C-VILLE Weekly | February 14 - 20, 2024

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Charlottesville High School's interim principal brings immense experience to role PAGE 11 Enjoy the silence: Albemarle CiderWorks' new book club lets you read in peace PAGE 31

HA IK US FROM TH E HE ART

Check out this year's winners!

FEBRUARY 14 – 20, 2024 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

PAGE 46

Rescuing Reid's The community comes together to save a Charlottesville institution

r e C m a mp m u S Guide

INSIDE

Pages 34-39


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WEEKLY SPECIALS Mondays-Fridays Wine & Food Specials Live Music by Old Age & Treachery 2/19

Wednesdays

Thursdays Thursday Night Music Series Live Music 5-8PM -or- Music Bingo 6-8PM $5 Glasses Of Wine, Beer & Cider and Chip Flights

Upbeat & Fun Bands Every Saturday Night

Gather your friends and family and join us for live music that you’ll want to dance to! Plus, sit back and enjoy your favorite glass of wine, beer or cider along with delicious food, an extensive non-alcoholic menu, and great options for kids and the whole family. Saturday, February 10: Cake Fight | 5-8PM Saturday, February 17: The Wavelength | 5-8PM Saturday, February 24: Kat & The Travelers | 5-8PM Saturday, March 2: Zuzu’s Hot 5 | 5-8PM Saturday, March 9: Jackson, Pendergrass & Townsend | 5-8PM

SCAN FOR WINERY CALENDAR

Fridays Live Music 5-8PM Every Friday Barrels & Tanks Tasting Pop Up - Kick Off Event 2/16 (See calendar for details & future dates of the tasting pop up.)

Saturdays

Sundays Music Bingo 2/11, 2/25, 3/17, 3/31 Paint & Sip 2/18, 3/10, 3/24 Maker’s Market 3/3, 4/14

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Live Music All Day Every Saturday: Live Music 1-4PM Eastwood After Dark: Fun & Lively Bands 5-8PM

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

Chef Tasting Series 2/21 Rosé Blending Workshop 3/6 10% Off Bottles Every Wednesday

Eastwood After Dark


INSIDE THIS ISSUE

4

A little

V.36, No. 7

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY P.O. Box 119 Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

told

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Richard DiCicco richard@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny tami@c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

birdie

EDITORIAL

NEWS REPORTER Catie Ratliff reporter@c-ville.com

FEATURE 22

CULTURE

Can Reid’s be saved?

29 Feedback: Chatting with Sunny War ahead of her Front Porch show.

Community rallies behind downtown grocery store.

facebook.com/cville.weekly February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

31 Tried it in C’ville: Albemarle CiderWorks’ Silent Book Club. 33 Pages: Ben Sloan weighs in on his second book of poetry. 40 Sudoku

NEWS

us...

27

9

41 Crossword

11 Who is CHS interim principal Kenny Leatherwood?

42 Free Will Astrology

13 Real Estate Weekly: Implementation of city’s new zoning code is delayed.

P.S.

CLASSIFIED 43 46

Haikus from the Heart

COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Faith Goalder MAGAZINE EDITOR Caite Hamilton CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Matt Dhillon, Carol Diggs, Brielle Entzminger, Mary Esselman, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Will Ham, Erika Howsare, Justin Humphreys, Kristin O’Donoghue, Lisa Provence, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Julia Stumbaugh, Courteney Stuart, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Max March max@c-ville.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Gabby Kirk (434) 373-2136 gabby@c-ville.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Brittany Keller brittany@c-ville.com Sarah Smith sarah@c-ville.com DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

BUSINESS PUBLISHER Anna Harrison anna@c-ville.com OPERATIONS MANAGER Maddie Donegan maddie@c-ville.com

There’s a whole bunch of news you’re missing! Follow @cville_weekly, and @cville_culture to get the latest scoop on what’s going down in Charlottesville.

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Debbie Miller debbie@c-ville.com A/R SPECIALIST Nanci Winter (434) 373-0429 CIRCULATION MANAGER Billy Dempsey circulation@c-ville.com

C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle, and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2024 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

Virginia Press Association


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BROUGHT T O YOU BY HARMONY WINE, EAS T W OOD FARM AND WINERY & C AS TLE HILL CIDER

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

People's Choice Rosé W ine Competition | D J Double U | Local W iner ies Beatrix Ost Ar t Installation | Varieties of Wine and Cider | Shopping Experience W ine Education Sessions | À La Car te Menu Selections by The Cater ing Outf it


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THIS WEEK

Hello, Charlottesville! Thank you for reading C-VILLE Weekly. All across America, small businesses help make up the fabric of close-knit communities. From familyowned mom-and-pops to the latest venture by a local entrepreneur, small businesses bring color and character to all sorts of markets and neighborhoods. Our city is no different, and in this week’s cover story (p.22) we highlight a local store that’s suffered the impacts of an aging customer base and a worldwide pandemic, and whose community is rallying support to keep it afloat. Reid’s Super-Save Market on Preston Avenue has been called a Charlottesville institution, and this week Carol Diggs spoke with the owners about the store’s recent plight of empty shelves and thinning crowds—and the creator of a GoFundMe raising money to save it. Reid’s has a decades-long legacy in the city and has remained a family business, but does that mean that it deserves donations to keep it going amid all the other causes in Charlottesville worth contributing to? So far the GoFundMe has more than doubled the $10,000 goal initially set, so it’s clear that some people think Reid’s is worth their support. Also this week, be sure to check our back page for Haikus from the Heart contest results. We got a lovely crop of romantic poems this year, and are excited to share them with you. Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone!—Richard DiCicco

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

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2.14.23

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RESIDENCY EVERY THURSDAY IN FEBRUARY

02-23 | CHATHAM RABBITS WITH CALEB CAUDLE

02-24 | COLE CHANEY LEGENDS & VERSE 2024 WITH ABBY HAMILTON 02-25 | CHLOË ESTER, CLOUDBELLY, AND TROUT BASELINE 02-29 | KENDALL STREET COMPANY

We JUST got in the popular Free Fly clothing line The Angler is the only local Filson dealer and JUST got our biggest shipment We have NEW Smith sunglasses & Costa is 50% off! We are getting new Rods, Waders, Bags and more weekly!

RESIDENCY EVERY THURSDAY IN FEBRUARY

03-01 | LYAO STANDUP WITH TANAEL JOACHIM 03-09 | THE SPIRIT BALL FT. PLEASE DON’T TELL WITH CHARMING DISASTER, NOUVEAU VINTAGE PLUS DJ CADYBUG

03-12 | TOW‘RS WITH A BOY AND HIS KITE

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PRESENTED BY 97.5 3WV 02-24| MADI DIAZ: THE WEIRD FAITH TOUR WITH OLIVIA BARTON 03-01| DONNA THE BUFFALO 03-02| THE WEIGHT BAND 03-03| ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONESTHE ANGELS IN SCIENCE FICTION TOUR WITH SUGADAISY

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Limited tickets at New Dominion Bookshop and Greenberry’s, Barracks Road

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

START MAKING SENSE A TRIBUTE TO TALKING HEADS

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Tickets available at the UVa Arts Box Office (scan QR code).

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“I have had pneumonia for the past three weeks. While not contagious, that has slowed me down significantly. I am feeling much better and am enjoying the work of the legislative session.”

9

—State Sen. Creigh Deeds in a February 11 email about the fifth week of the legislative session.

NEWS

On principal PAGE 11

IN BRIEF

Diving in University of Virginia swimmers made waves over the weekend, with wins at both the World Aquatics Championships and the Cavalier Invite. And in Doha, Qatar, the Cavaliers have three medals at press time, including a world record gold in the 200m medley by alumna Kate Douglass. Other achievements include silver and bronze medals won by second-year Claire Curzen and third-year Jack Aikins, respectively. At home, the Hoos swam to 23 first places at the Cavalier Invite.

Högwaller Brewing is honoring late founder Wilson “Will” Richey with another beer, Merci Mr. Richey. The brew, made in collaboration with Basic City Beer Company, launched February 8 and is available for a limited time on tap and in a four pack. The French-inspired Pilsner follows Högwaller Brewing’s release of a lager named Ode to a Nightingale, in honor of the Charlottes­ ville restaurateur.

FILE PHOTO

Brewing bravo

Remains of the day

EZE AMOS

The late Will Richey has been honored with a new beer called Merci Mr. Richey.

The University of Virginia men’s basketball team’s hot streak came to an end on February 13 with an upset 74-63 loss to the University of Pittsburgh. The Hoos' defeat marks the end of an eight-game winning streak, and is the first time the Cavs have lost at John Paul Jones Arena since December 2022. UVA returns to the court at noon on February 17 for a home game against Wake Forest.

Make camp The Charlottesville Department of Parks and Rec opened up summer camp registration for city residents on February 12. Programs are available for all children ages 5 to 12, with a focus on providing both educational and recreational opportunities for local youth. From June 17 to July 26, the city is offering summer day camps at $95 per week for residents and $150 per week for

non-residents. Programs include Camp Shenandoah, for rising first through fourth graders, and Camp Blue Ridge, for rising fifth through seventh graders. Both camps run from 7:30am to 5:30pm, include breakfast and lunch, and will have a different theme each week for repeat campers. The city is also offering a new program at the end of the summer: Ultimate

Adventure Camp runs from July 29 to August 9. Registration for the field trip-packed option opens March 11, with a cost of $125 per week for residents and $150 a week for non-residents. For more information on summer camps—including accessibility accommodations and scholarship information—visit charlottesville.gov/389/Summer-Camps.

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Alley-oops

same area. A vast majority of these animals were killed in vehicle collisions outside of hunting season, making them ineligible for personal collection under the current law. Wilt’s proposed legislation would allow “any deer, bear, turkey, or elk that appears to have been killed in a collision with a motor vehicle to be claimed by and awarded to any person” and open up collection of carcasses beyond hunting season. Though interested parties still must verify an animal’s death and get permission from author​​ities before taking the carcass, the bill opens up the doors for more remains to be collected by residents rather than VDOT. Though the bill passed the House with 98 yeas and one abstention, it must be approved by the state Senate and governor before it can go into effect. HB 1025 was referred to the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Conservation, and Natural Resources on February 7, and a senate-wide vote on the legislation has not been scheduled at press time.

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

P

assing by the occasional roadkill is nothing new for Virginia motorists. But under new legislation passed by the House of Delegates on February 6, drivers may soon be able to take home more roadkill carcasses. The legislation—House Bill 1025, introduced by Republican Del. Tony Wilt—would expand who can take home what carcasses and when. Currently, Virginia drivers are required to report roadkill to either a conservation officer or law enforcement, and remains may only be claimed by the driver of the vehicle involved in the crash. Present law further restricts the collection of roadkill to deer and bear during their respective hunting season. Since the end of hunting season this year, 16 deer have been recovered from Albemarle County roadways, according to wildlife carcass removal data from the Virginia Department of Transportation. Between January 8, 2023, and press time, VDOT reports collecting remains of 320 deer and 12 bears from the


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NEWS 11

Stepping up CHS interim principal brings experience and connections to role By Yasu Shinozaki

EZE AMOS

“K

Though Kenneth Leatherwood was raised in Tennessee, Charlottesville High School’s interim principal built his career in education here in town, starting as a social studies teacher and basketball coach in the 1970s.

“He told his office … ‘I need to be out for two days. My school’s in trouble. I want to go and see if I can help,’” Burke says. “And so he was here for two days, and he was here because he loves the school and he loves Kenny Leatherwood.” While Burke emphasizes that changes to the school’s atmosphere could not be attributed to one factor, she notes that CHS has felt calmer since Leatherwood stepped in as principal. Leatherwood says he’s happy with the progress that has been made since the reset, but added that his role as an interim principal was not to make major or permanent changes, but rather to provide consistency and stability. Burke and Wainwright say the role of interim principal has been difficult for others in the past, but Leatherwood’s familiarity with the school, its faculty, and its student body has helped. Leatherwood says his primary strengths as principal lie in his ability to connect with students and staff. As a teacher, Burke says she feels supported by Leatherwood. “He’s very much a teacher’s principal,” she says. “He wants the teachers to do well. He wants them to build relationships with the

kids. He wants to support them. He’s fiercely loyal to his staff and to the teachers that work with him.” The school is in the process of searching for a permanent principal to begin in fall 2024. Both Wainwright and Burke say they would like someone with experience and who would commit to serving in the position a long time. Wainwright says he’d like “somebody from the community, possibly. [Someone] that knows Charlottesville, because Charlottesville is a different animal. Anybody that comes from outside moving in, it takes a while to sort of figure out how this works.” Leatherwood says a lot has changed since he arrived at CHS. In 1977, the minimum age to buy tobacco products was 16 and there was a designated smoking area for students. Over the years, he’s seen many clothing and hairstyles come and go, and some return. But a lot, he says, remains the same. “I’ll just say that kids are kids and students are students,” he says. According to Leatherwood, this will be his last role in the Charlottesville City Schools—though he’s said that before.

“He’s very much a teacher’s principal. ... He’s fiercely loyal to his staff and to the teachers that work with him.” LOIS BURKE, CHARLOTTESVILLE HIGH SCHOOL

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know a lot of people. And I think that’s made the difference here.” Leatherwood arrived most recently at CHS in the midst of November’s “hard reset,” which was spearheaded by the school administration after numerous fights and other incidents resulted in teachers calling in sick and the school closing for three days. Wainwright and Burke both say Leatherwood’s connections to the school and community helped ease tension in the aftermath. “It was almost like the building took a sigh,” Burke says. “Everybody knows him in the community, even though he wasn’t born here. … I think that he’s just such a part of the community that people feel really comfortable with him and they know that he’s going to call it like he sees it. And as a teacher, that’s the way he was with me in all of his roles. He was very honest and upfront.” Burke says Leatherwood’s connections helped mobilize many community members to get involved in helping the school. During the hard reset, volunteers would walk the halls to provide support to students. She mentioned one former student and son of a former teacher who took time off from his Richmond job to volunteer.

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

enny grew up in Charlottesville,” says Lois Burke, who has worked with Charlottesville High School interim principal Kenneth Leatherwood for many years. This isn’t literally true, she clarifies. Leatherwood was raised in Tennessee and moved to Charlottesville when he was in his early 20s. But almost all of Leatherwood’s decadeslong career as an educator and administrator has been in Charlottesville City Schools. He started at CCS in 1977, when he was hired as a social studies teacher and JV basketball coach at Charlottesville High School. Leatherwood, who played basketball in college, went on to become head coach in 1981. He also served as social studies department chair and assistant athletic director. In the late ’80s he took a position as dean of students, and in 1993 he gave up coaching to become assistant principal. In 2003, Leatherwood became CHS principal and served in the position until 2008. After that, he worked for human resources at the central office and as director of the alternative educational institution Henry Avenue Learning Center, later renamed Lugo-McGinness Academy. He retired in 2013. Since leaving CCS, he has returned to serve in numerous interim capacities: assistant principal of Clark Elementary, and principal of Venable Elementary, Greenbriar Elementary, and Walker Upper Elementary. Most recently, he stepped in at CHS after former principal Rashaad Pitt resigned in November. Many students and faculty were familiar with Leatherwood, 69, before he returned to CHS last fall. Juniors and seniors remember him as their principal at Walker, while others knew him from when they were in elementary school at Greenbriar or Clark. Some current CHS teachers had him as a teacher or principal when they were high school students. Others recall working with him. “I have great relationships with people from over the years,” Leatherwood says. “I talked to a lady today, she works with a nonprofit. … I didn’t have any idea who she was at the time. And it turned out, I was her history teacher in 1980, 1983 … and she remembered the class. She told me she appreciated me being here. … It made me feel pretty good about the relationships that I’ve built over the years and I guess that’s part of who I am.” CHS teacher Lester Wainwright says Leatherwood’s community connections go beyond Charlottesville City Schools. “He’s from the community,” Wainwright says. “He’s big into his church and his wife [is] also. And so … they have Sunday dinners … and a lot of people come, so they


February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

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13

Real Estate Weekly

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City Council moves up the timeline for review of new projects

New City Counselor Natalie Oschrin says she finds it strange that the development code is retroactive.

By Sean Tubbs

A

s part of the adoption of the development code on December 18, 2023, a divided City Council set a date of August 31 for when projects would be reviewed under the new rules and would be subject to new affordability requirements. Councilor Natalie Oschrin was in the audience as a community member in December, but she was on the dais on February 5. “I thought it was very strange that it was retroactive and it was a 3-2, and if I had been up here that day, it would have been a 3-2 vote in the other direction,” says Oschrin, who was sworn in at the end of 2023. The Charlottesville Area Development Roundtable sent a letter to council requesting that the date be moved to December 18. City Councilors Michael Payne and Lloyd Snook disagreed out of a concern that the city would lose millions that would be paid into the Charlottesville Affordable Housing Fund under higher pay-in-lieu fees under the new code. “It’s a complete mess and $30 million, even $10 million or $20 million, is the difference between a homeless shelter being built or all phases of public housing getting built or not,” Payne says. There are only a handful of projects that were submitted under the old rules that would be affected. The 3-2 vote to move the cut-off date forward was not anticipated on the agenda and came at the end of a very long meeting. One new component that comes with the new rules is a city website that allows

anyone the chance to review the hundreds of permits that come through City Hall each month. “Anyone can view the projects that are in front of the city through our public portal, so you can pull that open, see the plans and see what’s coming, and then of course you can submit questions directly to the Neighborhood Development Services office,” says James Freas, director of Neighborhood Development Services. The portal is active, though not all of the site plans are uploaded, as is the case with 1216 River Vista Ave., which was bought by Mount View Properties, purchaser of the single-family detached house in December for $425,000. This property is adjacent to a future 72-unit development the company obtained a rezoning for in 2022. Another item to track in the portal as the new development code comes into effect is whether landowners will take advantage of the additional density built into the new rules. The owner of 1105 Grove St. in Fifeville has filed for a demolition permit for a single-family structure that straddles two lots. That work has an estimated cost of $10,000. The property is not currently listed, but marketing materials state that the new Residential A zoning would allow three units per lot. However, the new system puts a lot of discretion in Freas’ hands. “This information would need to be verified by the City of Charlottesville zoning administrator,” reads the realtor’s website for the property. A question to ask a lot in the coming months is: How will the public find out?

“Anyone can view the projects that are in front of the city through our public portal, so you can pull that open, see the plans and see what’s coming.” JAMES FREAS, NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DIRECTOR


15

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Keswick Estate Exquisite Albemarle County Country Estate set on 10 wooded acres. Gracious Manor Home offers peace and quiet! Home features 5 bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, multiple wood burning fireplaces and a spacious 2.5 car garage. Fabulous kitchen features custom Jaeger & Ernst cabinets, Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances, expansive island, corner wet bar and a built-in Miele coffee maker. Beautiful primary suite with granite fireplace, custom walk-in closet and en-suite spa bathroom with a walk-in shower and marble tile floor with radiant heat. Extensive outdoor living area; gated courtyard, patio with wood burning fireplace and a 30’x15’ screened in porch with audio/visual hookup. Property features a stunning heated pool. Additional property available. $1,695,000

Fabulous, nearly level building lot in the heart of Ivy. A beautiful, private 5 acres with mature oak trees. Murray Elementary school district. $350,000

UNDER CONTRACT

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

503 Faulconer Drive Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903 p: 434.295.1131 f: 434293.7377 e: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

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Country living 15 minutes of Downtown & within Albemarle County. This single floor home has beautifully updated kitchen & bathrooms. $260,000

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Here’s your chance to live in a 1906 farmhouse with all the style and character while enjoying the conveniences of a modern home. $130,000

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Find Homes REALTORS® are licensed to sell real estate in the Commonwealth of VA. Locally owned and operated. Find Homes Realty Brokerage License # 0226033659. 90 Whitewood Rd # 6, Charlottesville VA 22901. 434-218-0221. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this isn’t a solicitation. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed.


17

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

HIGHER GROUND

MILL HOUSE

Former house of noted local architect Floyd E. Johnson, on the banks of Totier Creek. Thoughtfully renovated and expanded, 5-BR, 3 full and 2 half BA. Guest house, 2-bay garage, pool, equipment shed plus 130 acres of open & wooded land. MLS#639196 $2,475,000 Court Nexsen, 646.660.0700

DOWNTOWN PENTHOUSE

This 3 bedroom, 3.5 bath condo features extra high ceilings, a modern and open floor plan with huge windows and doors, and a large rooftop terrace with views of the Downtown Mall all the way around to Monticello. MLS#634149 $1,690,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

R ED

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27 acre estate, mountaintop retreat with 11,400 sf., 8-BR, 6.5-BA residence with many outside terraces, decks and unsurpassed panoramic mountain views! 10 miles to famed Omni Homestead Resort, 2 miles to the airport. www.highergroundva.org Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 or Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

WAYSIDE PLACE

FREE UNION PARCEL

42 acre tract on Wesley Chapel Road with the right to be divided into two 21 acre parcels. Big views with clearing towards the Blue Ridge. Stream frontage on Burruss Branch. Old logging road recently cleared for easy access. MLS#647055 $799,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

WEST MAIN STREET CORRIDOR

Investment/Assemblage opportunity between University of Virginia and Charlottesville’s dynamic Downtown Mall. Property is being targeted to be classified to RX-5 in the new city zoning ordinance. MLS#30850340 $875,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

U N D

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Prime location near UVA Grounds and Barracks Road shopping, steps from Downtown Mall. Charming 4-bedroom, 3.5-bath residence rich in history, awaits its second owner. MLS#648746 $1,150,000 Mark Mascotte, 434.825.8610

EAST WATER STREET

FRAYS GRANT

SIMMONS GAP/ ESTES RIDGE

10 acres of mature woods. Property has long road frontage and consists of two parcels being combined and sold as one. No homeowners association! Design and build your dream residence on this very well-priced parcel. MLS#621178 $189,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $275,000 Court Nexsen, 646.660.0700

SIMMONS GAP ROAD

5-acre lot with mature hardwoods. Great opportunity to build with no HOA. Private building site amongst beautiful woods. Located between Free Union and Earlysville but so convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. MLS#621177 $119,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

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This 21 acre lot is situated at the end of a culde-sac that provides privacy and a quite setting among towering hardwoods, and is convenient to CHO airport and ample shopping of various kinds. MLS#640231 $269,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 or Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

ARDWOOD ROAD

Well constructed home just four miles north of the City. Set on 1.45 acres - great outdoor space for gardens. Home is in need of some renovation, but given quality construction & excellent location, it’s worthy of the investment. MLS#638788 $495,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

February 14 - 20, 2024 c-ville.com

Rare opportunity for a unique downtown office/retail condo with deeded onsite parking space! Located in the Holsinger Condo on Water Street, one block removed from the Historic Downtown Mall. Easily accessible to UVA and all Charlottesville has to offer. $495,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250


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TODAY’S MARKET TAKES EXPERIENCE The Right Agent Can Lead The Way

WOODLANDS RD AREA

$549,900

$495,000

1802 BYBEES CHURCH RD

1105 CARLTON AVE

$2,500,000

48 MAPLEVALE DRIVE

$799,900

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Bev Nash 434-981-5560

• 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms on 2+ acres • Hardwood floors, finished basement • 2,600+ sq ft of living area on a cul de sac • Garage, shed, workshop and paved drive • Generator, real fireplace, basement wood stove • 5 mins to the Reservoir, 10 mins to Albemarle HS

Ruth Guss 434-960-0414

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• 3 Bedroom, 2.5 Baths, 1,920 Fin. Sq. Ft. • 22 Acres - Mature Woodland in Land Use • Private Setting with Firefly Internet Access • 736 Sq. Ft of Elevated Deck and Gazebo • 832 Sq. Ft. - Detached Garage/Workshop

• Commercial property in the heart of Belmont. Property consists of three city lots, .31 acres with a 3420 sq ft commercial building on lots 1 and 2. Zoned B-3 currently, slated as CX-3 in the draft of the new city zoning ordinance. There is three phase electricity to the building. The main level is currently a workshop and storage space. The second floor has been finished with a kitchenette, conference space and office.

• Lakefront living at it’s finest in a spacious, well maintained custom home • 5 Bedrooms/3 Baths located at Lake Monticello • Living room with cathedral ceilings & fireplace • Family room with pellet burning stove • 2 Kitchens perfect for large gatherings • Sunroom and glass surround deck • Generac backup generator

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434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901

Moving Forward Transition is an opportunity regardless of your place in life... and you may feel now is the time to make a move. As a Seniors Real Estate Specialist, I’m here to help take the worry out of selling your home so you can focus on your future goals. I have been a valued REALTOR® with Montague Miller & Company for 35 years and a certified SRES® with extensive training to meet the needs of 50+ age clients when selling their home, buying, relocating, or refinancing residential or investment properties. For a consultation and a Free Market Analysis of your home contact:

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Your Place. Our Purpose. 3511 Marlboro Ct | Charlottesville Minutes to UVA, Downtown, everything Charlottesville!

FLEXIBLE FLOORPLAN that accommodates changing needs. Well-established gardens and easy, heated robot cleaned pool. Main floor living 3 BR/2.5 BA with a 1 BR apartment for 30+ day rental. 3rd Lower-level apartment is a great place to give older teens an opportunity to see what it means to live on their own, provide an opportunity for multi-generational living, or generate income separate entrance or unlock stair door for inclusion to upstairs. Self Start Whole House Generator. $875,000 | montaguemiller.com/649191 Carol Costanzo | 434.962.1419

606 Bridlespur Ln | Earlysville

2154 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy | Charlottesville

1088 Killdeer Ln | Crozet

Traditional cottage in northern Albemarle. One of the original colonial-style huntbox homes in Hickory Ridge. Beautiful setting with mountain & sunset views. Large living room with fireplace with first floor primary suite.

Beautiful ONE LEVEL 4 BR, 3 BA home with Guest Cottage or in-law suite. Beautiful BRAZILIAN CHERRY flooring and CERAMIC TILE. Top of the line appliances convey in both home and cottage. Easy 8.5 miles to Wegmans.

This charming 5 bedroom, 3 full bath home offers an exceptional opportunity to create your dream home in a tranquil & private setting but right next door to Old Trail. Over 3500 sqft. finished space with tons of natural light.

$469,000 | CarterMontague.com/649411 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

$675,000 | montaguemiller.com/648657 Trish Owens | 434.825.5393

$619,000 | montaguemiller.com/646082 Gaffney Saadut Team | 434.981.9968

1704 Old Brook Rd | Charlottesville

2 Heards Mountain Rd | Covesville

Two older homes on this lot. Property is developable. 7.96 acres zoned R-2 Residential. Beautiful, flat to sloping terrain, mostly wooded with some steep slopes. A Builder & Developer will create something special here.

15 acre lot with gorgeous views, surrounded by mountains in southern Albemarle, 15 minutes south of Charlottesville. Rolling pasture, driveway already in place, soil testing done. Subject to County approval, division process underway.

$549,900 | montaguemiller.com/646821

$995,000 | montaguemiller.com/646888 Gaffney Saadut Team | 434.760.2160

$345,000 | CarterMontague.com/646225 Carter Montague | 434.962.3419

Doug Burke | 434.996.6791

Have You Been Considering a Career in Real Estate?

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Proudly serving Central Virginia’s real estate needs for seventy-five years! MONTAGUEMILLER.COM | 434.973.5393 | CHARLOTTESVILLE | MADISON | ORANGE | AMHERST/NELSON

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Real estate education for Salesperson Licensing, Continuing Education & Post License Education

Montague Miller & Co. offers a flexible hybrid online & in-class personalized education program to fit your schedule and specialized needs. Sign up for Principles of Real Estate at:

February 14 - 20, 2024 c-ville.com

1400 River Rd | Charlottesville Walk to the downtown mall from this 3 BR Brick Ranch w/Sunroom, large deck, finished basement & large private backyard. Includes additional 1-BR, full-bath Cottage with kitchen/living room as a Rental. Off street parking!


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PRESENTS:

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1100 DRYDEN LN, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22903 | WWW.HOWARDHANNA.COM/ROYWHEELER

3334 BROWNSBURG TPKE $2,600,000 RAPHINE, VA TONY GIRARD (434) 249-1674

1101 KEITH RD STANARDSVILLE, VA MICHELLE GREGORY

536 FOX HOLLOW LN PALMYRA, VA LEE WYATT

$620,000

HOWARDSVILLE TPKE 105.60 ACRES $450,000

(540) 718-3065

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$719,000 ( 434) 906-7308

949 GLENWOOD STATION LN #202 $325,000

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA KATELYN MANCINI

(703) 203-3388

PENDING

0 SCOTTSVILLE RD 5.50 ACRES

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA KATELYN MANCINI

$235,000

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SCAN QR CODE TO VIEW LISTINGS ONLINE CHARLOTTESVILLE 434.951.5155 | ZION CROSSROADS 434.589.2611 | GREENE COUNTY 434.985.2348

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2313 ROSE HILL CHURCH LN $417,500 CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA SHARON MERRICK E (540) 406-7373 DUKE MERRICK (540) 962-5658

36 MOUNTAIN SUNSET LN $433,620 GORDONSVILLE, VA SUSAN STEWART (434) 242-3550 February 14 - 20, 2024 c-ville.com

PRICE IMPROVEMENT

93 WELSH RUN RD $675,000 RUCKERSVILLE, VA CHRISTOPHER KETCHAM (239) 839-1374


Free market

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22

Community and customers rally to save Reid’s BY CAROL DIGGS

L

ast fall, Megan Salgado stopped by Reid’s Super-Save Market on Preston Avenue and was gobsmacked. “The shelves were almost completely empty,” she recalls. “I’d seen on Instagram that the store was in trouble, but it was worse than I thought.” In January, she decided to galvanize support for the long-standing neighborhood grocery store and put up a GoFundMe page to raise $10,000 to help it survive.

Reid’s GoFundMe page—which, as of this writing, has raised more than $20,000, twice the original ask— generated local media interest, and stirred up debate: Is the purpose of public fundraising efforts to get a failing business out of trouble? Or is the purpose of a community funding effort to raise all boats in the community, whether they are an individual, a nonprofit, or a store that’s a neighborhood institution? The market’s supporters and donors clearly feel Reid’s is a special case; many regard it as part of “the


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C ONTINUED ON PAGE 25

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Reid’s co-owner Sue Clements, who’s committed to keeping the store open, says sales dropped post-pandemic, and they had trouble paying distributors and keeping shelves stocked.

people have continued to get paid, and there haven’t been any layoffs.”) This is when Megan Salgado walked in and mentioned the possibility of a GoFundMe page to one of the store managers. Other customers had brought up the idea, but Sue and Billy said they were reluctant to put up a page asking their own customers for help. They were, however, open to the idea of the community taking charge. A few weeks later, Salgado decided to go ahead. She had grown up in Charlottesville, and spent her middle school years in the Rose Hill neighborhood. “I would always run into people I knew [at Reid’s],” she says. After moving away from Charlottesville, she recently returned to live in the Woolen Mills neighborhood and would shop at Reid’s a couple times a month. “It’s a really good location for a grocery store, I would stop by on my way to somewhere and pick up things I need. Once it was a bundle of firewood—you can’t get that at a convenience store.” But her reactions to Reid’s troubles went deeper than convenience and nostalgia. “In Charlottesville, we talk about being a community and keeping things local, but sometimes there’s a disconnect between the talk and what’s happening. How can we be better about that?” To Salgado, Reid’s is even more than a beloved community institution—“it’s a grocery store in the middle of a food desert. If Reid’s shuts down, who are the people who will be hurt by that?” When Salgado put up the page, she set a goal of $10,000, a figure she picked randomly, “and I thought that would be a reach.” She posted the link to Reid’s Facebook page, and shared it on NextDoor and her Instagram account. “I was surprised at how quickly [the GoFundMe page] caught on—it’s apparent the store has quite a following.” Of more than 200 donations, the majority range from $10 and $100—but there are many for $200 to $500. Notably, there are two $1,000 donations from fellow businesses: Bodo’s and The Markets of Tiger Fuel, both of which have stores across Preston Avenue from Reid’s. “I see Reid’s as a community resource, and the well-being of their business is important to the community,” says John Kokola, co-owner of Bodo’s. “And they’re our neighbor, I want to help when I can.

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

old Charlottesville.” The original store downtown, then called the Stop ‘n’ Shop, was bought by Malcolm Reid in 1961 and renamed. When the building burned down in 1982, Reid sold his satellite store on Preston Avenue to employee H. Kennan “Kenny” Brooks. Brooks died in 2016, and his daughters Kim Miller and Sue Clements took over. Sue, who works full-time for the University of Virginia, has gotten more involved in the grocery store’s operation in the last few years. Her husband, Billy, who handles

day-to-day operations, has worked there for more than 35 years, while Kim is more involved in running the satellite Reid’s in Dillwyn, which opened in 2015. The first thing Sue wants to make clear is her commitment to keeping the store open. “My father was the kind of guy who, if you came in and said you didn’t have the money for groceries that week, he’d let you shop and pay him back later—that’s just the kind of man he was. We still have customers who will call and ask us to put an order together for them. We try to help our customers out—we had a community day here the year before COVID hit, and it was a huge success.” Reid’s still has a large community posting board outside its entrance, with everything from concert ads and lost pet fliers to business cards and event notices. But times and the neighborhoods have changed. “It used to be that 60 to 70 percent of our customers were from the neighborhoods [Rose Hill/Birdwood, 10th and Page, and Starr Hill],” says Sue. “Now it’s under 50 percent.” As the neighborhood population has aged, customers pass away and families move out; large family homes get sold off. Real estate values have soared as the Preston Avenue corridor has developed, but the people moving into the new upscale homes and apartments have new habits. “People don’t do all their grocery shopping in one place anymore,” Billy Clements notes. The Clements acknowledge a confluence of factors that they should have noticed earlier. Troubles began well before the pandemic—which actually boosted sales, as people were reluctant to go into large grocery stores and were buying in bulk for fear of shortages. But then, when the shutdown eased, people stopped hoarding. Post-pandemic issues hit the store hard; as sales dropped, they had trouble making the payments to distributors to keep products in stock. By last October, Reid’s had a sign on the door letting customers know that in spite of empty shelves, the store was still open. “We own this building, and it’s valuable real estate,” says Sue. “It would be easy to sell, but our customers were saying, ‘Please don’t leave us.’” The crisis spurred the Clements to re-examine their operations, realizing that business as usual wouldn’t suffice. (Sue says proudly that although they have lost some employees to attrition, “all our


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24

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Local resources for small businesses

C O NTI N U E D F R O M PAGE 2 3

Customer Megan Salgado started a GoFundMe page for the downtown grocery store. Her goal was to raise $10,000— at press time, more than $20,000 has been pledged.

 Central Virginia Small Business Development Center offers business counseling ranging from start-up advice to financial, marketing, and workforce development for established businesses; access to market and sector research; and a variety of events and training sessions.  Community Investment Collaborative supports development and growth of community businesses and entrepreneurs, focusing on early-stage business education and connection to resources including mentoring, microfinancing, education, and networking.

Johnson also noted that Piedmont Virginia Community College runs a range of programs for business management and workforce development.

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 Virginia Small Business Financing Authority is the state’s business and economic development program, which provides access to financing programs specifically geared to small businesses.

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

They represent the spirit of the neighborhood, and have deep roots in Charlottesville’s history. And then, what would it look like if this business weren’t here any more? I hope that people will vote with their feet, and their pocketbook.” Gordon Sutton, president of Tiger Fuel, says, “My brother [Taylor Sutton, Tiger Fuel’s COO] and I live downtown; we shop at Reid’s, we love the people there—they’re really service-oriented and friendly— and we want to see them survive.” The Preston Avenue Tiger Market staff have been known to send a tray of sandwiches over to the Reid’s staff for lunch. Sutton acknowledges the objections that have been voiced about donating to a business when so many community efforts in Charlottesville need support. “I vetted the idea through our management and our marketing director, who oversees our efforts to support local nonprofits, and got their blessing. We all see Reid’s as a community institution.” In the end, Sutton says, he and his colleagues decided that Reid’s was a special case, and a place worth supporting: “I’m cheering for an old institution that I like.” So is long-time customer Norman Lamson, who has lived in the Rose Hill area and patronized Reid’s for 30 years. “I’ve always done all my shopping there,” he says. “It’s five minutes away, and they have the best meats in Charlottesville.” Seeing the empty shelves “was sad—I figured they were having difficulties, so I decided to keep going there to support the store. It’s important that it’s a family business.” While the outpouring of support was welcome, the Clements know that Reid’s has to succeed as a business to survive. The first step, says Sue: “Address what we’re selling. In the past, the grocery business was all about options. But now, we’re going to be stocking fewer products while still offering a range of high-, low-, and midpoint cost items.” Reid’s has always been known for its meat and produce. Fresh fruits and vegetables can be hard to

find in a small mom-and-pop outlet, but Reid’s has an entire wall of produce at prices close to the large supermarkets. One online reviewer may have noted that you can’t find bok choy or papaya, but then there’s plenty of shelf labels noting what foods are eligible for SNAP benefits. “We are trying to serve all the genres of our neighborhood,” Sue says. But it’s the meat department that gets customers raving—and coming back. Reid’s is one of the few stores around that has its own meat-cutter, a skill that is less and less available as more large outlets stock only pre-cut and pre-wrapped meat. The market carries a wide selection of beef, ready to sell or cut to order. Billy says proudly, “You want your steaks two inches thick, fine. You can even call ahead.” Reid’s selection of pork runs from head to feet—literally. “We sell everything but the squeal” is clearly one of Billy’s favorite lines, and you can always find Kite’s Virginia ham. The offerings of poultry and fish are more basic; fresh fish is delivered once a week. One innovation that has brought in buyers is the new value aisle. When a distributor has an overage, or a good deal on products the Clements think will suit their customers, they advertise the weekly special on Reid’s Facebook page and website, and in local fliers. These rotating specials can include special-offer meats and produce, as well as staples from canned tomatoes, cereal, and soft drinks to mac-and-cheese, vegetable oil, and Oreos. Sue is aware the store’s marketing efforts have to expand, and she hopes the attention to its plight will encourage more people to come in the door. “Grocery stores are a penny-making business. But we’re here to serve the community—the people and families that work here, our family, and the families that shop here.” As for the GoFundMe page, Salgado always saw it as a temporary measure to get Reid’s back from the brink. “The key is to have people patronize the place,” she says. “I hope people know that they ought to be shopping there. I hope they capitalize on this interest.”

“The challenges facing small local businesses aren’t any different here in Charlottesville,” says Matt Johnson, assistant director of the City of Charlottesville’s Office of Economic Development. “Sourcing supplies, slim margins, the cost of real estate whether you own or rent, attracting the right staff—these are universal problems. But because small businesses usually run with much tighter profit margins, they often have less funding available to facilitate change.” Long-standing small businesses, especially those that are locally owned, have a special character, says Johnson. “People have emotional connections to these places, where they might have gone as children or shopped in their early years. That’s the benefit of having these businesses— they help to shape the community.” OED strives to be responsive to businesses of all sorts and sizes, says Johnson. “One of our main purposes is to serve as a point of contact. Whether your business has challenges or you want to position your business for future growth, we want to point you to the resources you need, within city government or outside sources and partners.” He notes that OED is adding a staff person who will be specifically focused on supporting entrepreneurs. Johnson cited other resources in the area which, like OED, are available without fees—and most of them have programs specifically geared to small, women-owned, and minority businesses:


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SARA CURRUCHICH: PHOTO CREDIT JESÚS TZOC

A FREE CONCERT IN CHARLOTTESVILLE

Award-winning singer, songwriter, and human rights activist opens her world tour

Thursday, February 22, 2024, at 7 pm Old Cabell Hall Sara Curruchich, Maya Kaqchikel Guatemalan singer-songwriter is the first indigenous Guatemalan singer and songwriter to sing in Kaqchikel (her mother tongue), as well as Spanish, for an international audience. Her voice and message of love, awareness, respect, and defense of life in all its forms, have led many people to regard her as a beacon of light and hope. Her music blends various genres such as rock, folk and traditional Mayan Kaqchikel music. Sara music focuses primarily on the experiences of Indigenous people, bringing traditional Guatemalan music and modern sounds together to reflect the diversity and history of her people.

UR

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Y A

Old Cabell Hall ursday, February 22, 2024 | 7:00 pm Sara Curruchich, Maya Kaqchikel Guatemalan singer-songwriter is the first indigenous Guatemalan singer and songwriter to sing in Kaqchikel (her mother tongue), as well as Spanish, for an international audience. Her voice and message of love, awareness, respect and defense of life in all its forms, have led many people to regard her as a beacon of light and hope.

PHOTO CREDIT JXUN CIIN

PHOTO CREDIT: SANDRA SEBASTIAN

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

Her music blends various genres such as rock, folk and traditional Mayan Kaqchikel music. Sara music focuses primarily on the experiences of Indigenous people, bringing traditional Guatemalan music and modern sounds together to reflect the diversity and history of her people.

tickets.artsboxoffice.virginia.edu

UVA Sponsor: Center for Global Inquiry & Innovation Library System Parent funds Vice Provost for the Arts Race, Place, & Equity Program Karsh Institute of Democracy: working group in Indigenous Studies Black & Indigenous Feminist Futures Institute Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

With contributions by: American Studies Old Cabell Hall Department of Art Music Department Karsh Institute of Democracy: Sound Justice Lab Department of Women, Gender & Sexuality Interdisciplinary Archaeology Program Casa Bolivar Mead Grant

RESERVE YOUR TICKETS AT: (434) 924-3376 artsboxoffice@virginia.edu

The concert it is free for all, but every person needs to get a ticket from UVA BOX Office. 2 tickets per person. And you can call many times.

Full Program Schedule and Ticket Reservations


CULTURE

27

THROUGH 3/10

WELL HEELED

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Paulius Sinkora and Xavier Taylor

DATES VARY

SHORT NOTICE

SATURDAY 2/17

UVA Drama’s New Works Festival treats audiences to a varied collection of short works, ranging from drama to farce, that explore everything from workplace woes to matters of the heart. The pithy plays are written, directed, designed, and performed by students. Travel back in time to regency-era England in Becca Davis’ The Sapphire Hyacinth, follow along as a couple navigate a breakup in Mary Hall’s Running Out of Time, sit in on a PTA meeting at a private school in Abby Milne’s Karens, and more. $5, 8pm. Helms Theatre, 109 Culbreth Rd. drama.virginia.edu

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The Robert Cray Band hits the road for the first time since the release of its 2020 album, That’s What I Heard. The Grammy-nominated roots and Southern soul record is just the latest achievement in the band’s fourdecade career, with over 15 albums released, an induction into the Blues Hall of Fame, an Americana Music Awards Lifetime Achievement, and five Grammy wins. With opener Corey Harris. $29.75–59.75, 8pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

SUPPLIED PHOTO

BLUES CLUES

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

WILL KERNER

Feathers are flying and there’s glitter galore at Live Arts’ Kinky Boots. The heart-warming musical sees an unlikely partnership blossom between Charlie Price, owner of a failing shoe factory, and Lola, a fabulous drag queen in need of a pair of sturdy stilettos. Xavier Taylor dons a sky-high wig for the role of Lola opposite Paulius Sinkora as Charlie. Jude Hansen directs, with music direction by Abby Smith. $28–33, times vary. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org


CULTURE THIS WEEK

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Wednesday 2/14 music Berto & Matt. Latin guitar night. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 201 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com Hard Swimmin’ Fish. Blues, roots, and original music. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskeyjarcville.com

CT, FL, NJ, NY & VA

Jim & Juice. Murder ballads, country classics, and good times with Jim Waive and Jen Fleisher. Free, 7pm. Blue Moon Diner, 606 W. Main St. bluemoondiner.net Karaoke. With Jennifer DeVille. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. rapturerestaurant.com

stage C.S. Lewis On Stage: Further Up & Further In. Explore the heart and mind of C.S. Lewis. in Max McLean’s stage experience. $61–101, 7:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

Botanical Drag Bingo. Hosted by Crimsyn and Cake Pop. $15, 6:30pm. Botanical PlantBased Fare, 421 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. botanicalfare.com

Friday 2/16 music Black History Month Gospel Concert. Featuring Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Tasha Cobbs Leonard, with a special performance by Melvin Crispell III. Free, 6:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net Chamomile & Whiskey with Strong Water. Americana, blues, and more. $15–85, 7pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. prnbrewery.com

words Green Drinks. Chat with fellow environmentally minded people over drinks. Free, 5:30pm. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery, 520 Second St. SE. threenotchdbrewing.com

Harvey Street Collective. Indie and alternative rock vibrations. $12–15, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com

Purchase. Refinance. Renovation. Construction. Conventional, FHA, USDA & VA Loans.

outside

John Kelly. Sip on wine and enjoy live tunes. Free, 5:30pm. Hardware Hills Vineyard, 5199 W. River Rd., Scottsville. hard warehills.com

Branch Manager / Licensed Loan Originator NMLS# 162252 300 E. Main Street, Office 223, Charlottesville, VA 22902 pmadison@homesteadfunding.com

917-559-3659

SuperFly Run Club. Run around the city, then enjoy $5 pints and raffles. Free, 6pm. SuperFly Brewing Co., 943 Preston Ave. superflybrewing.com

etc.

Josh Mayo & The House Sauce. Rockin’ good tunes. Free, 8pm. Ace Biscuit & Barbeque, 600 Concord Ave. @acebiscuitand barbecue

Pride & Prejudice. Keira Knightley stars in the 2005 version of Jane Austen’s immortal romance. $10, 7pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com

Ken Farmer & The Authenticators. Blues, Americana, and classic country. Free, 6pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

Valentine’s Day Burlesque. Immodest Opulence Burlesque’s show includes performances by Ellie Quinn, Bert Shaffer, Conejita Luxxe, and more. $20–30, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com

Thursday 2/15 music facebook.com/cville.weekly

etc.

Simply the Best Financing For your Home Sweet Home! Patricia I. Madison

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

The New Works Festival. UVA student actors, directors, and designers bring new plays written by students to life. $5, 8pm. Helms Theatre, 109 Culbreth Rd. drama. virginia.edu

Office: 845-237-4163. Licensed in CT, FL. Licensed in VA - NMLS #3232 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org). Licensed Mortgage Banker - NYS Dept. of Financial Services. Licensed by the NJ Department of Banking and Insurance. *Guidelines and qualification details are subject to change at any time. Available for properties located in CT, FL, NY, VA. Prior builder/dealer approval required. NMLS ID# 3232

This is our town.

Berto & Vincent. Olé! Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 201 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com

Sue Harlow. Americana folk. Free, 5pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarmandwinery.com Sunny War. Ecstatic gospel, dusty country blues, thoughtful folk, and rip-roaring rock ‘n’ roll. $25–30, 8pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. frontporchcville.org

Boxcar Speakeasy. Live music with Boxcar Speakeasy, and a special wine and dessert pairing. $55, 4pm. Oakhurst Inn, 100 Oakhurst Cir. oakhurstinn.com

Sweeties, Taffy, New Boss, and En Regalia. Featuring MRC members, alumni, and staff. $10, 7pm. Music Resource Center, 105 Ridge St. musicresourcecenter.org

Jesse’s House. Rock and rockabilly originals. Free, 6pm. Blue Moon Diner, 606 W. Main St. bluemoondiner.net

Yeah! Featuring all your favorite ‘90s and 2000s hits. $15–22, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com

Kendall Street Company. Performing the Kendall Street is for Lovers Tour, with opener Natalie Blue. $12–40, 8:30pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com Mojo Pie. With Paxton Henderson. Free, 7pm. SuperFly Brewing Co., 943 Preston Ave. superflybrewing.com Songwriter’s Open Mic. Hosted by The Front Porch teacher Erynn Legna McLeod. Free, 7pm. Potter’s Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potterscraftcider.com Tara Mills Duo. Original folk and roots. Free, 5pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

.com

Seán Gavin, Colm Gannon, and Tommy & Saundra O’Sullivan. A double bill show of Irish music and song. Free, 5:30pm. Potter’s Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potterscraftcider.com

stage C.S. Lewis On Stage: Further Up & Further In. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $61–101, 7:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

stage The New Works Festival. See listing for Thursday, February 15. $5, 8pm. Helms Theatre, 109 Culbreth Rd. drama. virginia.edu Red Velvet: An Intimate Dinner & Curated Drag Show. Hosted by Cake Pop and Crimsyn. $55–100, 6pm. Bar Botanical, 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. botanical fare.com

words Charlottesville Reading Series. Featuring author GennaRose Nethercott and poet Ben Sloan. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com CreativeMornings. A breakfast lecture for the creative community. Free, 8:30am. Location TBA. creativemornings.com


CULTURE FEEDBACK 29 etc. River View Farm Tour. Learn about the Carr/ Greer Family. Free, 4:30pm. Ivy Creek Natural Area and Historic River View Farm, 1780 Earlysville Rd. ivycreekfoundation.org Traveling Our Ancestors’ Journey: A Descendants’ Reunion. A screening of Horace Scruggs’ latest short film. Free, 7:30pm. PVCC’s V. Earl Dickinson Building, 501 College Dr. pvcc.edu

Saturday 2/17 music Beleza Trio’s Carnaval Celebration. Featuring Madeline and Berto Sales and Matt Wyatt. Free, 5pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glass housewinery.com Ben Butterworth. From bluegrass to psychedelic country. Free, 5:30pm. Potter’s Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potterscraft cider.com Elise Ebert: Distinguished Major Voice Recital. Performing a program of Mozart, Debussy, Barber, Strauss II, and more, with Karen Dalton and Alex Suh on piano. Free, 8pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA Grounds. music.virginia.edu Empty Bottles. Soul, funk, and rock ‘n’ roll covers. Free, 7pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. prnbrewery.com The Gladstones. Originals and covers. $10, 7pm. The Batesville Market, 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. batesvillemarket.com In The Mix: The Source, Sound, & Soul of African American Music. A learning and listening experience with Horace Scruggs. $10–12, 7:30pm. PVCC’s V. Earl Dickinson Building, 501 College Dr. pvcc.edu John Kelly. Enjoy live tunes with your wine, cider, and beer. Free, 1pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwood farmandwinery.com The Judy Chops & South Hill Banks. Americana with elements of swing, blues, rock, and soul. $15–50, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. the southerncville.com

The Robert Cray Band. With opener Corey Harris. $29–59, 8pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net The Stews. Rock music. $18–20, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com Tre. Charles. Indie-folk, neo-soul, and alternative rock. Free, 8pm. The Stage at WTJU, 2244 Ivy Rd. wtju.net Violapalooza 2024. A day-long event of music making and learning, culminating with a performance featuring Andrea Priester Houde, Molly Wilkens-Reed, and Ayn Balija. Free, all day. Old Cabell Hall, UVA Grounds. music.virginia.edu

The New Works Festival. See listing for Thursday, February 15. $5, 8pm. Helms Theatre, 109 Culbreth Rd. drama.virginia.edu

words Amber McBride: Thick with Trouble. Celebrate the launch of McBride’s new poetry collection. Free, 4pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com C O NT I N UE D ON PAGE 3 1

By Shea Gibbs arts@c-ville.com

S

unny War is on the phone, and there’s a long pause. It’s not unexpected—not even awkward at this point. Pauses are more common than flowing conversation with the experimental singer-songwriter. But this pause is different. This time, War’s answering a question about her mental health, and the pause is alarming. So, too, is her eventual answer. “I think I’m okay. But probably not. I’m not going to kill myself or anything,” she says. Then she makes her decision: “I’m okay.” War, who will play a solo show at The Front Porch on February 16, has been public about contemplating suicide in the past, specifically while she was working on her latest album, Anarchist Gospel, released in early 2023. She says songwriting has been an outlet that’s helped her through hardships over the years, including a terrifying teenage battle with methamphetamine and heroin addiction. “I just write about whatever I’m thinking about at the time, I guess,” War says in her soft, halting way. “They are kind of like little therapy sessions for me. I guess if there is anything uplifting in them, it’s because I am trying to find something uplifting for myself.” There is indeed something uplifting, even empowering, in War’s songs. And after more than two decades of songwriting experience— she says she’s been at it since she was little more than 7 years old—the eclectic guitarist and vocalist is drawing national attention to her unique blend of folk, blues, gospel, and punk rock. Rolling Stone called her “one of the best new voices in roots music” after Anarchist Gospel’s release; an L.A. Weekly critic said he hadn’t “heard a young guitarist this dexterous and ass-kicking in eons.” War’s songs have their share of sadness, for certain. She calls the famously melancholic Elliott Smith, who died in 2003, one of her primary influences, and says she wrote Anarchist Gospel’s “I Got No Fight” to battle back suicidal thoughts. But when the Nashville native and current Chattanooga resident plays Charlottesville, listeners will hear more than just another singer-songwriter fighting depression. They’ll hear soaring, hopeful numbers. They’ll hear driving, confident takedowns of associates gone by, ethereal explorations of what it means to be human. They’ll also hear a style of guitar play so unique it can only have come about by the joyous happenstance of youth. According to War, after phases in which she was obsessed with blues rock and then ’70s and ’80s punk, she started listening to Dave Rawlings and Gillian Welch. It was 2001, the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou? had planted roots

Guitar virtuoso Sunny War performs her critically acclaimed music in a solo show at The Front Porch on February 16.

music back in the national zeitgeist, and War’s parents brought home Welch’s Time (The Revelator). The young guitar player was entranced by the album’s string parts. She wanted to emulate them. “I didn’t really realize there were two people playing, so I was trying to play both of their parts,” she says. “That ended up being the foundation of my style.” As War matured, she studied that twopart style intently. She self-released her first full-length album, Worthless, in 2015. She really began to find her voice on 2018’s With the Sun, followed it up with Shell of a Girl the next year, and won acclaim for 2021’s Simple Syrup, all three of which were distributed by Hen House Records. Prior to launching Anarchist Gospel, War moved back to Nashville from Los Angeles and signed to New West Records. She teamed up with producer Andrija Tokic, who’s worked with Alabama Shakes and Langhorne Slim, among others. Together, they solicited abundant guest vocals by some of War’s idols (Rawlings), friends (Allison Russell), and collaborators (Chris Pierce)—not to mention My Morning Jacket frontman Jim James. Despite Anarchist Gospel’s vocals-heavy vibe, War considers herself a music writer first. Fitting the meter of a song to existing

lyrics, she says, rarely works. “It’s all about rhythm, how many words you can get in ‘this’ amount of time,” she says. “But I also need it to be symmetrical—songs are symmetrical—and even.” Indeed, War says she never wanted to be a singer. As a 7-year-old, playing guitar was her singular obsession. Wrapping production on Anarchist Gospel, War got bad news. Her brother called and told her the siblings’ father was dying. She went to Chattanooga, driven by Tokic himself, to be with her dad in his final days. Now, just over a year after releasing her latest LP, War guesses she’s played more than 200 shows. She says she’s exhausted. How does she get over the exhaustion and find inspiration to keep going? “I don’t,” she says. Still, War has reason to look ahead, with two projects in her sights. In April, she’ll be featured on My Black Country: The Songs of Alice Randall, alongside Rhiannon Giddens, Adia Victoria, and others. And by that time, War says she’ll hopefully have been working on another full-length record for about a month. If you or anyone you know is experiencing suicidal thoughts or a mental health crisis, please call or text the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline. It is free, confidential, and available 24/7.

An L.A. Weekly critic said he hadn’t “heard a young guitarist this dexterous and ass-kicking in eons.”

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stage

Sunny War channels complicated past in moving folk-punk

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

LUA Project. Music inspired by Mexican Son, Appalachian song forms, and more. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com

More than okay


February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

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CULTURE TRIED IT IN C'VILLE 31 Saturday 2/17 Storytime. Readings of recent favorites and classics. Free, 11am. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

classes Crochet for Beginners. Learn the basics of crochet with Emma. $25, 10am. The Scrappy Elephant, 1745 Allied St. scrappy elephant.com Do you want to crochet a snowman? Make an adorable little snowman in this two-day class. $35, 11:30am. The Scrappy Elephant, 1745 Allied St. scrappyelephant.com PLAY! Pop Up: We’re Going on a Bear Hunt. An event designed for children with developmental differences and their families. Free, 9am. Dot to Dot: Pediatric Speech Language Therapy, 2300 Commonwealth Dr., Ste. 30. dottodotspeech.com

outside Geology Hike. Learn about the geology of Ivy Creek. Free (registration required), 11am. Ivy Creek Natural Area and Historic River View Farm, 1780 Earlysville Rd. ivy creekfoundation.org Little Naturalist Program. Introduce the kids to nature and explore the trails. Free, 10am. Ivy Creek Natural Area and Historic River View Farm, 1780 Earlysville Rd. ivy creekfoundation.org

etc. Farmers Market at Ix. Enjoy a range of products, from produce and meat to bakers and artisans. Free, 9am. Ix Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

Sunday 2/18 music Talia Pirron: Fourth Year Miller Scholar Recital. Performing classical and musical theater pieces, from Mozart to Bizet, in collaboration with pianist John Mayhood, violinist Eliana Pirron, and featuring duets with Elise Ebert and Jack Kehoe. Free, 3:30pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA Grounds. music.virginia.edu

Theocles. The local singer-songwriter performs a solo set. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com Willie DE. Acoustic tunes. Free, 2pm. Potter’s Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potterscraftcider.com Zuzu’s Hot 5. With Pete Vigour, Doug Bethel, Brandon Rose, Sam Green, Paul Rosen, and Susanna Rosen. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com

dance

classes Paint & Sip: Candy Heart Wineglasses. Paint a pair of Valentine-themed wineglasses. $40, 2pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. catelynkelsey designs.com C O NT I N UE D ON PAGE 3 3

WHAT

Reading and drinking cider (socializing optional).

WHY

Because even though there is a high correlation between being an introvert and liking to read, it’s sometimes nice to read with others in a different setting. Access to yummy cider is a bonus.

HOW IT WENT

Silent book club helped me finish a book in a day and change, so I’d say it went well. I arrived at 12:30pm-ish to get provisions before the hour of silent reading began at 1pm. Why, yes, I did take a ride on the Pomme Mary—fizzy, fruity, and delicious. The event promised an hour of quiet reading with an optional hour of kibitzing afterward. Participants choose their own books to read, with no obligatory book club picks to endure (after all, life’s too short to read books we don’t enjoy). I took my seat in the Orchard Room, and others trickled into the welcoming space. Peppy instrumental music from “Bridgerton” played. Many opted to take their cups of hot cider, mulled I believe, to a semi-circle of seats surrounding a crackling fire. People arrived solo, in pairs, and even one small group. Some got right to it, starting to read, while others chatted. I stole surreptitious glances at book covers as people pulled out their reading. Don’t you love how books can recommend people? Just when I’d started to wonder how seriously we would take the “silent” part of silent book club, a staff member announced we’d begin as she closed the door. Music ceased. We went hard with the silence. You could have heard an heirloom apple leaf fall. Other than a few times when I giggled (quietly, mind you) and felt like I’d broken the code of conduct, the time and pages flew. I cannot recall the last time I had such focused reading time. So much

Don’t you love how books can recommend people?

Silent Book Club at Albemarle CiderWorks is a monthly event, with the next scheduled meeting on February 25.

reading was done, and I got so sucked into my book—I had arrived only a few chapters in—that I kept reading after I got home. The next day, the book was done. After our silent reading hour ended, the most introverted among us sighed, closed their books, and left. A few stayed in the Orchard Room to finish their chapter or beyond. Several of us stepped outside into the entry room by the bar and chatted about

Silent Book Club albemarleciderworks.com books. We swapped recommendations and commiserated about needing to balance heavier reading with palate-cleansing beach reads. We genuinely enjoyed each other and the talk of books.

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Tango Sundays. A lesson with Anna Léon and Cristian Bravo. $25, 4pm. Municipal Arts Center, 1119 Fifth St. SW, Ste. A. virginiatango.com

I don’t know about you, but setting a goal for how many books to finish in the next year is a traditional new year’s activity for me. I’m of the ripe old age that I can recall the 1984 start of Pizza Hut’s BOOK IT! program, which payed whippersnappers to read. Those free, personal-sized, deep-dish pepperoni pizzas helped solidify my love of reading, and readingrelated goals, fostering a habit that continues to this day. As is the way with many new year’s goals, by February I start to fall behind. Just to be clear, I don’t judge January me, or January any of us, for setting reading goals that may not be realistic. We were younger then. We had the whole year ahead of us. We were sweet, naive summer children, even in the dead of winter. Maybe I’d always reach my annual reading goal if I bought myself a pizza when I hit it. Or maybe my goal required me to have dedicated reading time outside of the house, away from distractions, with access to drinks and snacks. Enter Albemarle CiderWorks’ Silent Book Club.—Kristie Smeltzer

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

Tanner Usrey. Country grit, rock ‘n’ roll energy, and Americana eloquence. $20, 8:30pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com

Shhh…get your read on

ALBEMARLE CIDERWORKS

C O NTI N U E D F R O M PAGE 2 9


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THIS WEEK AT THE PARAMOUNT FREE!

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

FEBRUARY 16 6:30PM

TASHA COBBS LEONARD & MELVIN CRISPELL III

Movie Sponsor:

LIVE ACTION FEBRUARY 18 | 2:00PM

FEBRUARY 17 8:00PM

ZEPHYRUS

Jack & Wendy Brown • Patti Cary & Todd Stansbury • Pam & Frank Edmonds • Chris & Brad Eure • Janna & David Gies • Elizabeth & Joe LeVaca • Julie & Geoff Montross • Susie Morris

215 East Main Street, Charlottesville, VA | 434.979.1333 | theparamount.net

Central Virginia’s Early Music Vocal Ensemble

ZEPHYRUS

Megan Sharp, Director

Central Virginia’s Early Music Vocal Ensemble

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

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Megan Sharp, Director

PRESENTS

Polyphony & Prejudice: Music by Vicente Lusitano Saturday, February 17 at 8 p.m. St. Thomas Aquinas University Parish 401 Alderman Road, Charlottesville Friday, February 23 at 7:30 p.m. Cove Presbyterian Church 5531 Covesville Lane, Covesville

TICKETS $20 adults / $15 seniors, $5 students Available on our website and at the door Admission to the February 23 concert is by donation only

TICKETS $20 adults / $15 seniors, $5 students Available on our website and at the door Admission to the February 23 concert is by donation only

For more information, please visit WWW.ZEPHYRUS-VA.ORG FACEBOOK.COM/ZEPHYRUSVA/


CULTURE PAGES 33 Sunday 2/18 etc. Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai. Professional assassin Forest Whitaker stays cool in a crazy world. $10, 6pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com Oscar-Nominated Short Films—Live Action. Screenings of Red, White and Blue, The After, The Wonderful World of Henry Sugar and more. $7–9, 2pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net Titanic. Set sail with Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet in director James Cameron’s Oscar-winning love story. $10, noon. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. draft house.com

Monday 2/19 music Chelsea Cutler. Performing The Beauty Is Everywhere Tour. $37–162, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com Old Age & Treachery. Live music. Free, 1pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarmandwinery.com Vincent Zorn. A lively blend of rumba guitar. Free, 6:30pm. South and Central Latin Grill, Dairy Market. vincentzorn.com

words Bringing the Outside In: Arts-Based Engagement with Place. A roundtable discussion that reflections on landscapes of Black freedom manifested in Black art. Free, 5pm. Campbell Hall, UVA Grounds. arch.virginia.edu

etc. Dick. Teens Kirsten Dunst and Michelle Williams uncover the Watergate scandal in this 1999 comedy. $5, 7pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com

Tuesday 2/20 music

Broadway and More Featuring Mary Mikels. Classical and broadway tunes. $15, 4pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org Tuesday Evening Concert Series: Arod Quartet. A program of Haydn, Debussy, and Beethoven. Free, 7:30pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA Grounds. tecs.org Vincent Zorn. Solo wild gypsy rumba. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com

words

etc. eXistenZ. Jennifer Jason Leigh and Jude Law blur the lines between reality and virtual reality. $7, 8pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com Raised/Razed. A screening of Lorenzo Dickerson’s documentary. Free, 6pm. JMRL: Central Library, 201 E. Market St. jmrl.org

By Sarah Lawson arts@c-ville.com

B

en Sloan’s second book of poems, Then On Out Into a Cloudless Sky, is a collection of work that speaks to various themes and eras, highlighting the far-ranging interests of its author. As an object, the book is a delight, an elegant pamphlet with a cover that captures the bright blue of sky and a wisp of cloud, assembled with a five-hole stitch of orange thread along the fold. The work within is dedicated to Sloan’s students at the Fluvanna Correctional Center, and features an epigraph from Abdulrazak Gurnah’s novel The Last Gift: “Sometimes I’m struck with amazement when I consider exactly how I have found myself here. But then I suppose many people can say that about their lives.” After speaking with Sloan, a man whose path in life has taken its own unique shape and whose career as a teacher has influenced countless students’ trajectories, that epigraph seems a fitting way to begin. Sloan grew up on a farm in southeast Missouri and, while his family had books at home, his hometown was so small that it lacked a public library or even a school library. According to Sloan, “It wasn’t until I was about 16 that I started going to a local public library in St. Louis,” where his family had moved. He quickly found poetry and remembers discovering Margaret Atwood, whose work made a strong impression on him. “I bought a paperback copy of her poems and was amazed by them,” he recalls. “This short form, in a very condensed way, really opened a door. It just seemed remarkable to me. I remember trying to figure out, ‘How did she do that?’” At college, Sloan took creative writing classes and enjoyed reading widely, earning his MFA from Brooklyn College, where he studied with the influential poet John Ashbery, eventually working as his assistant for a year. “He was a very sweet and generous person,” says Sloan, who also has a Ph.D. in American literature from the City University of New York Graduate Center. From 2003 to 2022, Sloan taught at Piedmont Virginia Community College. While there, he got involved in the Higher Education in Prison Program, which offers opportunities for incarcerated learners to earn an associate degree while at the Fluvanna Correctional Center for Women, the Buckingham Correctional Center, or the Dillwyn Correctional Center. Sloan taught in both the Fluvanna and Buckingham programs, building on past experience teaching in a prison setting when he lived in North Carolina. “As a culture, we’ve decided to hide prisons from ourselves. … I have always been interested in working with marginalized and disenfranchised students,” he says. All told, Sloan taught in prison programs for more than 15 years, and found it to be

Ben Sloan will read from his work as part of the free Charlottesville Reading Series on Friday, February 16 at New Dominion Bookshop.

poems in Then On Out Into a Cloudless Sky are historical in nature, those that stand out with the most personal style are the ones that examine small moments and fancies, such as in “Hunched Groups.” Trying to figure out what it is I am thinking today / I eventually just give up and decide to let it all go, / and when I do I see the day sitting out there / all around me like a murder of crows peering down / from power lines, backs pressed up against / the surrounding blue, hunched groups of them / puffing on cigars and arguing with one another / in the same gravelly voices heavy smokers use / when they talk together on their coffee breaks.

meaningful work despite limited computer access and the often frustrating protocols that shaped the experience—especially during the early COVID-19 pandemic. However, Sloan remained committed to the work, adapted, and found that, even as he influenced his students in their writing, they also influenced him. “Their writing was often so honest and direct. … Some of what I’ve learned over the years, in college and graduate school, I realized I needed to drop in order to get to the point … not to mess around with a lot of filler,” he says. This directness shows up in his recent collection, where poems function as a direct transfer of his perspective to the reader— unadorned but insightful ways of thinking about the everyday. Though some of the

Other poems suggest a thematic influence from his students, sharing perspectives from the back seat of a police car in “Arriving,” and of a girl about to be taken to juvenile detention in “Departing,” which contains this excerpt: …But before being taken away / to juvenile detention, just to break one final rule, what the hell, / she chases from his chain-link cage, and into the woods, / their dog, Jimi Hendrix, who, stunned, not knowing what else to do, / starts to run, teaching himself how it’s done as he goes. As in Sloan’s own early interest in Atwood’s work, his poems spur the reader to pull them apart, to dig into the power of the poet’s concise phrasing. “When I read, it opens up a new space inside of me,” he says. “I just hope that when people read my poems, it opens up a space for them, a new way to see things.”

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Entrepreneurs and Espresso. Chat with fellow entrepreneurs over coffee. Free, 8am. CODE Building, Irving Theater, 225 W. Water St. cvsbdc.org

Local poet Ben Sloan doesn’t shy away in latest book

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

Blackberry Smoke. American country rock. $42–217, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jefferson theater.com

Honest and direct

SUPPLIED PHOTO

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OUR 2024 THEME

MUSIC • ART • IDEAS A Festival About the Future of Our Community Learn more and get involved at tomtomfoundation.org

April 17—21 2024


35

2024 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Albemarle County Parks & Recreation Summer Summer 2024 2024 Activities Activities • Tennis Clinics

r e C m a m m p u S Guide directory of Summer Camps, Schools & Programs for kids

• Tennis Clinics • Pickleball Clincs • Clincs • Pickleball Sports Variety Camp • Sports SummerVariety Recreation Camps Camp • Summer Swim Program • Summer Recreation Camps • Karate Classes • Swim • Summer Iaijutsu Classes Program • Yoga Classes • Classes • Karate Tai Chi Classes Spring Break Camp • Iaijutsu Classes For detailed • Rec Day Camps information on • Yoga Classes Albemarle County • Volleyball Camps and Clinics • Tai Chi Classes Parks and Recreation • Outdoor Movie Nights camps & classes • Spring Break Camp please visit the For detailed information onat Albemarle website • Rec Day Camps County Parks and Recreation camps & www.albemarle.org/ • Volleyball Camps and Clinics classes please visit the website at or call the Forparks detailed information on Albemar www.albemarle.org/parks or call main office at the • Outdoor Movie Nights classes please visit the website at www. main office at 434-296-5844. 434-296-5844.

at 434-296-5844.

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For detailed information on Albemarle County Parks and Recreation camps & classes please visit the website at www.albemarle.org/parks or call the main office at 434-296-5844.

Register for STEAM Discovery Academy’s Summer Camp!

It’s It’s time time to to register register for for summer summer camp! camp! In In addition addition to to culticultivating a passion for all aspects of STEAM: Science, vating a passion for all aspects of STEAM: Science, TechTechnology, nology, Engineering, Engineering, Art, Art, and and Math, Math, our our programs programs integrate integrate essential leadership skill development essential leadership skill development including including commucommunication, nication, teamwork, teamwork, and and goal goal setting. setting. Our Our programs programs are are designed designed to to spark spark curiosity, curiosity, build build resilience resilience and and self-conself-confidence. fidence. Concepts Concepts and and challenges challenges are are presented presented by by comcombining education and entertainment, allowing students bining education and entertainment, allowing students to to learn learn through through play play and and grow grow while while having having fun. fun.

Don’t miss your opportunity to be a part of the fun! Learn more and register at www.steamda.com! Email: info@steamdiscoveryacademy.com

Phone: 434-987-3918

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•• Eligibility: Eligibility: Open Open to to students students K-8 K-8 grade grade •• Location: Location: Charlottesville Charlottesville Catholic Catholic School School and and our our Incubator Incubator located located at at 206 206 Albemarle Albemarle Sq. Sq. •• Camp Camp Hours: Hours: 8:30a-5:30p, 8:30a-5:30p, with with half half day day options options


2024 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

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#1 Day Camp in Charlottesville Limited Space Available REGISTER NOW!

Front Porch Summer Camp and Spring Break too!

Sing! Mo ve!

GRADES K - 11

Play!

434.293.2529 • www.tripleccamp.com

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Cr

Rising K - 2 8:30 - 3 pm 3+ hrs outdoor activities each day! www.frontporchcville.org

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Tips for Campers (and Parents!)

The Bridge PAI’s Summer Camp offer exciting and engaging opportunities for youth to explore their creativity with a local artist. Intro to Stop Motion Animation $275.00 Total of 15 participants Grades 1-4 Teacher: Joe Vena Date and Time: June 17- June 21, 8:30am-12:30pm

Art Show $275.00 Total of 15 participants Grades 1-4 Teacher: Ryan Trott Date and Time: June 10-June 14, 8:30am-12:30pm

Mural Camp $275.00 Total of 15 participants Grade 5 and up Teacher: Jae Johnson Date and Time: July 15-19, 8:30am-12:30pm

Register and find more info at: www.thebridgepai.org/camps

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Have a question? Email education@thebridgepai.org

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Today’s youth go to technology to escape, and studies show this increases their stress. Some ideas might be: taking 10 deep breaths, traveling to a happy place in your mind, packing a certain stuffed animal, shooting hoops, or tossing a football. They are capable of this independence. • Your plan should NOT be, “Give it a couple of days and if you don’t like it, we will come get you.” This will set them up to give it a couple of days and knock the confidence right out of them. • Let your camper know what to expect with correspondence. You don’t need to write everyI love those rare moments of parday, but let them know what to enthood when I am not preparing expect. for the next thing. Most of the time as a parent, I feel as if my day is full of getting something ready. Yourself Small things like breakfast, sack • You are giving your child an incredible gift. I cannot promise lunches, and backpacks. Big things you that they won’t lose some like preparing my children to besocks, that they will love every come productive adults. Our job meal or activity, and that they as a parent is to prep! will adore every counselor. But you are preparing them for colIt’s spring, and summer camp is on lege and beyond; you are giving the horizon. Here are some things them the freedom to gain conthat you can do to prepare your fidence, independence, and camper and yourself for camp. leadership skills; and you are instilling in them that they can Camper do it. • Plan several sleep overs. Resist • What do YOU want during their the urge to pack their bags for time at camp? Think about a vathem or to check on them while cation, time to organize, time to there. If they have a phone, have have one-on-one time with your them leave it at home. This is a other children, or some “date good way to practice not having nights” with your spouse or direct or constant contact. friends. • Have them write a good ol’ letter to someone. You will thank • If you have apprehensions, work to resolve them. If you are worme when you receive a letter ried that your camper is not gofrom camp! ing to know anyone, set up a • Gear up physically. If you have pre-camp get-together. If you purchased hiking boots, break are worried about your camper’s them in with a long walk. medical needs, become friendly • Especially for teenagers, have with the camp nurse. If you are them take a mini-vacation from anxious about their food allertheir devices. A couple of hours gies, talk to the camp’s head or a weekend. cook. Make a camper-sick plan • Have them write a statement for yourself. :) Make sure there for their social media pages. is only excitement and optimism “Peace out Facebook, I won’t be coming from you, and share your sharing my day-by-days with anxiety with another adult. you, I will be at camp.” Your • Pack self-addressed envelopes teenager may not post that, but in their luggage. maybe something like it. • Have them write down their • Whether they are flying or driving, refrain from bawling until goals. they can’t see you. Take a deep breath, trust, and remind yourMake a homesick plan: self that you are giving them an • Homesickness isn’t entirely bad. awesome gift. It’s great to love your home. It’s sometimes part of the process, Brooke Cheley-Klebe is the 4th and it’s a confidence booster generation to operate Cheley Colwhen a camper gets through it. orado Camps. She is the proud • Make a happy place plan and mom of three girls, Ellie, Kate, and write it down. This is an amazing Samantha, and loves being inopportunity to learn a life skill. volved in the camp industry.

With small group sizes,

2024 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

Preparing for Camp:

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2024 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

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NEW IN 2024

FOUR ACTION PACKED WEEKS OF LAUGHING AND LEARNING! July 8 –Aug. 2 | stab.org/summer

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Ages 6-10 & 11-14 www.wildrock.org

Brought to you by

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Camp

Nature play!

A Safe Haven For Creative Self-Expression A Safe Haven For Creative Self-Expression arts • crafts • sewing • theatre • music • • • • arts printmaking wizardry • animation • cooking • crafts sewing theatre music

wizardry • animation • cooking • printmaking

Session 1: June 10-21Session 1: June 10 - 21 Session 2: June 24-July 5 Session 2: June 24 - July 5

Rising 1st-6th Grades Haven For Creative Self-Expression NEW!

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Week-Long Programs for Contact Director Jocelyn Camarata Rising 7th-9 th 434-296-1303 ext. 501 Grades

Week-Long Contact Director Jocelyn Camarata A Safe Haven For Creative Self-Expression s • crafts • sewing • theatre •Programs music 434-296-1303 ext. 501 for Rising dry • animation • cooking • printmaking spectrumdirector@tandemfs.org spectrumdirector@tandemfs.org 7th-9th arts • crafts • sewing • theatre • music Grades Session 1: June 10-21wizardry animation available printmaking •Registration • cooking Registration available at tandemfs.org/spectrum at•tandemfs.org/spectrum

ession 2: June 24-July 5

Rising 1st-6th Grades ative Self-Expression

Session 1: June 10-21 NEW


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- Healthcare - Culture & Performing Arts - Coding & AI - Build & Design - Drive & Fly - Drones & Gaming

Learn today...Lead tomorrow

Summer Camps 2024

- Gaming & Animation - Game Design I & Game Design II - Advanced Technologies - Robotics & Gaming - Visual & Performing Arts - Science & Art

Scholarship options: As low as $60 per student for each week-long camp experience.

Locations

2024 SUMMER CAMP GUIDE

KidsCollege@PVCC

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Fluvanna County High School, Jefferson School and PVCC Main Campus.

In-Person &

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Scholarships available!

www.pvcc.edu/kidscollege | 434.961.5354 | kidscollege@pvcc.edu

CINE Golden Eagle Award

PEABODY Award Winner

NY Festivals TV & Film Best Student Program

Children’s Film Festival Seattle Official Selection 2024

San Diego International Kids’ Film Festival Official Selection 2023

Los Angeles Animation Festival Finalist 2023

CHECK OUT OUR WORKSHOPS FOR RISING 9TH GRADE - COLLEGE FRESHMEN

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Narrative Filmmaking - June 3 - 7 & June 24 - 28 Animation with Motion Capture - June 10 - 14 Mockumentary - June 17 - 21 Evening Screenwriting - June 17 - 21 Evening Acting for the Camera - June 17 - 21 Advanced Film Lab - July 1 - 5 Narrative Filmmaking Level II - July 8 - 19 Nonfiction Filmmaking - July 22 - August 2 Movie Musical - August 5 - 9

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Online


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PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

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February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

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#1

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CROSSWORD

I remember that BY MATT JONES ACROSS 1. Ceremonial act 5. Angry 8. Toy manufacturer in a 2023 movie 14. Even, to Yvette 15. Sugary suffix 16. Kay Thompson’s Plaza Hotel girl 17. Effect of ongoing muscle strain, maybe 19. Gas station brand 20. “God giveth, and the DMV ___ away” (memorable line from 1988’s “License to Drive”) 21. Skirt length 22. “Can I buy ___?” (request to Graham Norton on the U.K.’s “Wheel of Fortune”) 23. Soda concoction that’s not quite cream soda 29. Clothing 31. LAX postings 32. Prepared 33. Seal-hunting swimmers 36. Corned beef dishes 39. Business with wholly owned subsidiaries 43. Medium setting? 44. Alphabetically last Marx brother 45. “32 Flavors” singer DiFranco 46. World of Warcraft beginner, perhaps 48. Clean (up) 52. Description that spares no detail 57. Teachers’ org. 58. Number after sieben 59. Magic Johnson’s real first name 61. Sly question of confirmation

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S O F A R B A N C L I E V A L S O O G L E A N O D E U N I X S C R U B C L E A N T R I O D E S E T L O O S E T R Y A S E E S R E D L E N D E E D O Z E N I P O D T H I R T Y T W A S H U F F L E H A L N E O H E R E S Y F A C E E L M E V I C T S B O T O X R O A R F E D O R A S A P P L E S N O R T H S E A B R O A D M I N D S U C A L A C E S A R O N I N O S E H A L T N E G A N A T T Y

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Strong suits

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ANSWERS 2/7/24

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

1

35. Closing into a fist 37. Guitar intensifier 38. Identify 39. Academy in Colorado, briefly 40. Handout at a restaurant 41. Leave abruptly 42. “From Peru to ___ ...” (line from Enya’s “Orinoco Flow”) 47. 10 of 12, for short 49. Intrude upon 50. Airport winter need 51. Pull vigorously on 53. “Star Wars” character Calrissian 54. Respond to, as an order 55. “Hot in Herre” rapper 56. “Què ___?” (“How’s it going?”) 60. Baseball card stats 61. The Last ___ (“Hot Ones” closing sauce, usually) 62. Suffix for reflect or reflex 63. Improv comedy pioneer ___ Close 64. Fish and chips fish 65. Show on television

64. Repeat reference, or what the long theme answers demonstrate 66. Longtime Vogue photographer Richard 67. “Beds Are Burning” band Midnight ___ 68. Inkling 69. Fit in 70. Thirsty 71. Mirû Museum architect Jose Luis ___


42 By Rob Brezsny

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Pisces

(Feb. 19–March 20): Piscean perfumer Sophia Grojsman says, “Our lives are quiet. We like to be disturbed by delight.” To that end, she has created over 30 best-selling fragrances, including Eternity Purple Orchid, Désir Coulant (Flowing Desire), Spellbound, Volupté (Pleasure), and Jelisaveta (“God is abundance”). I bring this up, Pisces, because I believe it’s now essential for you to be disturbed by delight—as well as to disturb others with delight. Please do what’s necessary to become a potent magnet for marvelous interruptions, sublime interventions, and blissful intrusions. And make yourself into a provider of those healing subversions, too.

Aries

(March 21–April 19): Some stories don’t have a distinct and orderly beginning, middle, and end. At any one point, it may be hard to know where you are. Other tales have a clear beginning, middle, and end, but the parts occur out of order; maybe the middle happens first, then the end, followed by the beginning. Every other variation is possible, too. And then there’s the fact that the beginning of a new story is implied at the end of many stories, even stories with fuzzy plots and ambiguous endings. Keep these ruminations in mind during the coming weeks, Aries. You will be in a phase when it’s essential to know what story you are living in and where you are located in the plot’s unfoldment.

Taurus

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(April 20–May 20): As I meditate on your destiny in the near future, I sense you will summon extra courage, perhaps even fearless and heroic energy. I wonder if you will save a drowning person, or rescue a child from a burning building, or administer successful CPR to a stranger who has collapsed on the street. Although I suspect your adventures will be less dramatic than those, they may still be epic. Maybe you will audaciously expose corruption and deceit, or persuade a friend to not commit self-harm, or speak bold thoughts you haven’t had the daring to utter before.

Gemini

(May 21–June 20): Lately, you have been learning more than you thought possible. You have surpassed and transcended previous limits in your understanding of how the world works. Congratulations! I believe the numerous awak-

Aquarius

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Poet Anna Akhmatova lived till age 76, but her destiny was a rough ride. Her native country, the authoritarian Soviet Union, censored her

work and imprisoned her friends and family. In one of her poems, she wrote, “If I can’t have love, if I can’t find peace, give me a bitter glory.” She got the latter wish. She came close to winning a Nobel Prize and is now renowned as a great poet and heroic symbol of principled resistance to tyranny. Dear Aquarius, I predict that your life in the coming months will be very different from Akhmatova’s. I expect you will enjoy more peace and love than you’ve had in a long time. Glory will stream your way, too, but it will be graceful, never bitter. The effects will be heightened if you express principled resistance to tyranny. enings stem from your willingness to wander freely into the edgy frontier—and then stay there to gather in all the surprising discoveries and revelations flowing your way. I will love it if you continue your pilgrimage out there beyond the borders for a while longer.

Cancer

(June 21–July 22): As I study the astrological omens for the coming weeks, I suspect you will feel more at home in a situation that has previously felt unnerving or alien. Or you will expedite the arrival of the future by connecting more deeply with your roots. Or you will cultivate more peace and serenity by exploring exotic places. To be honest, though, the planetary configurations are half-mystifying me; I’m offering my best guesses. You may assemble a strong foundation for an experimental fantasy. Or perhaps you will engage in imaginary travel, enabling you to wander widely without leaving your sanctuary. Or all of the above.

Leo

(July 23–Aug. 22): Of your hundreds of wishes and yearnings, Leo, which is the highest on your priority list? And which are the next two? What are the sweet, rich, inspiring experiences you want more than anything else in life? I invite you to compile a tally of your top three longings. Write them on a piece of paper. Draw or paste an evocative symbol next to each one. Then place this holy document in a prominent spot that you will see regularly. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you are in a phase when focusing and intensifying your intentions will bring big rewards.

Virgo

(Aug. 23–Sept. 22): Actor and travel writer Andrew McCarthy hiked across Spain along

the famous pilgrimage route, Camino de Santiago. On the way, he felt so brave and strong that at one point he paradoxically had a sobbing breakdown. He realized how fear had always dominated his life. With this chronic agitation absent for the first time ever, he felt free to be his genuine self. “I started to feel more comfortable in the world and consequently in my own skin,” he testified, concluding, “I think travel obliterates fear.” I recommend applying his prescription to yourself in the coming months, Virgo—in whatever ways your intuition tells you are right. Cosmic forces will be aligned with you.

Libra

(Sept. 23–Oct. 22): In the natural world, there are four partnership styles. In the parasitic variety, one living thing damages another while exploiting it. In the commensal mode, there is exploitation by one partner, but no harm occurs. In the epizoic model, one creature serves as a vehicle for the other but gets nothing in return. The fourth kind of partnership is symbiotic. It’s beneficial to both parties. I bring these thoughts to your attention, Libra, because the coming weeks will be an excellent time to take an inventory of your alliances and affiliations—and begin to de-emphasize, even phase out, all but the symbiotic ones.

Scorpio

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio author Dan Savage says, “I wish I could let myself eat and eat and eat.” He imagines what it would be like if he didn’t “have to monitor the foods I put in my mouth or go to the gym anymore.” He feels envious of those who have no inhibitions about being gluttonous. In alignment with astrological aspects, I au-

thorize Savage and all Scorpios to temporarily set aside such inhibitions. Take a brief break. Experiment with what it feels like to free yourself to ingest big helpings of food and drink—as well as metaphorical kinds of nourishment like love and sex and sensations and entertainment. Just for now, allow yourself to play around with voraciousness. You may be surprised at the deeper liberations it triggers.

Sagittarius

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Dear Wise Gambler: You rank high in your spacious intelligence, intuitive logic, and robust fantasy life. There’s only one factor that may diminish your ability to discern the difference between wise and unwise gambles. That’s your tendency to get so excited by big, expansive ideas that you neglect to account for messy, inconvenient details. And it’s especially important not to dismiss or underplay those details in the coming weeks. If you include them in your assessments, you will indeed be the shrewdest of wise gamblers.

Capricorn

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn golfer Tiger Woods is one of the all-time greats. He holds numerous records and has won scores of tournaments. On 20 occasions, he has accomplished the most difficult feat: hitting a hole-in-one. But the weird fact is that there were two decades (1998–2018) between his 19th and 20th holes-in-one. I suspect your own fallow time came in 2023, Capricorn. By now, you should be back in the hole-inone groove, metaphorically speaking. And the coming months may bring a series of such crowning strokes. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: RealAstrology.com, (877) 873-4888


CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE Friday at 5 PM for

inclusion in the next Wednesday’s paper.

SIZES Full AVAILABLE Page Half Page Quarter Page Eight Page 1/16 (Business Card)

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Rates starting at $40. Email for specific pricing.

Pre-payment Required. We accept all major credit cards, cash or check.

EMPLOYMENT

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CLINICAL TRIALS

Advancing Healthcare Through

CLINICAL TRIALS

www.uvaclinicaltrials.com

Exercise Training and Drug Study

We’re eager to hear from candidates who share our passion for serving the community for the following positions.

$16-$18 per hour

UVA Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism Lee Hartline 434-924-5247, lmh9d@virginia.edu HSR200065 How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.

To see a complete job description for each position, visit arcpva.org/careers Advancing Healthcare Through

Offering competitive compensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive benefits package including paid leave, health, dental & vision insurance, as well as life & long-term disability insurance.

CLINICAL TRIALS

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Study for Type 1 Diabetes

The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

UVA Division of Endocrinology Study Coordinator: Lee Hartline Phone: 434-924-5247 / email: lmh9d@virginia.edu IRB-HSR# 210198 How clinical trials benefit you. At UVA, clinical trials are taking place every day. Because of this, UVA is an environment of care where learning, discovery and innovation flourish. And it is our patients — today and in the future — who reap the rewards, whether or not they participate in a trial. Please call the trial coordinator to enroll confidentially or for additional information.

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Men and women with type 1 diabetes, 18-40 are needed for a study about the impact of an investigational medicine or exercise training on blood vessel health. Participation includes 2 outpatient study admissions (7-10 hours) and 6 brief study visits over 4 months, taking a study medication or participating in exercise training (3 times weekly) for 14 weeks, and completing questionnaires. All visits are scheduled during the week. 3 visits require blood draws. Compensation is $700. Principal Investigator: Kaitlin Love, MD

February February 14 14 -- 20 20 ,, 2024 2024 c-ville.com c-ville.com

Direct Support Professionals (Residential and Day Support)

Non-smoking, inactive adults aged 21-60 needed for study on the effect of exercise and the drug liraglutide on blood vessels. You must have 3 of the 4 characteristics: overweight, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high fasting blood sugar. Study requires three 1-hour and two 9-hour visits over 6 months in UVA’s Clinical Research Unit. Participants are randomized to one of 3 groups: exercise training, study drug, or exercise + study drug. Compensation is $1,500. Principal Investigator: Zhenqi Liu, M


LEGALS

44

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: L.M. (dob 2/4/2018)

VIRGINIA: IN THE ALBEMARLE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT MOUNT MORIAH CHURCH, A Virginia nonstock corporation, Plaintiff, v. PARTIES UNKNOWN, Defendants, Defendants,.

Case No.: CL24-59

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

February 14 - 20 , 2024 c-ville.com

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The object of this suit between Plaintiff Plaintiff.Mount MountMoriah MoriahChurch, Church.and andDeDefendants, fendants. Parties Unknown, is to quiet title to a parcel of land in Albemarle County. The parcel of land at issue is Parcel 30B as shown in that certain Plat Showing a Boundary Survey of Mount Moriah Methodist Church and Cemetery of Key Incorporated Land Surveyors & Land Planners signed by John A. Taggart, III 27, 2001 and recorded among the land records Ill on March 27. of the Albemarle County Circuit Court in Book 2023, Pages 361-64, which is part of Tax Map Parcel Number 04100-00-00-03000. 04100-00- 00-03000. Plaintiff has filed a complaint which (i) states that there are or may be persons, whose names are unknown, interested in the subject to be divided or disposed of; (ii) describes the nature of such interest; and (iii) makes such persons defendants by the general description of “parties unknown”. Accordingly, it is therefore ORDERED that any such interested parties unknown appear in this LhisCourt Courtlocated locatedatat501 501East EastJefferson JeffersonStreet, Street,CharlotCharlottesville, Virginia 22902, on or before April 12, 2024, at 9:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as counsel may be heard, to protect their interests. And, it is further ORDERED that this Order be published once each week for four successive weeks in C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper of general circulation in Albemarle County; County: that a copy of this order be posted at the front door of the courthouse wherein this Court is held; and that, upon completion of such publication, the clerk shall file a certificate in the papers of this case that the requirements of Virginia Code Section 8.01-317 have been satisfied. Entered this 16 day of January, 2024 Cheryl V. Higgins Judge WE ASK FOR THIS: Thomas Thomas M. M. Hendell Hendell (VSB (VSB No. No. 78579) 78579) Daniel R.O. Long (VSB No. Daniel R.O. Long (VSB No. 95873) 95873) TREMBLAY TREMBLAY & & SMITH, SMITH, PLLC PLLC 105 East High Street 105 East High Street Charlottesville, Charlottesville, Virginia Virginia 22903 22903 Telephone: (434) Telephone: (434) 977-4455 977-4455 Facsimile: Facsimile: (434) (434) 979-1221 979-1221 thomas.hendell@tremblaysmith.com thomas.hendell@tremblaysmith.com daniel.long@tremblaysmith.com daniel.long@tremblaysmith.com

The object of this suit is to terminate residual parental rights in L.M. (dob 2/4/2018) and aprove foster care plan with adoption goal. It is ORDERED that Katy Maupin, appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before March 19, 2024 at 9:00 a.m. 1/9/2024 DATE

Areshini Pather JUDGE

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: Z.S. (dob 8/22/2007) The object of this suit is to terminate residual parental rights in Z.S. (dob 8/22/2007) and aprove foster care plan with adoption goal. It is ORDERED that Amy Runyon, appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before April 2, 2024 at 9:00 a.m. 2/1/2024 DATE

Areshini Pather JUDGE


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NOTICE NOTICE OF OF COMBINED COMBINED JUDICIAL JUDICIAL SALE SALE FOR FOR DELINQUENT DELINQUENTTAXES TAXES Pursuant Pursuant to to Decrees Decrees entered entered in in the the Circuit Circuit Court Court of of Albemarle Albemarle County, County, Virginia, and the Circuit Court for the City of Virginia, and the Circuit Court for the City of Charlottesville, Charlottesville, Virginia, Virginia, respectively, respectively, the the undersigned, undersigned, Jonathan Jonathan T. T. Wren, Wren, Special Special Commissioner of said Courts, will offer for sale pursuant to Section Commissioner of said Courts, will offer for sale pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq seq.. of of the the Code Code of of Virginia, Virginia, at at public public auction auction on on the the 58.1-3965, et front steps or in the main courtroom of the Albemarle County Circuit front steps or in the main courtroom of the Albemarle County Circuit Courthouse, Jefferson Street, Street, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, Virginia, Virginia, on on Courthouse, 501 501 E. E. Jefferson Tuesday, February 27, 2024 at 2:00 p.m., properties located Tuesday, February 27, 2024 at 2:00 p.m., properties located in in Albemarle Albemarle County County and and the the City City of of Charlottesville, Charlottesville, for for payment payment of of delinquent delinquent taxes. taxes. For For aa list list of ofproperties propertiesand andterms termsof ofsale, sale,please pleasego goto to www.martinwrenlaw.com. www.martinwrenlaw.com. For For more more information, information, you you may may also also contact contact Jonathan Jonathan T. T. Wren, Wren, Special Special Commissioner, Commissioner, at at 434-817-3100 434-817-3100 or wren@martinwrenlaw.com. or wren@martinwrenlaw.com.

SERVICES

SHOW CAUSE AGAINST DISTRIBUTION ORDER It is ORDERED that the creditors of, and all others interested in the above estate show cause, if they can, on March 19, 2024, at 9:00 a.m. before this Court at its courtroom, against the payment and delivery of the estate to the distributees without requiring refunding bonds. It appearing to the Court that the report of the accounts of Patricia L. Shawley and Truist Bank, Co-Executors of the Estate of Steven Ray Shawley, and the report of the debts and demands against the estate have been filed in the Clerk’s Office and that six months have elapsed since the qualification of such Executors, on motion of the Executors, it is ORDERED that the first paragraph of this Order be published once a week for two successive weeks in C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper with general circulation in Albemarle County, Virginia.

GOT MAD SKILLS? Cheryl V. Higgins Judge

Artist Bobby Austin

Notices

Women’s Women’s Divorce Divorce and and Pursuant to Separation Decrees entered in the Circuit Court of Albemarle County, Separation Recovery Recovery Virginia, and the Circuit Court for the City of Charlottesville, Virginia, respectively, the undersigned, Jonathan T. Wren, Special Group Therapy Group Therapy

IN RE ESTATE OF STEVEN RAY SHAWLEY, DECEASED

Artist Bobby WE ASK FOR THIS: Austin

& MISC. NOTICE OF COMBINED JUDICIAL SALE FOR DELINQUENT TAXES

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE

Entered this 8th day of February, 2024

Community

Commissioner of said Courts, will offer for sale pursuant to Section 58.1-3965, et seq. of the Code of Virginia, at public auction on the Early, LPC Deb Early, LPC front steps or in the Deb main courtroom of the Albemarle County Circuit Courthouse, 501 E. Jefferson Street, Charlottesville, Virginia, on Tuesday, February 27, 2024 at 2:00 Ext p.m., properties located in 434-963-0324 434-963-0324 Ext 6 6 Albemarle County and the City of Charlottesville, for payment of delinquent taxes. For a list of properties and terms of sale, please go to Dr. & Associates Dr. Lewis Lewis Weber Weber Associates www.martinwrenlaw.com. For more&information, you may also Providers of mental health 1980 Providers ofT.quality quality mental health since since 1980 contact Jonathan Wren, Special Commissioner, at 434-817-3100 or wren@martinwrenlaw.com.

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46

P.S. HAIKUS FROM THE HEART

Words of love C-VILLE’s Valentine’s Day poetry contest returned for another round of competition this year, and we are excited to share the winner and runners up from 2024’s impressive batch of entries. These heartfelt and beautifully crafted haikus capture the mystery, passion, tragedy, and wisdom of love, all in a compact form. Thank you to all who submitted!

F I R S T P L AC E Lovers hold their breath in the heart of Winter’s den like seeds await sun. Jessi Giannini

February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

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RU NNERS U P I saw you today holding hands in a cafe. My heart is shattered...

Your gaze catches mine Pierced, we come undone as one The jay laughs with joy

We’re getting old now Young lovers should heed our words: Live for each other

Larry Bauer

Jan Sievers Mahon

Laird Wm. Ramsay

Apricot revealed Chlorophyll gives way to gold Souls become real too

words have lost their way I can no longer express my heartbeat tells all

True love is always saving the last Oreo for your wife to eat.

Mary Courts

James Irving Mann

Sarah Shedd

I open the note It’s my name in the corner heart beating faster

Parking garage love— Concrete perfumes a shared breath as we start to kiss

Love smells of roses Thorns draw bright red aroma Blue heart remembrance

Madelyn Jones

Jessica Bossler Palmer

Glenda Staton


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February 14 – 20, 2024 c-ville.com

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Thank you for Thirty Wordy Years! March 20—24, 2024

Throughout Charlottesville with special preview events around the Commonwealth

Seventy Bookish Events! Highlights include: Wordy Thirty Anniversary Party Sat., March 23, 7—11pm

Celebrate our 30th Anniversary at The Bradbury/Vault with a D.J., dancing, drinks, food, and authors! (ticketed)

The Paramount Theater: All Day Pass Sat., March 23, 10:30am—8pm

All day, all events: Senator Danica Roem, U.S. Poet Laureate Ada Limón, bestseller Roxane Gay, and Percival Everett on tour with his newest book, all at The Paramount Theater. (ticketed)

Festival Friday on Charlottesville’s Downtown Mall

Fri., March 22, 5—7:30pm

Bookshops and other spots offer readings, poetryprompts, art, and literature, and you. (free)

Same Page Community Read:

Wed., March 20, 5:30—7pm

Florence Adler Swims Forever Jefferson Madison Regional Library presents this community read at the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center. (free)

30th Anniversary Kickoff:

’90s Rooftop Party Common House, Charlottesville Wednesday, March 20; 7—9pm 90’s dress would be dope (but not required) on the roof (unless the weather’s trippin’) Join pop culture critic and author of 60 Songs that Explain the ‘90s Rob Harvilla to hear some throwback tunes and reminisce about the ‘90s.

Find all Festival Events, Authors, Speakers, and full Schedule at

VABook.org or scan the QR Code


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