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MAY 26 – JUNE 1, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE EZE AMOS

Charlottesville’s growing. Where will everyone live?

VOL. 30 NO. 21 n MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T HE CHARLOTTESVIL

WWW.CAAR.COM

L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene,

Local dancers keep a spring in their steps PAGE 19

City Hall gets serious about equity and inclusion PAGE 10

Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange,

Augusta

COLLEGE TOWN:

If Jefferson Could See Us Now BY KEN WILSON

INSIDE

FREE


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May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

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Live • Dine Work • Play

A full service needlepoint shop

Charlottesville Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu www.cvillebjj.com (434) 825-6202

McIntire Plaza, a well-established and vibrant community, is home to many of Charlottesville’s favorite shops. Ideally located between Route 250 and Downtown, McIntire Plaze features an eclectic mix of food, art, retail, and local entrepreneurship of all shapes and sizes.

Curated Apparel, Accessories & Gifts For Every Body, Sizes XS to 3X Preloved, Vintage, Handmade & New www.rethreadscville.com

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WE WILL FOREVER REMEMBER YOUR SACRIFICE!

MEMORIAL DAY You fought for freedom in foreign lands, knowing it would protect our freedom at home. In recognition of our fallen heroes from the Rivanna Community... Lost In Vietnam: Champ Lawson, Jr. Grandville Jones, Jr. Oscar Mauterer John Tyler Erskine Wilde Thomas Grinnell, III Walter Payne Harvey Mulhauser Douglas Wallace Charles Milton, Jr. Allen Firth

Wayne McRay Floyd Coates Howell Blakey Walter Ross, Jr. Wayne Craig Lost in Iraq: Humanyun Kahn Bradley Arms Lost in World War II: Douglas Hall Kirby Frank Dabney Peregoy

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

VFW Post 2044 Earlysville, Virginia

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* If we have omitted any Soldier, Sailor, Airman, Marine or Coast Guardman, please email us their name and information so we may add them to our roster: cdrpost2044@vfwva.org Adjpost2044@vfwva.org

Howard Hollar Roger Link Carl Gibson Randolf Nunn, Jr. Robert Marshall Edward Lamb Clyde Perry, Jr. Gerald Caton James Kardos Charles Butler Robert Ruggles Richard Carter


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No. 21

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

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FEATURE 14

EDITORIAL

In the zone

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

Residents react to city’s proposed land use changes. NEWS 9 10 Talking diversity, equity, and inclusion with Ashley Reynolds Marshall. 11 Why can’t elite universities retain faculty members of color? 13 What’s in a name? B.U.C.K. Squad attracts controversy.

CULTURE 17 18 Feedback: “Empire of Excellence” giddily pushes boundaries. 18 In Memoriam: Remembering painter Edward Thomas.

19 Extra: Local dancers haven’t missed a move. 21 The Working Pour: Mixing it up with area collabs. 22 Sudoku 23 Crossword 25 Free Will Astrology

Q&A 27 Who’s your pick for Virginia’s next governor?

CLASSIFIED 28

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Alana Bittner, Deirdre Crimmins, Amelia Delphos, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Max March (x16) GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com

Real Estate Weekly Page 31

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Chloe Heimer, Lisa C. Hurdle (x30), Stephanie Vogtman (x39) PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson (x25)

MARKETING SERVICES DIVISION CLASSIFIEDS Gabby Kirk (x36) classifieds@c-ville.com Beth Wood (x56)

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C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2021 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

Virginia Press Association


THIS WEEK

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For a long time, a big part of Charlottesville’s brand has been its small size. We’re an intimate little burg nestled at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains; we’re a college town. But Charlottesville is becoming a real city, whether you like it or not. The university is growing, the tech industry is growing, the health care industry is growing, the art community is becoming more robust by the day. I could go on and on. It’s up to us—and our elected officials—to determine what type of city we want to create. Will we shut out new development, forcing people to live further afield and drive farther to work here? Or will we embrace small apartments and little commerce centers, creating a walkable, bikeable, 21st-century city? Will we dig in our heels to keep things the way they’ve always been, or will we work to undo the legacies of segregation that are built into our streets? How do we craft a built environment that meets the urgent challenges of the future and also addresses the un-righted wrongs of the past? If your eyes glaze over when you hear the words zoning or Future Land Use Map, I understand where you’re coming from—it’s complicated stuff. The stakes, however, could not be higher. Reworking the city’s Comprehensive Plan (and, within that, the land-use regulations and zoning code) is a long and complicated process, and we’re only part way through. Read about the draft Future Land Use Map (page 14) for an update on where things stand. Welcome to the city.—Ben Hitchcock

5.19.21

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DAIRY DAYS A WEEK OF CELEBRATORY & OPENING EVENTS AT THE DAIRY MARKET

MONDAY, JUNE 14

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 16

MARKET MONDAYS

TOTS TUESDAY

WORKOUT WEDNESDAY

DINE OUT DONATIONS TO CITY OF PROMISE

KIDS CARNIVAL INCLUDING PETTING ZOO, ACTIVITIES & MOO THRU COWS

SPENGA WORKOUT CLASSES ON THE PATIO & IN THE BRICK CELLAR

THURSDAY, JUNE 17

FRIDAY, JUNE 18

SATURDAY, JUNE 19

RIBBON CUTTING

BRICK CELLAR GALLERY OPENING

JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION

RIBBON CUTTING WITH SPECIAL GUEST RITA MCCLENNY

ART OPENING WITH ARTISTS FRANK PHILLIPS & CHRISTEN YATES

MUSIC, ART & DANCE AT OLD TRINITY CHURCH & DAIRY MARKET

DETAILS & REGISTRATION AT DAIRYMARKETCVILLE.COM/EVENT/DAIRY-DAYS

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TUESDAY, JUNE 15

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JUNE 14 - 19, 2021


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“More than anything, I’ll miss the fights. At a posh school like UVA, Sheetz provided a place to see the real side of people at night.”

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—UVA student Sam Beidler, speaking to The Cavalier Daily about the announcement that the Sheetz on University Ave is closing

NEWS

Denied! PAGE 11

Walker running again

IN BRIEF

Alt-right production of Oklahoma! is a go

UVA will require its students to get vaccinated before returning to Grounds in the fall, the university announced last week. Students have until July 1 to share their proof of vaccination with the school health system. Dozens of colleges and universities around the country have announced similar policies, including liberal arts schools like William & Mary and large state universities like the University of Michigan.

Who’s she running against? Strap in, this can get a little confusing. Two seats on Charlottesville’s five-person City Council will be up for grabs in the fall. In November, four candidates will compete for those seats: Mayor Walker, an independent, will run against another independent, 23-year-old entrepreneur Yasmine Washington, and two Democratic candidates. Those Dems will be chosen at a primary on June 8. Three candidates are running for the two Democratic nominations: School board member Juandiego Wade, UVA planner Brian Pinkston, and entrepreneur Carl Brown. Check back next week for a full preview of the June 8 Democratic primaries at both the local and state levels.

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Students must get vaccinated, says UVA

Charlottesville Mayor Nikuyah Walker officially announced on Friday that she’s seeking re-election to City Council in the fall. The announcement does not come as a surprise: Walker has hinted multiple times in recent months that she planned to run for a second four-year term on the council. During a 28-minute Facebook Live broadcast, Walker spoke about the fight for racial justice that has driven her work on council. “As a Black woman sitting in this position, especially the last two years, I have been very exhausted,” Walker said. “Even though I’ve always been ready to battle with people, it’s been a challenge to be under attack all the time. But I am a fighter in my spirit.” Walker said she decided to seek reelection because she felt she had a duty to her constituents, particularly young Black people. “What will giving up show people who have been inspired because you’ve been here?” she asked herself before throwing her hat in again. “I am tired, but we have to continue,” said Walker. “This is not just about us. The whole world is watching.”

@cville_weekly

KRISTEN FINN

The second of UVA’s back-to-back graduation ceremonies went off without a hitch last weekend, as the Class of 2021 took a well-deserved walk down the Lawn. We’re happy for the students—and also happy that we’ll be able to get a restaurant reservation this weekend.

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

Class of 2021 says farewell

EZE AMOS

Two weeks ago, we reported that a local cidery had called off a scheduled production of Oklahoma! after discovering that the show’s director, Brian Clowdus, was a farright political candidate in Florida who left his previous directing gig amidst a swirl of racism allegations. Clowdus has found another area venue willing to put on his show, however. Mount Rouge Farm in Nelson County will host Oklahoma! in August. Clowdus won’t be the only member of the production with dubious politics. The lead role has been given to James O’Keefe, the founder of Project Veritas, a far-right activist group that uses misinformation to attack mainstream media outlets and progressive organizations. For a list of upcoming arts and culture events that do not feature white-supremacist-adjacent media agitators in starring roles, check out our local arts calendar at events.c-ville.com.


NEWS

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Finding the answers Ashley Reynolds Marshall becomes Charlottesville’s first manager for racial equity By Brielle Entzminger Reporter@c-ville.com

W

hile serving as a magistrate judge in Virginia’s 23rd judicial circuit, Ashley Reynolds Marshall heard a case that made her rethink her entire career. An undocumented woman, who had fled violence in Honduras, needed protection from her abusive husband. Marshall offered to have the husband kicked out of the house and issue a restraining order, but the woman decided against it—she was terrified her husband would hurt her or their children, or call U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to get her deported. And because her husband had not allowed her to learn English, the woman could not start the naturalization process to become a United States citizen. “I couldn’t sit with the fact that because of her trauma, she wasn’t able to go through a process that she so desperately wanted to do, and there wasn’t anything I could do,” says Marshall, who was born and raised in Roanoke. “I realized that I wanted to be able to impact people before I saw them in the magistrate’s office, where my options were limited.” So Marshall cast aside her black robe and picked up a master’s in public administration from Virginia Tech, and then she

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threw herself into public service, working with several nonprofits in the Roanoke area. Now, a decade after leaving the courtroom, she hopes to further address the needs and concerns of marginalized communities as Charlottesville’s first deputy city manager for racial equity, diversity, and inclusion. “To see a community have a recognition that [racial equity] is an important consideration when you are trying to figure out how to best support your citizens was really impressive,” says Marshall, whose first day on the job was earlier this month. “It doesn’t happen very often. I really just felt moved to throw my hat in the ring.” The process of creating the position began in August 2019, but hiring was slowed by COVID. Marshall will monitor Charlottesville’s new Office of REDI, Human Services and Social Services departments, Office of Human Rights, and Police Civilian Review Board, ensuring the city is tackling racial equity issues both within its own government and in the community. The newcomer describes her position as almost like a “blank slate.” “They want [me] to be able to dig into the community and figure out where it needs to go, what’s missing, and how this particular role can help,” says Marshall. “The city is not saying we have all the an-

Ashley Reynolds Marshall is the city’s first Deputy City Manager for Racial Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion.


NEWS

ASHLEY REYNOLDS MARSHALL

DATA: UVA

The graph above shows a breakdown of UVA faculty by race and gender.

By Amelia Delphos

L

“This isn’t just UVA. This is at many institutions across the country.” PAUL HARRIS, FORMER UVA FACULTY MEMBER

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ast week, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones was denied the position of the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism at the University of North Carolina’s Hussman School of Journalism. The tenured position seemed like a natural fit for Hannah-Jones, a UNC alum and one of the developers of the 1619 Project for The New York Times. Despite her backing by the university’s dean, chancellor, and faculty, UNC’s Board of Trustees decided to offer Hannah-Jones a five-year, non-tenured appointment following public and private outcries from conservatives. Supporters of Hannah-Jones have been quick to point out the racism that appeared to be at play in her tenure denial. All previous Knight Chairs had been offered tenure, and all previous Knight Chairs were white. Tenure denial to Black and Brown faculty is not unique to the University of North Carolina. In the Spring of 2020, 38 percent of UVA faculty participated in an interuniversity research study “dedicated to improving outcomes in faculty recruitment, development, and retention.” Among underrepresented minority faculty, tenure policies and tenure expectations clarity were ranked as weaknesses of working at UVA. Then, in the summer of 2020, the university made national headlines. Paul Harris, a former professor in UVA’s School of Education, was denied tenure after five years in the department by an all-white review board. He appealed his tenure denial to the provost’s office and, after a months-long process and national attention, the university reversed the decision. The appeal took a toll on the Harris family. “Just the amount of time that it took us,” says Harris. “There was a lot of time and energy and emotional currency that we had to expend unnecessarily.”

This month, Harris decided to leave the School for Public Policy and Leadership, and university for a position at Penn State’s Barbara Brown-Wilson, assistant professor College of Education. of urban and environmental planning and co-founder and faculty director of UVA’s EqAccording to Harris, Penn State was an appealing university. “Dean Kimberly Lawuity Center. The report outlined new goals less’ vision at the College of Education is for underrepresented faculty recruitment, promotion, and retention. one of building an anti-racist culture, and my work situates incredibly well within The first recommendation—which has that larger vision and scope,” he says. “I felt been completed—was to endow the Carter confident that my work would be valued G. Woodson Institute for African-American and African Studies. Most of the money here and that I could add value to what’s from the endowment will go toward the happening.” hiring of new faculty and postdoctoral fel“This isn’t just UVA,” Harris says. “This lows for the institute. is at many institutions across the country. The task force also recommended douThere can be a reckoning with how structures and systems and policies in place bling the number of underrepresented perpetuate the status quo that privilege faculty at UVA by 2030. Although this whiteness and marginalize racial minorirecommendation has yet to be completed, ties, particularly Black and Brown faculty.” the university is making strides to meet Since 1987, UVA or UVA-affiliated this goal. A $5 million grant from the Melgroups have released over 15 reports delon Foundation is dedicated to the growth tailing the university’s shortcomings when of racial equity programs, funding postit comes to racial equity. In 2020, as prodoctoral fellowships, and supporting factests erupted around the country in the ulty teaching and research focused on aftermath of the murder of George Floyd, racial equity. Additionally, the money will UVA President Jim Ryan appointed a new be used to build faculty and curriculum Racial Equity Task Force to address racial around the subject of race, place, and equity. The grant will allow the College of equity concerns at the university. Arts and Sciences to hire more faculty, es“We were in this particular moment in time in our country in which a number of pecially minority faculty. things felt different,” says Kevin McDonald, “We anticipate that these openings, all a member of the task force and UVA’s vice focused on race and equity, will attract president for diversity, eqand sustain a strong community of BIPOC scholars and uity, and inclusion. “But there was definitely a level of teachers who can contribute racial reckoning and reflecto real, lasting transformation, both personally and tion at UVA,” said a UVA organizationally, that made spokesman in a statement. our efforts feel a bit different.” “We continue to unapoloIn addition to McDonald, getically recognize the value of the task force, which released diversity, equity, and inclusion,” its findings in the August 2020 says McDonald. “There’s an Audacious Future Report, is intentionality to our work. We made up of Ian Solomon, want our equity talk to match dean of the Frank Batten our equity talk.” Paul Harris

@cville_weekly

bers who are or who have been incarcerated, and who live in public housing in Roanoke. “While I’m not from here, I do know how hurtful those issues can be [and] how complex those concerns can be,” she says. “I’m looking forward to listening [to city residents], from the position of someone who knows how hard it is to have to bury your kid cousin.” As a Black woman, Marshall says she is humbled to be a part of bringing systemic change to Charlottesville, pointing to the city’s long history of slavery, Jim Crow, and white supremacy. “I know how much my ancestors went through to allow me to sit in the office where I’m sitting,” Marshall says. “It is an honor to be able to try to continue the hard work that people who look like me have done for eons now.” “Everyone should have the opportunity to not just survive, but to thrive,” she adds.

Amid high-profile tenure cases, UVA examines faculty equity

SUPPLIED PHOTO

“Getting to be someone’s voice is such a privilege.”

Lessons learned?

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

swers—it’s saying let’s find out the answers.” “I get the really distinct honor and pleasure of interacting with members of the community to find out how I can be of service,” she adds. “Getting to be someone’s voice is such a privilege.” Marshall received a B.A. in psychology from Hollins University, as well as a J.D from William & Mary Law School. She is currently pursuing a Ph.D. at the Center for Public Administration and Policy at Virginia Tech. While earning her M.P.A., Marshall interned for Roanoke’s city manager. She went on to lead United Way of Roanoke Valley’s Bank On program, which helped people set up checking and savings accounts, and provided them with free financial education. She also created and ran the nonprofit’s RISE program, which rehoused youth experiencing homelessness. Marshall later became the executive director of Mental Health America of Roanoke Valley, offering free mental health care to uninsured and underinsured community members. And before coming to Charlottesville, she served as the chief executive officer of the YWCA of Central Virginia, overseeing programs assisting victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, as well as providing housing for low-income women. Marshall credits her parents for her passion for serving others. Her mother is a surgical technologist, while her father has been the assistant city manager of Roanoke, city manager of Martinsville, and now the deputy city manager of Danville. “I got to see [my father] lead in a way that I wanted to emulate,” says Marshall. “He leads with heart and integrity, and so does my mom. It really is ‘how can I be of service’—that’s how I was raised.” Over the past year, gun violence has spiked in Charlottesville’s predominantly Black neighborhoods, a pressing issue Marshall has a personal connection to. When she was a teenager, her cousin was a victim of gun violence. She also has family mem-

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The local authority Spring fever Q&A

Seeking designer We’re looking for a freelance graphic designer who can step in and help out with newspaper production in times of need. Must be ready to learn on the job and generate and execute creative ideas on the go! See the full job listing at c-ville.com/work-at-c-ville.

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

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What seasonal events are you excited to see return? Send your answers to question @c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram

What to do?

In the April/May issue of Abode, we take you inside a former writer’s retreat that’s been transformed into a luxurious English cottage for gathering, relaxing, and enjoying the surrounding Waterperry gardens. We also tour a Frank Lloyd Wright-inspired home in Batesville; check out Mudhouse’s newest space on 10th Street; and show you how high-end fixtures dictated the direction of a local kitchen renovation. On stands now!

Inside. Outside. Home. APRIL/MAY 2021

A view of South River prompts a Stanardsville family to add a pool

English influences At Waterperry Farm, a former writer’s retreat becomes a garden oasis

Online all the time Make c-ville.com your go-to website for breaking news and trending topics. It’s where you’ll find all of our stories from the newspaper and magazines, as well as web-only exclusives—videos, photo galleries, playlists and more. C-VILLE Weekly, the alternative voice for everything happening in our city, is your source for news that affects your life. We cover the arts, music, food and community topics you need to know. We’ll tell you where to go, what to see, what to do, what to eat. This is our town—live it up.

For your complete guide to can’tmiss events (and to submit your own!), visit events.c-ville.com.

This is our town.

BUZZWORTHY Mudhouse’s latest space has a modern twist OUTSIDE THE BOX An eye-catching passive house in Batesville IN THE ROUND Eleven30 condos utilize the courtyard concept

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NEWS

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Squad drama Father of gun violence victim calls on B.U.C.K. Squad to change its name By Brielle Entzminger

“Stop using my son’s name and honor my son. They’re not doing what they’re supposed to be doing,” he says. “I want this to stop as soon as possible.” B.U.C.K Squad associate director Herb Dickerson claims the accusations are based on “no facts whatsoever.” Though the group started off as a volunteer effort, it has received enough donations from the community to pay members a bi-weekly salary. “We don’t have access to no money, at no time ever,” says Dickerson. All donations are immediately turned into the group’s

reporter@c-ville.com

The B.U.C.K. Squad has held child-focused community events in recent months.

Dickerson says the squad invited Burton to become a member and participate in their work, but he hasn’t shown up. They also gave his family a significant amount of support after Washington’s death, when Burton told Dickerson he could not afford to pay for his son’s funeral. “I spoke to my director [at The Haven], the funeral home director, and some people in the community that would help,” Dickerson says. “Me and Pertelle raised $14,000 to give [Washington] the burial that the family wanted…and we arranged the funeral.” “To this day, we haven’t seen where that money even went. That hasn’t gone towards the funeral at all,” he adds. “And we never got a thank you.” Though the squad’s every day work involves talking down groups of young men, its members hope to end the cycle of violence in Black communities by hosting events and programs for kids. “Our main focus is the children, because if you can catch them at an early age, you can reclaim their brain to think another way, other than what they see in the streets or in their household,” says Dickerson. “And we work with all of the adults...to direct them to the right resources that can help them.” Dickerson emphasizes that the squad does not plan on changing its name, which is now copyrighted. However, he says they would try to give Burton additional financial support if he came to them with a specific financial request, like rent assistance. “We’re not using Buck’s name—we’re using Brothers United to Cease the Killing. This is just an [abbreviation] for that,” he says. “We don’t owe [Washington’s family] anything. If anything, they owe us.”

“Our main focus is the children, because if you can catch them at an early age, you can reclaim their brain to think another way, other than what they see in the streets or in their household.” HERB DICKERSON, B.U.C.K. SQUAD

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ast December, 32-year-old Jamarcus “Buck” Washington was found dead in the South First Street public housing complex, a victim of rising gun violence in Charlottesville’s predominantly Black neighborhoods over the past year. Pained by his friend’s murder, Pertelle Gilmore contacted his mentor Herb Dickerson, and recruited a handful of people in the city’s Black community to intervene in conflicts before they turned into deadly shootings. The group met with Washington’s family, and received permission to name themselves the B.U.C.K. Squad, an acronym for Brothers United to Cease the Killing. But now Washington’s father, Darnell Burton, is accusing the squad of dishonoring his son, claiming it is misusing donations. “I thought they were going to use the money donated to them to do a good thing for my son,” says Burton. “But [the money] is not being used properly.” “They’re buying all kinds of sweatsuits, traveling, going out to eat—just personal stuff,” he says. Burton thinks the group does not focus enough on gun violence among adult men, pointing to several events the B.U.C.K. Squad hosted for children in public housing communities over the past few months. “Kids is not out here killing each other,” he says. “These are adults killing each other.” Burton also accuses multiple members of not answering his calls, and refusing to give his family any financial support. He urges the squad to change its name—and says if members refuse, he will sue them.

accountant, Tommy Everett, who then distributes the paychecks. Most of the money received goes toward salaries, but the group is also saving to purchase a physical headquarters. “We live just like everyone who works and has a job,” Dickerson says. “[Burton’s] thinking that we’re making a lot of money, when I work two full-time jobs.” In response to Burton’s gripes with the group’s custom gear, Dickerson says their shirts were made for free by member Bryan Page, who designs clothes professionally.


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Our backyards New map shows where the city could grow By Sean Tubbs

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ots of people want to live in Charlottesville. To help meet the demand for housing throughout the city, leaders have hired Arlington-based consulting firm Rhodeside & Harwell to rewrite Charlottesville’s Comprehensive Plan, a document that guides land-use policy in the city. As part of that process, the consultants are now taking public comment through May 31 on a colorful document known as the Future Land Use Map. The map “sets the stage for the city’s longterm vision of how it’s going to grow,” says Ron Sessoms of Rhodeside & Harwell. “You can think of this as the 10,000-foot view of the city, defining where there are opportunities for growth.” Some residents feel the process was rushed and that the proposed map would allow for too much new density. Others say the map doesn’t go far enough, and the proposed plans aren’t proactive enough. “We’re really looking to increase the availability of housing in neighborhoods that have had what we’re calling more exclusionary zoning, that’s really limited to single-family uses,” says project manager Jennifer Koch. “At

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Barracks/Rugby

the same time, we do not want to increase pressure on neighborhoods that may be at risk for displacement, including lower-income neighborhoods and neighborhoods where people were displaced previously.” It’s important to note that this land-use map is created to recommend policies for a subsequent zoning rewrite. This is not a final zoning map. Once the land-use map is adopted—currently expected to happen later this summer—the more granular zoning evaluation will begin. For now, the conversation is about the map, a purely advisory document. There are over 15,600 separate parcels of property, and each is represented on the map by a color. That color tells planners, builders, and the general public what level of development is desired in the state-mandated Comprehensive Plan. Right now, more than half of the city is rated “low-density residential.” Under the draft map, many of those areas would remain low density, though the map recommends zoning changes to allow up to three units per lot on the large swathes of the city that are currently zoned R-1, allowing only single families. The name of this category would change to General Residential.

The draft plan also creates a new category called Medium-Intensity Residential, that recommends zoning to allow multi-unit buildings with between four to 12 units. This would allow construction of row houses, townhouses, and other housing types known colloquially as “the missing middle.” Under the draft map, General Residential would make up 39.4 percent and MediumIntensity Residential would be 14.4 percent. Many of the areas designated under the new category are along main thoroughfares such as Cherry Avenue, Rugby Road, and Grove Road. Other neighborhoods, like 10th and Page, remain essentially untouched by the new map. Diana Dale, a resident of the Martha Jefferson neighborhood and member of a steering committee overseeing the Cville Plans Together Initiative, says her neighborhood association supports upzoning but isn’t sure why some neighborhoods were chosen for the possibility of increased density. “The entire board is totally in agreement with the strategy of eliminating R-1 across the city and allowing for this soft density approach where you’re allowing for flexibility in in-fill,” Dale says. “When you look at this map, it’s clear that certain areas have been

selected to carry the higher medium densities. When people look at this map, there isn’t any narrative about why these areas were selected.” Emily Dreyfus, an organizer with the Legal Aid Justice Center, says the map needs to be refined to further demonstrate the city’s commitment to adding density to wealthy singlefamily neighborhoods. “This does not go far enough in terms of integrating neighborhoods that have been historically exclusive,” Dreyfus says. “We all knew it would come down to this kind of debate—people who live in those neighborhoods not wanting to see change.” Though the current engagement period is only for the land-use map and draft text, a subcontractor called Code Studio has been hired to work on the subsequent zoning rewrite. One consultant says one single color on the draft Future Land Use Map will not result in one single type of zoning. “There would be two, three, four implementing zoning districts that might all have appropriate strategies for different types of the community, but those can’t quite be figured out until we can understand where they are likely to be applied,” says Lee Einsweiler. Einsweiler says he is hopeful to have a first draft of a land-use map to work off in the

Belmont


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near future, and that there will be other opportunities for feedback. The current schedule shows adoption of the plan by the end of the summer, followed by work on the zoning rewrite. The next City Council will vote on that plan, which is currently scheduled to be adopted in the summer of 2022. Planning Commissioner Lyle Solla-Yates says the goal of the plan is to figure out how much the city can build in the future. “The way I think that the Planning Commission is thinking about the Future Land Use Map, which may be different from anyone else, is that it’s the outer envelope of what is possible,” says Solla-Yates. “It isn’t destiny. It isn’t what the city is forcing. It’s just the maximum we are imagining.” Dale says she and many others would like a delay in the process, to make up for a year where the pandemic distracted people from local issues. An online petition from Barracks/Rugby residents to “slow down the vote” has garnered 210 signatures, though it’s not clear from the petition exactly what vote the signers are concerned about. They say they are specifically worried about the inclusion of two mixed-use nodes in their neighborhood. Koch says a delay is being considered, but notes that the next important date on the project’s timeline is a June 29 work session with the Planning Commission. If you’re interested in commenting, email engage@cvilleplanstogether.com.

Mapmaker, mapmaker, make me a map The maps below show neighborhoods where the Future Land Use Map recommends zoning for increased density. The map suggests some of these neighborhoods, like Rugby and North Downtown, should be open to more inclusionary zoning. Belmont, meanwhile, has just a few spots where density could significantly increase.—Ben Hitchcock

Barracks/Rugby The map on page 14 highlights the proposed land use in the Barracks/Rugby neighborhood. Currently, the entire neighborhood is zoned R-1, meaning only single-family houses are allowed; it’s zoned to remain a “lowdensity residential area.” The Future Land Use Map recommends changes in a few spots. Along major corridors like Rugby Avenue and Rugby Road, the Future Land Use Map suggests Medium-Intensity Residential land use, saying the area should be zoned to allow buildings of up to 12 units and 4.5 stories that are built in a “form compatible with adjacent residential areas.” Some lots along Preston Avenue could also change from single family to High-Intensity Residential , zoning for up to five stories and 13 or more units. The new map also proposes adding Neighborhood Mixed-Use Nodes and Corridors at the intersection of Barracks and Rugby roads and along the eastern part of Rugby Avenue. Those areas would allow for both commercial and residential buildings of up to four or five stories.

Belmont Right now, almost all of Belmont is zoned R-1, allowing only single-family dwellings, and the Future Land Use Map below proposes leaving much of Belmont in the lowest-density category, General Residential . Early Street, and the lots around Belmont Park, could be upgraded to Medium-Intensity Residential land use, meaning enacting zoning that allows up to 12 units and 4.5 stories to be constructed there. The Future Land Use map also adds a Neighborhood Mixed-Use Corridor next to the park. Currently, there’s one commercially zoned parcel there, occupied by Brown’s Market. The map suggests zoning for a few more parcels of similar commerce next door.

North Downtown The Future Land Use Map proposes allowing for increased density in much of North Downtown. Almost everything in the highlighted portion of our map is currently zoned R-1, allowing only single-family homes. The new map suggests designating most of the neighborhood as Medium-Intensity Residential , which would allow buildings of up to 12 units and 4.5 stories. The map also proposes adding a few Mixed-Use areas, which could be commercial or residential.

North Downtown

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CULTURE

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SATURDAY 5/29

BITE THE BULLITT Steve McQueen is the grave-faced police lieutenant tasked with protecting a key murder witness in the 1968 action-thriller Bullitt. Yet before the night is over, the witness is dead and McQueen must uncover who’s behind it. He faces gangs, violence, and cinema’s most famous car chase, while expressing not a flicker of emotion. As the smoke billows from under his Mustang GT, the audience can’t help but wonder how much longer he’ll keep his cool. $5-8, 3 and 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 979-1922.

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THURSDAY 5/27

VEGAN DELIGHT

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O U R G U I D E T O YO U R W E E K

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The smell of garlic cooking can be pretty irresistible— just don’t let it burn! Chef Antwon Brinson of AB Concepts guides you carefully through the process of making the popular Ethiopian dish Bakela Alicha with Moroccan Chermoula Sauce during the next installment in his Live Recipe Master Classes series. The creamy dish makes white beans the star of the meal, accompanied by a sauce made with fresh herbs and garlic. The class includes a shopping list, recipe, and video recording. $29.99, 5:30pm. culinaryconceptsab.com/classes.

Garlic gets things sizzling in your home kitchen as you follow Antwon Brinson’s Ethiopian cooking class.

Americana guitarist and songwriter Molly Tuttle traces her musical origins to playing in her father’s bluegrass band at 11 years old, and she wants to pay it forward. “One of my goals is to inspire the next generation, especially young girls, to play guitar,” she says. “I think if girls see a woman doing something, it helps them think, ‘I can do that, too.’ ” Her most recent album, …but I’d rather be with you, highlights her expert flatpicking and sweet, pure voice that evoke folk ballads from the ’60s. From FKA Twigs to the Rolling Stones, the record is a tribute to the songs that sparked her love of music. $10 livestream, $120-300 pods. Festy, Chisholm Vineyards at Adventure Farm, 1135 Clan Chisholm Ln., Earlysville. thefesty.com.

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GUITAR HERO


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CULTURE FEEDBACK

Stream sequence Local musicians join the streaming craze with extreme variety show By Shea Gibbs arts@c-ville.com

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The zany online music variety show “Empire of Excellence” launched last fall, and its second season runs through July 3.

their unwitting real-life musical and poetry guests—and navigate an intertwined television, cosmic, and real world, all while battling the Gwar-like musical villain Crab Action and some force known as the Big Bad.

Christo and Chase’s goal is to create a fun, semi-coherent space to celebrate live music and art in the post-pandemic world: “A platform for everyone to come together and entertain,” Christo says. But musicians, poets,

and others joining the fun—the Reverend Bill Howard of the Judy Chops is a regular guest, for example—do so at their own peril. “There is an element of Japanese game show challenges that the guests will not expect,”

IN MEMORIAM

Painter Edward Thomas captured local scenes in lively detail Most days, Charlottesville artist Edward Thomas could be found with his folding easel, set up on a sidewalk, by the river, or at a construction site, engaged in capturing “what the world looks like from where I stand,” he’d say. Thomas died May 8, 2021, at the age of 49. “Edward had an extremely good eye and extraordinary sense of color,” says his friend and mentor Richard Crozier. “He painted with a kind of bravura.” He produced faithful renditions of his subjects, with formal elements—palette, marks, and gestures—having a stand-alone integrity that transcends their narrative role. Thomas had a rare ability to convey the quality of air and light, enlivening his paintings with particular vitality. He also experimented with various forms of animation, made filmstrips based on flip book technology, built at least two cycloramas (which allowed the viewer to experience a 360-degree panorama), and a number of praxinoscopes (similar to a zoetrope), nine of which were featured in a 2015 show at Second Street Gallery. He built tabletop versions and a giant one the Dave Matthews Band took on tour. A graduate of the University of Virginia School of Architecture, Thomas was an inveterate builder

constructing, among other things, a wall that showcased the history of masonry techniques, transitioning from neolithic drystack to Jefferson-inspired arches that formed an aqueduct. He also excavated and built a subterranean, groin-vaulted wine cellar with a tunnel connecting it to the house. His friends describe Thomas as witty, hardworking, kind, gentle, and endlessly creative. He cared about the world around him, volunteering for Food Not Bombs and The Salvation Army, and using his art as a means

“He painted with a kind of bravura.” RICHARD CROZIER

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van Christo and Trevor Chase were headed to a themed party—a postapocalyptic themed party, of course. So they invented two characters, vigilantes Ace Fondo and Lex Blazer, “a couple of badass guys” who “fought in every war, flexing their biceps while smoking cigars.” Now years later, “Ace & Lex: American Heroes, Elite Commandos” anchor Christo and Chase’s pandemic pet project, “Empire of Excellence,” a livestreamed music and variety show available on Facebook Live and Twitch, and archived on YouTube. The show’s first season ran from October to November last year, and it’s currently in its second season, with eight episodes running biweekly through July 3. So, just what is “Empire of Excellence”? It’s often said good writers don’t know what’s going to happen in their books until they get there. Christo and Chase are kind of like that, only they ain’t writing books, and where they’re going probably isn’t in this dimension. “The whole show has a connecting theme, but it is all kind of absurdity,” Christo says. “All the art and the music is about embracing the over-the-top nature of 1980s action.” Take the duo’s plug for season two. The golden boy is missing, they say. To find him, they’ll have to do business with a nomadic bartering fortune teller—not to mention

Painter Edward Thomas was an architect, historian, and prolific artist who, with his folding easel, was a familiar site in Charlottesville. His artist statement attributes his style to minimal thought during the process: “Thinking gets in the way and leads to artifice; painting what you think is there rather than what is there.” and tinkerer, creating and adapting with constant inventiveness. He described his house on 6 1/2 Street as “a perpetually unfinished architectural laboratory” where he could employ his knowledge of brick masonry,

to conserve countryside and old farms targeted by developers. He drove one of the first (if not the first) hybrid cars in Charlottesville, a 2000 Honda Insight. Thomas was an avid gardener, and shared the vegetables he grew with friends. He loved animals and had three dogs, Five, Jupiter, and Zero. UVA architecture professor Peter Waldman says of Thomas, “He was joyful and poignant. His is a great loss as he mirrored for us all Charlottesville, making the ordinary splendid.”—Sarah Sargent


CULTURE EXTRA

“There is an element of Japanese game show challenges that the guests will not expect.” TREVOR CHASE

Charlottesville’s dance clubs keep moving during COVID By Alana Bittner arts@c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

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Edwin Zoa has had a foothold in Charlottesville’s social dance scene since the early ‘90s. When COVID forced us to distance, Zoa still found ways to keep dancing safely.

ness depends on group classes,” he says. For the first few months, things were rough. He even considered changing his career path entirely, picturing himself working at Target or The Home Depot. But to his “absolute surprise,” a shift occurred. “About four months into it, people were getting cabin fever,” Roa says. “So they were reaching out to me, seeing if I was willing to do private classes. I needed that.” Roa’s business has changed completely. While he originally relied on socials and group classes, he’s now sustained entirely by private lessons. Other organizations have also revamped their business model. Terry Dean’s Blue Light Ballroom provided area residents with dance classes for years, but the pandemic forced the studio to evolve into a new organization: Charlottesville Ballroom, which adapted quickly to social distancing. An air purification unit was purchased, group classes were capped according to CDC guidelines, and spots were marked on the dance floor to ensure everyone kept a safe distance during class. Unlike pre-COVID classes, there is no partner switching, and dance socials have been moved to Zoom. Partly because of these measures, Charlottesville Ballroom hasn’t had a single COVID case come from its studio—but socially distanced dancing has its challenges. At its core, dancing is inherently social, and without that connection, it isn’t quite the same. But the pandemic helped dancers find different ways of connecting. Faruque and Wegert both have careers outside of dance, and didn’t feel pressured to continue teaching classes. That meant that for the first time in a long time, they could focus on their own training. “Both of us were able to grow a lot as dancers, because we actually had consistent time to work on stuff,” says Faruque. With the coming of summer and rising vaccination rates, the Charlottesville dance

community is slowly emerging from hibernation. Roa, Faruque, and others have begun offering outdoor classes and workshops (below). It’s hard to gauge what this will look like next fall or beyond. But for Faruque, the uncertainty brings hopeful optimism. “For me, the world is a playground to explore and I’ll go wherever dance takes me,” he says. Roa agrees. “The honest truth is that no one knows where the pandemic is going to take us But just like a dance, we’re moving through it. And it will go wherever it needs to go.”

Let’s dance Edwin Roa leads Zoirees (45-minute outdoor classes in salsa, bachata, cha-cha, and tango) at IX every Thursday at 7pm. ixartpark.org. Follow Anya Faruque and Tim Wegert on Facebook and Instagram (anya_ faruque; tim.allen3) for info on upcoming classes. Charlottesville Ballroom offers American tango, advanced rumba, line dance, and more. charlottesvilleballroom.com. Charlottesville Tango on Water Street is not currently offering classes, but is likely to begin outdoor sessions in the next few months. charlottesvilletango.com. USA Dance Charlottesville has classes in ballroom, Latin, nightclub, and swing. usadancecville.org. Smooth Sailing Ballroom offers private lessons in a variety of different dance styles. smoothsailingballroom.com SwingCville are purveyors of fine vintage moves. danceswingcville.org. Charlottesville Swing Dance Society is a West Coast swing dance

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s we fumble our way back to normal, Edwin Roa has a suggestion for reconnecting with other humans and gaining a new understanding of each other: social dancing. Roa says social dance can cure everything from partisanship and close-mindedness to existential crises. We are “at the risk of being so logical, we are losing our own humanity,” he warns. “We all come from different backgrounds, but we all desire the same thing: to be understood. You and I don’t have to agree, but we can have a dialogue. And that dialogue is the dance.” In the 1990s, Roa moved from Bogotá, Colombia, to Charlottesville to work in textile design. Dance was not part of the plan. But on a whim, he started taking classes. That soon turned into teaching dance, and before he knew it, his career path had changed entirely. Today, he’s the face of Zabor Dance, The Dance Spot, and The Charlottesville Salsa Club. For Roa, what makes social dance special is the social part. “We are meant to be around people, we are meant to communicate,” he says. For 20 years, The Charlottesville Salsa Club has provided just that: a place for people from all over Charlottesville to come together, put aside their differences, and dance. When the pandemic hit, Roa was faced with a question: What do you do when your life’s passion “becomes a superspreader?” He was not alone. The pandemic has forced social dancers around the globe to rethink how to do what they love. Anya Faruque and Tim Wegert are the couple behind Charlottesville’s zouk community. Zouk, a smooth, wave-like partner dance from Brazil, first enchanted Faruque and Wegert a couple years ago, leading them to offer classes and socials north of town. Charlottesville’s dance scene is small, which means it’s also close-knit, and Faruque learned to dance at Zabor Dance. After only a few classes, she jumped into salsa parties. “My little confident self at the time was like, ‘I don’t need a class, I’ll just follow’!” she laughs. It was at one of those parties that she met Wegert. “I don’t even think I asked his name, I just danced with him,” she remembers. Six years later, they teach zouk classes all over the world. In March 2020, they had just returned from teaching in Quebec, finished a zouk intensive in California, and were about to drive to a dance congress in Virginia Beach. Then everything shut down. The reality sank in slowly. “At first, I thought it would last maybe a couple weeks,” says Faruque. “Then this event is canceled, that one’s canceled, this is postponed…once consistent things kept canceling, we realized that this would be a while.” This new reality put Roa into panic mode. “I got really scared because my whole busi-

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“Ten years ago, when [Christo] was getting started, he used a similar format,” Chase says. “It was an inclusive cooperative. He was the bedrock, and other people came and went.” It’s been no easy feat sustaining “Empire of Excellence” thus far—Christo and Chase have put considerable time and money into their studio green screen and audio and video equipment—but the two friends expect to continue it, releasing episodes seasonally in four to eight show blocks. To stay afloat, they collect donations during their episodic streams, and recently landed a grant from the Arts Council of the Valley in Harrisonburg. When musicians start touring again, Christo hopes he’ll be able to draw acts from Charlottesville or Harrisonburg to the studio for interviews and antics—the whole process is intended as a way to promote independent music. “There are a lot of shows that have variety acts, and there are interview shows,” Christo says. “But I haven’t seen anything quite like this.”

Dancing our way

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

Chase says. “We do throw our guests into the narrative without telling them.” And where do all their head-in-theclouds ideas come from? While Christo and Chase, also running buddies, pound the pavement. “A lot of it formulates naturally on runs,” Chase says. “We’ll be on a run and have all these dumb ideas. Then I will be editing some of the show together and see some stupid special effects on YouTube.” Christo and Chase are part of a trend— over the past year, scores of creatives have joined the stream team. From March 2020 to April 2021, Twitch reported a massive bump, going from 5.1 million to 7.2 million active channels. Twitch’s livestream viewership has also exploded, with 79 percent growth year-over-year since March 2020. And while a good portion of the traffic comes from online gaming, Twitch reported music and performance arts category viewers increased from an average of 92,000 last February to 574,000 last March. It’s hard to say where “Empire of Excellence’’ fits in with the overall streaming trend, but it has been drawing several hundred more viewers with each installment, and pulls about 500 comments per show. Christo had a following prior to the livestream experiment as Jaguardini, an electro­ n ­ ic synth pop project he describes as “low-fi beats” with “a lot of shredding and yelling into the microphone.” Chase has played in and out of bands over the years, and been a supporter of the local music scene, selling merchandise and serving as an ad hoc hype man. As for their day jobs, both Christo and Chase are educators, and their hope going forward is simply that “Empire of Excellence” continues to sustain itself as a new outlet to their multimedia side hustles.

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CULTURE THE WORKING POUR

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Drinking buddies Collaboration across industries benefits beverage fans

W

hile most of us have been trying to keep our distance over the past year, there’s been lots of pairing up in the wine industry. Area winemakers have been pursuing both formal and informal collaborations as a natural expression of their intellectual curiosity and creative spirit. And as you can see from the sampling of collabs below, these projects also involve local breweries, cideries, and distilleries.

Blenheim Vineyards and Fine Creek Brewing Company blenheimvineyards.com finecreekbrewing.com

Winemaker Ben Jordan is no stranger to co-fermentation, where different grape varieties are combined to ferment together into a final product. In a recently released collab-

A quick survey of the world’s wine regions reveals that winemaking is always accompanied by distillation of wine into brandy. It’s a natural partnership and, at least historically, it was always made from local grapes grown in the region. Inspired by world-famous brandies from the Cognac and Armagnac regions of France, winemaker Joy Ting (this writer’s wife) and master distiller Ivar Aass of Charlottesville’s Spirit Lab Distilling are collaborating to make a Virginia brandy that they call Esprit Joyeux. Aass and Ting are both focused on the brandy as a true expression of Virginia. As Ting explains, “The grapes are grown in the Shenandoah Valley. They are specifically managed and picked with brandy production in mind. After fermentation into wine, distillation occurs at Spirit Lab. Finally, the brandy is aged in barrels made from wood that comes from a forest in Culpeper.” Every one of the above-mentioned partners goes out of their way to express their love

A great deal of mutual admiration shines through in locally produced beverage collaborations such as the Rosé Gose beer by Fine Creek Brewing and Blenheim Vineyards.

Joy Ting and Ivar Aass get into the spirit of collaboration.

for each other’s products—and all of them speak highly of the production quality and skill level of their collaborators. More notably, there is frequent mention of the great ideas, character, and heart of the people behind the products. It’s clear that there are many rewards for these producers in pursuing these projects beyond the final product that is imbibed. Ultimately, though, it’s area drink lovers who truly benefit from these collaborations. Creativity and curiosity are a wonderful driver of the industry, but finding partners who are simpatico can truly spur things forward. These cooperative projects, especially ones that cross the boundaries of the wine, beer, cider, and spirits categories, result in new ideas, new flavors, and even entirely new categories of beverages, making it an exciting time to drink locally.

“These grape/apple fermentations are something we are both interested in, we are each a fan of what the other is doing, and honestly, we were looking to have fun.” BEN JORDAN, LIGHTWELL SURVEY

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lightwellsurvey.com troddenvale.com

@joytingwine spiritlabdistilling.com

@cville_culture

Lightwell Survey and Troddenvale Cider

Joy Ting Wine and Spirit Lab Distilling

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

In 2018, when Gabe Slagle was head brewer for Fine Creek Brewing Company in Powhatan, he visited Blenheim Vineyards and left some beer for winemaker Kirsty Harmon. This simple exchange led to the development of a professional friendship, as Harmon wrote back to say thank you and offered to provide grape skins if the brewery ever wanted to use them. When Slagle visited Blenheim again, he brought along Brian Mandeville, Fine Creek’s current head brewer, and the collaborations began in force. Over the years, Blenheim has had the opportunity to do wine pop-ups at Fine Creek, and has served the beer at its winery during special weekend events. On the production side, Fine Creek has used several different varieties of grape pressings in its beer, including viognier and rkatsiteli. There have even been some rosé-style beers that utilized skins from red grapes. According to Harmon, Fine Creek has “really gotten creative with how they have been able to incorporate our grapes into their beers.” In addition, “they are just really great people,” and she is hopeful that the collaboration will continue.

COURTESY OF FINE CREEK BREWING

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oration between Lightwell Survey and Troddenvale Cider, which is run by Will and Cornelia Hodges and located in Warm Springs, the concept goes a step further when grapes and apples are fermented as a single mixture. For the project, Lightwell contributed petit manseng and vidal blanc grapes and Troddenvale contributed Harrison and Golden Russet apples. (All the fruit was grown in the Shenandoah Valley.) The juice from this fruit was combined, with care taken to ensure that the resulting mix was exactly 50 percent wine and 50 percent cider. Then, each party took half of the mix, and the rest of the fermentation, aging, and bottling was done separately. While the producers share a low-intervention approach, and the resulting beverages have similarities, it is interesting to see how the same original juice can yield different results in the hands of a winemaker versus a cidermaker. The Lightwell version was fermented in stainless steel with a bit of sulfur dioxide added at bottling. The Troddenvale was fermented in neutral oak with no sulfur additions. Both are selling twopacks featuring the paired products. When asked why they decided to do this, Jordan says, “These grape/apple fermentations are something we are both interested in, we are each a fan of what the other is doing, and honestly, we were looking to have fun.”

SUPPLIED PHOTO

By Paul H. Ting


22

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

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#5

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

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#1

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CROSSWORD

Why you BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. Jerk 6. One may be pulled out of a bed 10. Questlove hairdo 14. E’en if 15. Dance that men often do shirtless 16. Think ahead 17. Lip-puckering, as kraut 18. Mineral plentiful in kale 19. Dracula accessory 20. South Korean debut of 1985 23. Go ____ 24. Traditional source of material for a sherpa’s coat 25. Ginger ____ 27. “____ Explain Things to Me” (Rebecca Solnit book) 28. Admit defeat 32. Up 35. “____ she blows!” 36. Key near Ctrl 38. Capital that lies about 15 miles from the body of water for which it was named 42. Org. for good drivers 43. Like pink cheeks 44. Adler who outwitted Sherlock Holmes 45. Most tasty 48. Celebrity with a namesake cereal in the ‘80s 49. Kvetchers’ cries 50. What “pizza” means in Italian 51. Company with the most U.S. patents per year since 1993 54. Homer’s angry outburst when Bart misbehaves ... or a hint to this puzzle’s theme

#3

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31. Panache 32. Reptile seen in hieroglyphics 33. High-priced Japanese beef 34. Avis competitor 35. 17 of Laila Ali’s wins, for short 37. Not just “a” 39. “____ we there yet?” 40. Trunk item 41. Mongolian shelter 46. “Heavens!” 47. “Sorta” 48. “Cool” amount DOWN 50. Lightweight boxer? 1. One of the Obamas 51. Response to “Who’s there?” 2. Exaggerate for effect 52. Run 3. What some musicians carry 53. What a lenient judge may show 4. Molt 55. Mythical creature seen 5. Encounter for a reef on old Bhutanese stamps diver, maybe 6. Alternative to an eggbeater 56. Thing with three feet 57. Like some traditions 7. Coin in the Trevi Fountain, perhaps 58. Bananagrams piece 8. Musk who, in 2021, 59. Kimono sash was named the world’s 60. Cartoonist Chast richest person by Forbes 61. Petting ____ 9. Carvey of “Wayne’s World” 10. High-level H.S. math class ANSWERS 5/19/21 11. State with 1,350 miles of coastline: Abbr. Skip a 12. Genre for Megan Thee generation Stallion 13. It’s next to nothing A D D I S G O U T P E D M U E S L I E D N A O L E 21. Swimming gold Y E A R O F T H E O Z W D S medalist Thorpe S T N P A A R L E E K S E V E N T Y S I Z E R S 22. Bronze E D Y S O B O I S T S 26. Delight E S S E O R A L U S A S K I P A G E N E R A T I O N 27. Nasdaq, e.g.: Abbr. A I M F L A T U T N E 28. Where VapoRub may U M P I R E S Z A H N S E Z O N T H E B E A C H be rubbed L O R E U N U M U E Y 29. Risqué I V E B I G B O Z S T O R E P E R A R A B Z I R C O N 30. First name of the first O R S E A S Y N E O N S man in space 59. Rice-shaped pasta 62. 1946 role for Fonda or 1994 role for Costner 63. Early ____ 64. Oaf 65. Lawyer’s clever question, say 66. Mexican civilization known for its colossal head sculptures 67. Preppy clothing brand 68. Without much thought 69. Impoverished

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© 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

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By Rob Brezsny

CULTURE FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Cancer (June 21-July 22): “I am tired of trying to hold things together that cannot be held,” testifies Cancerian novelist Erin Morgenstern. “Tired of trying to control what cannot be controlled.” Here’s good news for her and all Cancerians. You have cosmic permission to surrender—to no longer try to hold things together that can’t be held or try to control what can’t be controlled. Maybe in a few weeks you will have gained so much relaxed new wisdom that you’ll be inspired to make fresh attempts at holding together and controlling. But that’s not for you to worry and wonder about right now. Your assignment is to nurture your psychological and spiritual health by letting go.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Philosopher Georges Bataille wrote, “The lesson of Wuthering Heights, of Greek tragedy and, ultimately, of all religions, is that there is an instinctive tendency towards divine intoxication which the rational world of calculation cannot bear. This tendency is the opposite of Good. Good is based on common interest, which entails consideration of the future.” I’m going to dissent from Bataille’s view. I agree that we all have an instinctive longing for divine intoxication, but I believe that the rational world needs us to periodically fulfill our longing for divine intoxication. In fact, the rational world grows stale and begins to decay without these interludes. So the truth is that divine intoxication is crucial for the common good. I’m telling you this, Leo, because I think the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to claim a healthy dose of divine intoxication.

Virgo

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): Libran author Antonio Tabucchi described the frame of mind I

A SPRUCE UP

Holding Rad rugs from a new vibe Forth stir up

FEB / MARCH

CENTER SPO

T

gathering A revamped edere place in Belv

Gemini (May 21-June 20): A blogger named Valentine Cassius reports, “A tiny old woman came into the deli where I work and ordered a ‘wonderful turkey sandwich.’ When asked what she wanted on the sandwich other than turkey, she said ‘all of your most wonderful toppings.’” Here’s my response to that: The tiny old woman’s approach usually isn’t very effective. It’s almost always preferable to be very specific in knowing what you want and asking for it. But given the current astrological omens, I’ll make an exception for you in the next three weeks. I think you should be like the tiny old woman: Ask life, fate, people, spirits, and gods to bring you all of their most wonderful toppings.

recommend for you in the coming days. I hope you’ll be eager to embrace his far-reaching empathy. Like him, I trust you will expand your capacity to regard the whole world as your home. Here’s Tabucchi’s declaration: “Like a blazing comet, I’ve traversed infinite nights, interstellar spaces of the imagination, voluptuousness and fear. I’ve been a man, a woman, an old person, a little girl, I’ve been the crowds on the grand boulevards of the capital cities of the West, I’ve been the serene Buddha of the East. I’ve been the sun and the moon.”

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Author James Frey writes, “I used to think I was tough, but then I realized I wasn’t. I was fragile and I wore thick armor. And I hurt people so they couldn’t hurt me. And I thought that was what being tough was, but it isn’t.” I agree with Frey. The behavior he describes has nothing to do with being tough. So what does? That’s important for you to think about, because the coming weeks will be an excellent time to be tough in the best senses of the word. Here are my definitions: Being tough means never letting people disrespect you or abuse you, even as you cultivate empathy for how wounded everyone is. Being tough means loving yourself with such unconditional grace that you never act unkind out of a neurotic need to over-defend yourself. Being tough means being a compassionate truth-teller.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Fragile intensity or intense fragility? Ferocious gentleness or gentle ferocity? Vulnerable strength or strong vulnerability? I suspect these will be some of the paradoxical themes with which you’ll be delicately wrestling in the coming days. Other

possibilities: sensitive audacity or audacious sensitivity; fluidic fire or fiery fluidity; crazy wisdom or wise craziness; penetrating softness or soft penetration; shaky poise or poised shakiness. My advice is to regard rich complexities like these as blessings, not confusions or inconveniences.

metaphor for the following truth: Most humans feel more confident and expansive about exploring the outer world than their inner realms. But I hope that in the coming weeks you will buck that trend, as you break all previous records for curious and luxurious exploration into your deepest psychic depths.

Capricorn

Aries

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Birds that live in cities have come up with an ingenious adaptation. They use humans’ abandoned cigarette butts to build their nests. Somehow they discovered that nicotine is an insecticide that dispels pests like fleas, lice, and mites. Given your current astrological aspects, I’m guessing you could make metaphorically comparable adjustments in your own life. Are there ways you could use scraps and discards to your benefit?

(March 21-April 19): “Open your mouth only if what you are going to say is more beautiful than silence,” declares an Arab proverb. That’s a high standard to aspire to. Even at our very best, when we’re soaring with articulate vitality, it’s hard to be more beautiful than silence for more than, say, 50 percent of the time. But here’s a nice surprise: You could exceed that benchmark during the next three weeks. You’re primed to be extra expressive and interesting. When you speak, you could be more beautiful than silence as much as 80 percent of the time.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A blogger named Raven testifies, “My heart is a toddler throwing a tantrum in a store and my brain is the parent who continues to shop.” I’m pleased to inform you, Aquarius, that your heart will not act like that toddler in the coming weeks. In fact, I believe your heart will be like a sage elder with growing wisdom in the arts intimacy and tenderness. In my vision of your life, your heart will guide you better than maybe it ever has. Now here’s a message to your brain: Listen to your heart!

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): The Voyager 1 space probe, launched by NASA in 1977, is now more than 14 billion miles from Earth. In contrast, the farthest humans have ever penetrated into the ground is 7.62 miles. It’s the Kola Superdeep Borehole in northwest Russia. Metaphorically speaking, these facts provide an evocative

Taurus (April 20-May 20): Here’s the definition of an emotional support animal: “a companion animal that provides therapeutic benefit to a person with a mental or psychiatric disability.” I don’t mean to be flippant, but I think every one of us has at least one mental or psychiatric disability that would benefit from the company of an emotional support animal. If you were ever going to acquire such an ally, the coming weeks would be prime time to do so. I encourage you to also seek out other kinds of help and guidance and stimulation that you’d benefit from having. It’s the resource-gathering phase of your cycle. (PS: Cesar Chavez said: “You are never strong enough that you don’t need help.”) Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888.

T ART OF CRAF

r house Potter’s cide past embraces its

2021

Inside. Outside. Home.

s e n li e h t e id s n I

There’s no place like

home. Inside. Outside. Home.

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A WW II-era home—and its modern-day kitchen redo

Retaining the best of an unfinished Bundoran property, new owners craft their forever home

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo actor Ingrid Bergman won the most prestigious awards possible for her work in films, TV, and theater: Oscars, Emmys, and a Tony. She was intelligent, talented, and beautiful. Life was a challenge when she was growing up, though. She testified, “I was the shyest human ever invented, but I had a lion inside me that wouldn’t shut up.” If you have a sleeping lion inside you, Virgo, I expect it to wake up soon. And if your inner lion is already wide awake and you have a decent relationship with it, I suspect it may soon begin to come into its fuller glory.

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All about town. SPRING 2021

PROLYFYCK RUN CREW | ON-THE-STREET STYLE | COMMUNITY BIKES' MISSION

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LIVE THEATRE IS BACK!

PORTRAITS ARTISTS OF THE

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What is 434? It’s recreation, it’s culture, it’s society—it’s how we live in Charlottesville. In this fullglossy quarterly magazine, you’ll meet townspeople from all corners of our area, from creatives to CEOs, each with their own story to tell. Every issue will connect readers with the best things to buy, see, and get involved in that season.

Macbeth

Henry V

Dark magic and darker urges prevail in this tale of unchecked ambition, with murder begetting murder and blood thirsting for blood.

Swashbuckling adventure and romance burst at the seams in this chronicle of England’s greatest monarch.

MAY 13–SEPTEMBER 5

Blackfriars Playhouse, the world’s only recreation of Shakespeare’s indoor theatre

Outdoors at Mary Baldwin University Rose Terrace

JUNE 17–SEPEMBER 4

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! AmericanShakespeareCenter.com 540.851.1733 or 1.877.MUCH.ADO

This is the 434, and we’re all about town.

ON STANDS NOW!


Q&A

27

Who’s your pick for Virginia’s next governor? @jennifercarrollfoy!

@joey.jobs.

@LEWISALAN.S/INSTAGRAM

@HWDYKE/INSTAGRAM

@jennifercarrollfoy is amazing! @BERNADETTEDONOVAN/INSTAGRAM

Terry McAuliffe. @SHARON_SALZ/INSTAGRAM

Perhaps myself. @MELISSASHIRLEYMILLER/INSTAGRAM

Jennifer Carroll Foy. @BLUELENALLC/TWITTER

@JennMcClellanVA. @JESSICASHEIN/TWITTER

Not McAwful. @MRCRAZYHEAD/INSTAGRAM

Chris Wayne. TONY JOOP/FACEBOOK

Give it to the food bank.

Little Buckets Farm Sanctuary is a nonprofit 501c3 vegan sanctuary. Little Buckets shows the public how farm animals have loving, fun, sweet personalities, have strong family bonds and friendships, and that they feel the same emotions as your domestic pets. We show there is no difference and that we should love all animals by living compassionately.

www.littlebucketsfarmsanctuary.org

BAKERS! Three rising stars making delish fresh bread

Taste is everything.

@ROBERTSMITH2030/INSTAGRAM

WILLIAM SHIFFLETT/FACEBOOK

Anyone other than (R) for the rest of my life. @CVILLEBROCK/TWITTER

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

THE PEAR CO-OWNER ON HER “SECOND LIFE” IN CHARLOTTESVILLE

Something’s fishy around here...could it be fresh salmon?

JM Stock’s ham biscuit is always a winner.

A very Southern summer Collards, fried chicken, mac ‘n’ cheese, and, yes, biscuits—our summer menu is heating up

Say “mmm.” When it comes to area eats, we let our cravings guide us. And in this quarterly magazine, you’ll find everything from a stack of pancakes to a plate of filet mignon. Each issue of Knife & Fork introduces readers to chefs, food trends, recipes, and, most importantly, the best meals around. ON STANDS SPRING, SUMMER, FALL, WINTER

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Next week’s question: What seasonal events are you excited to see return?

MEET MYO QUINN

May 26 – June 1, 2021 c-ville.com

Donald J. Trump.

ICE CREAM MAKERS! A customizable hot-day treat SUMMER 2021

JANET UHRICH EDEN/FACEBOOK

Any Republican.

TAKERS! C-Ville Supper Club brings dinner to your door


28

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HELP WANTED Come Join the Pavilion Operations Team (Downtown Charlottesville) The Pavilion is looking for a few hard-working additions to our Operations Crew. This is seasonal, part-time, mostly outdoor work from April thru November each year. It is physically demanding and takes place in all conditions as you set up and take down for all events. The Ops Crew is who makes the Pavilion run! You will get to see what happens behind the scenes and how shows come together. Hours will vary each week but will include some very long days and most Fridays. We pay a competitive starting wage and provide meals for most events. We also will pay you to get trained and certified with OSHA, ABC, Crowd Management, Fork Lift and Manlifts, etc. Your pay will rise as you become certified and as you show us your skill set and desire to contribute to the team. Shoot us an email at info@ sprintpavilion.com and tell us a little about yourself and why we need you on our team. Chef/Kitchen Manager and Line Cooks - The Light Well in Orange, Virginia

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Monticello seeks an experienced custodian to clean and maintain Monticello’s Visitor Center and other Foundation buildings. Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities: Program Manager- Day Support, Louisa County. Part-time 20 hours per week. Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, pay range of $15-$17/hr.) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr.) Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr.) We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet and C’ville! Additional detail for each vacancy (including schedules) may be viewed on the Employment page of our web site. To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/ In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Successful applicants will have the ability to: Operate vacuum cleaners, floor polishers, and buffers, as well as other standard cleaning equipment. climb ladders up to 6 feet and lift or maneuver up to 50 pounds. Satisfactory work record and references required. Driver’s license required. This is a 25 hour/week position. Flexibility to work one weekend day required. Open until filled. The Thomas Jefferson Foundation is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Diverse candidates encouraged to apply. Please apply here: https://monticello.applicantpro.com/ jobs/1805841.html


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WWW.CAAR.COM 31

VOL. 30 NO. 21 n MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

FREE

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

BY KEN WILSON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

COLLEGE TOWN: If Jefferson Could See Us Now


MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

32

22 ACRE FARM IN FREE UNION

10 acres of pasture with four-board fencing, 2-stall barn, riding ring and elaborate kennels backing to Farmington Hunt Club. Ride out! Spacious and charming 5 bedroom home with master suites on 1st and 2nd floor. Walkout terrace level is an apartment or extension of the home. Wonderful remodeled kitchen is open to the family room and huge screened porch. Beautiful views of nature in all directions. $1,500,000.

PENTHOUSE OVERLOOKING UVA AND THE SOUTHWEST MOUNTAINS

One of a kind 2500 square foot home with cathedral ceilings and stunning views from the sixth floor. 3 bedrooms and 3 baths. University Village is a 55+ community offering gracious dining, multiple amenities and activities including a heated indoor pool. Reserved indoor parking with only a 5 minute drive to Grounds and 10 to downtown C’Ville. Walk to the Miller Center, UVa baseball and North Grounds. $950,000.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

A 10 MINUTE WALK TO THE ROTUNDA FROM UNIVERSITY CIRCLE

Cape Cod with character so convenient to everything UVa and downtown. Tucked away on this quiet street with no through traffic. Oasis of green in the hidden backyard.Eat-in kitchen opens to the sun room. Handsome fireplace. Master bedroom and office on the first floor. Full unfinished basement for great storage or expansion. $800,000.

Jim McVay

Roy Wheeler Realty Associate of the Year 2017, 2018, 2019 & 2020 Associate Broker • Charlottesville Realtor since 1978 434-962-3420 • jim@jimmcvay.com

1100 Dryden Lane, Charlottesville


33

UNDER CONTRACT

1920’S SPACIOUS HOME

ESCAPE TO THE COUNTRY

STORYBOOK CAPE COD

413 Main Street 3 BR, 2 BA, 1796 SQ FT $205,000 mls 617291 Jan Shiflett, 434-242-6057

109 Daves Place 3 BR, 4 BA, 4934 SQ FT $849,900 mls 605988 Warren Maupin, 434-962-8939

655 Harrison Street 4 BR, 3 BA, 2795 SQ FT $395,000 mls 608408 Steve White, 434-242-8355

STUNNING ESTATE PARCEL

SANDY BRANCH RESORT FARM

WESTERN ALBEMARLE

Dick Woods Road 21.28 acres on Ivy Creek $1,500,000 mls 616567 Jane Porter Fogleman, 434-981-1274

2 Burnley Station Road Waterfront parcel of 5.96 acres $235,000 mls 612451 Barb Kelley, 434-882-2520

B Greenwood Road 2.41 wooded acres $144,900 mls 532642 Mike Peters, 434-981-3995

VIEW THESE LISTINGS ONLINE

PRICE REDUCED

LAKE ANNA WATERFRONT ESTATE PARCEL

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

FREE UNION

2330 Homestead Farm Road 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 5614 SQ FT $1,475,000 mls 611677 Steve White, 434-242-8355

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM/RWR-REW-WEEKLY-LISTINGS/

Charlottesville 434.951.5155 | Greene 434.985.2348 | Zion Crossroads 434.589.2611 | Western Albemarle 434.205.4355 WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

20144 Daniel Road Spectacular 83+ acre parcel $2,499,000 mls 617263 Steve White, 434-242-8355


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MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

34

BROOK HOLLOW

HOMESTEAD FARM ROAD

• Private setting with English Cottage main home • 38 acres, 3 separate parcels • Spectacular westward mountain views and sunsets • Charming guest cottage • MLS# 614593 • $1,695,000

• Custom built elegance • 10’ ceilings • Main floor master suite • Lovely mature landscaping • MLS# 611677 • $1,475,000

BLACKWELLS HOLLOW ROAD • 65 acre western Albemarle parcel • Parcel has access through Patricia Ann Byrom Preserve Park. • Within 30 minutes of Charlottesville • MLS# 617660 • $695,000

LAKE ANNA • 82.91 acres • 3500 linear feet on Lake Anna • Rolling pasture and hardwoods • MLS# 610245 • $2,499,000

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

UNION MILLS ROAD, TROY • Custom home on 3.55 acres • 5 BR/3.5 BA, 2533 fin.sq.ft. • Bold stream at rear property line with huge 1000+ acre forest behind • MLS# 617760 • $549,900

SOUTH RIVER MEADOWS • 40.70 dividable acres • South River frontage • Blue Ridge Mountain views • MLS# 600761 • $595,000

KESWICK ESTATE • Private setting with mature hardwoods • Elevated building site • Situated on a cul-de-sac • MLS# 615730 • $294,500

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com 28 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville


35

Let an agent who knows guide you.

LOUISA COUNTY

$299,900

$441,705

Lot 24 Pelham Dr/Troy

133 BLUE RIDGE DR

$424,900

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

A DREAM HOME IS GREAT, BUT THE RIGHT ONE IS BETTER. SOLD

Bev Nash

434-981-5560

• Construction is underway on 7.8 wooded acres • 1400 sf, 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Similar to photo, covered porch, rear deck • Superior modular construction like 2x6 walls • Conditioned crawl space • Paved State road • Granite counters, real fireplace • October completion

425 Rosewood Dr

$385,500

Ruth Guss

434-960-0414

• 4 Bedrooms, 2 1/2 Baths • Finished Bonus Room • To be Built, The Rosalyn on 2.35 Acres • First Floor Master Suite w/ Garden Bath • Luxury Vinyl Plank Floors on Main Level, 2 Car Garage • Kitchen w/ Granite Counter-tops, 42”Cabinets, Island • Upgraded Siding, 10’x16’ Rear Deck, 2 Zone HVAC

4209 HAWKINS LANE

Shannon G. Hudson 540.661.2083 • Classic home in a classy neighborhood • 5 bedrooms w/3 masters, 4.5 baths • Landscaped w/brick courtyard & fountain • Partial basement w/1 car garage • Sunroom, FP, built in bookshelves

$495,000

$99,900

PRICE REDUCED

Dan Corbin

434-531-6155

• New Custom Construction • Available June 2021 • 1980 Sq ft, One Level, 3 bedroom, 2 Bath, on 0.5 ac. • Granite, Gas Fireplace, Patio, Lovely Floors & Fixtures • Gorgeous Pond View, No HOA • Well and Septic = No Water Bills • West River Meadows Subdivision - Fluvanna County • MLS 617217

Piney Mountain Subdivision, Palmyra

10+ acre Lots

GOT PLANS? LET’S BUILD!

434.985.0021 410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 Downtown

• Country Living in Convenient Location. • Private Stocked Pond & almost 5 acres in Albemarle County • Main Level Master Suite • Eat In Kitchen w Stainless Appliances • Covered rear deck & Finished Basement • Covered Front Porch w View of your pond & pasture • MLS# 605931

$340,030

14 ELM CT/TROY

Pat Burns

434-465-4444

• Sitting amidst estates and horse properties this beautiful 5 acre lot in Keswick area for sale to build your dream home. Convenient to Charlottesville, Gordonsville. 99,900.

517 LEXINGTON AVE

$895,000 PRICE REDUCED

Lori Click

434-326-7593

• To Be Built! The Brookwood, Similar to Photo! • 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Attached Garage, 1.66 Acres • Upgraded Siding Accent, Wide Window Trim, 10’x16’ Rear Deck • Master Suite with Garden Tub, Double Bowl Vanity • Kitchen with Granite Countertops, Stainless Appliances • Luxury Vinyl Plank Floors, Forest View s/d offer DSL, Fiber Optic

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • • • • • • • • •

Quintessential Charlottesville Notable Victorians on Lexington Ave Extensively renovated Redesigned character in all bathrooms, Master suite created on 3rd level Tremendous banquette seating & abundant light Ornate fixtures throughout convey Unique shelves, custom art features & organic tile and Onyx detail. Large level fenced yard

434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Gorgeous NEW 10+ Acre Homesites • No HOA, Common Sense C&Rs, Firefly • Close to the Lake, Dining, Shopping, Schools • Ready to Build? Be in Your New Home Summer 2021 • Your Choice of Remaining Lots - $109,000 • Call for A Personal Tour - MLS 602023

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730


MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

36

2884 PALMER DRIVE | $2,675,000 | MLS 604640 4 Bedrooms • 4 Full Bath & 1 Half Bath • 4,118sqft • 4.15 Acres • 2.5 Car Garage

3280 BROADMOORE DRIVE | $2,700,000 | MLS 604638 4 Bedrooms • 3 Full Bath & 1 Half Bath • 4,000 sqft • 2 Car Garage

2869 PALMER DRIVE | $2,850,000 | MLS 604639 4 Bedrooms • 4 Full Bath & 2 Half Bath • 4,606 sqft • 3 Car Garage

2559 PALMER DRIVE | $2,425,000 | MLS 604636 3 Bedroom • 3 Full Bath & 1 Half Bath • 3,750sqft • 2 Acres

2571 PALMER DRIVE | $2,625,000 | MLS 604637 4 Bedroom • 4 Full Bath & 1 Half Bath • 4080sqft • 2 Car Garage • 2.7 Acres

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Frank Hardy Sotheby’s International Realty is proud to present 5 newly constructed exclusive residences within Keswick Estate. The product of intensive planning and collaboration among the area’s top builders and architects, these homes embody the highest standard of craftsmanship. Owners of these homes will enjoy thoughtfullydesigned floor plans with main-level masters, spacious secondary bedrooms and seamless transitions between the indoor and outdoor space.

keswickestate.com Murdoch Matheson

434.981.7439 murdoch.matheson@sothebysrealty.com Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


37

NEWS & VIEWS Local Real Estate News Reporting Error Found in CAAR 2021 1st Quarter Home Sales Report

Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

UNIVERSITY CIRCLE

Unique opportunity in the best University location. Over a half acre lot. Bright clean residence with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, hardwood floors, great room, dining room and eat-in kitchen. Property also offers 2, one bedroom apartments on the terrace level. Large deck. Lots of off street parking! $850,000

REDBUD LANE

Unique, contemporary tri-level home. Set on 2 acres with beautiful trees and mature landscaping. Home features; 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, dining room, 2 decks, paved driveway and a 500 sq. ft. carport. $435,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

Annie Gould Gallery

109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville.

NEWS & VIEWS

It has come to the attention of the Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® (CAAR) there was a substantive reporting error in the March 2021 home sales data - specifically impacting the closed sales and median sales price. This inaccurate data was included in the CAAR 2021 1st Quarter Home Sales Report. Virginia REALTORS® and CAAR conducted extensive research to determine the root cause of the error. It was determined to be an inadvertent modification of the data feed within the CAAR Multiple Listing Services (MLS) system that Virginia REALTORS® uses for reporting purposes. The data feed has been fixed to avoid similar reporting issues for future reports. On behalf of Virginia REALTORS® and CAAR, we sincerely apologize for the inconvenience this situation has caused. We understand the magnitude of the impact to you and your sphere of influence. Please know improved quality assurance procedures with each participant in the process are being put in place to ensure that this does not occur again. It is our sincere desire and professional mandate to ensure the accuracy of the data presented so you can continue to have the confidence in the reports you have enjoyed up to now. The Revised CAAR 2021 1st Quarter Home Sales Report is now available at CAAR.com. About CAAR: The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® serves more than 1,300 real estate professionals and affiliate members throughout the City of Charlottesville and the counties of Albemarle, Fluvanna,

Greene, Louisa, and Nelson. Widely recognized as the leading voice for real estate in Central Virginia since 1925, CAAR members bring professionalism and high ethical standards to every business transaction. The Association advocates for the protection of private property rights and provides tools and technology for members to achieve expertise in serving the needs of customers and clients. The CAAR membership is committed to enriching the region’s neighborhoods by engaging in a variety of educational programs as well as community service events each year. If you have a question about today’s market, contact a REALTOR® today using mycaar.com for residential properties and cvcmls.com for commercial properties! They have the expertise, tools, and local insight you need to make the best real estate decision. NOTE: The term REALTOR® is a registered collective membership mark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of the National Association of REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics. About Virginia REALTORS® Virginia REALTORS® (previously known as the Virginia Association of REALTORS®) is the largest trade association in Virginia, representing 35,000 REALTORS® engaged in the residential and commercial real estate business. Virginia REALTORS® serves as an advocate for homeownership and homeowners and represents the interests of property owners in the Commonwealth of Virginia. For more information, visit www.virginiarealtors.org or follow Virginia REALTORS® on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. NOTE: The term REALTOR® is a registered collective membership mark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of the National Association of REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics.

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY


Village” designed by Jefferson himself (in part as a teaching tool) in Palladian and Greco-Roman style. Call it what you like, it’s stately and it’s beautiful, and it’s rich in history. Robert and Ted Kennedy (both law students), former U.S. Senators Chuck Robb and John Warner, along with Katie Couric, Tina Fey and Tiki Barber are just a few of its most famous grads in living memory. But while these alumni and countless others have impacted the nation, the school’s presence here in the 21st century is evident throughout the city. Take the UVA Hospital medical staff working day and night giving out vaccinations in the former Big Lots store in the Seminole Square Shopping Center. Chances are you or someone you know is awfully glad they’ve been there. UVA proudly proclaims its mission “to serve the people of Virginia, and to lead the advancement of human knowledge and to benefit the region and the world.” Look at just a few of the ways the university makes Charlottesville itself such a great place to live.

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

38

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

Economic Impact

COLLEGE TOWN: If Jefferson Could See Us Now BY KEN WILSON

I

magine no afternoons in Scott Stadium watching the Hoos, and no evenings in John Paul Jones Arena cheering on five young men who have been mentored by Tony Bennett. Imagine perhaps just one comfy (but extremely crowded) coffee shop, just a few exciting restaurants, no

annual book and film festivals, no lectures by visiting scholars, and a relative dearth of imaginative start-ups. What you’re imagining is Charlottesville without UVA—without the excitement, creative energy, and derring-do of a college town. How do you like it? Fortunately, you don’t have to. Ranked fourth in the nation among

public colleges and universities by U.S. News and World Report, UVA has a total undergraduate enrollment of 17,011. Formally known as the University of Virginia and fondly referred to as “Mr. Jefferson’s University,” or just “the University,” it lacks a “quad” and a “campus” but is proud of its “Grounds” and its “Lawn,” with its handsome “Academical

The University of Virginia has been the region’s leading economic engine almost since it was established over 200 years ago. “The University of Virginia is a significant driver of the economies of the communities it serves and of the commonwealth as a whole,” says Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Patrick Hogan. “From employment to operational spending and construction, to the activity attributable to research and medical care, UVA is proud of its positive economic benefit to the state.” An independent economic impact study conducted in 2016 found that the university’s Academic Division, Health System, and the College at Wise combined to generate a total of $5.9 billion annually in economic activity for the Commonwealth of Virginia. This includes spending on goods and services, spending by employees, students and visitors, and money spent by businesses benefiting from UVA’s own spending. The university’s 2020-2021 pre-COVID operating budget was $3.845 million. UVA employees and students generate more than $70.3 million annually through contributions to charitable organizations including the Common-


39

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

FEATURE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM


40 MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

Your Home will look its Best with the Listing Solution

List your home with me and receive property photos, a 3D immersive tour and accurate floor plans, using the newest technology.

Viewer

wealth of Virginia Campaign, which itself supports more than a thousand groups through their volunteer activities. UVA leads all state agencies in giving to the CVC, and has, since 1999, given a total of more than $13 million to the campaign, which supports more than 1,000 organizations.

FEATURE

Knowledge and Know How, Dollars and Cents One huge way that UVA impacts the economy is through its development of new commercial products—development that the National Venture Capital Association says helps to make Charlottesville the fastest-growing venture capital ecosystem in the country. As a major research university, UVA can take credit for discoveries that make our lives better, such as groundbreaking findings of previously unknown structures in the human brain. Its research enterprises have an annual economic impact of $644.5 million, are responsible for one in five jobs created or supported by the University and attract funders and research and development businesses to the Commonwealth.

UVA’s research park just north of town off of Route 29, newly renamed “North Fork,” houses an impressive array of science and technology firms, government contractors, academic institutions, startups and nonprofits employing hundreds of people and responsible for who knows how many hundreds of collaborations over its 35-year history. Collaborators include UVA’s School of Engineering and Applied Science, its School of Medicine, and its College of Arts & Sciences. Subjects of collaborations, previous or ongoing, include pharmaceutical research; development of cancer, diabetes and alcohol addiction treatments; training; product development and improvements; and a whole lot more. Recent collaborations with the MITRE Corporation include developing software to protect against cyber threats, and work on COVID-19 personal protective equipment and other medical matters. UVA’s School of Medicine, Health System, and College at Wise are engaged with the National Institute of Health, the National Science Foundation, NASA, the Department of Defense, and others,

Whether you’re buying or selling a home, locally or globally, searching for investment opportunities or just have questions, I’m here to help.

Peter McFarren REALTOR®

202.341.4422 petermcfarren@gmail.com

PeterMcFarrenRealtor.com

500 Westfield Rd. Charlottesville, VA

(434) 939-7098

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CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

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41

Lovingston Winery | Nelson County

105 Finders Way | Charlottesville

Nestled into 65 acres of rolling hills in central Nelson Co, this successful vineyard has a proven track record of producing award-winning and highly rated wines. With 11 acres of vines, a 4000 square foot production facility, and 3 renovated homes, the property has limitless possibilities.

Occupying an idyllic wooded hillside setting just outside Charlottesville, this 4 BR, 3.5 BA home has a new kitchen and wet bar, new cedar shake roof, updated screened porch, new whole-house generator, and extensive landscaping. Farmington location, western Albemarle schools, minutes to Barracks Rd. $1,095,000 | montaguemiller.com/616588

$2,490,000 | cartermontague.com/607769 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

$725,000 | montaguemiller.com/612597 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

630 Windrift Dr | Earlysville Desirable neighborhood of Windrift in Earlysville. Home sits atop a knoll with mountain views. Large backyard with fenced tennis court, deck & storage shed. 4 BR, 3 BA. Large bedroom and full bath in walk out basement.

lot 11 Langdon Woods Dr | Albemarle

838 Village Rd | Charlottesville

Proposed custom home to be built by European Homes of Albemarle on this beautiful lot in northern Albemarle County. Superior quality finishes including gleaming hardwood floor, custom Cabinetry, 9 ft ceiling and much more.

Prime location, just moments from UVA & downtown, this pristine Arts & Crafts style home offers a wonderful balance of location, style, and space. 5 BR, 4.5 BA home w/fenced back yard with plenty of space for play and outdoor living.

$850,000 | montaguemiller.com/617300 Anita Dunbar | 434.981.1421

$797,000 | montaguemiller.com/616583 Anita Dunbar | 434.981.1421

3848 Zion Rd | T roy

247 Monte Vista Ave | Charlottesville

Calling Investors, Three Houses sold together. 3830 Zion Rd, 3848 Zion Rd & 3864 Zion Rd, Troy VA. All homes are currently tenant occupied. Each home has 2 BRs, 1 BA, kitchen and living room, each on 1.09 acre lot.

Charming Cape Cod in Fry’s Springs! This well loved home features 3 BRs and renovated bath with a new tile shower. Kitchen has newer SS appliances and a built in china hutch. Nice city lot with fenced year yard and off street parking.

$419,000 | montaguemiller.com/616760 Kyle Olson | 540.649.4131

$334,900 | montaguemiller.com/617808 Dana Watson | 434.996.2700

Whether you're buying or selling a home, locally or globally, searching for investment opportunities or just have questions, we're here to help. At Montague, Miller & Co., we take pride in our ability to educate and guide our clients to successful outcomes through professionalism and honest counsel. MONTAGUEMILLER.COM | 800.793.5393 | CHARLOTTESVILLE | MADISON | CULPEPER | ORANGE | AMHERST/NELSON

As a three generation family company, we’ve been serving Central Virginia’s real estate needs for over seventy years!

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

$364,900 | montaguemiller.com/616129 Douglas Burke | 434.951.7122

Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

FEATURE

Black Angus Farm | Scottsville Enjoy total peace and privacy at Black Angus Farm in southern Albemarle overlooking the James River. Located at the end of a quiet country lane, the 66 acres includes elevated pasture and mature forest.4BR, 3.5 BA farmhouse.

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

YOUR PLACE. OUR PURPOSE.


agencies, skilled nursing facilities, and even grocery stores.

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

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Happy Grads, Eager Homebuyers

FEATURE

UVA students help make this city such a standout town it’s no wonder so many want to live here after graduation. Keith Davis, Principal Broker/Partner with Nest Realty, has been in Charlottesville for 25 years and has sold homes here for 16. As the largest employer in the area, “UVA has a significant impact on the number of buyers and sellers and the general health of the real estate market” (which is excellent), Davis notes. “Some area REALTORS® have a good referral business that comes from university employees and graduates.” Even more frequently, the potential buyers are UVA alumni, oftentimes retirees. “Being in Charlottesville means you have access to a school that provides everything from arts to sports to the academic,” Davis adds, “not just for their students, but for the broader community. We lived within walking distance of the university for years and frequently went to the Culbreth Theatre or to sporting activities—things that were on grounds, that are fabulous. That outreach is why, in large part, many of the graduates continue to come back to Charlottesville.” Graduates like Davis’ own wife. “She was more than happy to move here when we were getting married,” he says. And while Davis himself has never worked directly for the university, he’s quick to recognize how much its done for him: “Every job I’ve had here has benefitted from hiring from UVA or research that came out of UVA,” he says, “or from a real estate market that’s largely driven by the employment of the university.” activities which directly and indirectly create a wide range of jobs. A lecture series entitled Grounds on the Go, which is presented in conjunction with UVA’s Applied Research Institute, features UVA faculty experts speaking on research to interested fellow park researchers and members of the community.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Good Neighbor Charity As part of its mission to educate, UVA facilitates student-led organizations that form and train socially conscious, volunteer-minded community leaders, build community partnerships and promote lifelong volunteer service. Madison House on Rugby Road is the university’s volunteer coordinator center. More than 3,000 volunteers serve as tutors, construction workers, day care supporters, patient service representatives, role models, and peer counselors. Madison House has taken the challenging conditions of the pandemic in stride, making many of its volunteer opportunities virtual. Hoos Assisting with Life Obstacles (HALO) tackles hunger, homelessness, unemployment, and pressing local issues through seven different programs, assisting families and individuals in need by providing food, educational training, companionship, and childcare. FoodAssist aims to bridge the gap between food waste and food insecurity by collecting perishable food from fra-

ternity and sorority houses and dining halls—typically hot, leftover meals—and delivering it to needy community members. Founded in the fall of 2018, FoodAssist has roughly 30 volunteers, and hopes to add more. Two to four days a week pre-COVID, the group delivered to the afterschool program Computers for Kids. Since the onset of the pandemic, as FoodAssist has collected food from an increasing number of Greek life houses, and has received a constant stream of donations, donations have gone to the Salvation Army instead—642 pounds worth in the fall semester, and 400 this spring. The 30 or so active members of Net Impact combine their newly acquired business skills to support of socially minded entrepreneurship and consciousness raising. Net Impact facilitates ongrounds discussions of social issues, which help students to think more deeply about how their actions and careers impact the local community as well as the world around us. Currently the group works with a number of non-profits including Community Investment Cooperative, which connects aspiring entrepreneurs with existing ones, city officials with nonprofit service providers, and state agents with local businesspeople. Other collaborators are Charlottesville Angel Network, Charlottesville Business Innovation Council, CIC, Computers 4 Kids, Smart Cville,

The Salvation Army, and Wild Virginia. Altogether, a 2015 study found generous UVA faculty, staff and students volunteered for a total of 111,135 hours at schools, health clinics, food pantries, community centers and animal shelters, and made $18.9 million in charitable donations—$70.3 million including the dollar value of volunteer hours. UVA led all state agencies in employee-giving through the Commonwealth of Virginia Campaign (CVC).

Helping the Community When It Needs It Most Brainy people are good help in a crisis. Take paramedic and UVA Health intensive care registered nurse Jessica Denomme, whose idea it was for UVA to aid COVID-19 first responders by manufacturing personal protective equipment for them. Thanks to Denomme’s initiative, students and employees at the Curry School of Education and Human Development, the Darden School of Business, UVA Health, UVA Engineering, and the School of Architecture worked together—virtually, socially distanced— with local volunteers and businesses to provide PPEs like masks, face shields, and nasopharyngeal swabs. UVA put together a team composed of volunteers who took their time away from their full time jobs, producing products not for UVA Hospital alone, but also for Martha Jefferson Hospital, local EMS

Meeting the Future Thankfully, the unique challenges posed by the Coronavirus crisis are abating; what form the next public emergency will take is unknown. What is clear, though, is that the University of Virginia will be an enormous asset to the Charlottesville community in meeting any challenges that come our way. Quality of life, health care, educational opportunities, career opportunities . . . what hasn’t UVA improved around here? A school that offers 48 bachelor’s degrees, 94 master’s degrees, 55 doctoral degrees, along with professional degrees in law and medicine attracts a lot of smart kids and turns out even smarter young adults, many of whom fall in love with its history and culture and gorgeous Shenandoah Valley setting and decide to stick around. Lucky us. Skilled and educated, creative and entrepreneurial, these UVA grads could make it anywhere they like, and yet they choose to make it here. They are, to say the least, good company. “I always have this tag: live where you love, and love where you live,” says Cynthia Viejo of Nest Realty. “I find this place to be a very powerful energy center that attracts all different kinds of people: artists, writers, and actors; health-conscious, community conscious, and Earth-conscious people.” UVA,” she says, “adds a wonderful flavor.”


COMMONS Based on the Danish model of cohousing Privately-owned homes | Central green spaces First all-solar community in Virginia

At Emerson Commons in Crozet, we have designed a pedestrian-oriented neighborhood where we cross paths with each other often. We can easily take the time to stop and chat. A beautiful club house allows us to have potlucks and neighborhood events together. Neighbors co-manage the community and meet each other that way. A beautiful pool, walking trails by a creek, and multiple playgrounds give us further excuses to connect with our neighbors.

• • • • • •

MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

Emerson

FOR SALE: 843 Stargazer Lane, Crozet

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NEW 5/21 $462K 4BR, 3BA 2417 sq. ft. Solar panels Backyard facing the woods and creek

Contact us at info@sheeflee.com or 540-250-3261 to arrange a tour.

RoofMaxx.com | 434-207-2074

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Roof Maxx is a quick, natural and affordable alternative to a complicated, expensive and life-disrupting asphalt roof replacement. We offer free roof assessments and our service saves up to 80% over a roof replacement


MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

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EMERALD RIDGE

Beautiful contemporary home located near Mint Springs Park in the Western Albemarle School District! 4-BR, 3.5-BA. Walk-out ground floor apt. with second kitchen, BR, library/office space, and full BA. Large back deck with mountain views. MLS#616605 $550,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MEADOWBROOK HILLS

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

OLD TRAIL

Classic brick Georgian, c. 2008, 5 bedrooms, including main level master suite, spacious and modern open floor plan. Views of the adjoining Old Trail Golf Course, buffered by small woods, and views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. MLS#614945 $1,475,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

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Circa 1946 brick home on 1+ acre in desirable city location. Features main-level master bedroom and bath, eat-in kitchen, and sunroom. 3 bedrooms and 2 baths on second level. Lot may possibly be subdivided. MLS#615341 $2,150,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

Spectacular country estate offering complete privacy and total serenity from over 53 acres in Free Union with Blue Ridge views and 2-acre lake. The heart of the property showcases a stunning custom-designed residence with 6 BR, 6.5 BA, spacious chef ’s kitchen, lovely dining room and breakfast room, cozy paneled den, and great room with soaring exposed-beam ceiling and fireplace. Property is fenced with 3-board fencing. Located approximately 15 miles NW of UVA and Downtown Charlottesville. MLS#617485 $4,165,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CEDAR HILL

One-level living in this Mid-century brick contemporary with many opportunities located in the middle of 11.5 acres. Property includes a spring-fed pond and a pastoral setting on Panorama Road, just north of Charlottesville. MLS#615745 $590,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville, 14 miles to CHO Airport. 177 private acres with c.1901 classic Virginia farm house, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

CASTELBROOK

A rare opportunity to own a little slice of heaven in Batesville! Stately 2-story brick home built circa 1890, 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, nestled on just over 19 tranquil acres, is the quintessence of understated elegance! MLS#616392 $1,595,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

KESWICK

Enjoy mountain views of the historic Southwest Mtns. from this upgraded 4-BR residence on 6 private acres. From the front wrap-around porch, enter into the main level which has just undergone a fabulous transformation. Inviting living space has vaulted ceiling, LR w/stone FP, open updated kitchen flowing into great/ sun room, DR, home office, half bath & laundry. The second level has 2 master suites w/private BA, 2 BR & BA. Barn/ stable & workshop. Convenient to Pantops, Downtown Historic Mall, UVA & Keswick Hall amenities. MLS#611672 $989,000 C. Dammann, 434.981.1250

NORTH DOWNTOWN

Colonial Revival style c. 1913 residence restored to perfection. Flexible and updated floor plan with 2,970 finished square feet. Coveted private backyard and off-street parking. Walk to the amenities of the Historic Downtown Mall and UVA. MLS#608794 $1,449,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

CLOWES HOUSE

BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

FOOTHILLS FARM

Private, peaceful, and scenic with idyllic setting & views! 170 acres of pristine farmland with c. 1921, 4-BR farmhouse. Separate 1-BR, 1-BA apt. above 2-bay detached garage. Currently used as cattle farm, the property includes barn & additional outbuildings. MLS#613650 $1,585,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

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Circa 1870 residence in the heart of Gordonsville with historic character, original architectural detailing, and updated systems. Walk to the many amenities of Historic Main Street Gordonsville or take a short drive to Charlottesville and UVA. MLS#615710 $289,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

OLD VIRGINIA

Mostly open rolling Albemarle County parcel offering 51.8 acres, sweeping panoramic mtn. views, bold stream, pond, and old unrestored log cabin near old home site. Tract has division rights and is potential conservation easement candidate. West of Charlottesville. MLS#615504 $780,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

BELLAIR

GLENDOWER ROAD

PRICED UNDER COUNTY ASSESSED VALUE! Classic, well-built 4-BR home, privately situated on 5 private acres only 15 miles south of Charlottesville & UVA, and only 5 miles from historic Scottsville. MLS#604475 $599,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

FRAYS MILL

Mostly wooded preservation tract of 81.395 acres next to Frays Mill Subdivision in highly desirable northern Albemarle. This beautiful gently rolling land has a great, private homesite with Blue Ridge Mt. views, and creek on property. MLS#608509 $995,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

EXCEPTIONAL LARGE ACREAGE

Two wonderful estate parcels in coveted Ragged Mountain Farm. Excellent building sites, complete privacy, beautiful Blue Ridge mountain views. Murray/ Henley/Western Albemarle school districts.84.79 acres: MLS#563174 $995,000; 100.22 acres: MLS#563171 $1,100,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GREENTREES

188+ acres in Albemarle, 12 miles south of Charlottesville on Rt 20. This wooded tract, mostly in hardwoods, offers long road with potential for eight 21-acre lots. There is conservation easement potential. MLS#614109 $1,299,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

LOCUST GROVE

Charming home converted to duplex long ago, close to downtown. Rear deck overlooks playground at Burnley Moran School. All utilities separately metered - a rare find. Off-street parking. Lots of natural light in lower level. MLS#617369 $389,000 Jeremy Fields, 434.270.1220

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from the University of Virginia and within walking distance to the Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

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Rare opportunity to purchase a building lot of just under 1 acre in sought-after Bellair. Lush, mature landscaping, partly wooded, stream/creek. Minutes from UVA, shopping, dining, and entertainment. Murray/Henley/Western Albemarle school district. MLS#614627 $375,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SIX MILES NORTHWEST

Private 4.29 acres, spacious Traditional brick home, built circa 2006, 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths, attached 3-bay garage and detached 2 bays. Meriwether Elementary District, NO HOA, only 6 miles to Barracks Road Shopping Center. MLS#614079 $1,250,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076


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Live It Up

HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF MAY 23, 2021

THERE WERE 119 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 41 were in Albemarle with an average price of $590,328 n 15 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $443,212 n 10 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $292,330 n 4 were in Greene with an average price of $452,475 n 16 were in Louisa with an average price of $436,617 n 3 were in Madison with an average price of $243,329 n 6 were in Nelson with an average price of $331,829 n 12 were in Orange with an average price of $328,083 n 6 were in Staunton with an average price of $253,667 n 6 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $222,829

HOMES SOLD

Fine Properties VOLUME 27, ISSUE 1

A Publication of The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS®

www.caar.com

The Residences at 218 The RESIDENCES at 218 define luxury in Downtown Charlottesville. These lavish condos are offered both meticulously designed or finished to your particular taste. This premium location boasts the best in dining, shopping, and entertainment. Featuring awe-inspiring views of Charlottesville and the surrounding mountainscape, with floor to ceiling windows and expansive outdoor terraces.

John E. Neal (434) 906-3141 jneal@gemc.com

www.RESIDENCESat218.com

Homes of Distinction in Central Virginia Look for our latest issue where you pick up C-VILLE Weekly

THE 677 STARFIELD ROAD KESWICK

1607 CENTER AVENUE FRY’S SPRING

6220 VENABLE ROAD KENTS STORE

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

309 SHORTMANS ROAD MINERAL

205 LEE AVENUE ORANGE

524 ROBIN STREET STAUNTON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


MAY 26 - JUNE 1, 2021 ISSUE 3021

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