__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

MARCH 17 – 23, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

Keeping it together Most of us had a lonely year, but local co-housers have maintained their human connection

VOL. 30 NO. 11 n MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T WWW.CAAR.COM HE CHARLOTTESVILL E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

MATT RILEY / UVA ATHLETICS

NCAA tournament preview: UVA men are (hopefully) back in action PAGE 10

Charlottesville Black Arts Collective presents new group show PAGE 18

Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange,

EZE AMOS

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene,

Augusta

NOW IS THE TIME T O BUY YOUR

Country Home BY CARLA HUCKABEE

INSIDE


2

NOW OPEN! ANGELIC’S KITCHEN • BEE CONSCIOUS CHIMM STREET • DINO’S • ELEVA COFFEE THE MILKMAN’S BAR • MOO THRU SPRINGHOUSE SUNDRIES STARR HILL BREWERY • TAKE IT AWAY

OPENING SPRING 2021! MAIZAL • CITIZEN BURGER STAND GRN BRGR • MANILLA STREET MASHU FESTIVAL open daily 8am – 9pm (10pm fri & sat) VISIT DAIRYMARKETCVILLE.COM FOR THE LATEST UPDATES FOLLOW US AT @DAIRYMARKETCVILLE

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

UC050-2021_CVILLEWeekly_Print | .125” bleeds | 9.25” W x 6.25” H finished | CMYK | 4 of 4


3

The 27th annual Virginia Festival of the Book continues this week! EVENT SPOTLIGHTS: Trouble on the Road: S.A. Cosby and Walter Mosley in Conversation March 20 | 4-5 pm Crime-writing phenom S.A. Cosby (Blacktop Wasteland) and Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Walter Mosley (Blood Grove) discuss their newest books in conversation with Stephen Mack Jones.

Environmental Injustice: Reckoning with American Waste March 20 | 7-8 pm Nonfiction writers Kerri Arsenault (Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains), Anna Clark (The Poisoned City: Flint’s Water and the American Urban Tragedy), and Catherine Coleman Flowers (Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret) discuss their investigations into American environmental injustices.

Indigenous Poetry: Language as a Map Home

PREMIER SPONSOR Premier

Sponsor

Premier

March 21 | 7 – 7:45pm Virginia Poet Laureate Luisa A. Igloria (Maps for Migrants and Ghosts) and Benjamín Naka-Hasebe Kingsley (Dēmos: An American Multitude) read from and discuss their work exploring how language serves as a key and a map to the places and people that have been lost.

O Wondrous World! Ross Gay and Aimee Nezhukumatathil in Conversation March 22 | 12 – 12:45pm Authors Ross Gay (The Book of Delights) and Aimee Nezhukumatathil (World of Wonders: In Praise of Fireflies, Whale Sharks, and Other Astonishments) discuss their new books, collected essays devoted to their appreciation of ordinary wonders of the world, rendering them extraordinary. Sponsor

The Art of the Short Story: John Lanchester & Te-Ping Chen

Premier Sponsor Premier Sponsor Premier Sponsor

Major Sponsors March 22 | 7 – 7:45pm Major Sponsors MAJOR SPONSORS Major Sponsors Major Sponsors

Major Sponsors

Yellow Wife with Sadeqa Johnson March 24 | 7 – 7:45pm

Program

Program Sponsors

Albemarle County Rotary Albemarle County Rotary Anthology Senior Living

Albemarle County Rotary Anthology Senior Living The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Bank of America Carol Troxell Fund Jefferson-Madison Regional Library Same Page CFA Institute Jefferson-Madison Regional Library Same Page Community Read Energy Dominion

ProgramSponsors Sponsors Program

Novelist Sadeqa Johnson discusses her latest book, Yellow Wife, the harrowing story of an enslaved woman forced to barter love and freedom while living in the most infamous Sponsors slave jail in Virginia. Jefferson-Madison Regional Library Same Page Community Read The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation John L. Nau III Center for Civil War History, UVA University of Virginia Gamma Knife Center W.K. Kellogg Foundation

facebook.com/cville.weekly

John Lanchester (Reality and Other Stories) and Te-Ping Chen (Land of Big Numbers: Stories) discuss their new collections of short stories which grapple with questions of interpersonal connection, technology, ambition, and distraction, through a mixture of witty literary fiction, magical realism, and cultural criticism.

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Join us through March 26 for virtual events with authors discussing all genres and reading interests. All events are free to attend and most events will be available to watch live or on-demand. Watch ondemand events at VaBook.org/Watch and explore the full schedule of FREE virtual events at VaBook.org/Schedule


4

INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No.11

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

Check out our

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-817-2749 www.c-ville.com

NEW easy to

c-villeweekly. adperfect.com • • • •

Liners Employment Community Celebration Announcements

Prices starting as low as

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

$

5

Special pricing for nonprofits and community outreach For legal announcements please contact Gabby@c-ville.com

EDITORIAL

EZE AMOS

use Classifeds site at

Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

FEATURE 14

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com

Living proof How residents of area co-housing communities are riding out the pandemic. NEWS 9 10 Can the Hoos make a deep run in this year’s NCAA tourney? 11 Descendants will weigh in on Court Square memorial. 13 Meet four new Dems vying for two City Council seats.

CULTURE 17 18 The Works: Black Arts Collective brings on the “Water” works.

19 The Working Pour: Cheers to these locally brewed stouts. 22 Sudoku 23 Crossword 25 Free Will Astrology

CLASSIFIED 27

CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Jedd Farris, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Erika Howsare, Meg Irvin, Cortney Meriwether, Desiré Moses, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Mary Shea Valliant, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Max March (x16) GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com

Real Estate Weekly Page 31

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Lisa C. Hurdle (x30), Stephanie Vogtman (x39) PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson (x25)

MARKETING SERVICES DIVISION CLASSIFIEDS Gabby Kirk (x36) classifieds@c-ville.com Beth Wood (x56)

BUSINESS PUBLISHER Anna Harrison (x51) CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Debbie Miller (x28) A/R SPECIALIST Nanci Winter (x33) CIRCULATION MANAGER Billy Dempsey (x32)

C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2021 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

Virginia Press Association


5

SENTARA MARTHA JEFFERSON HOSPITAL IS OFFERING A

FREE BREAST HEALTH SCREENING Women, be a good example for your family...Take care of yourself!

Quirk Hotel encourages curiosity for the unique, inspiring and beautiful. A momentous tribute to the art, culture and history that makes each stay everything but usual.

Friday, April 9, 2021 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sentara Martha Jefferson Outpatient Care Center 595 Martha Jefferson Drive | Charlottesville

Quirk Hotel is the first boutique art hotel to be established in Charlottesville’s historic downtown.

499 WEST MAIN STREET, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA, 22903 434-729-1234 | QUIRKHOTELCVA

COVID-19 SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

• COVID Screening required before allowed to enter the building • Masking required at all times • No children allowed • All visitors asked to wait in the parking lot Schedule your screening mammogram before your first COVID-19 vaccine dose or at least 4 weeks after your second vaccine dose.

Free blood sugar and cholesterol screenings will also be offered

You’re focused on growing your business. We’re focused on you.

You may qualify for this service if you: • Don’t have insurance that covers mammograms and cost is a concern • You are 40 or older; and • It’s been over a year since your last mammogram, or you’ve never had one

Special thanks to The Women’s Committee of the Martha Jefferson Hospital Foundation for its support of this important event.

www.sentara.com

2075 Bond Street | Charlottesville Saturday | March 20 | 9 a.m. - 11 a.m. The first 50 customers to mob with us will receive a $5 credit towards their purchase. To learn more visit www.facebook.com/CandFBank Pictured L to R: Kim Garrison, Retail Team Lead C&F Financial Center; Andy Gonzalez and Kevin Bennett, Duck Donut Associates. Citizens and Farmers Bank

facebook.com/cville.weekly

For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 1-800-SENTARA (1-800-736-8272).

Duck Donuts

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

APPOINTMENT NECESSARY


6

Ever seen what your real estate agent takes from you?

1% Commission. Full Service Real Estate.

The Real Estate Market is HOT! Why Pay More Than Necessary? What separates Jordan from others:

Full Service real eState. 1% commiSSion

- Owner and Broker

- Over $16M in annual sales

- Angie’s List Service Award Winner

- Ranked in top 20 out of over 1,000 realtors

- Financial supporter of area non-profits

- Best of C’ville Finalist What recent clients say:

Testimonial: We’ve been absolutely blown away by the service and value Equity Saver USA delivered. This is simply the best real estate representation we’ve ever had, bar none, after 20+ years and a dozen homes bought and sold. Jordan’s combined a cutting edge business model with best in class service. I challenge any realtor who would adopt this 1% model to outdo Jordan in his execution. Good Luck. —Steve and Peri

Follow us on Instagram @EquitySaverUSA EBRATIN EL

EquitySaverUSA.com • 434-964-SAVE (7283)

IN C

HAR

13

G

Equity Saver USA is a full service real estate For more information: www.EquitySaverUSA.com brokerage company charging a 1% commission An Old Dominion Realty & Investment LLC company for its services to buyers and sellers of real estate. The concept was developed while Jordan Hague worked at Dell, Inc., where he learned to identify and distribute commodity products and services more efficiently and effectively to the market at lower prices.

C

Keep more of what’s yours with our 1% business model for buyers and sellers of real estate.

We Pay buyer cloSing coStS!

- Born and raised in Cville

LOT

TES

VILL

E

WINDOWS • SIDING • DOORS • BLINDS

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Visit Our New Showroom in the Rio Hill Shopping Center next to Kroger!

GET NEW BLINDS FREE!!!

*Purchase 5 or more Signature Series Gold or Platinum, Composite or Wood Double Hung Windows & get an equal amount of San Clemente series faux wood blinds free. Expires 3/31/2021 Not Valid On Previous Purchases. Offers Cannot Be Combined. Ask About Our No Payment - No Interest Finance Options!

*Offer includes installation of blinds up to a maximum of 93 united inches & excludes valance, hold-downs, & designer tape.

Call Today for FREE In-Home Consultation

(434) 465-6558

charlottesvillereplacementwindows.com Class A Contractor # 2705145469

NOT YOUR TYPICAL WINDOW REPLACEMENT COMPANY!


THIS WEEK

7

What’s the point of having a great story if you don’t tell it over and over again? Kihei Clark zips the ball halfway down the court, setting up a feathery equalizer from Mamadi Diakite as the buzzer sounds. Kyle Guy stands at the free throw line, looking like he’s about to vomit from nerves, but hits three free throws in a row to send the Hoos to the championship. De’Andre Hunter knocks down a corner three to push the tournament’s final game to overtime; Braxton Key’s dunk puts the exclamation point on the end of the magical run. Stunning victory, one year after stunning defeat. Two years later, the whole thing still sends a shiver down my spine. With any luck, this weekend will see the UVA men’s basketball team take the court at the NCAA tournament for the first time since that championship game. Yes, it’s been a rocky season in more ways than one. Yes, they have an active case of COVID in the locker room and the whole thing could come tumbling down at any minute. It’s entirely possible that, between the time of this writing and the time this paper is in your hands, the Cavaliers will have withdrawn from the tournament because of the coronavirus. Right now, though, like any good college basketball fan, I am foolishly optimistic about the team’s prospects, both for clearing COVID protocols and for winning some basketball games. Who are we kidding—delusional confidence is the entire point of March Madness! And even if UVA does have to withdraw, or even if the team shows up in Indianapolis and loses its opener, at least we will have had an opportunity to tell some good old stories.—Ben Hitchcock

3.17.21

BUBBLES & ICE COOLSCULPTING ELITE LAUNCH PARTY MARCH 24 • 4 - 6 PM

FREEZE AWAY FAT AND STEP OUT OF QUARANTINE WITH CONFIDENCE!

Moldavite

Be sure to ask us about our private shopping experience - the Rock Star hour! www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive Charlottesville VA 22901 434-284-7709

CALL OR EMAIL TO RSVP (REQUIRED) INFO@SIGNATUREMEDSPA.COM | 434.923.4646 BONNIE STRAKA, MD & OUR TEAM OF BODY EXPERTS 3350 BERKMAR DRIVE | 434.923.4646 | BODYBYSIGNATURE.COM

facebook.com/cville.weekly

the stone of transformation! Formed over 14 million years ago, Moldavite was created under intense heat and pressure from a meteorite collision. Moldavite helps with spiritual change, prosperity and protection. It is THE stone of 2021!

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

LIMITED GUESTS MASKS REQUIRED INDOOR - OUTDOOR LIVE MUSIC BY THE DADGERS EXCLUSIVE SPECIALS FOR ATTENDEES: TWO FREE MUSCLE BUILDING TREATMENTS ($1000 VALUE) WITH COOLSCULPTING PURCHASE OF $3500+ SWAG BAG AND RAFFLE


8

From Classroom to Boardroom Race & Equity Conference MARCH 30— APRIL 8, 2021 Building more equitable communities through inclusive workforce development and workplace action. ASCENSION:

Joining Together to Rewrite the Code

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

MARCH 30, 1:00—1:45PM Join leading Black artists, thinkers, and Charlottesville community members for a conversation about higher levels—how art and community can deliver us to places that change our hearts and minds, and how to return from those places with an amplified ability to listen, learn, and grow. Together, we can make the space; we can rewrite the code—but only if our social fabric is there to support us.

SAHARA CLEMONS Artist/Designer Sahara Clemons Originals Panelist

WILLIAM JONES Cofounder Prolyfyck Run Creww Panelist

LISA WOOLFORK Convener Black Women Stitch Panelist

SARAD DAVENPORT Senior Executive TMI Consulting, Inc Moderator

R EG I S T ER NOW AT TOMTOMFOUN D ATION .OR G/CLASSR O OM -TO-BOARDROOM PRESENTED BY

United Way of Greater Charlottesville

WITH SUPPORT FROM


“July 4 with your loved ones is the goal.”

9

—President Joe Biden, in a speech this week about the country’s COVID recovery plan

NEWS

Hoop dreams PAGE 10

Welcome to Governor’s school

IN BRIEF Civilian Resignation Board Another member of Charlottesville’s Police Civilian Review Board has resigned, the second person to do so since the board began meeting in July. This time, Dorenda Johnson is the one on her way out. The board’s meetings have been tense of late, with a recent meeting culminating with board chair Bellamy Brown feeling the need to assert that he is “not a misogynist.” Johnson signed off with an email saying simply: “Good evening please accept my resignation.”

Statue on the move?

After 15 years at the helm of Charlottesville City Schools, superintendent Dr. Rosa Atkins is retiring. Her last day is May 31. “I’m so honored to have served the students, families, staff, and community of Charlottesville,” said Atkins in a press release. “I’ve actually postponed this decision for a while due to the pandemic, but I’m at a point where I want to spend less time as superintendent and more time as Nana.” Since becoming superintendent in 2006, Atkins has spearheaded the creation of a division-wide preschool program, championed social-emotional learning, and redesigned gifted education, earning an array of national awards for her work.

Under her leadership, graduation rates for Black students have increased by 25 points. Meanwhile, suspension rates have significantly dropped. Atkins has also served on multiple organizations, including Governor Northam’s Commission on African American History Education, which worked to improve the state’s Black history curriculum. “We thank Dr. Atkins for her calming presence, her bold work to promote equity, and above all, for her commitment to children,” said school board chair Lisa Larson-Torres in a press release. The school board will meet this week to discuss the search for a new superintendent.

EZE AMOS

AMY AND JACKSON SMITH

Superintendent steps aside

Rosa Atkins

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Brad Sheffield

Governor Ralph Northam came to town last week, stopping by Venable Elementary on Thursday to check in on city schools’ gradual reopening of classrooms. In February, Northam directed all schools in Virginia to make some in-person learning available to students by mid-March, after the CDC released information about managing virus transmission in schools. At Venable, Northam read aloud to a second-grade class from We’re Going to be O.K., a children’s book about surviving the pandemic, written by Dr. Ebony Jade Hilton and Dr. Leigh-Ann Webb of UVA hospital.

@cville_weekly

Jaunt, the area public transport system, is accusing their former CEO of budget shenanigans. This week the organization put out a statement saying that auditors found “the CEO purchased numerous expenses for goods, services, and travel, which violated internal control policies of the corporation.” Former Jaunt boss Brad Sheffield, who resigned in December, maintains his innocence, though Jaunt says Sheffield was pushed out as the company was “no longer comfortable with [his] business judgment.” Not a lot to be jaunty about over there right now.

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Getaway driver

ZACK WAJSGRAS

Last month, the city put out a call asking anyone who wants the West Main Street statue of Sacagawea cowering behind Lewis and Clark to just come and take it already. Amazingly, it seems like there might be some interest in the hulking, racist casting—Charlottesville received nine responses to its call for information, report city officials. Responses will be reviewed before determining if any of the offers are viable.


10

NEWS

A year of madness The (still) defending national champs return to the tourney—COVID tests pending

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

E

BY THE NUMBERS 162 Blocks by Jay Huff in his career at UVA Huff notched the second-most blocks by a player in program history—Ralph Sampson had 462.

81.7 UVA’s team free-throw percentage this season That’s just a hair short of the all-time single-season record—Harvard’s 1984 squad hit 82.2 percent from the stripe.

MATT RILEY / UVA ATHLETICS

ven in a sport known for madness, the 2020-21 men’s college basketball season was nuts. The pandemic brought the cancellation of thousands of games, including the entire Ivy League season, and posed unprecedented challenges for teams that did play. Powerhouses like Duke and Kentucky plummeted to historic lows, yielding the first NCAA tournament without either team since Gerald Ford was president. Here in Charlottesville, the UVA’s women’s team abandoned its season midstream. The men’s team paused its season three times due to positive COVID tests, including last weekend when a confirmed case forced the Hoos to forfeit their ACC tournament semifinal against Georgia Tech. None of that, however, covers the most unthinkable part of this Cavaliers’ season: The team’s offense carried it to success. Pandemic or not, the program that Coach Tony Bennett built on defense finished with its worst defensive efficiency rating since his second season (2010-11). COVID-19 surely didn’t help. While Bennett’s signature pack-line defense can take years to grasp, a UVA team that relied heavily on three newcomers had to learn it on the fly, all while a pandemic disrupted preparation and the team’s schedule. And yet, as the defense struggled, Virginia’s offense thrived. While the team’s defensive efficiency ranking fell from No. 1 in the country last season to No. 33 this season, its offense jumped from No. 256 to No. 12, becoming Bennett’s first team to have four players average at least 9.5 points per game. A trio of sharp-shooting big men led the way, with 6' 8" transfer Sam Hauser (16.0 points per game) earning all-ACC honors, 7' 1"

42.8 Sam Hauser’s season three-point percentage Senior Jay Huff will be key to the Cavaliers’ success in the NCAA tournament.

senior Jay Huff (13.1 ppg) making secondteam all-ACC, and 6' 9" transfer Trey Murphy (11.3 ppg) finishing third on the team in scoring. The glue was third-year point guard Kihei Clark (9.5 ppg). Entering the season, Clark had started 50 games for Virginia. UVA’s other four starters entered the year with zero UVA starts combined. Put it all together, and through some ups and downs, the Hoos (18-6) won their fifth regular season ACC title in eight years, ending the season ranked 15th in the country. And then COVID-19 struck again. Hours after a thrilling win over Syracuse in the quarterfinals of the ACC tournament last Thursday, a player tested positive for the virus, forcing the Cavs to withdraw from the tournament and begin quarantining.

At press time, UVA plans on competing in the NCAA tournament (though if we’ve learned anything this year, it’s to expect the unexpected). Assuming the team can clear COVID-19 protocols before the tournament begins this weekend, the question is how far can it go. After sitting through three double-digit losses this season, fans still have a nagging sense that, despite the team’s success, it has still not quite put it all together. Nevertheless, the numbers suggest that the sky is the limit for this team: Though there is no precedent for the pandemic, there is one for a UVA team whose offense is ranked higher than its defense. That has happened once in Bennett’s tenure, in 2019, when the Hoos became national champions.—Simon Davidson

UVA’s sharpshooter posted the best mark in the ACC.

5 ACC regular season titles for Tony Bennett This year’s conference title was the Hoos’ fifth in the last eight years.

23 Career points scored by graduating forward Austin Katstra Hey, it’s 23 more than most of us!

1,097 Days since UVA last lost an NCAA tournament game Remember that one? Me neither. —Ben Hitchcock

Tournament tests The Cavaliers are the fourth seed in the Western region of the NCAA tournament bracket. The scouting report below looks at what may be ahead for the Hoos. No. 13: Ohio Bobcats UVA will open its tournament run against the 13-seeded Ohio Bobcats. High off their first Mid-Atlantic Conference title in nine years, the Bobcats will roll into the NCAA first round on the back of conference tournament MVP Jason Preston. The NBA-hopeful point guard recorded his 1,000th career point as one of 22 he contributed during the MAC championship game. But Preston’s shooting isn’t what should worry the Cavaliers most about this matchup. He

ranked sixth-best in the NCAA with 7.2 assists per game through 2020-21, so his playmaking may be the biggest threat to UVA’s hopes of advancing to the second round. The Bobcats finished red-hot. They won six of their last seven regular-season games before surging through the MAC tournament, while the Hoos will be cooling their heels in Charlottesville for over a week before they play again. The Bobcats have become a trendy first-round upset pick for national pundits; the Cavs shouldn’t take the mid-major squad for granted. No. 5: Creighton Should the Cavaliers get past Ohio, they could face Creighton in the round of 32. The Bluejays

enter the NCAA tournament still reeling from a stunning loss in the Big East championship. Underdog Georgetown dominated from tip-off to final buzzer, at one point going on a 46-8 run as they crushed Creighton to claim the title. But the Bluejays are more than they may have appeared in a disappointing final. One of the most balanced teams in the Big East, all five Creighton starters averaged double-digit scoring this year. Guard Marcus Zegarowski is a consistent leader, but forward Denzel Mahoney, forward Damien Jefferson, forward Christian Bishop, and guard Mitch Ballock are all threats as well. Both Bishop and Jefferson averaged more than five rebounds per game in 2020-21, while Ballock

led the conference with 72 field goals. The Bluejays’ balanced offense put up 77 points per game in 2020-21, nine more than the Cavs’ average of 68.6. Would UVA be able to keep Creighton at bay should the two teams meet? It depends on the Hoos’ success in keeping the Bluejays shooters from heating up. No. 12: UC-Santa Barbara UC-Santa Barbara burst into its first NCAA tournament since 2011 by winning 15 of its 16 final regular-season games on the way to a Big West title. The run feels like an inevitable step forward for a program that made the biggest single-season improvement in NCAA history back when head coach Joe Pasternak brought the 2017-18

Gauchos from six to 23 wins during his first year with the team. The Gauchos are legitimate contenders to upset Creighton, which could set up a second-round matchup with UVA. Led by one of the NCAA’s best rebounders in JaQuori McLaughlin, UC-Santa Barbara ranked second in the Big West with an average of 76.5 points per game, even as it held opponents to just 62.8 points. The 13-point scoring margin ranks 11th-best in the NCAA and makes the team a definite obstacle to the Cavaliers’ championship hopes. The Cavs’ methodical offense would have to be at the top of their game in this matchup—Devearl Ramsey, the Big West’s leading stealer, lurks, ready to gum up the works.—Julia Stumbaugh


NEWS

11

EXP E R I E N CE

NO BAR S . NO S PRINGS. PU RE COMFORT.

Memorial movement Historic Resources Committee gears up for descendant outreach By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

I

ON SALE NOW MARCH 5-29

5-29

1/14/21 4:19 PM

VA 22902 434-970-1900 I Tuesday – Saturday 11am – 5pm www.lodgerva.com

This is our town.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

EZE AMOS

.com

@cville_weekly

t’s been over a year since 74-year-old Richard Allan hurled Charlottesville’s former slave auction marker into the James River, frustrated with Charlottesville for not creating a better tribute to the thousands of enslaved people bought and sold in Court Square. Ever since, the city has been working to replace the marker. The Historic Resources Committee maintains that installing a more permanent memorial requires collecting input from descendants of enslaved laborers. That outreach process was just beginning last spring when COVID hit, disrupting R the committee’s plans. During a March 12 virtual meeting, the committee largely discussed who should spearhead the public engagement process, which is more complex than one might think. “It’s actually kind of a complicated thing to get appropriate public comment. I’m CS_SALE-ADS.indd just wondering if we even have the kind of expertise to do that?” asked member Dede Smith. “I’m just a little concerned about doing it right, and then not putting undue burden on our two staff members.” “We shouldn’t actually be the people doing this. We should only be setting up that structure,” echoed the committee’s vice co-chair Phil Varner. “City staff or anyone who is retained by city staff for doing this sort of public engagement should be the ones doing it.” Jeff Werner, historic preservation and design planner, explained that city staff were not well equipped to facilitate this type of outreach, and proposed the committee instead find a facilitator with connections to descendant communities. Member Genevieve Keller suggested the committee also tap the group of descendants they met with last March for guidance in selecting a facilitator. During last year’s meetings, “they didn’t want just another plaque put up,” said member Jalane Schmidt. “Because they thought that then the city, us, would just lose momentum on the project, and it would remain a small plaque, as it had for years.” Schmidt emphasized the The city removed this handmade, temporary memorial that importance of the city cover- took the place of the slave auction marker that was stolen ing all of the community enlast year.

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

gagement costs, and compensating the facilitator fairly. “This was already a commitment made by the city. If COVID hadn’t come along that was the plan. And there’s already a budget there for it,” she said. “Also, if we’re engaged in that process, that allows us to go to other funders [and] apply for other grants.” The slow-moving process has spurred some community members to create their own commemorations at the site. Allan, the white man who initially stole the plaque, has organized a group of residents—including descendants—for the cause, calling ON SALE NOW MARCH on the city to take action in the short term. In recent weeks, the group has held a press R E T A I L E R E X T E N D E D R E TA I L E R E conference T A I and L E R at the spot where a vigil I N F O R M AT I O N E X T E N D E D R E TA I L E R the plaque used to sit. They’ve also installed I NaFmore O R M AT I O N a temporary memorial, featuring thorough description of the history of Court Square than was on the original plaque. That temporary memorial was later removed by the city, says Allan. 3 The committee decided to begin virtual forums around May, giving the facilitator ample time to reach out to descendant groups. “I hope when we start to meet in person we won’t do away with the virtual component, particularly with something like this with the descendants of the enslaved, because they could live all over the world now, and maybe want to have an opportunity to participate,” said Keller at the meeting. The committee will continue to move forward with the outreach process at their 218 West Market Street, Charlottesville, next meeting in April.


12

Luxury Charlottesville Apartments Beacon on 5th apartments are perfectly located for immediate access to the best Charlottesville has to offer, including UVA's campus, Wegman’s grocery store, the

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Rivanna Trails and other parks and recreational opportunities. Our residents enjoy a unique balance of urban living in a picturesque setting with breathtaking views of the Blue Ridge foothills and the vibrant culture of Charlottesville, complete with art venues, delicious cuisine, entertainment excursions, textbook historical locations, and recreational opportunities for every age and taste.

Contact Us Today! 434.204.2515 Beacon5thApartments.com Leasing@Beacon5thApartments.com


NEWS

13

First look City Council candidates share their visions in first panel discussion

SUPPLIED PHOTO

C

funding options available for small-scale infrastructure projects. “There’s always some type of safety grant,” said Wade. “And now with UVA’s new positioning on being more friendly to the neighborhoods, I would go to UVA [and] say, ‘Hey! This is a $20,000 project—is this something that you can do?’” Washington suggested such projects could be funded by the $500,000 already included in the city’s operating budget for sidewalks. The Capital Improvement Program also currently sets aside $50 million for school reconfiguration, a low estimate for the project’s current price tag. All four candidates recommended the city consider additional funding options for the massive project. “We need to think about community partners, a foundation, ways of raising money,” said Pinkston. “That might be the sort of thing where we issue a bond referendum.” The candidates were divided when it came to raising taxes. The current proposed city budget for fiscal year 2022 includes an increase in the property tax rate. Washington supports the move, hoping the money will be used to help better fund public works projects. Wade and Pinkston, meanwhile, said they would be very hesitant to raise taxes. Brown expressed concern about rising property assessments—a consequence of gentrification. “I think homes should be taxed at an individual rate for what they were purchased for, or what their value was at that point in time, and not for the entire scope of every home in that area,” said Brown. “We need to come up with some way where we’re not putting people in a bind, where they are having to give up their properties because of what’s built around them.” The Democratic primary will be held on June 8.

“I think just bringing two people off of [council] is going to change the chemistry and dynamic of the entire board, and give us an opportunity to start from scratch.” CARL BROWN, CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE

pegssalt.com Sold in local groceries, Whole Foods, and Amazon Prime

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Peg’s Salt. The original every day, easy meal solution.

@cville_weekly

We were a meal kit before there were meal kits.

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

ity Councilor Heather Hill and Mayor Nikuyah Walker’s terms expire at the end of the year, and four candidates have thus far declared their intention to win those seats. Earlier this month, social entrepreneur Carl Brown announced his bid for City Council, joining Charlottesville School Board member Jaundiego Wade, UVA project manager Brian Pinkston, and entrepreneur Yas Washington in the race. Walker is running for reelection, and Hill has not made an announcement either way. The candidates will compete for two Democratic nominations this summer, and the two winners will run with Walker, an independent, for the open council seats in the fall. On Wednesday evening, the Fry’s Spring Neighborhood Association hosted a virtual forum for the four new candidates. The panel was the first event at which the whole group appeared together in the same place, and the candidates shared how they plan to address a range of pressing issues, from the affordable housing crisis to dysfunction inside City Hall. During his opening remarks, Brown, who was born and raised in Charlottesville, emphasized his deep roots in the community and leadership within local organizations, allowing him to have a “good understanding” of the city’s needs. Pinkston, who unsuccessfully ran for council in 2019, highlighted the collaborative skills he’s gained from his 17 years in project management, while Wade pointed to his 16 years serving on the school board, and his 20 years working as a transportation planner for Albemarle County. Just 23 years old, Washington touted her campaign work for Albemarle County Commonwealth’s Attorney Jim Hingeley and 5th

Congressional District candiWade promised to bring calm date Dr. Cameron Webb. She’s and consistent leadership. also served as a youth coun“I think just bringing two selor, and founded her own people off of [council] is going communications business, to change the chemistry and Rocket Science Integrated. dynamic of the entire board, and give us an opportunity to On the topic of affordable housing, Wade said there start from scratch,” said Brown. needs to be more collabora“I wouldn’t say that I’m budtion—and compromise—bedies with Michael [Payne], Sena tween the city, developers, and [Magill], or Lloyd [Snook], but Brian Pinkston neighborhood associations. I know I can work with them,” Brown argued that neighechoed Pinkston. borhood associations should The candidates also dishave more control over develcussed the Capital Improvement Program, the city’s opment plans. “I just don’t feel like we five-year budget for large should be making those deinfrastructure projects. Halterminations from our standbert mentioned that in Fry’s point to say this is going to go Spring, residents have long in this neighborhood, [paradvocated for improved peticularly] when they run that destrian and bicycle safety on neighborhood,” he said. “We Stribling Avenue—the future Juandiego Wade site of a controversial 170-unit need to see more representadevelopment—but council tion from the neighborhood standpoint...and then we can has yet to address the problem. go from there.” Around town, other neighborWashington discussed the hoods have similar issues, various challenges that come as a growing Charlottesville with R-1 zoning, which limits juggles development, transdevelopment to one unit per portation, and other concerns. lot. Other zoning categories, “The issue that I see with like R-1B, are needed to build the [Capital Improvement Program] is that large prioriaffordable housing, she said. Forum moderator Jason ties come up every couple of Yasmine Washington Halbert later asked the canyears,” said Pinkston. “What I would do is that I would sit down with the didates how they would put a stop to the city manager, [and] make a point that, yes, high turnover in city leadership, and frequent clashes between councilors since the we need to fund these large things, [but] we 2017 Unite the Right rally. also need to make sure this backlog of things Washington said she would focus on like sidewalks doesn’t fall off the radar.” building a strong council and City Hall, in Drawing from his background in transportation, Wade pointed to the variety of order to properly support the city manager. SUPPLIED PHOTO

reporter@c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

By Brielle Entzminger


14

EZE AMOS

In a year of isolation, co-housers envision a more connected future

ALL TOGETHER NOW

By Sydney Halleman

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

I

magine, for a moment, that the forced sense of isolation, loneliness, and stircraziness of the past year didn’t happen. That, although you may still have to wear a mask to the grocery store, be careful around the elderly, and work from home, you could pop outside and share lunch with others. A playdate for the kids, in this idyllic world, is only a few feet away. Your friends are only one or two homes from you and, with a text, they could join you outside for a chat in five minutes. No need for perpetual Zoom hangouts and Thanksgiving alone in front of the TV. The secret has been under our noses this whole time: co-housing. And at Emerson Commons, that’s exactly what the past year has looked like. Emerson Commons, composed of 26 colorful, solar-paneled homes on a grassy plot in Crozet, is one of a handful of intentional living communities in the Charlottesville area. Residents of such communities share decisionmaking duties, common spaces, and meals. Although many people still refer to them as communes, most modern co-housing communities don’t reflect the free-loving, basketweaving hippie stereotypes that defined the commune movement during the 1970s. “A lot of times people hear co-housing and think ‘commune,’” says James Gammon, a resident of Emerson Commons. “I like to tell people that it’s legally a condo association.” As the COVID-19 pandemic has driven people around the world indoors—increasing isolation and preventing family and friends from gathering together—interest in intentional living communities has increased. Weary of social distancing, it seems,

many are longing for a deeper sense of connection with their neighbors. Reflecting on the pandemic, Gammon tries to empathize with those, this author included, who are suffering from varying levels of cabin fever. “I’m trying to imagine what that would be like, if we lived in our old house,” he says. “I think it would have been a crazy lonely year.”

Common purpose Co-housing has existed in the United States since at least the 1700s—think of the Christian Shakers, famous for their pacifism, celibacy, and artisanal furniture. Modern co-housing began in the 1940s with the establishment of the Inter-Community Exchange in Ohio, and co-housing and communes gained popularity, and sometimes notoriety, in the counterculture heyday of the 1960s—the modern organizations inherited the Shakers’ anti-war zeal, but passed on the celibacy part. Locally, Twin Oaks in Louisa County was established in 1967 and still follows the almost tribal shared labor model of those early days. (Twin Oaks declined to participate in this story, citing concerns surrounding coronavirus.) But intentional living communities saw another, different sort of boom in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. According to the Foundation for Intentional Community, listings in the group’s directory doubled between 2010 and 2016. Some of Charlottesville’s more recent intentional communities were founded in that time, including Emerson Commons. Emerson Commons residents aren’t living in '60s-style yurts or bead-spangled tents—families at Emerson

rent or buy a house, sometimes for as much as $400,000, when they join. Gammon joined Emerson in 2015 and moved into the community in 2019. Gammon and his wife, Rebecca, were drawn to the idea after experiencing a sense of alienation and a lack of community following the birth of their son. “We were the first couple in our group of friends to have a kid,” Gammon says. “Oh gosh, that was an isolating year. You don’t go out or do things that your friends do anymore.” Gammon’s wife stumbled across cohousing through a Facebook moms’ group. The young couple decided “that day,” they say, to visit Shadowlake Village, another cohousing community near Blacksburg. They were hooked. “All the kids were having a Fourth of July parade for the adults and then our son crawled for the first time,” he says. “It seemed like a good omen or something. …It just instantly sounded like, ‘Why didn’t I know this was a thing for my whole life?’” Five years later, they’re surrounded by friends and support, while many others

“In traditional communities, you’re isolated. You may or may not know your neighbors. We have to build community or else we’re just sitting in our houses.” DAVE REDDING, ECOVILLAGE

have experienced a year of unprecedented isolation. Emerson Commons residents have stayed closer than most of us. Children have playdates outside, and regular online game sessions occur—Among Us is a favorite. A few people have recently started a weekly Dungeons & Dragons campaign. When one community member contracted COVID-19, neighbors pitched in to bring chicken soup and walk the neighbor’s dog. They’ve had to adapt to social distancing inside their community, especially because some work in health care, but Emerson has been an almost alternate pandemic world where complete isolation from friends and family isn’t necessary. And others are taking notice. The community has seen an uptick in inquiries from potential new members during the pandemic. “It’s so easy to take for granted, once you live here,” Gammon says. “It’s hard to talk about the things that aren’t problems anymore.”

Communing with nature Dave Redding, one of the founders of EcoVillage, was struck for the first time by the intentional-living philosophy while he and his wife were Peace Corps volunteers in Korea. Like Gammon, conventional housing didn’t appeal to Redding. Social interaction in your average neighborhood, he says, mostly involves watching people from your window. “In traditional communities, you’re isolated. You may or may not know your neighbors,” Redding says. “We have to build community or else we’re just sitting in our houses.”


EZE AMOS

15

During the pandemic, residents of Emerson Commons have continued to regularly gather for meals, children’s playdates, and game sessions.

far between during COVID-19. Final approval for building plans have been pushed back, and a set date has yet to be determined. “I’m definitely looking forward to the end of COVID,” Redding says. Like Gammon, he expects interest in co-housing to increase even more after the pandemic subsides. “We’re all feeling the strong effects of [the pandemic],” Redding says. “This is not the way that it was meant to be.”

Reaching out

SUPPLIED PHOTO

facebook.com/cville.weekly

When we asked Araminta Village’s J. Elliott Cisneros if we could use this photo, he said, “Groovy!”

Models of ownership, the steep cost to enter into modern co-housing arrangements, formations for conflict resolution and consensus, and even language in these communities are founded and based on values that often disregard people of color. Farmer has consulted with intentional communities on how to welcome people of color, but says that those institutions are often unwilling to change the structure of their values. She says Twin Oaks, for example, attempted to create a cap on the number of white people that could be community members. “I thought that was a bad idea, because they were only looking at admission and not at the deeper structure,” Farmer says. “When I talk to communities I often say, ‘If you started majority white you probably will stay that way.’” The FIC’s BIPOC counsel works to form inclusive communities for people of color. Araminta has events like the weekly Community Circles that ask individuals to examine their underlying attitudes about difference and society. Nevertheless, Farmer, like the folks at Emerson Commons and EcoVillage, is hopeful about the future of intentional communities. The FIC has definitely seen an increase in interest, she says, and they’ve started online events for those curious about intentional living. “It totally makes sense to me, why people would be drawn to this,” Cisneros says. Araminta Village has a long road ahead and needs things like development planning, which has stalled during the pandemic. But Cisneros keeps asking questions, keeps imagining. “It all goes back to that question,” he says: “‘What is community?’”

@cville_weekly

Though all of these co-housers are building on their visions of a brighter future, J. Elliott Cisneros’ vision might be the most ambitious. Since 2018, he’s been working to get Araminta Village up and running. Araminta was Harriet Tubman’s given first name, which she changed as an adult for reasons that remain uncertain. Cisneros chose it to reflect his dream—a multi­

racial, queer-friendly, multifaith community in Charlottesville. Cisneros and his two daughters briefly lived in an intentional living community in Colorado, but he was disconcerted by the lack of racial diversity—like many communes, the neighborhood was overwhelmingly white. While he was living there, Cisneros says, one Black family arrived and left after only a month. Cisneros moved to Charlottesville in a camper van after the Unite the Right rally in 2017. Since 2006, he’s run a nonprofit called The Sum, which offers to “assess one’s unconscious orientation to power and race, religion, dis/ability, sexual orientation, gender, socioeconomic class, and ethnicity” through a written test and one-hour phone call, for $150. The Sum then offers a 45-hour Power of Difference Certification program to schools and businesses that might be concerned about their results. Cisneros has set up a Sum Study Center downtown, and also started planning Araminta Village. The problem with attracting people of color to co-housing, says Crystal Byrd Farmer, a board member of The Sum and a member of the BIPOC council for the Foundation for Intentional Community, stems from co-housing’s beginning. Founded in the U.S. primarily by white people, co-housing has been exclusionary since its beginning. And it’s a hard problem to solve for alreadyestablished intentional communities. Farmer recognizes that people of color often try these communities and then leave. “Some communities think, “Why don’t people of color come? We’re so nice!” Farmer says. “But it’s so much deeper than that.”

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Redding, a former electrician, contractor, and world traveler, founded EcoVillage, an intentional community, in 2013—but the neighborhood as fully envisioned doesn’t exist yet. The current building plan has room for up to 38 houses and a common house on six-and-a-half acres in Albemarle County. One of EcoVillage’s core aims is to lessen its environmental impact. Redding is working with UVA to design houses that produce net-zero waste and energy use. The property is designed to accommodate an ample amount of garden space, electric car charging, solar power, and sustainable stormwater management. Residents will share a small fleet of vehicles, but mostly get around on bicycles and an ELF, a headturning hybrid of a tricycle and a car complete with solar panels, a covered cab, and a rechargeable battery (if you’re lucky, you might see Redding riding an ELF around town). And, although the community isn’t complete yet, residents have already been advocating for sustainability issues in the greater Charlottesville area. In October, EcoVillage co-created a petition advocating for more decisive language in the city’s Climate Action Plan. Seven people, including Redding, currently live in EcoVillage, in the two houses on the property. But, even with a small number of people, he can feel the benefits of the co-housing community during the otherwise isolating experience of the pandemic. Members do Tai Chi classes and regularly eat lunch and dinner together outside. Not everything is sunshine and roses, however. Financial donors, something Eco­Village needs to become a reality, have been few and


16

Rocky will be at the Eternal Attic on Friday, April 2nd 10 – 4

paying you top dollar for your gold and silver and antiques.

gold and silver are still up! now is the time to sell!

Rocky pays more for gold, silver and many other items he can resell

ROCKY BUYS: GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM JEWELRY (EVEN BROKEN) GOLD, SILVER PLATINUM COINS, BULLION HE PAYS EXTRA FOR GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS HE CAN RESELL ROCKY WILL PAY UP TO $3000 FOR A GOOD ONE CARAT DIAMOND SOLITAIRE STERLING FLATWARE, HOLLOWWARE ANTIQUE GUNS AND AMMUNITION, SWORDS, CIVIL WAR ITEMS POST CARDS, OLD QUILTS, OLD CLOCKS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE SOME GLASSWARE SOME COSTUME JEWELRY SOME POCKET AND WRIST WATCHES LIKE ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE, OMEGA, AND MORE RUNNING OR NOT SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY

we are now back open regular hoursTuesday – Saturday 9:30 to 5, antiques open at 9 for both buying gold and silver and shopping! jewelry repairs done on the premises often while you wait Bench Jeweler wanted $40,000 to $60,000 a year plus benefits - call for details.

HOURS: tues - sat 9:30 - 5 • 1-800-296-8676 Antiques open at 9:00

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

rockysgoldandsilver.com

r e C m a m m p Su Guide

Annual directory of Summer Camps, Schools & Programs for kids

published in c-ville March 31st, April 14th and May 5th

To book your space email: classyexec@c-ville.com


17

OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK

TUESDAY 3/23

SATURDAY 3/20

SATURDAY 3/20

SAFETY DANCE

HITTING THE HIGH NOTES

PUBLICITY PHOTO

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Renée Fleming

@cville_culture

“Well, everybody’s dancin’ in a ring around the sun,” sang the Grateful Dead. Seems that vibe is right on time to shake off a year of COVID quarantine. GD cover band The ’77z takes up the mantle of the hippie pied pipers at Equinox. The live gig will explore the transitional moods of spring and offer the audience spaced-out dancing in colorful, socially-distanced flower circles. Pay in advance online to avoid interaction, check the weather for sunshine, wear a mask, and get somethin’ shakin’ on “Shakedown Street.” $10, 4pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St., SE. ixartpark.org

Though the Metropolitan Opera house remains dark, the talent from its stages is still beaming around the world. Met Stars Live in Concert features two performances from last summer: Renée Fleming from the Dumbarton Oaks estate in Washington, D.C., and Jonas Kaufman from Polling Abbey in Munich, Germany. Fleming, one of opera’s most beloved divas, flexes her broad repertoire, while tenor Kaufman belts out 12 show-stopping arias from a historic venue. Attendees can pre-order sandwiches and cookies from Petite Marie Bette. $11-15, 1pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

Mike Nichols’ beginnings as an improv comedian in 1950s Chicago informed his long career as a film and theater director. He shepherded numerous Neil Simon plays to Broadway success, and drew brilliant performances from Robert Redford, Elizabeth Taylor, Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep, and Tim Curry, among many others. In 1967 alone, he had four hit plays running simultaneously, while racking up 20 Academy Award nominations for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and The Graduate. Mark Harris will discuss his new biography, Mike Nichols: A Life, during the Virginia Film Festival’s next installment of Beyond the Screen, in partnership with the Virginia Festival of the Book. Free, 4pm. Zoom required. virginiafilmfestival. org.

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

PUBLICITY PHOTO

FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS


Eat up!

CULTURE THE WORKS

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

18

Letting it flow Charlottesville Black Arts Collective’s “Water” sends a ripple of emotion of time and memory. For painter Clinton Helms, the theme manifests as a powerful thunderstorm, while Bolanle Adeboye captures the joy of a young girl playing in the rain. Yet despite the range of subjects, Price marvels at how “each individ-

By Alana Bittner arts@c-ville.com

S! GADGET a few g, For sprinave tools must-h

! DRANKS courtesy oze opps New bo ttle House of Bo

ART! ooney’s Evan M ired series sp candy-in SPRING

2021

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

. ything

ever Taste is

ED -TO-FE MOUTH ing three Unpack ie ’grams food five eir top s!) th nd (a ck local pi

! h c n u l Let’s do

itage True Herfurther aims to ’s ia in rg Vi cy wine lega

arkable! It’s Rem classic ’s Baggby s combine sammy cream turkey, and , cheese a o (plus avocad other whole lotta f). good stuf

eat three-m ies, and e endless ar ed samm ks, bagg idday options uc tr od m Fo —your platters

on stands now!

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

facebook.com/cville.weekly

W

hen writer and photographer Kori Price agreed to be part of the curation committee for a Black artists’ exhibition at McGuffey Art Center, water was not on her mind. It didn’t come up until someone asked how they wanted viewers to move through the gallery. Price recalls discussing ways to make viewers feel like they were underwater: “How did we want them to feel? Should they follow a specific route through the space? How should they flow through?” Those questions evoked sobering scenes for Price. Water signified the Middle Passage, the expanse of ocean that was used for trans-Atlantic slave trade, into which an unknown number of Africans jumped rather than endure bondage. But water is also present in moments of joy and release, strength and protest. Price says the committee, which also includes Derrick Waller, Sahara Clemons, Dena Jennings, Jae Johnson, Tobiah Mundt, and Lillie Williams, soon realized it was the perfect metaphor for framing such a broad topic, and agreed on “Water: The Agony and Ecstasy of the Black Experience” for the show’s title. The group intentionally kept the requirements for the participating artists simple, asking only for interpretations on the theme. The results are wide-ranging and surprising. The show features painting, photography, and film, plus banjos carved from dipping gourds. In the films of Ellis Finney, water symbolizes the flow

Bolanle Adeboye’s “Rain Dancer” is part of “Water: The Agony and Ecstasy of the Black Experience,” which features work by 25 Black artists from across Virginia. The exhibition is on display at McGuffey Art Center through March 28.

ual piece flowed together as a cohesive unit in the show.” Waller, a photographer, says that initially, he had no idea where to begin in creating his art for the show. The challenge encouraged him to step out of his comfort zone and pick up a paint brush. The discussions involving the trans-Atlantic slave trade had imprinted one quote in particular on his mind. In Black Panther, Michael B. Jordan’s character Killmonger says, “Nah... Just bury me in the ocean…with my ancestors that jumped from the ship…cuz they knew death was better than bondage.” Waller’s resulting work, “Death Was Better Than Bondage,” is a haunting tribute to those who jumped. Black pins are scattered across a background as blue as the sea, marking the lives lost to the waves. When Price discovered that the first slave ship to the mainland colonies, the White Lion, landed in present-day Hampton, Virginia, she grabbed her camera and drove down to visit. The experience was moving, and resurfaced questions about her own past. “Like many Black Americans, there’s likely not a record of who my enslaved ancestors were or when they gained their freedom,” Price says. “Though I don’t know them by name, I think about them...and wonder who the more than 20 Africans were that walked off the White Lion and became our legacy.” Price’s “Shadow of 20. and Odd Negroes” shows ethereal shadows cast upon a deserted beach, stretching almost to the ocean beyond. As submissions came in, the McGuffey committee noticed that many of the participating artists were showing work for the first time. Waller says that in talking with the artists it became clear that opportunities for Black artists to show their work were limited. For Waller, this affirmed a troubling trend. In his experience, it’s been “very rare to attend an art show that is totally focused on celebrating the talents of Black artists.” During the curation process, the committee members began to discuss the role they could play in helping Black artists get connected with opportunities to show their work, and eventually decided to present the show as the product of a new organization: the Charlottesville Black Arts Collective. Waller says that “helping Black artists gain exposure will be at the core” of CBAC’s mission. “Water” shows just how valuable that exposure is. By featuring a variety of Black voices, the exhibit captures the nuances and multiplicities of the Black experience, something missing from white-domintated art spaces. “I think that people can make a mistake in interpreting the Black experience as a singular and stereotyped experience,” says Price. She hopes viewers can “leave with a better understanding of our complexities.” For Waller, “Water” touches on something fundamental. “I think the show will make people feel,” he says, “whatever that emotion may be…joy, sadness, anger, peace. I want people to feel. And then I hope these feelings spark good conversation and dialogue.”

Water signified the Middle Passage, the expanse of ocean that was used for trans-Atlantic slave trade, into which an unknown number of Africans jumped rather than endure bondage.


CULTURE THE WORKING POUR

19

Rockin’ stout Cradle a craft cup ‘o boozy mud this March By Shea Gibbs

list, as it features oatmeal and is on the nanobrewery’s nitro line. Both attributes are designed to give the ale a creamy mouthfeel—the oats during the boil and the gas erupting into tight bubbles as the dark liquid hits the glass.

living@c-ville.com

B

eer drinkers are weaning themselves off of so many unfortunate St. Patrick’s Day traditions. Green beer? Gone. Drinking enough to shame their Irish forebears by the end of the night? Well, mostly gone. The next step? Reaching for a locally made, artisanal stout or porter, rather than that well-known macro sludge. No, we’re not talking 12 percent ABV pastry stouts crammed with everything from the supermarket candy aisle. And we’re not talking 14 percent barrel-aged behemoths. We’re talking mostly dry, non-adjuncted, reasonably low-alcohol beer you can crush without much concern. “[Dry stout] is a simple beer—one of the simplest,” said Kevin McElroy, co-founder and head brewer at Random Row Brewing Co. “I think for me, it is that kind of roasty flavor that comes along with it. Personally, I am a low ABV beer drinker. [Dry stouts] have so much flavor, but they don’t have that heavy alcohol content. It’s the combination of drinkbalility and taste.” Here’s a look at seven local stouts and porters to replace your Guinness this St. Paddy’s Day.

Rockfish Brewing Company Baltic Porter, 7.2% ABV

So what the heck is a Baltic porter? It’s a lager, meaning it’s fermented differently from other porters, which are ales. According to the Beer Judge Certification Program, it’s a style categorized with other porters primarily due to its malt character. BJCP, the gold standard for beer style definitions, says Baltic porters might have hints of “caramel, toffee, nutty to deep toast, and/or licorice notes...Some darker malt character that is deep chocolate, coffee or molasses but never burnt.” Baltic porters also feature higher alcohol contents than other porters, but they fall short of imperial or barrel-aged stouts, making them a fair sub for dry stouts.

Random Row Brewing Co. Sublimation Stout, 4.9% ABV

Random Row’s Sublimation is likely the one true dry Irish stout you’ll find on C’ville taps this March. McElroy says it’s made with but a few humble ingredients: British pale malt, roasted barley, flaked barley, East Kent Golding hops, and British ale yeast. The brew’s been as low as 4.5 percent ABV in some batches and featured other Euro-staple hops like Perle, but it always has a roasty, unsweetened flavor profile typical of the dry Irish.

Reason Beer

Locally brewed stouts and porters offer an Irish goodbye to traditional pints.

Strange Currencies, 5.7% ABV

Blacklight Tapestry, 5% ABV

Champion Brewing Company has made a number of stouts over the years that put a pint of Gat to shame. So, while this year fans’ll have to settle for a robust porter, they know they’re in capable hands. Black Light Tapestry brings chocolate, coffee, and chic-

Danzig, 8% ABV

ory flavors to a creamy body, as well as a subtle hop tinge at 25 IBUs. Dark beer lovers have praised the brew, which has been on tap at Champion since February 5, for its dark-roast, nearly burnt aesthetic.

Seven Arrows Sundog Milkstout, 5.5% ABV

Not all the great local Guinness substitutes are purely dry. Seven Arrows’s Sundog Milkstout features the addition of non-fermentable lactose sugar, making the resulting

brew slightly sweet. The lactose also gives the beer its creamy mouthfeel, which the brewers say manifests in a “tight, thick head like whipped cream.” But Sundog’s flavors are in line with our other macro-alternatives—they brim with chocolate and coffee, along with a slight hoppiness and roast bitterness.

Decipher Brewing Scytale Stout, 5.7% ABV

Decipher Brewing’s Scytale Stout is a unique alternative to the St. Paddy’s Day fare on our

Devils Backbone Brewing Company offers a sturdy Baltic porter in Danzig, a beer that’s won numerous awards at the Great American Beer Festival and World Beer Cup. “Baltic porters bring aspects of strong lagers and English porters together,” says Jason Oliver, Devils Backbone’s head brewer. “We have always brewed it to be a true-to-style Baltic porter.” At nearly twice the alcohol of a Guiness, revelers will want to take their time savoring Danzig’s flavor profile, which delivers the coffee and chocolate notes typical of a porter. “It’s kind of a hybrid,” Oliver says. “Beer styles are a bit of an invention to classify things. They serve a purpose, but they can’t cover all the bases.”

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Champion Brewing Company

Devils Backbone Brewing Company

@cville_culture

Blurring the lines between styles, Reason’s Strange Currencies porter offers the roasted coffee, chocolate, and caramel flavors stout lovers crave. But it also brings a hoppy edge you don’t find in traditional Irish stouts. Legend has it Reason’s head brewer, Mark Fulton, originally brewed Strange Currencies in honor of his wife and named it after the REM song that soundtracked their first wedding night dance. These beers, you will be mine.

For one example of the style, pull up to a pint of Rockfish Brewing Company’s Baltic Porter. The brewery’s take is mostly dry, pops with roasted coffee and chocolate, and comes in at a reasonable 7.2 percent ABV.

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Legend has it Reason’s head brewer, Mark Fulton, originally brewed Strange Currencies in honor of his wife and named it after the REM song that soundtracked their first wedding night dance.


20

New but with an old Soul

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

If you haven’t been by Minerals & Mystics yet, we can’t wait to meet you!

We are a unique gem in Seminole Square Shopping Center filled with rocks and minerals, sterling silver natural gemstone jewelry and so much more. Each of us here at Minerals & Mystics is on our own path of spiritual discovery and enlightenment. We may have just opened in August, but we have been studying and working with crystals and jewelry for many years, each of us in a different mindset and place on our path just like you. What better way to grow than by sharing that journey with others. Join us for beautiful treasures, interesting conversations, and a like-minded community of different and wonderful seekers.

Be a rock star at Minerals & Mystics! Be sure to ask us about our private shopping experience - the Rock Star hour! www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive Charlottesville VA 22901 434-284-7709


!

J

B a s ’ c y k a

21

Listen to Jay Lopez LIVE & LOCAL - Weekdays Starting at 6:00 AM Or, to Stream SAMFM Online go to 1055SAMFM.com – click on LISTEN LIVE All Your Favorite‘Classic Classic Rock Hits fromthe the70’s 70’s, 80’s 80’s and All Your Favorite Hits’ from and90’s 90’s!

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

…And on ‘Classic Hits’ 105.5 and 95.3 SAM FM

@cville_culture

Start Your Day with Jay in Central Virginia

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Photography Courtesy of Virginia Koontz Photography


22

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


23

CROSSWORD

PR stunt BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. 1% alternative 5. Arizona ballplayers, for short 11. Peter Pan rival 14. White House worker 15. Keys on a piano 16. Declaration made with a card in hand 17. Someone who’s crazy about pasta sauce? 19. Org. with the Suns and the Heat 20. Reggae kin 21. Limo window feature 22. Stiletto, e.g. 23. When some people have sex? 27. Apply liberally, as makeup 30. Leashed 31. Saberhagen with two Cy Young Awards 32. Heading on a personal bio 34. “Comprende?” 35. Staged attention-getter ... or this puzzle’s theme 37. Zip 40. Develop 42. They’re loaded with cash 43. Satisfactory 45. Tony winner Phylicia 47. Outfit made from a nutty confection? 50. Country star McEntire 51. Top-quality 52. Quit stalling 55. Punch lines? 56. Explanation for an inflated balloon’s undoing?

#3

1

2

3

4

33. A/C measure 35. Big ____ (BoSox legend) 36. Actor Gosling 38. “____ bit confused ...” 39. Drug used in microdosing therapies 41. She said “Little boy, gonna make you a man,” in a Kinks song 42. Saddlebag carrier 43. Rebelled DOWN 44. Like apartments built in the 1930s 1. Gullible sorts 2. Captain born 3/22/2233 45. Brad of “The Client” 46. Not on land 3. What comes to mind 48. Novo-Ogaryovo is the 4. Sister of Beth, Jo and official one of the RusAmy sian president 5. Possessed child in “The 49. Guinness world record Omen” holder for longest live 6. Sauvignon ____ weather report 7. “____ a stinker?” (Bugs 52. On Bunny catchphrase) 53. Like a warm bed on a 8. One-fifth of MV winter night 9. Korean export 54. Half of seis 10. Cul-de-____ 56. Rank below cpl. 11. Portmanteau holiday 57. Fjord relative also called Emancipa58. School of thought tion Day 59. NYSE listings 12. Still being tested 13. Gave birth in a stable ANSWERS 3/10/21 18. Other, in Oaxaca 22. Steering position 23. Stroke H B P I N C S N C C 24. Die, as a light E E L N E O L B O M B 25. Faulkner’s “Requiem M A A F L U O C A S I O T Y C O N N W G D P for ____” L E H R T A D G O L D A 26. “Infestation” heavy E D A M E T O P R I S S M A R E R A W S E T A T metal band A L LIE D A LIE N T N T 27. “Young Sheldon” N O T O C C U T I L D E I N U P T O P S T E E N network A G N I I L A K I L N S 28. “All bets ____ off” S A N V E H I D E D U H I C E E D U C E S 29. Watch closely U S O O R L A U N T S B A T N Y Y D O C S 32. “That’s ____ subject” 60. ____ Paulo, Brazil 61. Costar of Ford and Hamill 62. Move like molasses 63. Directional suffix 64. Chevy model since 1966 65. 1974 Elliott Gould/Donald Sutherland comedy

Lie

5

7

18

20

21

28

24

© 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

25

37

38

39

52

53

54

26

35

33

36

41

42 45

44

47

48

50

51 57

58

46

49

55

56

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

facebook.com/cville.weekly

#6 solution

13

30 32

40

12

22

29

34

#5 solution

11

19

31

43

10

16

23

#6

9

15

17

27

8

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

14

6


March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly 24


By Rob Brezsny

CULTURE FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Aries (March 21-April 19): Poet Ocean Vuong speaks of the Hawaiian word kipuka. It refers to a patch of earth that doesn’t get covered with lava when an active volcano exudes its molten material. “Before the lava descended,” Vuong writes, “that piece of land was insignificant, just another scrap in an endless mass of green.” But now that piece of land is special, having endured. I encourage you to identify your metaphorical equivalent of kipuka, Aries. It’s an excellent time to celebrate the power and luck and resilience that have enabled you to persevere.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): “Extraordinary things are always hiding in places people never think to look,” writes Taurus author Jodi Picoult. Luckily for you, Taurus, in the near future you’ll be prone to look in exactly those places—where no one else has thought to look. That means you’ll be extra likely to find useful, interesting, even extraordinary things that have mostly been hidden and unused. You may also discover some boring and worthless things, but the trade-off will be worth your effort. Congratulations in advance on summoning such brave curiosity.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): “When we ask for advice, we are usually looking for an accomplice,” said Gemini author Saul Bellow. So if you have come here today to read my horoscopes, it’s possible that you’re seeking an accomplice to approve of you making a decision or a move that you have already decided to do. Okay. I’ll be your accomplice. But as your accomplice, the first thing I’ll do is try to influence you to make sure your upcoming actions serve not only your own selfish interests (although there’s nothing wrong with that), but also serve the interests of people you care for. The weeks ahead will be a favorable time to blend self-interest and noble idealism.

Cancer

All about town.

' M Y P E R F E CT C'V IL L E DAY' | O N - THE -S TRE ET S T Y LE | SP R I N G HAP P ENI N GS

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): No one had ever proven that there was such a thing as electromagnetic waves until Piscean physicist Heinrich Hertz did so in 1886. He was the innovator who first transmitted and received controlled radio waves. Alas, he didn’t think his breakthrough was useful. In 1890, he confessed, “I do not think that the wireless waves I have discovered will have any practical application.” But other scientists were soon capitalizing on his work to communicate long distances. Radio broadcasts were born. I will encourage you not to make a Hertzian-type mistake in the coming months. Always follow through on your initial labors. Have faith that the novelties you dream up will eventually have practical value. messy, chaotic world. In my judgment, now is one of those times when you would benefit from rubbing your soul against life. Please note: I DON’T mean you should go in search of rough, tough downers. Not at all. In fact, there are plenty of pleasurable, safe, educational ways to rub your soul against life.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): If you love the work of self-help author Paulo Coelho, you might be inclined to adopt his motto as your own: “Being vulnerable is the best way to allow my heart to feel true pleasure.” But maybe you wouldn’t want to adopt his motto. After all, what he’s suggesting requires a great deal of courage and daring. Who among us finds it easy and natural to be soft and receptive and inviting? And yet according to my analysis of the astrological omens, this is exactly what your assignment should be for the next two weeks. To help motivate yourself, remember the payoff described by Coelho: the possibility that your heart will feel true pleasure.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo author Michael Ondaatje celebrates “the hidden presence of others in us—even those we have known briefly. We contain them for the rest of our lives, at every border we cross.” As you approach your own upcoming border-crossing, dear Virgo, I encourage you to tune into memories about seven specific people who over the course of your life have provided you with the most joy and the most interesting lessons. Close your eyes for 20 minutes and imagine they are all gathered together with you in your favorite sanctuary. Remember in detail the blessings they bestowed on you. Give thanks for their influences, for the gifts they gave that have helped you become your beautiful self.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.22): “A balance that does not tremble cannot weigh. A person who does not oscillate cannot live.” So wrote biochemist Erwin Chargaff, who did crucial research leading to the discovery of DNA’s double helix structure. Since you’re the zodiac’s expert on balance and oscillation, and because these themes will be especially meaningful for you in the coming days, I’ll ask you to meditate on them with extra focus. Here’s my advice: To be healthy and resilient, you need to be aware of other possibilities besides those that seem obvious and simple and absolutely true. You need to consider the likelihood that the most correct answers are almost certainly those that are paradoxical and complicated and full of nuance.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In her poem “Sandra,” Scorpio poet Ariana Reines testifies that she has too many feelings—and that’s not a problem. On the contrary. They are her wealth, she says, her “invisible splendor.” I invite you to regard your own “too many feelings” in the same way, especially in the coming weeks. You will have opportunities to harness your flood of feelings in behalf of transformative insights and holistic decision-making. Your motto: Feelings are healing.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Historian and author Thomas Berry described “wildness” as the source of our “authentic spontaneities.” He said it’s “the wellspring of creativity” at the root of our lust for life. That’s a different definition from the idea that wildness is about being unruly, rough, and primitive. And Berry’s definition happens to be the one

that should be central to your work and play in the coming weeks. Your assignment is to be wild: that is, to cultivate your authentic spontaneities; to home in on and nourish the creative wellspring of your lust for life.

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Some of the great discoveries in the history of physics have been made while the trailblazing physicists are lolling in bed or in the bathtub. They have done the research and carried out the rigorous thinking, and are rewarded with breakthroughs while relaxing. I think that will be your best formula for success in the coming weeks. Important discoveries are looming. Interesting innovations are about to hatch. You’re most likely to gather them in if you work intensely on preparing the way for them, then go off and do something fun and rejuvenating.

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): My typical horoscope is an average of 108 words long. In that limited space, I can’t possibly tell you all the themes and threads that will be active for you during the upcoming phase of your cycle. I have to make choices about what to include and what not to include. This time I’ll focus on the fact that you now have an opportunity to deepen your relationship with your sense of smell— and to purposefully nourish your sense of smell. Your homework: Decide on at least five scents with which you will cultivate an intimate, playful, delightful connection in the coming days. (PS: You may be surprised at how this practice will deepen your emotional connection with the world.) Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, 1-877-873-4888.

What is 434? It’s recreation, it’s culture, it’s society—it’s how we live in Charlottesville. In this full-glossy quarterly magazine, you’ll meet townspeople from all corners of our area, from creatives to CEOs, each with their own story to tell. Every issue will connect readers with the best things to buy, see, and get involved in that season.

Email advertising@c-ville.com for more information 5 ABODE

5 ABODE

This is the 434, and we’re all about town.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

SPACE RESERVATION DEADLINE FOR SPRING: MONDAY, MARCH 15TH

March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

(June 21-July 22): A character in Barbara Kingsolver’s novel The Lacuna is told to “go rub his soul against life.” Now I’ll advise you to do the same. Why? While it’s true that you have a beautiful soul, you sometimes get in the habit of hiding it away or keeping it secret. You feed it a wealth of dreams and emotions and longings, but may not go far enough in providing it with raw experience out in the

25


March 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

26

You’re gonna need a bigger mouth.

BURGeR Wburgers eeK $6 signature

$6 signature burgers all week long

MAY 14 - 22, 2021 • C-VILLEBURGERWEEK.COM SPONSORED BY:


CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE

PAYMENT

QUESTIONS

RATES

UPGRADES

(for liners) Tuesday at 10:30 for inclusion in Wednesday’s paper.

In advance. We accept all major credit cards, cash, or check.

434-566-8660 308 E. Main Street, Downtown Mall salesrep@c-ville.com

1-30 words $20 31-40 words $23 41-50 words $26 51-60 words $30

logo $25 border $10 shaded $5 photo $15

HOWITWORKS

$0.35/word over 60

call 434-566-8660 salesrep@c-ville.com C-VILLECLASSIFIEDS.com

MISCELLANEOUS

SERVICES (MISC)

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

BULLETIN BOARD

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855-569-1909. (AAN CAN)

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work... You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844-511-1836. (AAN CAN)

4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1-888-519-0171 (AAN CAN)

AUTOMOTIVE

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866-535-9689 (AAN CAN) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS. Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not - 24 Hour Response - Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877-266-0681 (AAN CAN)

EDUCATION

ATTENTION ACTIVE DUTY & MILITARY VETERANS! Begin a new career and earn your Degree at CTI! Online Computer & Medical training available for Veterans & Families! To learn more, call 855-541-6634 (AAN CAN)

MEDICAL HEARING AIDS!! Buy one/get one FREE! High-quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible! 45-day money back guarantee! 1-833-5851117 (AAN CAN) Still paying too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order - prescription required. Call 1-855-750-1612 (AAN CAN)

HughesNet Satellite Internet - Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1-844-416-7147 (AAN CAN)

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-855-380-250

HEALING/MEDICINE

DO YOU OWE OVER $10,000 TO THE IRS OR STATE IN BACK TAXES? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855-955-0702. (Hours: Mon-Fri 7am5pm PST)

VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special - $99 + FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. CALL NOW: 888-531-1192 (AAN CAN)

WELLNESS

SERVICES

EDUCATION

CLASSIFIEDS

CONTRACTORS BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk-in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in-home consultation: 844-242-1100. (AAN CAN)

Call 434-566-8660 Email:

salesrep@c-ville.com

FINANCIAL SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A-rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/ year! Call 844-712-6153! (M-F 8am8pm Central) (AAN CAN) Over $10K in debt? Be debt free in 24-48 months. Pay a fraction of what you owe. A+ BBB rated.  Call National Debt Relief 877-590-1202. (AAN CAN)

CLINICAL TRIALS Exercise Training and Drug Study

Study for Type 2 Diabetics

Non-smoking, inactive adults aged 21-50 needed for study on the effect of exercise and the drug liraglutide on blood vessels. You must have 3 of the 4 characteristics: overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fasting blood sugar. Study requires three 1-hour and two 9-hour visits over 5 months in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Participants are randomized to one of 4 groups: control, exercise training, study drug, or exercise + study drug. Compensation is $1,500. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, MD.

Men and women with type 2 diabetes aged 18-60 needed for study on the effect of the drug empagliflozin (used to control blood sugar) on blood vessels. Study requires two 1-hour outpatient visits and two 7-hour admissions in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. The study drug is taken for 12 weeks. You must have Type 2 diabetes, be a non-smoker, and not taking insulin. Compensation is $800, paid in installments. Principal Investigator: Eugene Barrett, MD, PhD.

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline CRC 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu HSR #200065

UVA Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline CRC 434.924.5247 | lmh9d@virginia.edu IRB-HSR# 21403

Direct Support Professional Residential and Day Support Services Various shifts available To see a full listing of all of our positions, to apply and to learn more about what The Arc is doing to support our community, please visit our web site at http://thearcofthepiedmont.org/ In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and- for full time staff- an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Prepare for unexpected power outages with a Generac home standby generator REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

844-947-1479

FREE

7-Year Extended Warranty* A $695 Value!

Offer valid February 15 - June 6, 2021

Special Financing Available Subject to Credit Approval

*To qualify, consumers must request a quote, purchase, install and activate the generator with a participating dealer. Call for a full list of terms and conditions.

GET THE SCOOP ON OUR NEWS, ARTS, AND LIVING CONTENT BEFORE ANYONE ELSE. @CVILLENEWS_DESK @ARTSCVILLE @EATDRINKCVILLE

facebook.com/cville.weekly

How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.

Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities:

March 17 - 23, 2021 c-ville.com

uvaclinicaltrials.com

Advancing Healthcare Through

27


28

CLASSIFIEDS VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE STATEWIDE CLASSIFIED

AD NETWORK

COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE

AUCTIONS

Complainant, v.

Case No. CL20-1579

LOUISE TSUI, et als. Respondents.

March 17 - 23, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is to effect a judicial sale of certain real property designated as Tax Map Parcel No. 061W1-00-00-13705 (“61W1-13705”), and which is being assessed on the tax records of the County of Albemarle, Virginia in the name of Louise Tsui, in order to subject such property to the lien thereon for delinquent real estate taxes. It appearing from the Complaint and by the Affidavit filed according to law that diligence has been used without effect to ascertain the location of Respondent Louise Tsui. It is therefore ORDERED that Louise Tsui, appear on or before April 12, 2021 and take such action as she deems appropriate to protect any interests she may have in the above-described property. It is further ORDERED that the foregoing portion of this Order be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in the C-Ville Weekly, that a copy hereof be posted on the door of the Courthouse and that a copy be mailed to the last known address, if any, of the Respondent. The Clerk is hereby directed to send this Order to the C-Ville Weekly and to make the aforementioned posting and mailings. And this cause is continued. ENTER: Claude V. Worrell, II DATE: 3/4/21 I ASK FOR THIS: JONATHAN T. WREN, VSB #40304 MARTINWREN, P.C. 400 Locust Avenue, Suite 1 Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 (434) 817-3100 (phone) (434) 817-3110 (fax) wren@martinwrenlaw.com (email) Counsel for the County of Albemarle

ATTN. AUCTIONEERS: Advertise your upcoming auctions statewide and in other states. Affordable Print and Digital Solutions reaching your target audiences. C or Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-521-7576, mailto:landonc@ vpa.net, landonc@vpa.net

FARM EQUIPMENT OWN LAND IN VIRGINIA? Our Hunters will Pay Top $$$ to lease your land. Call now for free info packet 1-866-309-1507 www.BaseCampLeasing.com / Ref# VA11721

HOME IMPROVEMENT Vinyl Replacement Double Hung Window $249* Installed w/Free Trim Wrap. Call 804-739-8207. Siding, Roofing and More! GENERAC Standby Generators. The weather is increasingly unpredictable. Be prepared for power outages. FREE 7-year extended warranty ($695 value!) Schedule your FREE in-home assessment today. Call 1-844-947-1479 Special financing for qualified customers. Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-877-614-6667 Thinking about installing a new shower? American Standard makes it easy. FREE design consultation. Enjoy your shower again! Call 1-866-854-7620 today to see how you can save $1,000 on installation, or visit HYPERLINK “http:// www.newshowerdeal.com/vapress” www.newshowerdeal.com/vapress ATTN. CONTRACTORS: Advertise your business statewide and in other states. Affordable Print and Digital Solutions to reach Homeowners. Call Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-521-7576, HYPERLINK “mailto:landonc@vpa. net” landonc@vpa.net

LIVESTOCK SALES G&E Virginia Premium Assured Heifer/Cow Sale. March 27th, 2021 12:00 noon. G&E Test Center Gretna, VA. Call George Winn at 434-489-4458.

REAL ESTATE ATTN. REALTORS: Advertise your listings regionally or statewide. Affordable Print and Digital Solutions that get results! Call Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-521-7576, HYPERLINK “mailto:landonc@vpa.net” landonc@vpa.net

SERVICES DIVORCE-Uncontested, $395+$86 court cost. WILLS $195.00. No court appearance. Estimated completion time twenty-one days. Hilton Oliver, Attorney (Facebook). 757-490-0126. Se Habla Espanol. BBB Member. https://hiltonoliverattorneyva.com. Up to $15,000.00 of GUARANTEED Life Insurance! No medical exam or health questions. Cash to help pay funeral and other final expenses. Call Physicians Life Insurance Company- 844-509-1697 or visit www.Life55plus.info/vapress


CLASSIFIEDS

29

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC OF AN APPLICATION BY APPALACHIAN POWER COMPANY FOR APPROVAL AND CERTIFICATION OF THE CENTRAL VIRGINIA TRANSMISSION RELIABILITY PROJECT UNDER TITLE 56 OF THE CODE OF VIRGINIA CASE NO. PUR-2021-00001

CENTRAL VIRGINA

CENTRALRELIABILITY VIRGINA PROJECT TRANSMISSION

SCOTTSVILLE

SCOTTSVILLE SUBSTATION

LOVINGSTON

SOAPSTONE SUBSTATION

JAMES RIVER SUBSTATION

CLIFFORD SUBSTATION

JAMES

RIVER

SOAPSTONE SUBSTATION

JAMES

RIVER

JAMES RIVER SUBSTATION

CLIFFORD SUBSTATION

29

29

AMHERST

60

BOXWOOD SUBSTATION

LYNCHBURG

60

ER

MONROE SUBSTATION

S ME

RIV

RIVERVILLE SUBSTATION GLADSTONE

SUBSTATION

BECKHAM

MADISON HEIGHTS

RIVERVILLE SUBSTATION

S ME

JA

JOSHUA FALLS SUBSTATION

EXISTING TRANSMISSION LINE TO BE REBUILT SUBSTATION TO BE UPGRADED SUBSTATION TO BE EXPANDED PROPOSED SUBSTATION

ER

MONROE SUBSTATION

EXISTING TRANSMISSION LINE

PROPOSED TRANSMISSION LINE ROUTE

JA

JOSHUA FALLS SUBSTATION

REUSENS SUBSTATION

GLADSTONE SUBSTATION

60

GLADSTONE

AMHERST SUBSTATION

MONROE

REUSENS SUBSTATION

AMHERST SUBSTATION

RIV

EXISTING SUBSTATION

facebook.com/cville.weekly

BOXWOOD SUBSTATION

60

SCOTTSVILLE SUBSTATION

miles south of the community of Schuyler, near Carter Road and Rockfish Crossing. Approximately three steel monopole structures will be needed with an approximate average height of 115 feet. The structure height range will be between 100 and 130 feet. All distances, heights, and directions are approximate. A sketch map of the proposal accompanies this notice. A more detailed map may be viewed on the Commission’s website: scc.virginia.gov/pages/Transmission-Line-Projects. The Commission may consider a route not significantly different from the routes described in this notice without additional notice to the public. A more complete description of the Project may be found in the Company’s Application. The Commission has taken judicial notice of the ongoing public health emergency related to the spread of the coronavirus, or COVID-19, and the declarations of emergency issued at both the state and federal levels. In accordance therewith, all pleadings, briefs, or other documents required to be served in this matter shall be submitted electronically to the extent authorized by 5 VAC 520150, Copies and format, of the Commission’s Rules of Practice and Procedure (“Rules of Practice”). Confidential and Extraordinarily Sensitive Information shall not be submitted electronically and should comply with 5 VAC 5-20-170, Confidential information, of the Rules of Practice. Please refer to the Commission’s Order for Notice and Hearing or subsequent Hearing Examiner’s Ruling for further instructions concerning Confidential or Extraordinarily Sensitive Information. For the duration of the COVID-19 emergency, any person seeking to hand deliver and physically file or submit any pleading or other document shall contact the Clerk’s Office Document Control Center at (804) 3719838 to arrange the delivery. The Commission entered an Order for Notice and Hearing in this proceeding that, among other things, scheduled public hearings on APCo’s Application. On June 28, 2021, at 10 a.m., the Commission will hold a telephonic hearing, with no witness present in the Commission’s courtroom, for the sole purpose of receiving the testimony of public witnesses. On June 24, 2021, any person desiring to offer testimony as a public witness shall provide to the Commission (a) your name, and (b) the telephone number that you wish the Commission to call during the hearing to receive your testimony. This information may be provided to the Commission in three ways: (i) by filling out a form on the Commission’s website at scc.virginia. gov/pages/Webcasting; (ii) by email to SCCInfo@scc.virginia.gov; or (iii) by calling 804-371-9141. This public witness hearing will be webcast at scc.virginia.gov/pages/Webcasting. On June 29, 2021, at 10 a.m., either in the Commission’s second floor courtroom located in the Tyler Building, 1300 East Main Street, Richmond, Virginia 23219, or by electronic means, the Commission will convene a hearing to receive testimony and evidence related to the Application from the Company, any respondents, and the Commission’s Staff. Further details on this hearing will be provided by subsequent Commission Order or Hearing Examiner’s Ruling. An electronic copy of the Company’s Application may be obtained by submitting a written request to counsel for the Company, Noelle J. Coates, Esquire, American Electric Power Service Corporation, 1051 East Cary Street, Suite 1100, Richmond, Virginia 23219, or njcoates@aep.com. On or before June 24, 2021, any interested person may file comments on the Application electronically by following the instructions on the Commission’s website: scc.virginia.gov/casecomments/Submit-Public-Comments. All comments shall refer to Case No. PUR2021-00001. Any person or entity may participate as a respondent in this proceeding by filing, on or before May 11, 2021, a notice of participation. Notices of participation shall include the email addresses of the party or its counsel. The respondent simultaneously shall serve a copy of the notice of participation on counsel to the Company. Pursuant to 5 VAC 5-20-80 B, Participation as a respondent, of the Commission’s Rules of Practice, any notice of participation shall set forth: (i) a precise statement of the interest of the respondent; (ii) a statement of the specific action sought to the extent then known; and (iii) the factual and legal basis for the action. Any organization, corporation, or government body participating as a respondent must be represented by counsel as required by 5 VAC 5-20-30, Counsel, of the Rules of Practice. All filings shall refer to Case No. PUR-202100001. For additional information about participation as a respondent, any person or entity should obtain a copy of the Commission’s Order for Notice and Hearing. Any documents filed in paper form with the Office of the Clerk of the Commission in this docket may use both sides of the paper. In all other respects, except as modified by the Commission’s Order for Notice and Hearing, all filings shall comply fully with the requirements of 5 VAC 5-20-150, Copies and format, of the Commission’s Rules of Practice. The Company’s Application, the Commission’s Rules of Practice, the Commission’s Order for Notice and Hearing, and other documents filed in the case may be viewed on the Commission’s website at: scc.virginia.gov/pages/Case-Information. APPALACHIAN POWER COMPANY

March 17 - 23, 2021 c-ville.com

the community of Beckham, continues for approximately 0.9 mile, crosses the James River at Christian Island into Amherst County, and continues for approximately 0.6 mile. The route enters the expanded Riverville Substation on the Grief Paper Mill complex located adjacent to the James River, near the community of Riverville, and south of Stapleton Road. The proposed route of the Riverville-Gladstone 138 kV transmission line exits at the Riverville Substation, begins north on Grief Paper Mill property for approximately 1 mile and crosses Stapleton Road, continues north for approximately 0.2 mile, and crosses Riverville Road. The route continues for approximately 0.6 mile and turns northeast, continues for approximately 0.6 mile, crosses Old Galilee Road, continues for approximately 0.8 mile, and enters Nelson County. The proposed route continues northeasterly for approximately 0.8 mile parallel and to the north of Piedmont Road, turns east, continues for approximately 0.3 mile, and crosses Piedmont Road. The proposed route continues for approximately 2.0 mile parallel and to the south of US Hwy 60, crosses Hwy 60, and ends at a switch structure adjacent to Central Virginia Electric Cooperative’s Gladstone Substation located on Hwy 60 near Spring Lane and the community of Five Forks. The primary structure types for the Joshua Falls-Riverville-Gladstone 138 kV transmission lines will be a steel H-frame and three-pole structures. The average height will be approximately 70 feet with structure heights ranging between 55 and 100 feet. The two 138 kV lattice towers necessary to span the James River into Riverville Substation will have an average height of approximately 100 feet, with structure heights ranging between 80 and 120 feet. Additionally, approximately 1,000 feet of the existing Amherst-Riverville 138 kV transmission line will be relocated at the Riverville Substation. The primary structure type for the 138 kV relocation will be monopole with structure heights ranging between 80 and 110 feet, with an average height of 100 feet. The Amherst-Reusens 69 kV transmission line rebuild is located on or near the existing transmission line right-of-way. The proposed route begins at the Company’s Reusens Substation located in the northern portion of the City of Lynchburg and on the west side of the James River (200 Old Trents Ferry Road, Lynchburg, VA). The proposed route exits the Reusens Substation over the James River for approximately 0.1 mile, entering Amherst County, and continues for about 0.4 mile. On the east side of the James River, the route turns north for approximately 0.1 mile, turns northeast, continues approximately 0.7 mile, crosses Route 685 (River Road), continues approximately 1 mile, spans State Highway 130 (Elon Road), continues approximately 0.8 mile, and crosses Winesap Road south of the community of Winesap. The proposed route continues approximately 1.1 miles, crosses South Amherst Highway south of Monroe, and enters Monroe Substation (3389 South Amherst Highway, Madison Heights, VA). The route exits Monroe Substation, continues approximately 0.7 mile, turns more northeasterly, and generally parallels Route 604 (S. Coolwell Road) for approximately 2 miles, and crosses Izaak Walton Road. The route spans US Hwy 29 after approximately 1.4 miles, continues for approximately 1.2 miles, crosses Ebenezer Road, generally parallels the south side of Ebenezer Road for approximately 2.7 miles, and enters Amherst Substation located adjacent and south of US Highway 60 (110 Substation Lane, Amherst, VA). The Project includes the proposed Amherst Extension 138 kV transmission line which is about 500 feet in length. It exits the Amherst Substation, parallels the northwest side of the Amherst Substation, spans US Highway 60, and connects to the existing Boxwood-Amherst-Riverville 138 kV transmission line. The Amherst Extension will use a single double circuit monopole structure ranging in height between 120 and 130 feet. Lastly, a minor relocation of approximately 1,500 feet of the BoxwoodAmherst-Riverville 138 kV transmission line is required northeast to southeast of the Amherst Substation. The relocation of the Boxwood-Amherst-Riverville 138 kV transmission line will use monopole structures with heights between 80 and 100 feet, averaging approximately 90 feet. The primary structure type for the Amherst-Reusens 69 kV rebuild will be a steel H-frame structure. The average height will be approximately 65 feet with structure heights ranging between 50 and 90 feet. In comparison, the majority of the existing wood Hframe structures have an average height of approximately 50 feet. Additionally, to span TRANSMISSION RELIABILITY PROJECT the James River near Reusens Substation and existing lines, apALBEMARLE ALBEMARLE proximately three 69 kV/138 kV NELSON NELSON COUNTY COUNTY COUNTY COUNTY double circuit lattice towers will SCOTTSVILLE be necessary. The average height of those structures is approxiLOVINGSTON mately 150 feet, with structure heights ranging between 140 and 160 feet. AMHERST COUNTY The proposed James River AMHERST Substation and 400-foot-long BUCKINGHAM COUNTY COUNTY transmission line are located on the Company’s property in NelBUCKINGHAM COUNTY son County, two miles south of CENTRAL VIRGINIA TRANSMISSION RELIABILITY PROJECT Lovingston, Virginia on James AMHERST River Road. One monopole BEDFORD GLADSTONE double-circuit steel structure will CENTRAL VIRGINIA TRANSMISSION COUNTY APPOMATTOX RELIABILITY PROJECT be needed with an approximate COUNTY MONROE height of 120 feet. EXISTING TRANSMISSION LINE BECKHAM EXISTING TRANSMISSION LINE TO BE REBUILT The proposed Soapstone BEDFORD PROPOSED TRANSMISSION LINE ROUTE COUNTY Substation and 600-foot-long MADISON SUBSTATION TO BE UPGRADED APPOMATTOX HEIGHTS transmission line are located on SUBSTATION TO BE EXPANDED LYNCHBURG COUNTY PROPOSED SUBSTATION the Company’s property in NelEXISTING SUBSTATION son County, approximately two

On January 26, 2021, Appalachian Power Company (“APCo” or “Company”) filed with the State Corporation Commission (“Commission”) an application for approval and certification to construct and operate electric transmission facilities in the City of Lynchburg and Albermarle, Amherst, Appomattox, Campbell, and Nelson Counties, Virginia (“Application”). APCo filed the Application pursuant to § 56 46.1 of the Code of Virginia (“Code”) and the Utility Facilities Act, Code § 56 265.1 et seq. APCo seeks to: (i) build a new 11.1 mile long 138 kilovolt (“kV”) transmission line from the Company’s Joshua Falls Substation to its Riverville Substation (the “Joshua Falls-Riverville 138 kV transmission line”); (ii) build a new 6.3 mile long 138 kV transmission line from the Company’s Riverville Substation to Central Virginia Electric Cooperative’s Gladstone Substation (the “Riverville-Gladstone 138 kV transmission line”); (iii) build two new 138 kV substations and associated transmission line extensions (the “James River 138 kV Substation” and the “Soapstone 138 kV Substation”); (iv) expand and/or improve the Company’s Riverville, Monroe, Amherst, Boxwood, Scottsville, Clifford and Joshua Falls Substations; (v) rebuild approximately 12.2 miles of the Amherst-Reusens 69 kV transmission line; and (vi) install and/or upgrade other related transmission line, substation, telecommunication, and distribution facilities (collectively, the “Project”). APCo states that the Project is necessary to maintain the structural integrity and reliability of its transmission system in compliance with mandatory North American Electric Reliability Corporation Reliability Standards. More specifically, the Company states that the Project will accommodate future growth in Amherst, Nelson and Albemarle Counties, mitigate thermal and voltage reliability criteria violations, and replace aging infrastructure that is at the end of its service life. The Company states that the desired in-service date for the Project is December 1, 2025. The Company represents that the estimated conceptual cost of the Project is approximately $147.7 million, which includes approximately $95.1 million for transmission-related work and $52.6 million for substation-related work. APCo asserts that the Project will require new right-of-way (“ROW”) easements for the construction of the Joshua Falls-Riverville 138 kV transmission line and the Riverville-Gladstone 138 kV transmission line. The Project will also require some updated and supplemental ROW easements for the rebuild of the Amherst-Reusens 69 kV transmission line. APCo represents that, following extensive outreach, public input and analysis, the Company considered 25 possible substation sites for the two proposed new substations, and developed four alternative routes for the proposed Joshua Falls-Riverville 138 kV transmission line, and two alternative routes for the proposed Riverville-Gladstone 138 kV transmission line. Description of the Project The Project includes the 11.1 mile Joshua Falls-Riverville 138 kV transmission line; the 6.3 mile Riverville-Gladstone 138 kV transmission line; the 12.2 mile Amherst-Reusens 69 kV Transmission Line rebuild; the new James River 138 kV Substation and 400 feet of new 138 kV double circuit transmission line; and the new Soapstone 138 kV Substation and 600 feet of new 138 kV double circuit transmission line. The proposed route of the Joshua Falls-Riverville 138 kV transmission line begins at the Company’s Joshua Falls Substation located near Mt. Athos Road in Campbell County, approximately five miles east of the City of Lynchburg, on the south side of the James River. The proposed route exits south from the Joshua Falls Substation for approximately one-third of a mile, turns east, and after approximately 1 mile enters Appomattox County. The route continues in an easterly direction generally paralleling the James River corridor for approximately 2.7 miles, avoiding Chestnut Mountain. The proposed route turns northeast and continues for approximately 1.5 miles, crossing Dreaming Creek Road and a large commercial timber tract located to the northwest and parallel to Route 611 (Trinity Road). The route turns north for approximately 0.9 mile, turns northeast and continues for approximately 2.2 miles generally to the north and parallel to Route 605 (Beckham Road), and crosses Route 623. The route continues for approximately 1 mile, turns north near


30

CLASSIFIEDS

BACKED BY A YEAR-ROUND

CLOG-FREE GUARANTEE

150 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE

ENJOYING A NEW SHOWER IS EASIER THAN YOU THINK

EXCLUSIVE LIMITED TIME OFFER!

15

% & OFF

YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE *

R GU

TO THE FIRST 50 CALLERS ONLY! **

OFF

WE INSTALL

YEAR-ROUND! LIFETIME WARRANTY

Promo Code: 285

2

1

RD

TE

5

SENIORS & MILITARY!

FINANCING THAT FITS YOUR BUDGET!1

NATIO

’S

GU

T

E

N

TH

+

% OFF

10

%

A

Subject to credit approval. Call for details.

1

CALL US TODAY FOR

A FREE ESTIMATE

1-877-614-6667

Mon-Thurs: 8am-11pm, Fri-Sat: 8am-5pm, Sun: 2pm-8pm EST *For those who qualify. One coupon per household. No obligation estimate valid for 1 year. **Offer valid at time of estimate only 2 The leading consumer reporting agency conducted a 16 month outdoor test of gutter guards in 2010 and recognized LeafFilter as the “#1 rated professionally installed gutter guard system in America.” CSLB# 1035795 DOPL #10783658-5501 License# 7656 License# 50145 License# 41354 License# 99338 License# 128344 License# 218294 WA UBI# 603 233 977 License# 2102212986 License# 2106212946 License# 2705132153A License# LEAFFNW822JZ License# WV056912 License# WC-29998-H17 Nassau HIC License# H01067000 Registration# 176447 Registration# HIC.0649905 Registration# C127229 Registration# C127230 Registration# 366920918 Registration# PC6475 Registration# IR731804 Registration# 13VH09953900 Registration# PA069383 Suffolk HIC License# 52229-H License# 2705169445 License# 262000022 License# 262000403 License# 0086990 Registration# H-19114

CALL TODAY newshowerdeal.com/vapress | 866-854-7620

A Smarter Way to Power Your Home. REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

facebook.com/cville.weekly

ACT NOW TO RECEIVE A $300 SPECIAL OFFER!*

(833) 688-1378

*Offer value when purchased at retail. Solar panels sold separately.

A SPRUCE UP

Holding Rad rugs from a new vibe Forth stir up

CENTER SPO

T

gatherin A revamped edere place in Belv

T ART OF CRAF g

r house Potter’s cide past embraces its

2021 FEB / MARCH

March 17 - 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Inside. Outside. Home.

A WW II-era home—and its modern-day kitchen redo

Retaining the best of an unfinished Bundoran property, new owners craft their forever home

There’s no place like

home.

Inside. Outside. Home.

Central Virginia’s No. 1 home magazine has never looked finer. ABODE has given readers an inside look at the region’s most interesting homes for nearly a decade. From landscape to interior design, floor to ceiling, blueprint to fixture, each month our writers team up with the area’s top architects and designers to give you an insider’s view of the local homes you’ve always wanted to see inside.

Inside the lines

Look for ABODE at over 100 locations across Charlottesville, Albemarle, Orange, Lovingston, Crozet, Staunton, Waynesboro, and Fishersville at major grocery stores, gyms, restaurants, and retail locations and online at c-ville.com.


VOL. 30 NO. 11 n MARCH 17 - 23, 2021

WWW.CAAR.COM 31

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Country Home BY CARLA HUCKABEE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY YOUR


MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

32

Semi-Custom Villa Style Homes Surrounding a Pocket Park! From $499,900 Tour our Newest Model Homes and Old Trail Village Tour Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere inBelvedere Belvedere and and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Pre-Construction Sales Now Open! Sales Center Coming Soon! Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 | 434-987-6522 Villa Model in Old Trail Village | 406 Astel St, Crozet, VA 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in OldinTrail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northepointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change

517 LEXINGTON AVENUE

4209 HAWKINS LANE

NOMINATE ME

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

NOMINATE ME

Stroll quintessential Charlottesville among the notable Victorians. Lexington Ave is pristine and adored by all who visit. This charming city home hasbeen extensively renovated; featuring redesigned character in all bathrooms, master suite created on 3rd level with tremendous banquette seating & abundant light.Ornate fixtures throughout the home convey. All rooms feature unique shelves, custom art features & organic tile and Onyx detail. Large level fenced yard with playstructure, abundant parking in both the front and rear. MLS# 611555 $ 945,000

Country Living in Convenient Location. Close to NGIC, Hollymeade, Pantops. Private Stocked Pond & almost 5 acres in Albemarle County. Main Level Master Suite, Tiled Dual Head Shower, Bamboo Hardwoods in Living Room, Eat In Kitchen w Stainless Appliances & Granite Counters. Covered Front Porch w View of your pond & pasture. Covered rear deck & Finished Basement with HUGE Family Room, 2nd Full Laundry Room, 3rd Full Bathroom & 4th Bedroom. 6 miles to Proffitt Rd.9 Miles to Hollymeade Town Center. MLS# 605931 $535,000

NOMINATE ME

130 TURTLE CREEK RD Buy and Sell Cville Team Nominees: Candice & Bert

Candice Van der Linde Candice van der Linde, Realtor @Candice_Realtor Buy and Sell Cville Team

Passionate about Helping People SELL & BUY Residential Real Estate in the Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you & Share Some of our Best Adventures!

Call: 434-981-8730 • Connect: BuyandSellCville.com Come visit: RE/MAX Realty Specialists

Turtle Creek Condo 1 BR 1 BA, with a NEW TRANE HVAC; brick fireplace with Buy and Sell Cville Team coveredNominees: porch Candice & Bert 943 Glenwood Station Ln #203 & storage Passionateunit. about Helping Buy and Sell Cville Team Charlottesville, VA2 22901 People SELL & BUY Residential Community has 2Candice Pools, Tennis Courts, Fitness Center, Club House &Real sidewalks Nominees: & Bert Estate in the throughout. Walk to Stonefield Shopping Center, mountain biking Trails, playgrounds Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you Passionate & Schools. MLSabout #614747 Helping $146,000 & Share Some of our Best

Candice der Linde, Realtor @Candice_Realtor Peoplevan SELL & BUY Residential

Candice van der Linde, Realtor

@Candice_Realtor

Real Estate in the Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you & Share Some of our Best

Adventures!


33

S

O L

D

Thinking of selling your house this year, call me.

MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

CRESTWOOD DRIVE

S

O

L

D

Amazing “Quality of Life” is found here in this beautiful, west facing, residence in Charlottesville’s premier 55+ Independent living community. This 2 bedroom 2 bath home is one of the larger units with 1981 sq. ft. A 20’ wall of windows overlooks a manicured lawn, out to the Blue Ridge. Large, formal dining room(could be a family room) plus a den allow for gracious living. Fabulous common areas on each floor. 75’ indoor heated pool, work out rooms, library, ping pong and billiards room. Accommodations for overnight guests. $450,000

POWHATAN CIRCLE

503 Faulconer Drive Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903 p: 434.295.1131 f: 434293.7377 e: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FABULOUS LAKEFRONT SETTING! 1.9 acres at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. Tastefully updated. Expansive decks overlooking the waterfall and lake. Great view of the lake from the family room which opens to a deck that leads to the attached greenhouse. Features include; 2 masonry fireplaces, hardwood floors, lovely foyer and study. Eat-in kitchen has inset maple cabinets. Large workshop/studio on terrace level, plus lots of room for storage. Quite and yet so convenient to everything! $550,000


NEWS & VIEWS CAAR Celebrates 2020 Annual Awards & REALTOR® Hall of Fame Recipients The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® (CAAR) has announced the recipients of its annual awards and REALTOR® Hall of Fame for 2020. The awards were announced during a virtual General Membership Meeting on Thursday, March 11th. The Affiliate of the Year recognizes a CAAR affiliate member who goes the extra step to help further the goals and objectives of the Association, CAAR members, their clients, and the community at large. The 2020 Affiliate of the Year award recipient was Megan Rodgers of Farm Credit of the Virginias. The Rising Star of the Year award recognizes a REALTOR® member who has held an active salesperson’s license for 18 consecutive months or less and balances sales volume and education with CAAR events and civic duties. The 2020 Rising Star of the Year award recipient was Stephanie Woolfolk of RE/MAX Realty Specialists – Charlottesville. The Sales Associate of the Year recognizes a REALTOR® who is a top sales producer, active in the Association and the community, and continues to improve his or her skills by engaging in continuing education courses and the achievement of professional designations. The 2020 Sales Associate of the Year award recipient was Mary Katherine King of Long & Foster – Old Ivy. The REALTOR® Ethics in Action of the Year recognizes a REALTOR® who is sought out by other REALTORS® who are seeking advice and counsel on questions concerning the Code of Ethics and professional standards. The 2020 REALTOR® Ethics in Action award recipient was Quinton Beckham of Keller Williams Alliance – Charlottesville. The REALTOR® of the Year honors a member who has participated in the REALTOR® Associations at the local, state, and national levels. Involvement in civic and community organizations is necessary, as is a high level of education and a dedication to the profession. The 2020 REALTOR® of the Year award recipient was Arleen Yobs of Nest Realty Group. WWW.CAAR.COM

VOL. 30 NO. 1 n JANUARY 6 - 12, 2021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

To conclude the awards ceremony, CAAR inducted Sue Plaskon of Long & Foster – Old Ivy to the CAAR REALTOR® Hall of Fame, the highest career honor. This accolade acknowledges outstanding and exceptional contributions for more than 25 years of continuous service to the local, state, and national Associations. 50 REALTORS® Inducted into the 2020 CAAR Professional Honor Society The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® (CAAR) announced the induction of 49 REALTORS® into the 2020 class of the CAAR Professional Honor Society during a virtual General Membership Meeting on Thursday, March 11th. This prestigious accolade has been a long-standing award program at the state level and was instituted by CAAR in 1996 to recognize standards of industry excellence. A total of 194 different REALTORS® have reached this pinnacle achievement in the local program’s history. The 2020 class marks the 25th year for six CAAR members and the first year for one member. The selection process for each year relies on four core areas: association involvement, professional development, leadership and volunteer participation, and success in either production of sales or as a managing Broker. The honorees are listed in alphabetical order, per class year. The 2020 Professional Honor Society & Awards Meeting was sponsored by Farm Credit of the Virginias. 1 - 4 Years | First Year* Quinton Beckham Emily Dooley John Farmer* Erin Garcia S. Lisa Herndon Errin Kardos-Searcy Barbara Kelley Katelyn Mancini Sarah Monceaux Brentney Moore Kristin Sorokti Amanda Spigone Wes Sury Josh White 6 – 9 Years Rachel Burns Anne Burroughs WWW.CAAR.COM

VOL. 30 NO. 9 n MARCH 3 - 9, 2021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

WWW.CAAR.COM

VOL. 30 NO. 4 n JANUARY 27 - FEBRUARY 2, 2021

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

FREE

10 Years Pam Dent

Charlottesville Habitat and Lowe’s Partnered for International Women Build Week

11 – 14 Years Kelly Ceppa Michael Guthrie Denise Ramey Sasha Tripp John Updike 16 – 19 Years Pat Crabtree James Dickerson Gaby Hall Kathy Markwood Donna Patton Sue Plaskon Greg Slater 20 Years Sabrina Thompson 21 – 24 Years Rives Bailey Anita Dunbar Karen Kehoe Pat Sury 25 Years Kim Armstrong Tim Carson Percy Montague, IV. Trish Owens Pat Widhalm Arleen Yobs About CAAR – The Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® serves more than 1,300 real estate professionals and affiliate members throughout the City of Charlottesville and the counties of Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, and Nelson. Widely recognized as the leading voice for real estate in Central Virginia since 1925, CAAR members bring professionalism and high ethical standards to every business transaction. The Association advocates for the protection of private property rights and provides tools and technology for members to achieve expertise in serving the needs of customers and clients. The CAAR membership is committed to enriching the region’s neighborhoods by engaging in a variety of educational programs as well as community service events each year. If you have a question about today’s market, contact a REALTOR® today using mycaar.com for residential propA P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

Charlottesville Habitat partnered with Habitat for Humanity International, Lowe’s, and more than 300 Habitat programs in the United States, India, and Canada for International Women Build Week (which was March 8-15) to highlight the global need for safe and affordable housing. During the COVID-19 pandemic, Habitat for Humanity’s top priority is the health and safety of our staff, volunteers, and community members. For this reason, much of the public involvement for 2021 International Women Build Week was hosted virtually on Habitat Charlottesville and Habitat International’s social media accounts. On Saturday, March 13, Habitat volunteers gathered socially-distanced on site to install siding to the exterior of two new homes Habitat Charlottesville is building on 12th Street. Among this small group were Habitat Homebuyers and future neighbors Tashae Anderson and Jeronda Jackson, who will purchase the single-family attached homes this summer, realizing their dreams of homeownership. This will be the first time that the two neighbors worked on their homes’ job sites together. Both mothers to two children, 12th Street homebuyers Tashae and Jeronda bonded quickly over the shared excitement their homes bring for their families. They cannot wait to have their own backyards to freely and safely play outside, paint the walls in their own rooms, and sit on their front porches. Tashae says her girls, ages 11 and 5, ask her to drive by the site a couple of times a week to check on the progress. Tashae’s determination to provide a stable home for her girls has led her to complete countless hours of financial education and volunteer sweat equity on Habitat’s job sites. She says it has almost been like having a part-time job, but for her girls, she’d do it all again. She’s been dreaming about them running around in a yard getting to play while they’re young. This summer, they will.

We’ve Got Central Virginia

WWW.CAAR.COM

VOL. 30 NO. 10 n MARCH 10 - 16, 2021

FREE

COVERED!

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

O N L I N E & I N P R I N T • 3 6 5 D AY S P E R Y E A R

WINTER on the Slopes:

Wintergreen and Massanutten Resorts BY KEN WILSON

Spring 2021:

Happenings Digital and Beyond BY KEN WILSON

Why Seniors

Love Central Virginia

BY KEN WILSON

2021

Free and Open to All BY KEN WILSON

Real Estate Weekly

CAAR

MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

NEWS & VIEWS CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY

Local Real Estate News

erties and cvcmls.com for commercial properties! They have the expertise, tools, and local insight you need to make the best real estate decision. NOTE: The term REALTOR® is a registered collective membership mark that identifies a real estate professional who is a member of the National Association of REALTORS® and subscribes to its strict Code of Ethics.

Debbie Cash Dan Conquest Tele Jenifer Mary Katherine King Georgia Lindsey Jessica Russo Keith Smith Yonna Smith Kristin Streed Tom Woolfolk

34


35

C U O N N D TR E AR C T

MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

lassic UVA Neighborhood EASY WALK TO UVA GROUNDS

This wonderful home offers a gorgeous new kitchen w/breakfast bar, granite counters, tile backsplash, & stainless KitchenAid appliances, hardwood floors, custom lighting, & dual master suites, one boasting a stunning bathroom with a garden shower, double vanity, & a huge walk-in closet with custom built-ins. Off thekitchen is a lovely screened porch with slate floor, a large patio for grilling and entertaining, and a vintage brick and wood shed with windows & a new roof for outsidestorage. The two paved driveways and large backyard will give you plenty of room for parking and playing. MLS# 614039 $829,000

Classic UVA Neighborhood

A PERFECT DOWNTOWN GEM

This lovely circa 1910 home has been meticulously and lovingly renovated and updated, including a gourmet kitchen with Wolfe, Delfield, and Miele appliances, custom master bath with a copper sitting tub & Toto toilet, a home theater, and a Provencal courtyard featuring a built-in grill and copper wall fountain, a conditioned 2-car garage, a slate roof, copper Walk to classes, a concert or a football game from this beautifully renovatedrain gutters, and wonderful old-world detailing throughout. The wrapand expanded home boasting two luxurious master suites, 1-2 morearound porch is wide enough for dinner parties, and the back courtyard is an exquisite private retreat, all only a few blocks from the fabulous eaterbedrooms, three full baths, a gourmet kitchen with granite counters and aies, shops, theater, & music scene of the downtown mall. MLS# 605612 breakfast bar, custom cabinetry and lighting, hardwood and ceramic floors,$1,875,000 Walk to classes, a concert or a football game from this beautifully renovated

a fireplace with gashome logs, aboasting walk-in laundry, and anmaster inviting screened porch. and expanded two luxurious suites, 1-2 more bedrooms, a gourmet kitchen with granite counters and a Outside you’ll three enjoyfull thebaths, large level backyard with a terrace for entertaining, BUILD YOUR IDEAL HOME breakfast bar, custom cabinetry and lighting, hardwood and ceramic floors, a vintage storage shed, many garden spaces, and two newly-paved driveways The most beautiful panoramic mountain, vineyard, and meadow views can be a fireplace withfrom gas logs, a walk-in laundry, andonanthe inviting screened enjoyed spec tacular property. Nestled gently sloping edge porch. of a or parking. Ready to this move in. $829,000. Outsidemature you’llhardwood enjoy theforest, largethelevel backyard with aeasily terrace for entertaining, homesite is very private, accessible & relativeRecent Properties Sold level, making much easier. You’ll enjoy access to the 15driveways miles of a vintagelystorage shed,construction many garden spaces, and two newly-paved hikingReady & horses and private lakes for fishing & kayaking. Downtown for parking. to trails move in.two$829,000. C’ville & UVA are just a 15-20 minute drive, and Pippin Hill Winery, Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie, & The Batesville Market are nearby. Bundoran Farm is a 2,300-acre preservation development built around a working farm operation with underground electric and fiber optics internet. MLS# 607578 $485,000

Recent Properties Sold

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

BETTER THAN NEW CONSTRUCTION

Sabina SabinaMartin Martin

Associate CRS,SRES, SRES,ABR, ABR,GRI GRI AssociateBroker, Broker, CRS, 434.981.1147 434.981.1147 (mobile) (mobile) sabinarmartin@gmail.com sabinarmartin@gmail.com “2018 Salespersonofofthe theYear” Year” “2018Real RealEstate Estate III Salesperson

RealEstateIII.com RealEstateIII.com

FindHome@RealEstateIII.com FindHome@RealEstateIII.com

2216 IVY ROAD, SUITE 210, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22903

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

One of the last homes built by Piedmont Construction before it was bought out, this luxurious home has so many upgraded features including crown moldings, coffered & tray ceilings, a 2-sided stone fireplace in the family room & screened porch, quartz counters, a gas cooktop, walk-in pantry & a gorgeous master suite w/ study, dual fuel heating, a tankless water heater, water filtration and air purification systems & a fabulous backyard. Ready to move in. $834,900

You’ll love coming home to this beautifully built Georgian house with so many wonderful features including five bedrooms, solid oak flooring, crown molding, granite counters, a walk-in pantry, designer kitchen, upstairs laundry room, spacious screened porch & deck, a walk-out basement and a huge yard of nearly 1.5 acres set on a cul-de-sac in a lovely neighborhood close to schools and shopping. Go for a jog or bike ride, or enjoy the community pool, fitness room, tennis court, playground, and fishing pond just a short stroll away. MLS#613974 $865,000


Spring Listings

BAREFOOT FARM

• Comfortable, manageable Keswick Estate • 38 acres, 3 separate parcels • English cottage style main residence • Seperate guest cottage • 6 stall shed row barn • Spectacular private setting with pond • Opposite Castle Hill and adjoins Keswick Vineyard • Glorious westward mountain views and sunsets • $1,795,000

FREE UNION

LAKE ANNA WATERFRONT • • • • • • • •

Country elegance Quality craftmanship Custom built Main floor master suite 4,564 sq. ft. finished living space 10 ft ceilings (2) 3 car garages 3,199 sq ft unfinished basement $1,525,000

LLANDAFF FARM

IN D PE N

D

IN

G

• Western Albemarle • Brick 6,189 sq. ft. residence • 6 bedrooms and 5 baths • 9 ft. ceilings and hardwood floors • Main floor master suite • Private rear screened porch • $819,000

PE N

• Lake Anna parcel • 83 acre parcel • Mix of open pasture and mixed hardwoods • 3,500 linear frontage along Lake Anna • Multiple building sites • Farmhouse, barn sold AS-IS • $2,499,000

CNOC TIRIM G

WIND RIVER

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

• Located in Southern Albemarle • 48 acre turnkey horse property • 3 stall barn and 3 board fenced pastures • Stocked 2 acre lake • 4,300 sq. ft. main residence • Hardwood floors and vaulted ceilings • Remodeled kitchen with quartz counters • Main floor master suite with remodeled bath • 1,897 sq. ft. of road frontage with 11 division rights • $1,250,000

EX N C E LU W SI VE

BROOK HOLLOW EX N C E LU W SI VE

MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

36

• 25 acre Rivanna river front estate • 14 ft. ceilings and hardwood floors • Renovated gourmet kitchen • Burn / green house • Extensive landscaping • $1,185,000

HILLTOP HOUSE IN SCOTTSVILLE • Located within 10 miles of Charlottesville • 19.80 acres offering privacy • 3 rented cottages • Cell tower lease revenue • Annual gross income $46,000+ • $765,000

• Renovated Cape Cod • 4 bedrooms and 3 baths • Finished basement • Separate 2 story masonry building • Additional lot • $425,000

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

stevewhiterealtor.com

27 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville


37 MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

GLENAIRE – WESTERN ALBEMARLE

BRICK RANCH ON 2.677 ACRES

3325 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy 3 BR, 1.5 BA, 1653 SQ FT $204,900 mls 613980 Mike Peters 434-981-3995

655 Harrison Street 4 BR, 3 BA, 2795 SQ FT $425,000 mls 608408 Steve White, 434-242-8355

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME

ENJOY EARLYSVILLE

WESTERN ALBEMARLE

3835 West Drive 4 BR, 3 BA, 3443 SQ FT $625,000 mls 614146 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

5 James Drive Conveniently- multiple lots available From $58,000 mls 614151 Dan Conquest 434-242-8573

Lot 3 Chimney Rock 5.48 acres of beautiful nature and privacy $175,000 mls 608093 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

COMING SOON

VIEW THESE LISTINGS ONLINE

BAREFOOT FARM

STORYBOOK CAPE COD

B Greenwood Road 2.41 wooded acres $144,900 mls 532642 Mike Peters, 434-981-3995

LLANDAFF FARM

4319 Scottsville Road 3 BR, 2 BA, 19.80 acres $765,000 mls 609461 Steve White, 434-242-8355

WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM/RWR-REW-WEEKLY-LISTINGS/

Charlottesville 434.951.5155 | Greene 434.985.2348 | Zion Crossroads 434.589.2611 | Western Albemarle 434.205.4355 WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

445 Glendower Road 3 BR, 3.5 BA, 48.02 Acres $1,250,000 mls 614253 Steve White, 434-242-8355


NOW IS THE TIME TO BUY YOUR

Country Home BY CARLA HUCKABEE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

38

Y

ou’re in good company if you are looking for a Central Virginia farm. Not only is agriculture Virginia’s largest private industry, but our area is also home to the most famous farmer in the world: Joel Salatin, owner of Polyface Farms. Don’t believe it? Ask Siri. Salatin and his Augusta County farm have been featured in Michael Pollen’s 2006 bestseller, The Omnivore’s Dilemma, and the films Food, Inc. and Farmageddon. He gained fame by shunning conventional agricultural practices. And he has been instrumental in changing the face of farming and inspiring others to jump in. Whether or not they’ve heard of Salatin or Polyface, plenty of city dwellers

dream of moving to the country for more space and more land. If you are ready to shift from dreamer to doer, three critical steps will help you successfully make the leap. An expert REALTOR® who knows farms, land, and estates can make the difference between a dream come true and a nightmare. Knowing what you want to accomplish with your expanded acreage will help smooth some bumps. And, whether you’re a buyer or a seller, understanding how to navigate this market will assure you get the best value on either side of the transaction.

Not Just COVID-19 COVID-19 has increased demand for larger lots, acreage, farms, and estates. But the pandemic shouldn’t get all the credit.

Long before anyone heard of COVID19, interest in farming was growing. Slow Food, food sovereignty, regenerative agriculture and farm-to-table movements have been years in the making. These have influenced a new generation of gardeners and farmers who appreciate the impact that even small-scale agriculture can have on our ecosystem. On the heels of those movements, a whole new crop of buyers has emerged. The pandemic just threw gas on the flames. John Ince, REALTOR® with Wiley Real Estate, says “There has been a remarkable surge of interest in farms and estate properties since COVID-19 hit. It’s not just the fear factor of folks wanting to be away from crowded situations but also the realization that working from home is a viable option. That’s a huge game changer that is likely to persist long

after COVID is in our rear-view mirror.” And it moves dreamers into action mode as many are released from having to live close to where they work. These buyers are being driven by a variety of goals. REALTOR® Steve White, with Roy Wheeler Realty Co., knows every client is different. “Some buyers are interested in the extra land so they can have multiple houses to create family compounds. A few are interested in large scale production. But almost everyone has some farming in mind. A chance to grow their own food, be a little healthier, maybe raise a few chickens. The common thread is finding that rural property that is still close to amenities.”

Expert in Your Corner Whether you’re buying or selling, it is important to have a farm and land expert


39 MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

METICULOUS CRAFTSMANSHIP AND TIMELESS FINISHES New Homes in the City of Charlottesville, Albemarle, and Louisa County Decorated model shown by appointment located at 210 Glenleigh Rd, Charlottesville VA 22911 Evergreenhomebuilders.com | 434.282.4584

FEATURE

ONE OF FRANKLIN COUNTY’S FINEST HORSE FARMS IS ON THE MARKET!

This gorgeous Country Estate has 2 Homes: completely remodeled & updated country-Manor home plus a 2013 low-maintenance one-level foreman’s home to care-for & work the Ranch. Nice almost-new Morton 4 stalls/tack & feed rooms with 1/2 BA, in horse Barn; Morton 22x28 Art/Hobby Studio w/pine beams on cathedral ceiling; Morton Hay storage/Maintenance 30x48 Tractor Barn; rustic early 1900’s wooden cowboy cabin; numerous horse run-ins; wood-shed barn, & a fully fenced ARENA riding ring, & multiple gated/fenced pastures, dot the landscape. There are 4 stocked Ponds, and 175 acres of great hunting, on gently rolling, mostly pasture land with tobacco barns & some woods, bordering over 3000’ feet on the Pigg River with a sandy swim-beach!

Reg AndeRson, ABR, GRI REALTOR® Cell: (540), ABR, 580-6960 REG ANDERSON GRI

REALTOR® E-mail: RegAnderson@Realtor.com

www.VirginiaPropertiesAndHomes.com

Cell: (540) 580-6960 www.LeesvilleLakeRealtor.com E-mail: RegAnderson@Realtor.com www.VirginiaPropertiesAndHomes.com Showing SML

untain Lake le Lake

by Boat! 2 Virginia Lakes - 2 Lake Lifestyles

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Great lower riverside land is perfect for corn/crops. 600+ bales of Hay production! Manor house was renovated completely in 2013 with propane-water heated wide-plank wooden floors, and spacious Master Suite and Great room additions. This is truly a very Special Farm! Horse retirement, rescue, or lay-up facility. Located only mins. from iconic Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia’s largest freshwater lake with 500mi. shoreline! MLS# 874616 $1,600,000


MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

40 in your corner. Any agent can sort list-

ings by size, price, and location. That’s not enough if you want to buy land for more than just window dressing or are selling a property with unique agricultural advantages. To expertly navigate your way through transactions involving working acreage or large properties, get a REALTOR® who understands the lay of the land. Pam Dent, REALTOR® with Gayle Harvey Real Estate, Inc., stresses how important it is to align the features of the land, regulations and incentives, with a buyer’s goals. Making a purchase without bringing all three of these together will result in frustration, buyer’s remorse, and missed opportunities. First match what’s possible on a certain property with what the buyer wants to do. Factoring in available programs and incentives in support of those goals can make the buying process easier and perhaps more affordable. A REALTOR® with extensive experience in farm and land sales will be in the best position to make that happen.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

Buyer’s Goals Do you envision a “gentlewoman’s farm,” or do you plan to generate significant revenue from this farm venture? Many buyers are not entering the farms and estates market to generate income. Dent sees a mix of clients, “those seeking privacy, and those wanting to work the land. Some people only want the views and space; others want to enhance their self-sufficiency.” Ince agrees. “For many during this past year, the idea of living out in the country was a new one. As the idea matured in their minds so did the excitement of a new lifestyle with chickens, goats, and a vegetable garden.” Once COVID-related events made relocation possible or more desirable, a whole new group of potential landowners entered the market. Buying acreage can trigger different opportunities, depending on how it is categorized. Jacob Gilley, with American Farmland Trust, explains why the definition of a farm is usually set at a bare minimum. He says the bar is set low on

“Suddenly, the roles are reversed. Buyers want as much land as they can afford. There has been an amazing uptick in sales, interest, and pricing in the last 12-18 months.” purpose. “It allows landowners to take advantage of different tax incentives and sustainability programs to protect farmland and support farmers. Government cash share programs for fencing, cover crops and sustainable practices can help a new farmer get started.” Gilley co-owns Heaven’s Hollow Farm with his wife Jennifer in Madison County. If a land-based enterprise generates as little as $1,000 worth of sales per year it

can be classified as a farm in Madison County. By comparison, Polyface Farm in Augusta County generates several million dollars per year. Marketing directly to consumers and agritourism have multiplied the opportunities for farmers to profit from their land. The Nelson 151 Craft Beverage Trail shows how lucrative winery, brewery, and other beverage tours can be. Farm-to-table dinners right on the

farm are increasingly popular. Horse farms market group rides. Harvest Hosts, HipCamp and other platforms make it easy for campers to overnight in farmbased locations. As an event site, Cole’s Greene Acres farms in Greene county hosts everything from weddings to picnics. A Better Way Farm & Goat Dairy in Waynesboro offers tours and a “goat herd share” program for fresh raw milk. Local farmers supply restaurants with microgreens and other produce. These and other creative enterprises can provide non-traditional income for farmers. You don’t need to be the next Joel Salatin. But knowing where your interests lie and what your priorities are before buying is important. Having that conversation with the right REALTOR® is crucial. With that information in hand, she can help you acquire a property that will support those dreams.

Inventory Driving the Market In 2021 inventory is the name of the game. White remembers the 2008-2009 real estate crash that sent owners of large properties selling. “They realized they didn’t need all this land and sold as prices plummeted. The farm and estate land market has never really recovered from that crash. Until now. “Suddenly, the roles are reversed. Buyers want as much land as they can afford. There has been an amazing uptick in


AUCTION Friday, Apr.9 at 1PM

April

9

Friday

601 Bridge St Danville, VA

41 MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

Annie Gould Gallery

FORECL O S U R E

74-Unit Apartment Community Auction will be held at The Institute for Advanced Learning & Research 150 Slayton Ave, Danville, VA

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville.

Bridge Street Side

109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

Attractive Interior

Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

LACKEY LANE

Unique Fixer Upper! Circa 1930’s Railroad House in Covesville. Lovely double front porches. First floor is a separate apartment. Second floor, which is accessed from the back, is at ground level. Come out to see the possibilities! Can be purchased with 1 acre at $185,000 or with 50 acres for $375,00

Attractive Interior

OLD TRAIL DRIVE

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

TERMS SUMMARY: A bidder’s deposit of $150,000 (in the form of a cashier’s check payable to “David Lingerfelt, Substitute Trustee”) is required to bid. Successful bidder must execute Foreclosure Sale Agreement immediately after the sale. Closing to occur within 30 days. Closing can be extended an additional 21 days if buyer adds $150,000 to the non-refundable deposit and presents a commitment letter from a lender satisfactory to the Trustee. No buyer’s premium will be charged. Full terms and conditions available online.

CONTACT Mike Torrence TRF Auctions 434-847-7741

TRF

AUCTIONS

Torrence, Read, & Forehand

Rick Read CBC Read & Co. 434-455-2285

Colliers Int’l Multifamily Advisors 804-320-5500

TRFAuctions.com 434-847-7741 101 Annjo Court, Forest, VA 24551 | VAAF501

PRINT ADVERTISING

has

MUSCLE!

CALL 434.817.9330 TO GIVE YOUR AD UMPH!

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Move In Ready! One level living in Old Trail! Energy efficient home with partially finished basement. Looks deceivingly small from the outside yet there is over 5,000 sq. ft. expertly designed to fit a variety of needs. 6” Castilian walnut floors, large rooms, sizable closets, custom master closet, deep front porch and lovely patio. This home is perfect for entertaining, working and learning remotely. Come visit in person or ask for a virtual tour through FaceTime. Owner is RE agent. $626,000

FEATURE

Prime Location

Selling for David Lingerfelt, Substitute Trustee Property: 601 Bridge St, Danville, VA (tax parcel 21459) Type: Occupied Apartment Building - 74 units Occupancy: 93%, opportunity to fill vacancies at mkt rate Buildings: Two historic buildings adapted for reuse: the Tobacco Company Cigar Factory, circa 1894, and the Waddill Printing Company, circa 1926. Redeveloped into apartments in 2004 with two stair and elevator towers added to connect the buildings and provide full ADA accessibility. Size: 87,704 sq.ft. on 1.7 acres Features: secured entry access, elevators, community room, patio terrace, 24hr maintenance, on-site mgmt. Location: Very attractive location w/ much to offer tenants • Adjacent to the popular Riverwalk Trail • One block from Averett University’s Riverview Campus • Near restaurants, breweries, shops, & attractions incl. the Science Center, Community Mkt, Carrington Pavilion, etc Tax Assm’t: $7,259,000 Value-Add: Foreclosure removes rent restrictions giving an outstanding opportunity to increase rents to market rate. After 3 years, restrictions are removed completely. AGENT ON SITE (appt req’d - call or visit website) • Tue, Mar.23, Noon-4PM • Tue, Mar.30, Noon-4PM • Tue, Apr.6, Noon-4PM • Other dates avail. by appt. DIR TO PROPERTY: Main St. to Memorial Dr. 1/4mi to L on Newton St to R on Bridge St. Property on left.


MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

42

Peter McFarren REALTOR® 202.341.4422 petermcfarren@gmail.com

Spring Is a Great Time To Make a Move Not Sure Where to Start? I invite you to give me a call for a “meet and greet” to answer your questions and help you make your next move. While assisting you in a sale or purchase of your home, my ambition is to make the process go smoothly and as stress-free as possible and help you receive the best value for your investment.

I’d love to share current housing information with you. Visit my website and sign up for my newsletters:

petermcfarren.myhomehq.biz

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

500 Westfield Rd. Charlottesville, VA

ROCK BRANCH Horse and Cattle

Lessons, Boarding, Trail Rides & Parties www.rbhorseandcattle.com info@rbhorseandcattle.com rbhorse_cattle

The market for farms and estates has quickly caught up to the general residential real estate market. It’s becoming more and more of a seller’s market, threatening to leave buyers out in the cold this spring. sales, interest, and pricing in the last 12-18 months.” The market for farms and estates has quickly caught up to the general residential real estate market. It’s becoming more and more of a seller’s market, threatening to leave buyers out in the cold this spring. One of White’s clients had his property on the market for more than three months with not much action. “All of sudden I had three showings in the same day and two cash offers.” Dent too has seen parcels sit static for months, then there may be a dozen showings in a week and multiple offers. Ince sees the same trend. “While the residential inventory has been low for the past 24 months, there was still a reasonable selection of country properties on the market, especially if one was willing to look in our surrounding counties. The first quarter of 2021 has been a different story with multiple offers coming in and some sales well above asking price. We have a perfect storm for a continued seller’s market in the near future, but those who have been in the business long enough know what happens when escalating prices get out of hand.” This market should encourage anyone who is considering downsizing from their large country properties to make the move now. Ince expects to soon see those stalled property listings come to market. “Buyers can expect some new inventory this spring so we may see some balancing out as 2021 matures.” While the inventory is buoying prices, Ince says, “Low interest rates continue to be a strong driver which has been incentivizing buyers, making them more willing to pay higher prices.”

The Opportunity is Now Ince advises that this is the ideal time to close the deal. “The most important thing for buyers and sellers to consider right now is that this is opportunity time. Sellers can expect a robust turnout for a new listing priced in the sweet spot, while buyers can get a loan with monthly payments making that higher price pal-

atable. It’s rare to have such significant advantages for both sides of a transaction so we should have a very active market for the rest of 2021.” With favorable interest rates, unprecedented direct-to-consumer marketing opportunities, and expanding resources for protecting farmland, this may be the best time to jump into the farm scene. Be assured the Shenandoah Valley Young Farmers Coalition is cheering you on. French Price is part of the Coalition’s leadership team and works for Virginia Cooperative Extension. “Many of our members farm a few acres or want to start but struggle to find affordable land. Most of us garden. It’s amazing to see the mentoring that happens between farms of varying sizes whenever we can get together.” Dividing farm property can provide an opportunity. Last year, a Florida investor bought an operating farm near Gilley. “His plan is to eventually break it up into 40-acre farmettes that give smaller operators a foothold. I also see more non-operating landowners who keep the farm but lease it to someone that will work the land and treat it with respect.” In a nutshell, COVID-19 unleashed interested buyers. Low mortgage rates help justify the decision to buy. And the direct-to-consumer market is creating new paths to profitability. White says “For sellers, it’s one of the best markets in the last 15 years. They can finally get their price.” And for buyers, Dent helps them look at each available parcel with a creative eye. “Perhaps it doesn’t have everything you want, but does it have the basics and give you a workable entry point?” If you find something that works, you’ll be hooked. Ince enjoys being part of this movement. “From condo to country is a wonderful transition to be a part of and I have yet to see anyone take a step back once begun.” Carla Huckabee writes about high-performing real estate.


43

202 Azalea Dr | Charlottesville

1600 Ricky Rd | Charlottesville

First time offered on the market! This charming property located in the heart of Frys Spring offers 3 BR and 1.5 BA on a finished basement complete with two full kitchens! Located on city bus line & is an easy commute to UVA.

Lovely 5 BR home conveniently located near Barracks Road and UVA. Tastefully updated and well maintained. Beautiful Hardwood Flooring throughout the main level. Finished basement, fenced yard, large deck and garage.

Conveniently located, yet tucked away on a quiet cul-de-sac in Raintree, this one level home has 3 BRs and 2 BAs, and has many recent quality updates by current owners. Level rear yard with privacy fence, screened porch, and garage.

$385,000 | montaguemiller.com/614222 Dana Watson | 434.996.2700

$385,000 | montaguemiller.com/614663 Pat Sury | 434.760.2999

$375,000 | montaguemiller.com/614649 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

YOUR PLACE. OUR PURPOSE.

1497 Shadow Oaks Pl | Charlottesville

MONTAGUEMILLER.COM | 800.793.5393 | CHARLOTTESVILLE | AMHERST | MADISON | CULPEPER | ORANGE

Proudly serving Central Virginia’s real estate needs for over seventy years!

Congratulations

to our Charlottesville agents who have earned the

Code of Ethics Training Commitment to Excellence Endorsement Commitment to Excellence (C2EX) from the National Association of REALTORS® empowers REALTORS® to evaluate, enhance and showcase their highest levels of professionalism while serving clients and other REALTORS®

Carol Costanzo

Pam Drumheller

John Farmer

Pat Sury

434.260.8980

434.760.2999

Kelly Faillace

Trish Owens

Anita Dunbar

Lauren Padlo

434.962.4740

434.825.5393

434.981.1421

434.234.4461

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

434.962.1419

434.951.7139


MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

44

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers FOOTHILLS FARM

VERULAM FARM

Landmark estate just west of University of Virginia on 500 acres. Classic home of the highest standards with elegant spaces, 5 bedroom suites, formal gardens, pool, cottage, event barn, and bold mountain views creating a one-of-a-kind offering. MLS#597954 Andrew Middleditch, 434.981.1410

AVENTADOR

MERIDIEN

Private, peaceful, and perfect—a sophisticated country estate offering stunning Blue Ridge views from just over 40 rolling acres, 9 miles NW of Charlottesville. c. 1840, character-rich yet modernized home with 5 BR and 3.5 BA. Under conservation easement. MLS#613521 $3,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

JOHNSON HOUSE

3-BR, 2-BA Virginia farmhouse nestled in historic district of Covesville, located only 14 miles south of Charlottesville. Mostly open front pasture with nice pond in front. Remainder of acreage is wooded to top of back ridge. Century Link internet. MLS#613228 $516,500 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610

U

N D

ER

C O N

T

R AC

T

Magnificent Georgian home with over 10,000 finished square feet, 6 bedrooms, 6 full and 2 half baths, main-level master, eat-in kitchen. Guest home, and 296+ acres with panoramic pastoral and mountain views. MLS#602894 $4,750,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.AventadorVA.com

Private, peaceful, and scenic with idyllic setting and views! Comprised of 170 acres of pristine farmland with a charming c. 1921, 4-BR farmhouse. Features original hardwood flooring with modern updates including central HVAC system and connection for a whole-house generator. Separate 1-BR, 1-BA apartment/guest quarters above the 2-bay detached garage. Land is a wonderful mix of open, gently rolling farmland and hardwood forests. Currently used as a cattle farm, the property includes a barn and additional outbuildings. MLS#613650 $1,585,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FARMINGTON

1954 Milton Grigg 8-bedroom residence on over 2.5 acres. Fronting the 17th fairway in Farmington, offering a quality-built home, gorgeous setting, and prime location only minutes to UVA and Downtown. MLS#606911 $4,950,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WALNUT HILLS

HISTORIC Georgian Revival mansion built c.1878 by Gov. James Kemper on 373 splendid acres, guest cottage, and a complement of farm buildings. Long frontage on Rapidan River. MLS#574009 $3,490,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455 www.WalnutHillsVa.com

TOTIER HILLS FARM

Exquisite brick mansion, superb quality construction and features in over 9,000 finished square feet. On 98 gently rolling acres with total privacy, a stream, and pond. 5 minutes to shops, 15 miles to UVA. MLS#600284 $2,700,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.TotierHillsFarm.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

GLENDOWER ROAD

PRICED SIGNIFICANTLY UNDER COUNTY ASSESSED VALUE! Classic 4-bedroom home, privately situated on 5 private acres only 15 miles south of Charlottesville and the University of Virginia. Well-built home features hardwood floors, generous main-level master suite, open floor plan, plus full walkout terrace level, wrap-around covered porch and large open deck in the back, with great views of expansive, mostly open and level back yard with garden space. MLS#604475 $599,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

WOODLANDS

Beautifully restored 1760s Colonial home with 4 BR, 3 full & 2 half BA on 293 acres in Northampton County. Property has access to deep water on the Machipongo River which flows into the Chesapeake Bay. Easy access to the Atlantic Bay! Rare offering. MLS#614051 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


45

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CRAWFORD’S KNOB

An opportunity to own a deeded nature preserve protected in perpetuity, a chance to purchase and hold wilderness, and to leave it largely unaltered. This property is ideal for the passive enjoyment of wild lands and the conservation minded buyer. MLS#608893 $1,900,000 Will Carr, 434.981.3065

GREENTREES

188+ acres in Albemarle, 12 miles south of Charlottesville on Rt 20. This wooded tract, mostly in planted pines, offers long road with potential for eight 21-acre lots. There is conservation easement potential. MLS#614109 $1,400,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

KESWICK COUNTRY CLUB

Bordering (Full Cry)Pete Dye golf course and lake, within grounds of Keswick Hall, 5-star luxury resort, is this magnificent 5-bedroom residence constructed of the finest materials with attention to every detail. MLS#603398 $4,200,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.FairwayDriveAtKeswick.com

CHURCH POINT FARM

944 acres along the lower Chickahominy River with 8 miles of shoreline. The property consists of marsh, farmland, woods, and cypress swamp and is managed for waterfowl, deer, turkey, and dove. Features 3-BR brick dwelling. MLS#2036779 $3,960,000 Philip Reed, 804.833.8325 www.churchpointfarm.com

FACTORY MILL ROAD

Great 36 acre wooded lot with exceptional privacy, ideal for residential construction. Easy access to I-64 and Route 250 and 20 minutes to Short Pump. Good road frontage on state road and mostly level land. NO HOA. MLS#613845 $295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living within 20 miles of Charlottesville, 14 miles to CHO Airport. 177 private acres with c.1901 classic Virginia farm house, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#609244 $3,795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BURNLEY ROAD

Choose your builder and build your dream home on one of 3 private lots in Northern Albemarle. 5+ to 9+ acres. Exceptional Blue Ridge Mtn. views with privacy. Close proximity to NGIC, airport, shopping, and University Research Park. Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

EXCEPTIONAL LARGE ACREAGE

2 wonderful estate parcels in coveted Ragged Mtn. Farm. Excellent building sites, complete privacy, beautiful Blue Ridge Mountain views. Murray/Henley/ Western Albemarle school districts. 84.79 acres: MLS#563174 $995,000; 100.22 acres: MLS#563171 $1,100,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

ASHCROFT

Stunning mountain views abound throughout this bright, spacious, 4-BR residence. Privately tucked on 2.26 acres adjoining common space. Located minutes from Pantops, UVA, and all Charlottesville has to offer. MLS#607638 $1,145,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

46

HOME SALES Live STATS It Up ENDING THE WEEK OF MARCH 14, 2021 THERE WERE 70 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 23 were in Albemarle with an average price of $445,886 n 8 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $457,250 n 12 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $281,693 n 3 were in Greene with an average price of $302,817 n 8 were in Louisa with an average price of $324,735 n 3 were in Madison with an average price of $329,667 n 6 were in Nelson with an average price of $514,163 n 6 were in Staunton with an average price of $204,733 n 1 was in Waynesboro with a price of $314,000

HOMES SOLD

THE 1465 WICKHAM POND DR WICKHAM POND

941 ROSSER LANE RUGBY HILLS

3318 CARYS CREEK ROAD FORK UNION

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

256 WESTON ROAD LOUISA

6956 N SEMINOLE TRL LEON

75 LENTZ LANE SHIPMAN

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47 MARCH 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3011

New!

LAUREL CLIFF FARM

4010 W HOOVER ROAD

MONROE | $5,500,000

R E VA | $ 1 , 3 9 0, 0 0 0

162 mostly-open acre farm located amongst other large farms in beautiful Madison County. The land is predominantly rolling pastures, all recently fenced, and cross fenced with high tensile, currently used for cattle and hay production. Solidly constructed, charming farmhouse (c. 1830) has new metal roof and gutters but is in need of renovation. Great Blue Ridge mountain views, including Old Rag mountain. 15 minutes northwest of the town of Madison.

Wonderful views of the Southwest Mountains. Land is mostly open pasture with three excellent building sites, good road frontage and two entrances. Property is fenced, currently used for grazing. Electricity on property, well, and automatic waterer for livestock. Priced to sell.

Located in beautiful Amherst County, a private 1,292-acre farm estate with stunning panoramic mountain views. Laurel Cliff is ideal for the buyer wanting a large tract, with no conservation easement, to create a family compound, or retreat. Land is mix of open farmland and hardwood forest, with numerous streams and two ponds (one which is 8 acres). Brick 1929 manor house, two tenant homes and multiple barns. One hour south of Charlottesville, this property offers great privacy and proximity to two regional airports.

J U ST IN WIL E Y | 4 3 4 9 8 1 5 5 28 | M LS 6 1 41 7 5

JUSTI N WI LEY | 43 4 98 1 5528 | M L S 6 0 26 7 1

JU STIN WILE Y | 434 981 552 8 | MLS 610127

58 ACRES • MADISON RUN ROAD ORANGE | $395,000

CHARLOTTE S VILLE 434 293 3900

WILEYPROPERT Y.COM

ORANG E 540 672 39 03

Three exceptional lots in Bundoran Farm!

21 ACRES • HIGHTOP DRIVE

42 ACRES • WINSOME ORCHARD LN

NORTH GARDEN | $495,000

NORTH GARDEN | $425,000

NORTH GARDEN | $615,000

Exceptional Bundoran Farm homesite, outstanding views, 15-acre equestrian potential. Elevated homesite looks eastward over rolling pasture to the mountains across Edge Valley. Open market debut for this parcel that boasts direct access to the Farm’s 14-mile trail system. High speed internet, 15 mins to Charlottesville / UVA.

Excellent value in Bundoran. Protected homesite with views across your own horse pasture to the protected forest beyond. Electric and fiber optic to the lot. H7 is designated as an equestrian lot. Owners will have access to 14 miles of riding and hiking trails across 2300 acres of Bundoran Farm. 15 minutes from Charlottesville and UVA.

One of the most spectacular vistas in Bundoran— over the protected Edge Valley to Israel Mountain Range and beyond. Easy access to the Tom Mountain trailhead. Miles of trails, fiber optic internet, complete serenity all within 15 minutes of Charlottesville. Parcel is an equestrian lot which would allow the owner to have horses.

PE T E R W IL E Y | 4 3 4 4 22 20 9 0 | M LS 6 1 0 1 9 6

P ETER WI LEY | 43 4 422 2090 | M L S 6 1 0 3 7 9

PE T E R WILE Y | 434 42 2 2 090 | MLS 6045 34

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

22 ACRES • BUNDORAN DRIVE


ANOTHER HARD SELTZER? YEAH, BUT WE’VE GOT ANTIOXIDANT VITAMIN C.

CELEBRATE RESPONSIBLY®

©2021 MOLSON COORS BEVERAGE CO., FORT WORTH, TX • FLAVORED BEER

Profile for C-VILLE Weekly

C-VILLE Weekly | March 17 - 23, 2021  

C-VILLE Weekly | March 17 - 23, 2021  

Advertisement