALL 85+ FILMS AND EVENTS, OUR COVID-19 POLICIES, AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG.


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A SPOTLIGHT ON VIRGINIA FILMMAKING MENDING WALLS THURSDAY, OCT. 28, 6:30 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00 In the wake of the social unrest following George Floyd’s death, artist Hamilton Glass brings together 30 artists from different walks of life to collaborate, connect, and heal through art and storytelling. Based in Richmond, Virginia, the Mending Walls project pairs up artists of different backgrounds to complete a public art project that is meant to incite discussion not only amongst viewers but also between the artists themselves. Directed by Pam and Todd Hervey, this film follows the collaborative journey of some of the artists involved in the project and gives a glimpse into the healing process and educational growth that is taking place in the current day. Introduction by President and CEO of VPM Jayme Swain, discussion with producer Pam Hervey, co-producer Hamilton Glass, and subject Matt Lively, moderated by Marc Cheatham (The Cheats Movement) Presented by VPM Supported by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion THE MACHINERY OF DREAMS SATURDAY, OCT. 30, 11:00 AM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $12.00 Preceded by the short film The Beekeeper. When her mother is hospitalized after a car crash, eight-year-old Lily goes to live with her aunt and grandmother, who suffers from dementia. Lily’s grandmother begins to tell her a fairytale to pass the time, but when the lines between reality and fantasy begin to blur, Lily ventures into the fairytale to find a way to save her mother. Combining fantasy elements with a human story of grief and acceptance, The Machinery of Dreams is a sweeping portrayal of the bonds that tie a family together. Discussion with director Eric Hurt and actor Cora Metzfield, moderated by producer Jack Steinberg

HOW THE MONUMENTS CAME DOWN SATURDAY, OCT. 30, 6:00 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00 How the Monuments Came Down reveals the historic roots of white supremacy and Black resistance in Richmond since the end of the Civil War. Through personal stories from descendants and history-makers, the film uncovers how Confederate monuments came to shape Richmond’s landscape and why protestors demanded they come down. Introduction by President and CEO of VPM Jayme Swain, discussion with filmmakers Hannah Ayers and Lance Warren and story advisor and descendant Joseph Rogers, moderated by VPM news anchor Angie Miles Presented by VPM Supported by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion TRUTH TELLERS SUNDAY, OCT. 31, 1:15 PM | THE PARAMOUNT THEATER | TICKETS: $12.00

Discussion with filmmaker Richard Kane and subjects Robert Shetterly and Reggie Harris moderated by Andrea Douglas (Jefferson School) Supported by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion This film will be presented with Open Captions and the on stage presentations will include ASL interpretation.

A PREVIEW OF THE 34TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL OCT 27-31. VIEW ALL 85+ FILMS AND EVENTS, OUR COVID-19 POLICIES, AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG.

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Presented by United Way of Greater Charlottesville

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For activist Robert Shetterly, the divide between art and politics is a small one. A renowned artist who painted the series Americans Who Tell The Truth – a series of portraits that have been exhibited around the country over the past two decades – Shetterly started his art work as a response to the political climate in the early 2000s. Featuring interviews with artists and activists from around the country, Truth Tellers follows Shetterly as he explores the state of the country now and what it means to be a good American.

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

Supported by Charlottesville and Albemarle Convention and Visitors Bureau


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FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS STAY PRAYED UP SATURDAY, OCT. 30, 3:00 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $12.00 This foot-stomping, soul-stirring documentary follows the Branchettes, a legendary North Carolina gospel group led by the force of nature that is Lena Mae “Mother” Perry. Now in her 50th year as bandleader, Perry and her group have packed churches and lifted hearts throughout the South and as far away as Ireland. The film follows the Branchettes as they record their first, fully live album, and is a testament to the fact that music and faith are nothing without the fire that fuels them. Discussion with Mother Lena Mae Perry, producer Phil Cook, and filmmakers Matt Durning and D.L. Anderson Supported by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion MAYOR PETE FRIDAY, OCT. 29, 5:45 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $14.00 / $12.00 Directed by Jesse Moss of Boys State, which screened at the 2020 Virginia Film Festival, Mayor Pete follows South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg, his husband Chasten, and members of their campaign team from the days before he became the first openly gay presidential candidate, through his historic Iowa Caucus victory and campaign, to his appointment as the nation’s first LGBTQIA+ cabinet member during the Biden administration. This film is a fascinating look inside one of the most intense campaign cycles of our time, and a powerful story of perseverance and politics. Discussion with filmmaker Jesse Moss moderated by Ted Johnson (Deadline)

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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Supported by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion 9/11: INSIDE THE PRESIDENT’S WAR ROOM FRIDAY, OCT. 29, 2:00 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $12.00 This new Apple TV documentary gives a rare insider’s look at the events of that fateful day through the eyes of President George W. Bush and the members of his inner circle. With never-before-seen footage from the Capitol and interviews with the former President and other members of the Bush administration including Dick Cheney, Condoleezza Rice, and Karl Rove, this documentary explores how our nation responded to one of its most defining crises. Discussion with Former White House Chief of Staff Andy Card and Former Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove (via live video conference) as well as former White House Correspondent for ABC News Ann Compton, moderated by Director and CEO of The Miller Center William Antholis Supported by The Miller Center THE FIRST STEP SUNDAY, OCT. 31, 2:00 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $12.00 In a divided America, Van Jones controversially works across party lines for landmark criminal justice reform and a more humane response to the addiction crisis. Attempting to be a bridge builder in a time of extreme polarization, Jones delves into the inner workings of the Trump administration, from internal debates within both parties to the lives of frontline activists fighting for their communities. This timely and intimate documentary examines the various issues that divide the country, as well as the people striving to make this country better. Discussion with filmmakers Brandon and Lance Kramer and criminal justice reformer Louis Reed Presented by United Way of Greater Charlottesville Supported by CBS19 News

A PREVIEW OF THE 34TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL OCT 27-31. VIEW ALL 85+ FILMS AND EVENTS, OUR COVID-19 POLICIES, AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG.


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CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN AT THE DRIVE-IN MOVIES The Virginia Film Festival invites families and community members back to Morven Farm this Festival weekend for a series of drive-in movies, including Halloween classics celebrating anniversaries this year. All films will start at 7:00 PM. TICKETS ARE $30, SOLD PER VEHICLE. ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY, NO ON SITE SALES. A special discount for readers of C-VILLE Weekly! Take $5 off drive-in movies tickets when you use this code: SPOOKYCVILLE

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Saturday, Oct. 30, 7:00 PM

THE ADDAMS FAMILY Sunday, Oct. 31, 7:00 PM

A PREVIEW OF THE 34TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL OCT 27-31. VIEW ALL 85+ FILMS AND EVENTS, OUR COVID-19 POLICIES, AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG.

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Our Drive-In Movie Series presented by Morven Farm and UVA Arts: Office of the Provost and Vice Provost for the Arts.

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SCREAM Friday, Oct. 29, 7:00 PM

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

DRACULA Thursday, Oct. 28, 7:00 PM


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CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


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CROSSWORD

Not again BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK 34. Like lumber, in a mill 35. Most populous four-letter state 40. OB/____ 41. Middle of Q3 on co. reports 42. Forerunners of texts, in brief 43. “Uh-uh” 46. A shore thing to happen 50. Naval petty officer DOWN 51. Irks 52. Stan of Marvel Comics 1. Type of question with 53. Harden into bone two possible answers 54. On vacation 2. Divvy up 3. “When it rains, it pours” 57. Gave up 58. Flip response? sloganeer 59. Having candy before 4. Lhasa ____ (dog breed) dinner, say 5. “Buzz off!” 60. “____, can you see ... “ 6. Cocoon makeup 61. Either of two 7. Height: Prefix “Unforgettable” singers 8. Thoroughfare in 62. Together, in Toulouse Anytown, USA 63. Bowling targets 9. Maroon, in a way 64. Sworn statement 10. Long way to go? 65. Legendary Spanish 11. Supersonic speed knight El ____ 12. Roman emperor after Galba 13. Nair rival, once ANSWERS 10/20/21 14. Salk and Pepper, in brief 22. First name in Russian literature 23. “This is SO frustrating!” A L P S G A L L P I N T O 27. Amy who wrote “The S E A T O R E O O N E I L Joy Luck Club” K A N Y E W E S T W I R E S L E I S E N D T O 28. In the past K E L L Y C L A R K S O N S S E D E P A R T 29. It’s at the center of I P A S S P A P A R O A C H some court battles N U T M E G H I N T E D 30. British singer-songwriter E D S H E E R A N P A B S T M T N D E W A T V Rita B L U E S T R A V E L E R 31. “Don’t rush in!” L E N D T O N I P A N D G O N I E T Z S C H E 32. First U.S. color TVs S T E A M A R A B O H I O T O R R E W A R Y N E T S 33. ____ ex machina

67. Ugandan dictator Amin 68. How Rome wasn’t built? 1. Thanksgiving side dish 69. Low-tech fire starter 4. Indian state along the 70. ____ B or ____ C of Himalayas the Spice Girls 9. Halley of Halley’s comet 71. Respected elders 15. Grp. with the hits “Evil 72. “For crying out loud!” Woman” and “Do Ya” 73. Actors Harris and 16. Abbr. seen on 76ers Helms jerseys

ACROSS

17. Like Felix Unger vis-à-vis Oscar Madison 18. 35mm camera type 19. Conductor Georg with 31 Grammys 20. They’re produced by hives 21. Lacking a healthy glow, say 24. Nebraska native 25. French “Cheers!” 26. “Shh!” 34. Rihanna hit with the lyric “please someone come and rescue me” 36. Stress, it’s said 37. First word of a fairy tale 38. “THERE you are!” 39. “[sigh] ... We just dealt with this” (or what the circled letters spell in each of their answers) 44. Contents of l’océan 45. Bit of cunning 47. Arizona birthplace of César Chávez 48. ____-backwards 49. Truly unlikely 55. Pal of Seinfeld and Costanza 56. Bit of trivia 59. Unappealing 65. First of the Medicis to rule Florence 66. Ancient Greek region

#3

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50

#6 solution

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© 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

11

25 26

34

10

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24

#5 solution

9

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21

#6

8

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

1

Nietzche


October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com facebook.com/cville.weekly 50

You’ve Earned An

At Home Oasis

WINNER

BEST LANDSCAPE COMPANY


By Rob Brezsny

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Jungian psychotherapist and storyteller Clarissa Pinkola Estés reminds us, “In fairy tales, tears change people, remind them of what is important, and save their very souls.” I hope you’re open to the possibility of crying epic, cathartic, catalytic tears in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. According to my analysis, you have a prime opportunity to benefit from therapeutic weeping. It could chase your fears and cure your angst and revivify your soul. So please take advantage of this gift from life. Be like a superhero whose superpower is to generate healing by crying.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Filmmaker Wim Wenders said, “Any film that supports the idea that things can be changed is a great film in my eyes.” I’ll expand upon that: “Any experience, situation, influence, or person that supports the idea that things can be changed is great.” This is a useful and potentially inspiring theme for you to work with right now, Capricorn. In accordance with astrological rhythms, I hope you will be a connoisseur and instigator of beneficial, beautiful transformations.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Fitness buff Jack LaLanne was still doing his daily workout when he was 95. He was also famous for performing arduous feats. At age 65, for example, he swam a mile through Japan’s Lake Ashinoko while towing 65 boats filled with 6,500 pounds of wood pulp. I think you’re currently capable of a metaphorically comparable effort, Aquarius. One way to do it is by mastering a psychological challenge that has previously seemed overwhelming. So meditate on where your extra strength would be best directed, and use it wisely! If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are costume suggestions: fitness buff, bodybuilder, marathon runner, yoga master.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Mardi Gras is a boisterous festival that happens every February all over the planet. One hotspot is New Orleans. The streets there are filled with costumed revelers who enjoy acting in ways that diverge from their customary behavior. If you want to ride on a float in the parade that snakes down Royal Street, you must, by law, wear a festive mask. I invite all of you Scorpios to engage in similar festivities for the next three weeks—even if you’re not doing much socializing or partying. It’s a favorable time to experiment with a variety of alternate identities. Would you consider adopting a different persona or two? How could you have fun playing around with your self-image? less bound to gravity and solemnity, and more likely to break into song. Your fears are subsiding because you have the confidence to leave any situation that’s weighing you down. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here’s a costume suggestion: the bird that has your favorite kind of jizz.

Aries (March 21-April 19): Aries philosopher Emil Cioran wrote, “When I meet friends or people I know who are going through a difficult period, I usually have this advice for them: ‘Spend 20 minutes in a cemetery, and you’ll see that, though your worry won’t disappear, you’ll almost forget about it and you’ll feel better.’” I don’t think you’re weathering a terribly difficult phase right now, Aries, but you may be dealing with more riddles and doubts and perplexities than you’re comfortable with. You could be feeling a bit darker and heavier than usual. And I think Cioran’s advice would provide you with the proper stimulation to transform your riddles and doubts and perplexities into clarity and grace and aplomb. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here’s a costume suggestion: the spirit of a dead ancestor.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): According to some spiritual teachers, desire interferes with our quest for illumination. It diverts us from what’s real and important. I know gurus who even go so far as to say that our yearnings deprive us of freedom; they entrap us and diminish us. I strongly disagree with all those ideas. I regard my longing as a primary fuel that energizes my drive to free myself from pain and nonsense. How about you, Taurus? In alignment with astrological omens, I authorize you to deepen and refine and celebrate the

yearning in your heart. Your title/nickname could be: 1. Yearning Champion. 2. Desire Virtuoso. 3. Connoisseur of Longing.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Author Jessamyn West confessed, “I am always jumping into the sausage grinder and deciding, even before I’m half ground, that I don’t want to be a sausage after all.” I offer her testimony as a cautionary tale, Gemini. There’s no astrological reason, no cosmic necessity, that decrees you must become like a sausage anytime soon. Such a fate can be easily avoided. All you must do is commit yourself to not jumping into the sausage grinder. Also: In every way you can imagine, don’t be like a sausage.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): Our fellow Cancerian, author Franz Kafka, told us, “It is often safer to be in chains than to be free.” And yes, some of us Crabs go through phases when we crave safety so much that we tolerate, even welcome, being in chains. But the fact is that you’re far more likely to be safe if you are free, not in chains. And according to my reading of the astrological omens, that’s extra true for you now. If you can celebrate Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are costume suggestions: runaway prisoner, escape artist, freedom fighter.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Some of us yearn for allies who can act like saviors: rescue us from our demons and free us from our burdensome pasts and transform us into the beauties we want to become. On the other hand, some of us do all this hard work by ourselves: rescue ourselves from our demons and free ourselves from our burdensome pasts and

transform ourselves into the beauties we want to become. I highly recommend the latter approach for you in the coming weeks, Leo. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here is a costume suggestion: your own personal savior.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “One of the reasons people are so unhappy is they don’t talk to themselves,” says author Elizabeth Gilbert. “You have to keep a conversation going with yourself throughout your life,” she continues, “to see how you’re doing, to keep your focus, to remain your own friend.” Now is a favorable time to try such an experiment, Virgo. And if you already have skill in the art of carrying on a vibrant dialog with yourself, now is a perfect moment to upgrade and refine it. Try this experiment: Imagine having a conversation with the Future You.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “In the absence of will­power, the most complete collection of virtues and talents is worthless.” Libran occultist Aleister Crowley wrote that, and I agree. But let’s phrase his idea more positively: To make full use of your virtues and talents, you must develop a strong willpower. And here’s the good news, Libra: The coming weeks will be a favorable time to cultivate your willpower, along with the assets that bolster it, like discipline, self-control, and concentration. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are accessories I recommend for you to carry with you, no matter what your costume is: a wand, a symbolic lightning bolt, an ankh, an arrow, a Shiva lingam stone or crystal. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888.

Thursdays 5-9 pm at the Downtown Vitae Distillery tasting room! *Fabulous* specialty cocktails, as well as offer the $5 Raffle every 3rd Thursday of the month, with local goodies, and a Rockin Playlist!

Wearing rainbow and/or any outfit that makes you feel especially yourself will always be highly encouraged!

$1 from each cocktail sold will continue to help @cvillepride, along with the proceeds from our 3rd Thursday Raffles!

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NIGHT

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): When birdwatchers describe a bird, they speak of its “jizz.” This term refers to the distinctive character of its habitual movements, flying style, posture, vocal mannerisms, and coloring. One aficionado defines jizz as the bird’s “indefinable quality,” or the “vibe it gives off.” I’ve got a theory that right now you’re as bird-like as you’ve ever been. You seem lighter and freer than usual,

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

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New but with an old Soul

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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If you haven’t been by Minerals & Mystics yet, we can’t wait to meet you!

We are a unique gem in Seminole Square Shopping Center filled with rocks and minerals, sterling silver natural gemstone jewelry and so much more. Each of us here at Minerals & Mystics is on our own path of spiritual discovery and enlightenment. We may have just opened in August, but we have been studying and working with crystals and jewelry for many years, each of us in a different mindset and place on our path just like you. What better way to grow than by sharing that journey with others. Join us for beautiful treasures, interesting conversations, and a like-minded community of different and wonderful seekers.

Be a rock star at Minerals & Mystics! Be sure to ask us about our private shopping experience - the Rock Star hour! www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive Charlottesville VA 22901 434-284-7709


Q&A

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What do you think of the candidates for governor?

I like Princess Blanding. JORGE TERAN/FACEBOOK

I am pro environment so I vote blue every.damn.time! Republicans consistently undo environmental policies implemented by predecessors.

With the commonwealth’s house and senate controlled by the democrats all the gloom and doom under a Youngkin administration isn’t going to happen. Decide what is best for Virginia. I’m voting for fresh and new ideas. @PFDAUGHERTY1959/INSTAGRAM

STEPHANIE CIMILLO/FACEBOOK

Turn VA RED!

They both suck.

@MIMIREECE/INSTAGRAM

PAUL DIXON/FACEBOOK

Keep VA blue! I’m not voting for the antichoice, anti-vax, antivote mini t*ump.

Meh.

I will vote for McAuliffe, prototypical politico, over Youngkin whose model is an insurrectionist who tried to overthrow American constitution last January 6th.

JEREMY SHARP/FACEBOOK

GARY BERRY/EMAIL

@CAMI.LOVES.COLOR/INSTAGRAM

Like all elections, no good candidates. @DBLOND80/INSTAGRAM

Pretty sure there’s a third choice. Where’s their picture? @DIRTGOD_RAVEN_MACK/INSTAGRAM

I’m voting for the guy who believes parents must be and have a right to involve themselves in my (our) children’s education!

Two corrupt corporate tools, one more obviously toxic than the other.

Voting for Terry! Youngkin, recruited by Trump, is just a bored, super wealthy man who is dipping his toe into far-right-wing politics. Virginians aren’t buying what he is selling.

JAMIE DYER/FACEBOOK

@SHARON_SALZ/INSTAGRAM

@RKEYSAR/INSTAGRAM

@ROBERTSMITH2030/INSTAGRAM

@DULCIMERT/INSTAGRAM

Like choosing between a shit sandwich or a piss cocktail. MELISSA AMBER STATEN/FACEBOOK

Youngkin is a Nazi wannabe. PAUL ZAVADA/FACEBOOK

Don’t like either one of them. If Youngkin wins it will be the beginning of Trump’s next presidential run.

I agree that they’re both substandard. But, please vote for McAuliffe, the better choice in this dismal match-off.

DAVID GOODWIN/FACEBOOK

DENA BOWERS/FACEBOOK

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

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Next week’s question: How do you expect the UVA basketball teams to fair this year?

October 27 – November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

McAuliffe was already governor and not that good. Youngkin a much better choice.

At a rally for Youngkin, they pledge allegiance to a flag used at the January 6 insurrection, maybe the one used to beat up a police officer. Go Terry! I’d vote for the groundhog in my backyard before I’d even think of voting for a Republican, and I used to be a Republican.


54

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v. Civil Action No. CL21-1291 HEIRS OF GEORGE HUGHES, et. al., AND THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF PHILLIP HARRIS (Husband of Minerva B. Harris), SADIE BROOKS (Wife of Matthew Brooks), ? BROOKS (Wife of Charles Brooks), ? BROOKS (Wife of Burton Brooks). Defendants ORDER OF PUBLICATION

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October 20 - 26, 2021 c-ville.com

QUESTIONS?

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE WILLIAM H. YATES, Plaintiff

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316

__ Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: a male child born to Takia M. Calloway v. Takia M. Calloway and Unknown Father The object of this suit is to: Terminate the parental rights of Unknown Father, the father of a male child born to Takia M. Calloway on January 20th, 2020. It is ORDERED that the X defendant Unknown Father, appear at the above-named Court and protect her interests on or before October 27th, 2021 at 2:00 p.m. 9/15/2021 DATE

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Rates starting at $40. Email for specific pricing.

David M. Barredo JUDGE

The object of the above styled suit is to quiet title and claim by adverse possession of the property located in Albemarle County, Virginia known as Tax Map Parcel 0944·00·00·024Dl more particularly described as Lot Hon a plat prepared by Kirk Hughes, dated June 4, 2021 and recorded in Deed Book 5583, page 664, on containing 2 acres more or less on the east side of State Route 616. And, it appearing by affidavit filed according to law that the identity and/or physical whereabouts of the Defendants are unknown, it is therefore ORDERED that any person with an interest in said property appear on or before November 30, 2021, in the Clerk’s Office of the Court and do what is necessary to protect his or her interest. And it is further ORDERED that this order be published once a week for four successive weeks in the C’Ville Weekly, a newspaper of general circulation in Albemarle County, VA; and once a week for four successive weeks in the The Jewish Press, a newspaper in general circulation in Manhattan, New York, NY, that a copy of this order be posted at the front door of the courthouse wherein this court is held; and that a copy of this Order be mailed to any defendant whose last known address is shown on the affidavit at said address. ENTERED: 9/22/21 Claude V. Worrell, Jr. WE ASK FOR THIS: C. Hailey Vaughan Robertson, VSB # 65875 Robertson Legal, PLLC, 2407 Sunset Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 434·249·9298, chaileyvrobertson@gmail.com Counsel for Plaintiff SEEN: Christopher c. Graham, VSB # 46265 Eustis @ Graham, PC, 609 East High Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 434-293-9900, eandglaw@icloud.com Guardian ad Litem


EMPLOYMENT

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316

55

_ General District Court Charlottesville X Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court __ Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: a female child born to Paula Elizabeth Barrett v. Paula Elizabeth Barrett and Unknown Father or Curtis Smith The object of this suit is to: Terminate the parental rights of Unknown Father or Curtis Smith, the father of a female child born to Paula Elizabeth Barrett on September 5th, 2020. We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet & C’ville!

It is ORDERED that the X defendant Unknown Father or Curtis Smith, appear at the above-named Court and protect his interests on or before October 22nd, 2021 at 3:00 p.m. 8/11/2021 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population.

We're Hiring! About Us

Want to apply your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so, The Arc has these opportunities to offer.

Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities:

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $15-$17/hr) Direct Support Professionals- Charlottesville Day Support ($13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr)

In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience, The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive benefits package including paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

For more details and positions, and to apply, please visit Apply now!

http://arcpva.org/employment

@arcpiedmont.va Offering competitive arcpva.org compensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive benefits package including paid leave, health, dental & vision insurance, as well as life & long-term disability insurance. 434-977-4002 x124

The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

434-977-4002x124 arcpva.org • @arcpiedmont.va

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AND include a Logo or Photo in your ad.

Email chloe@c-ville.com for more information.

LOOKING TO HIRE? Advertise your Employymnet ad HERE

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Advertise your House for Sale or Rent, your Open Positions, your Big Items for Sale or your Community Announcement

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October 27 - November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

NEW!

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $15-$17/hr) Directinterested Support ProfessionalsCharlottesville We're very eager to hear from candidates in working in Crozet and C’ville! Day Support ($13-$15/hr) To see additional details and a full listing of all our positions or to apply, please visit our web site at http://arcpva.org/employment Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professional- Floater ($16/hr)


56

Winter Wander TRAIL OF LIGHTS

JOIN OUR TEAM! Two part-time positions available: *DELIVERY DRIVER *FRONT END ASSOCIATE Requirements: 18+ Years Old, Valid VA Driver's License, Basic Computer Skills, Basic Phone Skills

Earn some extra money for the holidays.

Knowledge of plants and flowers is helpful. Any retail experience preferred. We are willing to train the right candidate. Flexible hours to fit your schedule. For more info, stop by or email wecare@thedogwoodtreeflorist.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Boar’s Head Resort is hiring for their Winter Wander Trail of Lights illuminated lakeside stroll taking place from November 26 through January 30.

Food & Beverage:

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October 27 - November 2, 2021 c-ville.com

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WWW.CAAR.COM 57

VOL. 30 NO. 43 n OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Witch and Wizard Candy Paddle on Lake Monticello Photo by Joyce Foley

Resort-Style Living, Great Friends, and Nonstop Trees BY CARLA HUCKABEE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Lake Monticello:


OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

58

Ask Us About

St o n e O r c h a r d

Lifestyle Homes in the Villages of Stoney Creek

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

The views will last forever. This opportunity will not. • Breathtaking Mountain Views

• On the Golf Course

• Maintenance-free Landscaping

• Near the Clubhouse, Grill, Tennis, Pool

• Miles of Groomed Walking Paths

• Walk to Farmer’s Market, Town Center

from the mid-400’s Wintergreen Realty LLC

3079 Rockfish Valley Hwy, Wintergreen, VA 22958 (434) 361-0500 (800) 325-2200 www.wintergreenrealestate.com


59

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

WOODTHRUSH LANE

Custom home in Northern Albemarle County. Set on 2 private wooded acres on a cul-de-sac. Enjoy the outdoors from the front porch, deck or patio. Large, built in place garden shed for storage or workshop. Open Main floor plan with great flow. Study/Library with built in bookshelves. Second floor with master and 3 additional bedrooms including Junior suite with skylights. Finished terrace level with separate access and radiant heated tile floors. Beautiful, landscaped terraced gardens. 2 miles from Preddy Creek Trail Park with 571 acre recreational area for hiking, mountain biking and riding. Owner/Agent $795,000

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

Annie Gould Gallery

PENNY LANE

Fabulous cottage tucked away on 12.5 acres with 1 division right. Top quality craftsmanship features; a copper roof and downspouts, vaulted ceilings, dramatic windows and artistic stonework.The first floor bath features a stone fireplace. Mature landscaping, wrap around porch, spring, stream and a detached studio all work to make this a compelling property. The studio has a fireplace with a beautiful walnut mantle. There are 2 sheds (a potting shed and another set up for miniature goats) $850,000

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

Semi-Custom Detached Villa Homes Surrounding ainBelvedere Pocket Park! From $549,900 Tour our Newest Model Homes and Old Trail Village Tour Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere Belvedere and and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 Villa Model in |Old Trail Village | 406 Astel Crozet, 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in Old in434-987-6522 Trail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VAVA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Sales Center Now Open on-site off Rt 29 North!


OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

60

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers BEECH HILL

ROBINSON WOODS

Bright, comfortable, and recently renovated house with a flexible floorplan. 4 bedrooms and 3.5 baths. Features gas fireplace, wood floors, new appliances, granite countertops. Conveniently located in the city minutes from Downtown and UVA. MLS#620141 $670,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

OFF OF GARTH ROAD

12-acre country estate, west of Charlottesville. The 2-story, 5-BR, 4.5-BA manor home is surrounded by lovely mature gardens, plantings, trees, and beautiful spring-fed pond. Truly a rare offering with unsurpassed beauty, tranquility, and country living. MLS#617622 $2,500,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

WOODLANDS

Beautifully restored 1780s Colonial on 293 acres in Northampton County. This historic home has 4 BR, 3 full & 2 half BA. Property has access to the Machipongo River which flows into the Atlantic. Rare offering. MLS#614051 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.WoodlandsFarmVa.com

Spectacular and spacious contemporary residence on 14.3 acres. Situated between Ivy and Crozet. The interior features an open floor plan with quality details throughout, including Marvin windows, extensive custom millwork, 20 ft. high stone fireplace, superb kitchen/breakfast room, spacious master suite with dramatic spa bathroom. TOTAL: 4-5 BR, 4 full BA, 1 half BA. Exterior special features: copper roof, extensive Ipe deck, whole house generator, and heated pool. One huge feature: high speed fiber optic internet!!! MLS#623368 $2,375,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MADISON

Over 560 acres of wooded land on Thoroughfare Mountain in Madison County. Three contiguous parcels, completely private, with endless possibilities. Hunt, ride ATVs, camp, build a weekend retreat or a permanent residence in total serenity. MLS#621697 $2,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GALLISON HALL

Set on 43 park-like acres, this Farmington gem features a 1931-33 Georgian house, indoor pool and tennis facilities, spectacular Blue Ridge views, total privacy, and an exceptional close-to-town location. On historic registers. MLS#617686 $8,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

THE GLEASON

Open, extremely spacious floor plan with 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths. Enjoy expansive mountain and city views from inside or from one of 2 balconies. Secure garage parking. Ting Available. Walk to dining, shopping, and entertainment! MLS#621646 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434. 981.1863

HESSIAN HILLS

Brick ranch close to UVA. Open floor plan, front room with gas FP and skylights. Huge kitchen with upgraded appliances. Downstairs apartment has full BA, FP, kitchen, & private entrance. Agent related to owner. MLS#622003 $599,000 Gail Hubbard, 434.242.7073

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

MEADOWBROOK HILLS

Located in one of the City’s most desirable neighborhoods, this lovely 3-bedroom, 3-bath, circa 1958 brick home is convenient to all that Charlottesville has to offer! This home is in great condition and features hardwood floors, wood burning fireplace and recently renovated kitchen. The Rivanna Trail, Meadow Creek Park, Bodo’s Bagels and more are just right across the street. Walkable to Barracks Road Shopping Center and the University of Virginia and just a short drive from Downtown. MLS#622783 $695,000 Will Faulconer 434-987-9455

HIGHLAND COUNTY

Come see the stars! 356-acre mountaintop farm and cabin retreat. Panoramic mountain, valley, and pastoral views. Charming cabin with 3 BR, 1 full BA, stone fireplace, 2 porches. Fire pit, equipment sheds, pond, and stream. (Owner/Agent) MLS#619945 $1,395,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


61

32 ACRES WITH DIVISION RIGHTS

Land is a mix of pasture and woods with a creek, long road frontage, and DIVISION RIGHTS. There is an old homesite with mountain views. MLS#622704 EXCELLENT PRICE $338,000. For details call: Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

ESTES RIDGE

Beautiful 14.7-acre tract of pristine land with both open fields and mature woods. So many possibilities for the property - create a small estate parcel with main residence and dependencies or enjoy recreational activities. No HOA! MLS#621176 $289,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RAGGED MOUNTAIN FARM

Two wonderful estate parcels comprised of 185.01± acres, in coveted Ragged Mountain Farm. Excellent elevated building site, complete privacy, and beautiful views. Murray/Henley/Western school district. MLS#621083 $1,895,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

LONESOME MOUNTAIN ROAD

5-acre lot that has not been available for many years. This country but close-to-town location is conveniently located with quick access to Historic Downtown Mall, UVA, NGIC, airport, and North Fork Business Park. MLS#593160 $250,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RAGGED MT. SUBDIVISION

4.32 acres, half open, high cleared building site on plateau, fantastic view, gently rolling for great yard, driveway in place. MLS#622663 $465,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MISSION HOME ROAD

146.88 acres in Albemarle & Greene County. Privacy & protection adjacent to the Shenandoah National Park! Full division rights & multiple home sites. Extraordinary timberland. Views of the mnt., along with easy access to trails & Skyline Drive. MLS#620276 $1,200,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EMERALD RIDGE

Spectacular 22-acre lot in Western Albemarle! Wooded, wonderfully private and offers the ideal location for an elevated building site with the potential for big year-round views. Western schools! MLS#621504 $295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WESLEY CHAPEL ROAD

Nice, mostly wooded residential building lot in Meriwether Lewis School District! Great privacy, 1.72± acres, beautiful rural setting in an area of large farm and estate properties. Located approximately 15 miles NW of Charlottesville. MLS#613685 $125,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FOXWOOD FOREST

Beautiful 4-5 bedroom, smart wired home, nestled off the road in the neighborhood of Foxwood Forest with FIBER OPTIC INTERNET. 15 Minutes from Target/Harris Teeter. Minutes from NGIC and Research Park. MLS #619815 $795,000 Jennifer Moreira, 434.409.2844 (owner/agent)

NORTH DOWNTOWN

1920 Arts and Crafts bungalow 5 blocks north of the Downtown Mall. 2-story home offers LR with FP, DR, kitchen, 2-BR & 1 BA on the upper level. Separately metered lower-level apartment with 1-BR, 1-BA, kitchen, LR, & separate entrance. MLS#623414 $538,900. Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

62

WINTERGREEN

BROOK HOLLOW, KESWICK

This exceptional 15,000sf custom home created with exquisite craftsman-ship and luxurious attention to detail, sits in the Blue Ridge Mountains near Wintergreen. Built by Robb Construction, the floor plan is open and perfect for entertaining. Eucalyptus flooring leads you past mahogany doors and foyer to the dining room with a wagon wheel ceiling and alabaster and bronze chandelier. The great room is stunning with a 19’ barrel ceiling and two-story Rumford stone fireplace. The gourmet kitchen with wet bar, custom copper vessel sink from Italy, and butler’s pantry will delight you. Floor-to-ceiling mahogany creates warmth and elegance in the study. A sitting area and fireplace compliment the owner’s suite, and a fireplace near the bath invites relaxation. Located on the first floor, you also find a pool, sauna, and gym. A media and billiard room are located on the second level with three additional bedrooms. Wine cellar, banquet room with full bar, and apartment are on the terrace level. Entertaining continues outdoors with fire pit and grill on the upper patio and fireplace on the lower patio. For the most discerning buyer, Cardinal Rest is the perfect mountain retreat, or year-round primary residence. MLS 622288 $2,292,500

Comfortable and manageable Keswick estate of 38 acres. Three separate parcels, English cottage style main residence with 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, attached 2-car garage, home office, separate guest cottage, 6 stall shed row barn and separate storage building. Spectacular setting, well back from the road, opposite Castle Hill and adjoins Keswick Vineyards. Historic, spring and pond. Glorious westward mountain views and gated entry. MLS 614993 $1,475,000

SOUTHERN ALBEMARLE

LLANDAFF FARM

Exceptional details describe this custom-built, builder home. From the mahogany floors, the 60X96 kitchen island, exquisite moldings, spa-like primary suite to the private, park-like 10 acres. The floor plan is an entertainer’s dream, or, the perfect family home with an attached apartment. The apartment offers a spacious office/ game room, family room, one bedroom, one full bath, one half bath, kitchen and laundry. Sit on the beautiful gazebo overlooking your fenced, level yard including a 475’ zip line! Hardware River frontage for the water enthusiasts. Unfinished, walkout terrace level, detached 3-bay shop plus equipment run-in shed and gated entry. Geothermal heating and cooling and 75-year roof is just the start of a long list of impressive details featured in this home. MLS 622132 $1,795,000

9 acres in Albemarle County The southernmost hilltop of Carters Mountain, 8 miles from town, overlooking huge farms, estates, and the Hardware River below. Nineteen acres, income-producing (3) cottages with excellent long term tenants . The property has demonstrated good appreciation over the years. The income is solid, the view is sublime, and the cottages are in good repair. The oldest dates to 1928, with new replacements over the years. Established 1/2 acre vineyard. One could easily build here, now or in thefuture, for it also has that Classic Albemarle estate feel. MLS 609461 $659,500

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com 28 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville


63 OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

NEW CONSTRUCTION IN KESWICK

40 Campbell Road 4 BR, 3 BA, 3084 SQ FT $895,000 mls 622743 Duke Merrick, 434-962-5658

SOLAR + MAIN LEVEL LIVING

104 Bollingbrook Drive 3 BR, 3 BA, 2734 SQ FT $455,000 mls 622982 Katelyn Mancini, 703-203-3388

FERN HILL, MID-CENTURY MODERN

24.85 ACRES WITH POND

2006 Meadowbrook Road 3 BR, 2 BA, 1900 SQ FT $625,000 mls 623098 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

Hatton Ferry Road Homesite has 3-car garage in place $349,900 mls 623388 Mike Peters, 434-981-3995

THE MONTEGO

CONTEMPORARY HOME IN FREE UNION

379 Moon Shadow Road 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 1803 SQ FT $304,150 mls 622901 Susan Stewart, 434-242-3550

5115 Catterton Road 2 BR, 2 BA, 2042 SQ FT $499,900 mls 623208 Mike Peters, 434-981-3995

VIEW MORE LISTINGS ONLINE

LAKEFRONT DUTCH COLONIAL

STUNNING ESTATE PARCEL

312 Sunset Drive 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 2882 SQ FT $450,000 mls 622706 Jan Shiflett, 434-242-6057

Dick Woods Road 21.28 acres on Ivy Creek $1,195,000 mls 616567 Jane Porter Fogleman, 434-981-1274

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Charlottesville 434.951.5155 | Greene 434.985.2348 | Zion Crossroads 434.589.2611 | Western Albemarle 434.205.4355


FEATURE

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

64

Lake Monticello: Resort-Style Living, Great Friends, CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

and Nonstop Trees

T

he founders of Lake Monticello (back in the 1960’s) probably had no idea the impact they would have on a slice of land between the Rivanna River and State Route 53. What they envisioned as a cozy little getaway around a man-made spring-fed lake blossomed into a thriving active community in Fluvanna County. The weekend retreat evolved into yearround retirement and second homes. And those buyers eventually gave way to the entire spectrum of families and households who now enjoy a lifestyle that offers the best of resort-style living while keeping nature close.

Rich in Resort-Style Amenities Lake Monticello is the largest population center in Fluvanna County with ap-

BY CARLA HUCKABEE

proximately 12,000 residents. Within the gated community, there are 4,635 lots, all of them sold. Owners have yet to build on 329 of them but the other 4,306 are built and occupied, 20 more than a year ago. With more than 22 miles of coastline, there are 512 waterfront homes, and the golf course accommodates another 206 lots along its fairways. All homeowners are automatically members of the Lake Monticello Owners’ Association (LMOA) and enjoy the countless benefits that membership confers. The lake’s 350 acres accommodate powerboats, paddlers, and fishermen. The marina, boat launches, slips, and racks take the hassle out of owning a boat and make it easy to spend a lot more time on the water. Water skiing, tubing, fishing, and paddling are popular. Specific areas for swimming from boats and five separate

beaches bring out sun and water lovers of all ages during the hot summer months. Meanwhile, those who eschew sand can enjoy the outdoor pool for laps or general splashing around. Every self-respecting gated community includes a golf course and Lake Monticello’s is public. Upgraded facilities include an expanded grass hitting area as well as the new artificial tee-line turf practice area. Seven different leagues, from the Gray Foxes to the Pink Flamingos enjoy the competition and camaraderie of the course, open all but Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. After a round, golf mates can relive each shot on the Fairway Clubhouse restaurant terrace overlooking the beautiful 18th hole. Other dining venues include the Lakeside Restaurant, with many private dining options, The Pub for an extensive

menu and music, and the Shark Tank for corn dogs, nachos, ice cream and other casual fare. Requisite playgrounds, ball fields, pickle ball, basketball and tennis courts, and walking paths round out the resortstyle amenities. And Lake Monticello is just getting started.

Nonstop Trees and Nature “The first thing you notice are the trees; lots and lots of trees.” Lisa Henry moved to the Lake from Central Pennsylvania 10 years ago and is a Member Services Representative for LMOA. “People move here to be surrounded by nature. Yes, all the amenities are great, but it’s those amenities in this beautiful backdrop that make Lake Monticello special. We are close enough to Charlottesville to take advantage of everything they have to offer, but we get to live at the Lake every day.” A “cabin in the woods” is how Merieke Henry, LMOA Communications Director, describes the character of the community. “I often yield to deer (even on my driveway, as we have a creek running through our property where the deer like to drink) and admire a large and diverse bird population in our mature trees. Sightings of a bear swimming in the lake, or fox, raccoons, and even bobcats in yards are common. My favorite encounter


Vacation Year Round at

65 OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

Lake Monticello

www.monticellocountryrealtors.com

• Gated Residential Community • 350 Acre Recreational Lake with 5 Beachs • Great Fishing • City Services • Clubhouse, Pool, Tennis

• • • • •

Convenient To Shopping 18 Hole PGA Golf Course Activity groups for all ages Waterfront Homes Sold By Boat Community Tour Available at www.monticellocountryrealtors.com

Conveniently located just 25 minutes from Charlottesville, you’ll find a whole new lifestyle. Take Route 53 from C’ville to a left on VSH 618 (Lake Monticello Road). Our office is on the right

We Sell Homes by Boat! Open 7 Days a Week

Monticello country, realtors 2704 Lake Monticello Road • Palmyra, VA 22963

434.589.3539 • 800.225 LAKE

0 JAMES MADISON HWY

ZONED INDUSTRIAL. 9.4 +/- acres of mature hardwoods, pines and creek. 1,013 +/- feet of road frontage on James Madison Highway, VSH 15. Excellent location and investment potential. 2 miles to the historic Village of Palmyra, VA and the Rivanna River; less than 30 minutes to Charlottesville; less than an hour to Richmond. MLS# 609142 $89,000 FEATURE

15 PATRIOT LANE • LAKE MONTICELLO

River Bend at Broken Island. 76.68 +/- acres. Rivanna River views and access. Development potential. Family owned for two generations. Access through Sycamore Square on Justin Drive. Close to restaurants, retail, pharmacy and doctors. Just outside the gates of Lake Monticello, 15 minutes to Zions Cross Roads, 20 minutes to Charlottesville, 1 hour to Richmond. MLS# 609235 $385,000

RANDY WHITE Realtor

JEN SAMPLE

jennifer.sample@longandfoster.com

434-906-2187 CELL rwhite8551@aol.com

Sales Office: 434-589-7653 Mobile: 434-989-9246

3661 Lake Monticello Road Palmyra, VA 22963

MONTICELLO COUNTRY, REALTORS

www.MonticelloRealtors.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Move-in ready 3 BR, 2.5 BA on a corner lot with finished basement! Kitchen has cherry KraftMade cabinets, soft close drawers, granite counters, ceramic back splash, upgraded appliances, convection double oven, convection microwave & ceramic flooring. Formal dining room with walk out to large back deck. Large living rm w/wood burning FP. Spacious master BR with full BA. Finished basement w/rec rm, half BA & separate laundry room & storage area. MLS# 621264, $289,995

0 JUSTIN DRIVE


lake: a hawk dove down and caught a fish in front of my boat. Before I could catch my breath, a bald eagle swooped in and snatched the fish from the hawk! You can’t make this stuff up!” Looking for quiet, rural living after working in Northern Virginia, Margaret Loewenstein and her husband moved to Lake Monticello five years ago. They were drawn here by the country feel and natural beauty of the community. She supports an effort by residents to establish the community as a Certified Wildlife Habitat by the National Wildlife Federation. More than 80 of the required 150 households to achieve community certification already comply with the required practices. And on the golf course, there’s no need for piped in bird calls! The National Audubon Society certified the Lake Mon-

“If you want to buy, you need to put yourself in the best position, without any barriers. I had a couple from South Carolina who wanted to move to the Lake, but they had to sell their home first. That cut them right out of the picture.”

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

66 with wildlife was while kayaking on the

ticello Golf Course for its commitment to embracing the natural environment and protecting and supporting its wildlife and habitats.

Robust Social Network At the heart of what makes Lake Monticello a great place to live is what the residents make of it. The Newcomers and Old Friends Club (NCOF) creates a welcoming community and helps neighbors become friends. Loewenstein is Chairperson for NCOF and was greeted with more than 100 attendees at the September meeting, their first in-person gathering since COVID. “People were thrilled to be able to connect again and jump back in where we left off in the spring of 2020.

“Name whatever interest you can imagine, and we probably have a group for it. If we don’t, we can start one! Sip and savor, hiking, beer, anything goes. Our history groups and wine tasters have the most members. As groups fill up, we start a waiting list and ask for someone to lead the new group once we have enough interested members. “NCOF was established many years ago in response to so many people having moved to Lake Monticello from all over the country. This gave people an easy way to make new friends. Here, you can be as social and involved as you want to be. When I retired, I couldn’t have imagined having so many friends and being involved in such different activities and meaningful causes.

“It’s one of the things that is so very special about living at Lake Monticello.” A more recent addition to that social network is the Young Residents and Families Committee (YRF). Despite its original history as a retirement community, Lake Monticello’s demographics have shifted dramatically in recent years. Marieke says, “YRF was formed to represent this change in the population and organizes many family-oriented activities.”

Buyers Keep Coming It’s no surprise that the demand for housing at Lake Monticello exceeds supply. Combine the Lake’s attractions with a seller’s market, and you have the formula for a backup of buyers. Vicki Wilson, Principal Broker/Owner, Monticello Country REALTORS®, Inc., has lived at the Lake for 24 years. “Just like in other areas, inventory here is historically low. Some would-be sellers are staying put because they can’t find a home or are waiting for building material prices to come back down.” “There are three main sources of the continued influx into the Lake Monticello area,” says Sandra Collins, Associate Broker with Long & Foster. “First, UVA grads and alumni are staying or coming back, especially with the viability of working from home. Second, retirees, especially those coming from the Northeast for milder weather and a lower cost of living are looking for something within striking distance of Charlottesville’s cultural attractions. They can have the Lake and nature every day and go to Charlottesville when they want. And third, new homebuyers up to about the $300,000 level can find great value here. With current mortgage rates, buying can be cheaper than paying rent. “It’s frustrating for buyers, but there are signs things may be shifting. Days on market are beginning to soften. Any significant increase in mortgage interest rates will eliminate a big wedge of buyers from this market. “If you want to buy, you need to put yourself in the best position, without any barriers. I had a couple from South Carolina who wanted to move to the Lake, but they had to sell their home first. That cut them right out of the picture.” Wilson agrees. Buyers need to be ready to go. “We are listing homes every day; you just have to be quick and keep an eye on the market. That is what a good buyer’s agent will do for you. We see ‘coming soon’ homes on the MLS that might not appear on sites like Zillow or Realtor.com. until days later. That couple of days advantage can give a buyer a competitive edge.”

Too Much of a Good Thing? As more buyers look to this area for affordable and amenity-rich living within a 30-minute drive of Charlottesville, builders are responding with housing developments outside Lake Monticello’s gate. And Associate memberships at the Lake are available and offer some of the same social and golf amenities that people living inside enjoy. Ryan Homes is building two separate nearby developments. Advertised as the

most affordable new homes in the Charlottesville area, Village Oaks has more than 100 new households living directly across from Lake Monticello’s gate. These one-level living homes with unfinished basements and two-car garages took only 18 months to sell out. Nearby, the Island Hill community of fewer than 50 homes on larger wooded lots, boast homes of four or more bedrooms. The Villages at Nahor. Village Green. Colonial Circle. All told, well over 500 new homes. That much popularity is bound to generate some downsides, like traffic. Any sizable new developments receive much attention from area residents worried about the traffic sure to accompany an influx of new homes. Collins says, “The real concern is that traffic has been increasing in lock step with the number of new homes. All those cars, and trucks, are funneled [into the area] on the same two roads. And Route 53 can be somewhat treacherous at night or in the rain. But there’s not much doubt that the buyers are there.”

No Typical Buyer Twenty plus years ago, there was a typical buyer at Lake Monticello. That’s no longer the case. “We see empty nesters, retirees, firsttime home buyers, anyone that sees an advantage to lower prices, lower taxes, and the slower pace that the Lake offers,” says Wilson. “People come to Lake Monticello for the amenities, low HOA fees, clubs, activities, lake, and golf course. It’s a quick commute to Charlottesville and one hour to Richmond.” The Lake will always attract weekenders or buyers retiring to a more leisurely lifestyle. But that’s not even most of them anymore. “With more people working from home, our high-speed internet services offer that luxury” to buyers of all ages, continuing the demographic shift at Lake Monticello. “Our motto here is ‘Vacation at Home,’ but maybe we should say ‘Vacation or Work at Home.’” Henry says, “This started as a weekend place for retirees. It has become a lot more diverse. I’m older than I am young, and I would never want to live in a 55+ community. This is so much more interesting, so much livelier.” Merieke is surprised to find herself here after returning to Virginia from The Netherlands six years ago. She only considered Lake Monticello because rent was cheaper than in Charlottesville. “I never desired to live in a gated community, but, to my surprise, this warm neighborhood immediately stole my heart. My husband and I soon decided to buy a home inside the gates, partly because the community is ideal for family fun. There is a great high school nearby, and my two children can walk or bike to friends’ houses. And honestly, it was the smart thing to do as the housing prices were a steal! I describe Lake Monticello as a hometown—warm, neighborly, and quiet.” With trees. Lots and lots of trees. Carla Huckabee writes about high-performing real estate.


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971 FLATTOP MOUNTAIN RD

35

Located in Northfields subdivision this is an Entertainers Dream! The main home features 10 Bedrooms and 9 Full Baths; The Carriage House over garage features 3 Bedrooms and 2.5 Baths; 2 Large Vehicle Bays & Private Gym. Includes a second buildable Lot in rear w/access from Old Brook Rd. Build a pool house, guest house; or divide the parcel. LESS Than 5 miles to: UVA Hospital; Downtown Cville; JPJ Arena. CHO Airport 6 miles. DC 2 hours & Richmond 1 hour. MLS# 621112, $3,200,000

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STILL MEADOW

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

2085 Brownstone Lane

NORTHFIELD MANOR

5 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths • Hardwood Floors, Custom Bookcases, & Plantation Shutters • Stunning Moldings & Chair Railings • Professionally Landscaped for Privacy & Minimal Maintenance • Meticulously Maintained, includes a Generator • Convenient to Charlottesville’s Amenities & UVA MLS 621113 Offered at $675,000 Dir: 29 North, right on Carrsbrook Drive, left on Still Meadow Avenue, right on Brownstone Lane. House on left.

John Seidler 434 996-3268 Associate Broker, GRI

THE

Live year round comfortably in this retreat style custom home. Hi speed century link internet, double lot & never ending spring. w 3 beds 2.5 baths & wrap around deck. Offered at $700k

2271 Seminole Trail • Charlottesville, VA

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

500 DAVID ROAD

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited.

NOMINATE ME NOMINATE ME Candice Van der Linde Buy and Sell Cville Team

Call: 434-8730 Connect: BuyandSellCville.com Come visit: RE/MAX Realty Specialist

All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over).

NOMINATE ME

We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

Buy and Sell Cville Team Nominees: Candice & Bert

Candice Van der Linde @Candice_Realtor Buy and Sell Cville Team

Candice van der Linde, Realtor

Call: 434-981-8730 • Connect: BuyandSellCville.com

Passionate about Helping 308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA People SELL & BUY Residential Send your news and/or press Real Estate in the Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you & Share Some of our Best Adventures!

943 Glenwood Station Ln #203

22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com releases to editorREW@gmail.com

Buy and Sell Cville Team Nominees: Candice & Bert

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Marshalls Manner. This property features main house as well as a detached cottage. Tucked away main home boasts 5 bedrooms 3 full baths & updated kitchen & sunroom. The rentable cottage features 2 bedrooms 1.5 baths & Mountain View’s. The private 4.7 acres along with immense historic landmarks, adjoins UVA Foundation preservation. First time offered after almost 2 decades at $750k.


OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

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A DREAM HOME IS GREAT, BUT THE RIGHT ONE IS BETTER. Let an agent who knows guide you.

LOUISA COUNTY

$299,900

$142,500

SCHUYLER

SHADWELL ESTATES

$89,900

PRICE REDUCED

Bev Nash

434-981-5560

• Construction is underway on 7.8 wooded acres • 1400 sf, 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Similar to photo, covered porch, rear deck • Superior stick built construction • Conditioned crawl space • Paved State road • Granite counters, real fireplace • November completion

14 Tallwood Trl

Dan Corbin

$385,000

434-531-6155

• NEW Listing at Lake Monticello • 2688 sq ft, 4 bd, 3 ba, Cedar Cape • Floor to Ceiling Stone Fireplace, Open Loft • Updates include Hardwoods, Appliances and Paint • 1st & 2nd Level BRs, Ample Closets, Huge Master Suite • Wonderful Home for Family and Entertaining • MLS 623551

Piney Mountain Subdivision, Palmyra

10+ acre Lots

Ruth Guss

434-960-0414

• 3 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, 1,078 Sq. Ft. • Charming 1930’s Updated Two Story • First Floor Bedroom, First Floor Laundry • Painted Wood Cabinets, Mahogany Kitchen Countertop • .46 Acres Within Walking Distance of the Rockfish River

WAKEFIELD

$385,000

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • 4 Bedroom brick split-level home • Private cul-de-sac in Wakefield • Upper level: Spacious living & dining room, kitchen, 3 BR & 1.5 BA • Lower level: Great Room, 2nd Master Suite & ample storage • Updated Roof, Windows, HVAC, Flooring • MASSIVE level yard w/hot tub, garden spot & paved drive • MLS #622275

$340,030

14 ELM CT/TROY

Bev Nash

434-981-5560

• The last vacant lot available • Located just East of Shadwell. • Beautiful mature timber on 1.5 acres • Paved private road • Just 10 minutes to Pantops shops 5 minutes to Keswick Golf Club and Glenmore

$99,900

Pat Burns

434-465-4444

• Sitting amidst estates and horse properties this beautiful 5 acre lot in Keswick area for sale to build your dream home. Convenient to Charlottesville, Gordonsville. 99,900.

FLATTOP MTN RD

$700,000

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

MUST SEE!

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Gorgeous NEW 10+ Acre Homesites • No HOA, Common Sense C&Rs, Firefly • Close to the Lake, Dining, Shopping, Schools • Ready to Build? Be in Your New Home Spring 2022 • Your Choice of Remaining 5 Lots - $109,000 • Call for A Personal Tour - MLS 602023

434.985.0021 410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 Downtown

Lori Click

434-326-7593

• To Be Built! The Brookwood, Similar to Photo! • 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Attached Garage, 1.66 Acres • Upgraded Siding Accent, Wide Window Trim, 10’x16’ Rear Deck • Master Suite with Garden Tub, Double Bowl Vanity • Kitchen with Granite Countertops, Stainless Appliances • Luxury Vinyl Plank Floors, Forest View s/d offer DSL, Fiber Optic

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • Live year round comfortably • Retreat style custom home • Hi speed century link internet • Double lot & never ending spring • 3 bedrooms 2.5 baths • Wrap around deck

434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901


69 OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

VERULAM

|

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA

Nestled in the Blue Ridge foothills is one of Virginia’s

suite bedrooms. Tree lined drive and 20’ boxwood, a

preeminent estates, conveniently located just 4 miles

peaceful and private yet distinguished setting minutes

from UVA and modern amenities of Charlottesville.

from town. Additional amenities on 503-acre estate

The Classical Revival manor offers an easy elegance

include a charming guest house and restored dairy

with both formal and informal spaces that flow

barn turned grand event venue. The farm abuts 2,000

seamlessly to bucolic grounds with beautiful views,

additional acres of protected land including the 1,000-

formal Charles Gillette designed gardens and handsome pool complex. Elegant proportions (10’ ceilings), fine

W IL E Y PR O P E RT Y. CO M

architectural details and sophisticated craftsmanship are complimented by a modern kitchen and five en-

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access to major travel thoroughfares and airports with direct flights to most major US cities. $ 1 3 , 9 0 0, 0 0 0 | J U STI N W I L EY | 4 3 4 9 8 1 5 5 28 | M L S 6 228 4 4

VIEWMONT

LOUISA, VA

|

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA

18th century Virginia living at its finest. Historic main residence with 5

Exquisite 354-acre Carter’s Bridge estate, with stunning views, river

bedrooms, 5 baths, 2 half on main floor. Eight additional bedroom suites

frontage, just 10 mins to town. Gorgeous architecture and craftsmanship,

in the dependencies, rich with character and historical charm—all with

luxury finishes—10’ ceilings, wide plank oak floors, custom millwork,

fireplaces, modern baths and current mechanical systems. Green Springs

copper roof, Rumford fireplaces, guesthouse/garage, fabulous pool. Bright

Historic District, 20 minutes east of Charlottesville, 40 from Richmond.

living spaces that flow seamlessly indoors to out, remarkable surroundings.

$1,950,0 0 0 | PETER WILEY | 434 422 2090 | M LS 61 81 66

$ 6 , 3 0 0, 0 0 0 | P E T E R W IL E Y | 434 42 2 2 0 9 0 | M L S 6 1 4 7 4 1

1 32 E M AIN ST SU IT E A, ORAN G E, VIRG IN IA 2 2 9 6 0

540 67 2 3 903

/

5 0 3 FAULCONE R D R S UIT E 6 , CH A R LOT T E S V IL L E , V IR G INIA 2 2 9 0 3

434 2 93 3900

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

PROSPECT HILL

acre Ragged Mountain Reservoir Natural Area. Nearby


CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

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Take charge of your health. “My illness was my boss. It was telling me what I could and couldn’t do. This workshop put ME back in charge.”

Don’t let an ongoing health condition rule your life. If you have diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, pain, anxiety, or another chronic condition, sign up today for Live Well Virginia! This workshop meets every Wednesday via ZOOM November 10 to December 22 (1:30-4pm). No meeting November 24. Class size is limited to 12 participants. For more information or to register: Danny Harris (434) 817-5268, email: dharris@jabacares.org

Attend a FREE 6-week workshop and discover how to: ■ Cope with pain and fatigue ■ Eat well and exercise safely ■ Explore new treatment options ■ Talk with your doctor

In partnership with Jefferson Area Board for Aging, Sentara Health, Blue Ridge Medical Center, Rappahannock Rapidan Community Services, and the Population Health Department at UVA Health


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1570 Old Oaks Dr | Charlottesville Beautiful home in Ivy location west of town. Main level offers an incredible spacious Chef’s Dream kitchen with beautiful Cherry wood cabinetry and expanded kitchen/butlers pantry, living room, dining room, and extra-large family room with Jotul gas/wood-burning fireplace, library, and exercise room.

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 2, 2021 ISSUE 3043

YOUR PLACE. OUR PURPOSE.

$915,000 | anitadunbar-realtor.com/622260 Anita Dunbar | 434.981.1421

63 Middlebury Ln | Ruckersville

Lackey Ln | Covesville

This one owner 3 BR home has been meticulously cared for and is move in ready! The floorplan is an open easy flow, with a generous master suite, upper level laundry, and a fabulous screened porch. Minutes to Charlottesville.

Exquisitely restored antique log cabin nestled into a private hillside. Authentic, tasteful & historically sensitive renovations create a magically unique retreat property. The c.1900 cabin has exposed log walls, hewn beams, stone foundation.

$339,900 | montaguemiller.com/VAGR2000028 Garlene Daniel | 540.948.6655

4500 Monacan Trail Rd | North Garden

$350,000 | cartermontague.com/619303 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

23551 Village Rd | Unionville

182 W Nelson St | Orange New Construction! Spacious One Level living with Open Floor plan, Located in Town of Orange on Large Corner Lot. This is a Modular 2021 Suite Retreat, 1728sf, 3 BR, 2 BA, 8 foot flat ceilings, vinyl flooring throughout.

$325,000 | montaguemiller.com/VAOR2000160 Missy Garrison | 540.661.2353

23131 Village Rd | Unionville

Home is in like new condition & ready to move in! 3 BR, 2 BA home w/large Sunroom or Home Office overlooking beautiful mountain views plus a wonderful front porch perfect for sipping your morning coffee.New roof & more!

One level living, with handicap accessibility and a partially finished, walk-out basement, with kitchenette & full bath. You’ll love the HUGE kitchen and open floor plan! The spacious rear yard is completely fenced for pets. Back deck.

$399,000 | cartermontague.com/618610 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

$312,500 | montaguemiller.com/VAOR2000998 Karen Morris | 540.717.2478

$400,000 | montaguemiller.com/VAOR2000988 Garlene Daniel | 540.948.6655

Whether you're buying or selling a home, locally or globally, searching for investment opportunities or just have questions, we're here to help. At Montague, Miller & Co., we take pride in our ability to educate and guide our clients to successful outcomes through professionalism and honest counsel.

MONTAGUEMILLER.COM | 800.793.5393 | CHARLOTTESVILLE | AMHERST | MADISON | CULPEPER | ORANGE

Proudly serving Central Virginia’s real estate needs for over seventy years!

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Set on 9 very private acres south of Charlottesville, this solidly-built brick ranch has an open floor plan allowing for good flow and plenty of natural light. Updated kitchen and baths. Covered porch overlooking private yard.



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