C-VILLE Weekly | December 22, 2021 - January 4, 2022

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A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®

Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene,

Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange,

Augusta

ORANGE COUNTY It all clicked: Your most-read online stories

PAGE 13

Hear here: Virginia musicians stayed busy in 2021

PAGE 29

Close-In with a

Lifestyle to Love BY CARLA HUCKABEE

INSIDE

EZE AMOS

DECEMBER 22, 2021 – JANUARY 4, 2022 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

VOL. 30 NO. 51-52 n DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T HE CHARLOTTESVILL E


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Need a Reason? Bikini Season!

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December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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Want to stay in while it's chilly? Give us a call or place an order online!

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com facebook.com/cville.weekly


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Rocky will be at the Eternal Attic on Friday, January 7th 10 – 4

521 W. Main Street Waynesboro, VA 22980

paying you top dollar for your gold and silver and antiques.

gold and silver are still up!

(540) 943-9999 www.waynetheatre.org

now is the time to sell!

Rocky pays more for gold, silver and many other items he can resell

ROCKY BUYS:

SEE CURRENT MOVIE SCHEDULE ONLINE!

Arts Education Programs & Student Workshops Opportunities for kids to GROW in both their SKILLS & TALENTS and FOR THE ARTS Our atheir capella LOVE quartets and octets, adorned in Victorian dress, present holiday carols Learn More at waynetheatre.org

GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM JEWELRY (EVEN BROKEN) GOLD, SILVER PLATINUM COINS, BULLION HE PAYS EXTRA FOR GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS HE CAN RESELL ROCKY WILL PAY UP TO $3000 FOR A GOOD ONE CARAT DIAMOND SOLITAIRE STERLING FLATWARE, HOLLOWWARE ANTIQUE GUNS AND AMMUNITION, SWORDS, CIVIL WAR ITEMS POST CARDS, OLD QUILTS, OLD CLOCKS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE SOME GLASSWARE SOME COSTUME JEWELRY SOME POCKET AND WRIST WATCHES LIKE ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE, OMEGA, AND MORE RUNNING OR NOT SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY

buying gold silver and antiques daily jewelry repairs done on the premises often while you wait paying $2,000 - $3,000 for ladies Rolex watches and $2,500-$3,500 for men’s two-tone Rolex watches

HOURS: tues - sat 9:30 - 5 • 1-800-296-8676 Antiques open at 9:00

rockysgoldandsilver.com VISIT ROCKY’S EBAY SITE FOR SPECIALS ON GOLD, SILVER, ANITQUES AND COINS

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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WO R KI NG AT

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A unique, historic downtown coworking space

A comprehensive benefits package

A flexible, hybrid workforce

Working in a mission-driven industry

LEAR N MO R E : W W W. S ILV E R CH A IR.CO M /C A RE E RS


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Art Classes with Lee Alter Art Classes

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RESOLUTIONS FOR 2022:

TAKE A TRIP...

...AND PACK FOR IT LIKE A PRO.

Cubes, folders, pouches….all designed to increase organization, decrease weight, and make you feel great about getting out again.

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

Customized Vacations · Spring Break Trips Honeymoons · Multi-Generational Trips

LUGGAGE · HANDBAGS · TRAVEL ACCESSORIES · FULL-SERVICE TRAVEL AGENCY | Visit us at the Millmont Shops or online at shop.peacefrogstravel.com.

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est.


INSIDE THIS ISSUE

6

V.33, No. 51

FEATURE 15

The year in review ®

METROPOLITAN

2020

METROPOLITAN LIFE SUITS YOU.

METRPOLITAN LIFE SUITS YOU.

powersports.honda.com

ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE AFTER CONSUMING DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. For rider training information or to locate a rider training course near you, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 1-800-446-9227. Metropolitan® is a registered trademark of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. ©2020 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (02/20)

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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1370 MY20_Product AdMats Rnd.8 7.625” x 5.25” MODEL: METROPOLITAN Category: SCOOTER PAGE 10 February 28, 2020 9:50 AM

We said good riddance to the generals and told white supremacists to pay up, while our city government roiled, Republicans won big, weed became legal (kind of), and UVA redefined free speech. NEWS

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13 Meet the reader who regularly tells John Dewberry to finish what he started— plus our most-read stories of 2021.

CULTURE

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29 Sound Choices: Local music we loved this year. 31 All You Can Eat: Hello, goodbye—restaurant openings and closings. 35 The Working Pour: White wines to drink during the winter. 37 Extra: Derrick J. Waller’s “A Good Cry” captures moments of connection.

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

EDITORIAL EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (434) 373-0073 editor@c-ville.com NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Kristin O’Donoghue CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins,*Lucas Czarnecki, Amelia Delphos, Carol Diggs, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Lisa Provence, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Courteney Stuart, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR* Max March max@c-ville.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Gabby Kirk (434) 373-2136 gabby@c-ville.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Chloe Heimer, Lisa C. Hurdle DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman REAL ESTATE WEEKLY Beth Wood (434) 373-0999 beth@caarew.com PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

BUSINESS PUBLISHER Anna Harrison anna@c-ville.com CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Debbie Miller debbie@c-ville.com A/R SPECIALIST Nanci Winter (434) 373-0429 CIRCULATION MANAGER Billy Dempsey circulation@c-ville.com

42 Sudoku 43 Crossword 45 Free Will Astrology

CLASSIFIED 48

Real Estate Weekly Page 51

C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle, and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2021 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

Virginia Press Association


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ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL

THESOUTHERNCVILLE.COM

JEFFERSONTHEATER.COM

April 19 2022

SATURDAY, JANUARY 22

SAVED BY THE 90’S

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22

CHRIS ALAN PRESENTS: THE BARBER DEN PODCAST

A N EV ENING W ITH

APRIL 21, 2022 SUNDAY, JANUARY 23

ANDERSON EAST

SUNDAY, JANUARY 9

WITH BENDIGO FLETCHER

SISTERS & BROTHERS

01-27 | WHO’S BAD-THE ULTIMATE MICHAEL JACKSON EXPERIENCE 01-30 | LOST DOG STREET BAND *MOVED FROM THE SOUTHERN*

WITH BAKED SHRIMP AND SELEUS

SUNDAY APRIL 24

WITH MATT HECKLER

JUST ANNOUNCED!

02-07 | CORY AND THE WONGNOTES FT. ANTWAUN STANLEY

JANUARY 7-ON SALE NOW

DRAG BONANZA!

SPECIAL GUEST SIERRA HULL

02-12 | RIPE WITH THE CONNECTION 02-13 | YOLA WITH SPECIAL GUEST JAC ROSS 02-16 | DAVID BROMBERG QUINTET 02-17 | THE CADILLAC THREE 02-19 | THE STEEL WHEELS 02-20 | THE MOVEMENT

HOSTED BY: MISS BEBE GUNN & CHERRY POPPINS

CODY PURVIS

05.11.22

WITH BALLYHOO! AND LITTLE STRANGER

02-25 | LUCY DACUS SOLD OUT 03-01 | SAMMY RAE & THE FRIENDS 03-03 | FAYE WEBSTER

THE WOOKS

01-13 | JOCELYN & CHRIS PRESENTED BY 106.1 THE CORNER 01-23 | RYLEY WALKER WITH FILMS ON SONG 01-28 | DOPAPOD WITH EGGY 02-10 | JOE PURDY 02-11 | WILD RIVERS WITH COREY HARPER 02-12 | SUSTO 02-16 | DAVID BROMBERG QUINTET

FEATURING KATE BOLLINGER

03-21 | SOCCER MOMMY

WITH PEEL DREAM MAGAZINE

03-28 | WELCOME TO THE NIGHT VALE WITH SPECIAL GUEST: ELIZA RICKMAN

04-04 | CAR SEAT HEADREST 04-06 | FRIENDS! THE MUSICAL PARODY 04-10 | DAN TYMINSKI BAND NEW DATE 04-13 | SHOVELS AND ROPE 04-15 | TOMMY EMMANUEL

June 19

WITH ROB ICKES & TREY HENSLEY

02-20 | ANDY SHAUF WITH YVES JARVIS 02-21 | SUN JUNE WITH DAPHNE TUNES 02-25 | THE HAPPY FITS

WITH SPECIAL GUEST RICHARD SMITH

04-20 | ERIC JOHNSON TREASURE TOUR 2022 04-21 | SHARON VON ETTEN

WITH SARAH AND THE SUNDAYS

WITH SPECIAL GUEST MIA JOY

WITH KARINA RYKMAN

RENT THE JEFFERSON FOR YOUR EVENT!

RENTALS@JEFFERSONTHEATER.COM • 434-245-4917

WITH EARLY JAMES

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

TingPavilion.com

EAT AT THE SOUTHERN CAFÉ look for our daily specials!

café opens 2 hours prior to performances RENT THE SOUTHERN!

(434) 977-5590 or rentalinfo@thesoutherncville.com

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03-04 | SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS 03-15 | THE WAY DOWN WANDERERS 03-27 | ZACHARY WILLIAMS (OF THE LONE BELLOW)

04-25 | MATT KEARNEY 04-26 | TOO MANY ZOOZ

05-03 | LAWRENCE 05-05 | CAT POWER COVERS TOUR

NELLIE MCKAY

MARCH 16-ON SALE NOW

WITH INDIGO DE SOUZA

WITH BARTEES STRANGE

JANUARY 29-ON SALE NOW

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

JANUARY 16-ON SALE NOW


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THIS WEEK Each year, as the beginning of December rolls around, I eagerly click the link to my Spotify Wrapped. The annual rundown from the music streaming service shows users what they listened to the most over the last year, and people go crazy for it. Each year my social media feeds are clogged with friends sharing their top songs and artists. The wrap-up is so tantalizing, I think, because it offers me the chance to confirm that I’ve become the person I set out to be at the beginning of the year: cooler, hipper, happier than I was the year before. Of course, most of the time, the wrap-up suggests something different. When faced with cold hard numbers, I learn that my old favorites are still my old favorites, and that the metrics don’t quite back up my insistence that I really have changed. (That’s just a long-winded way of saying that my most-listened-to artist this year was, yet again, John Mayer.) In this week’s C-VILLE, you can take a look back at the biggest stories of 2021, both according to our online analytics (p. 13) and our gut instincts (p. 15). The wrap-up offers a snapshot of the way our city has and hasn’t grown since the calendar turned. We took down the statues, we held the neo-Nazis accountable, some great new restaurants opened. But the city’s leadership is still a mess, the conditions in the jail are still bad, and we’re still fighting against the coronavirus. As 2022 approaches, I hope we get to hear some new tunes. —Ben Hitchcock

12.22.21

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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A&W Collectables Antique Mall Over 60 Booths and Furniture Warehouse

Unique gifts for the holidays and everyday! Antiques Unique Gifts Artwork Vintage Cottage Chic

WISHING YOU PEACE, HOPE, & LOVE FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Jewelry Garden Art Glassware Furniture Seasonal Decor

WARMEST HOLIDAY WISHES FROM OUR A&W FAMILY TO YOURS! Thank you for supporting our small business! Open Christmas Eve until 3:00 pm. Open New Years Eve & New Years Day

3714 Richmond Rd, Keswick • 434-984-0820 Open Wed-Sun 9:30-5:30 6 miles east of Charlottesville •

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9 WINTER 2021

Taste is everything. CAN’T-MISS SIPS: We’re starting with Lightwell Survey’s Strange Hybrid Moments. PAGE 17

VERY FINE WINES

Small

What to drink, where to drink it, and who to know in the world of Virginia vino

Meet

CHRISTINA MARTIN,

Local

the baker with no bakery

SUSHI! Thai meets Japanese at the hands of the Tauchis PIZZA! A Lampo alum takes his slice of the local pie game BURRITOS! Lucky Blue’s Bar serves up something for everyone

Say “mmm.” When it comes to area eats, we let our cravings guide us. And in this quarterly magazine, you’ll find everything from a stack of pancakes to a plate of filet mignon. Each issue of Knife & Fork introduces readers to chefs, food trends, recipes, and, most importantly, the best meals around. ON STANDS SPRING, SUMMER, FALL, WINTER

We have Gifts for All Ages!

Great selection of La-Z-Boy recliners in stock! Open Mon-Fri 9:00-5:00 Saturday 10:00-3:00 540879-9372

Clocks, wall art, home décor, and more!

11 Killdeer Lane Dayton, VA 22821

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THE BELOVED HOLIDAY TRADITION RETURNS December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

LIVE ON STAGE!

A CHRISTMAS CAROL NOW THROUGH DECEMBER 30

Actress Natasia Reinhardt (photo by Amy Wolf)

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! AmericanShakespeareCenter.com • 540.851.1733 or 1.877.MUCH.ADO

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BLACKFRIARS PLAYHOUSE, STAUNTON, VA


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December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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Thank you for your support in 2021. The Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA has placed over 3,000 pets in homes this year.

Help us continue our lifesaving work by adopting, fostering or donating to save homeless pets! Scan to visit our website.

ww w . c a s p c a . o rg


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NO MATTER YOUR DESTiNATiON, QUiRK HOTELS ARE HERE FOR YOU THiS HOLiDAY SEASON. QUiRK RiCHMOND

201 W Broad St I (804) 340-6040 destinationhotels.com/quirk-hotel QUiRK CHARLOTTESViLLE 499 W Main St I (434) 729-1234 destinationhotels.com/quirk-charlottesville

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com facebook.com/cville.weekly


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434.977.4005 lwoodriff@loringwoodriff.com

401 Park Street Charlottesville, VA 22902

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425 NE 2ND STREET

690 IVY LANE

105 EDNAM PLACE

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526 N 1ST STREET

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4318 RAGGED VIEW COURT

699 IVY DEPOT ROAD

2014 FARRINGDON ROAD

Bellair

Free Union

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North Downtown

Farmington

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

Fray’s Grant

Ivy

North Downtown

Ivy

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Ivy

Ednam Forest

Near the University

Glenmore


“I said what I said, and y’all heard me. And I did what I did, and y’all saw it. Robert and his horse are gone.”

13

—Activist Zyahna Bryant, reflecting after the Lee statue was carted away in July

NEWS The ‘Dewberry Serenade,’ and other hits from an online man of mystery

PAGE 20

The Best of @Luffa_Klein What’s your go-to karaoke song? “My karaoke success is always the Dewberry Serenade. Always full of surprises and no solutions. Refrain goes ‘unfinished (14 years) disaster jungle concrete monument not removed from beautiful downtown.’ Sing along C’Ville.” SKYCLAD AERIAL

W

The Dewberry Hotel

Dewberry Mystery Drama. A dark scary unbelievable saga about an unfinished screaming disaster jungle project in mid C’Ville with a tragic NO ending. Get ready C’Ville it’s scare!” And on, and on, and on. We delighted in the creative, off-the-wall answers—and we started to wonder. Who was behind @Luffa_Klein? And what did the Dewberry ever do to him? Well, I’m pleased to report that we were able to track down our man of mystery. The person behind the @Luffa_Klein account wants to remain anonymous, but C-VILLE can confirm that he’s a longtime Charlottesville resident—and he’s been having just as much fun with the Question of the Week as we have. “I made it a sport, so to speak,” he says. When it comes to the Dewberry, “I think it’s ridiculous,” he says. “It appears unsafe, it doesn’t make sense. I’m not a lawyer, I’m

not an activist, I’m not politically involved, really… [But] it just sits there as a graveyard monument.” As it happens, there’s been some movement around the building in recent weeks—graffiti has been removed, and so has the sign on the front of the building that said “Coming summer 2009.” “The current work being done is a temporary art installation by The Friends of the Downtown Mall,” says city spokesman Joe Rice. “As far as the status of the building, it is my understanding that the owner is actively looking at options and a plan could materialize at some point in 2022.” For @Luffa_Klein, anything is better than what’s there now. “I don’t mind a hotel,” he says. “I just want to see it finished. Whoever comes up with a good idea.” —Ben Hitchcock

How do you expect the UVA basketball teams to fair this year? “UVA basketball teams will do just fine this season as long they don’t have to practice at terrible incomplete concrete rumble monument Dewberry (many names) in C’Ville center...FIRE ALL INVOLVED!” What’s been the biggest success in your garden this summer? “My success grow this summer has been Jungle Weed growing for FREE at the down town C’Ville unfinished (14 years) disaster Dewberry concrete monument that wasn’t taken down or removed. Shame on you C’Ville!” What’s your beverage of choice this summer? “My best all time drink is Dewberry Sour but hard to make sense of. Hard to learn because ingredients changes name all the time. Hard to make because it takes time (14 years) and hard to drink because you can swallow the unbelievable nonsense in a empty glass.”

It’s just clickbait:

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This mid-summer weekly wrap-up hit 6 Put it in reverse: City Council pauses pro- 9 ‘They were trying to kill me’: Charlottesville scholarships for descendants of enslaved on two of C-VILLE readers’ favorite toppolice accused of profiling, assault of Black posed parking garage (June 2) laborers (February 17) ics: Weed and the demise of the Fashion resident (February 3) The council says it will explore greener “This is really just the bare minimum that Square Mall. A Charlottesville police officer tackled options than a 300-spot garage. could be done for a community of people and concussed a Black civilian during a 4 Seeing Charlottesville: Painter Edward 7 The Power Issue: Rising stars edition who are responsible for these institutions traffic stop. Thomas captured local scenes in lively detail (June 23) existing,” said Justin Reid of Virginia Hu10 (May 26) Bagels, bridges, and Dave?: You know Our annual power issue highlighted unmanities in our most-read story of the year. Thomas, who passed away in May, is you’re from Charlottesville if… (April 28) der-30 all-stars, from public housing activ2 High hopes: A second-generation cannabis fondly remebered by many in the arts This lighthearted listicle garnered more ists to culinary whizzes, and more. entrepreneur gets a new weed club up and community. angry phone calls than any story we ran 8 ‘A dumpster fire’: City describes police misrunning—legally (October 6) this year. We wrote, “You know you’re from conduct as officers criticize chief (August 25) 5 Money talks: An anti-upzoning email The members-only Charlottesville CanCharlottesville if you’re so over Thomas Jefcampaign came exclusively from the city’s Former police chief RaShall Brackney nabis Club opened this fall. ferson.” Let me tell you: Some people here wealthiest homeowners (September 29) was fired in September, after her attempts are still really big fans of Thomas Jefferson. 3 In brief: CBD dispensary opens, Fashion Some wealthy local residents opposed to reform the department were met with Square Mall auctioned (July 21) building more dense housing in town. pushback from the rank and file. 1 Reparations: Virginia bill would require

@cville_weekly

C-VILLE’s most-read online stories of 2021

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

hat traits would you like to see in Charlottesville’s next police chief? What seasonal events are you excited to see return? If you had a warning label, what would it say? These are among this year’s C-VILLE Question of the Week. For most people, the answers to those questions would cover a pretty broad range of topics. But for the Twitter account @Luffa_Klein, all these queries come back to the same subject: The Dewberry Hotel. All year, multiple times per month, the avatar-less Twitter account has responded to our question, almost always finding a way to tie our prompt back to the unfinished steel shell that’s been sitting on the Downtown Mall for more than a decade, neglected by owner after owner. When asked to describe the perfect burger, @Luffa_Klein wrote, “My perfect burger is made with ‘organic meat’ from the Jungle Project fed ‘cows’ at the unfinished disaster Dewberrry Living!” To a question about the very best theater experiences, @Luffa_Klein responded, “Recent favorite theater experience is the

If you build it...


December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

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Thank you for your support this year and for helping us launch Envision. There’s still time to give this holiday season. Scan the codes below to learn more and make a difference in your community. Happy holidays!

Watch the trailer

@unitedwaycville unitedwaycville.org Make your gift


NEWS

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A look back at some of 2021’s biggest stories By Ben Hitchcock, Brielle Entzminger, and Kristin O’Donoghue

EZE AMOS

The city government couldn’t get its act together The George Rogers Clark statue was among the monuments removed this summer.

Glenn Youngkin will be sworn in next month.

Republicans took control of Virginia

Former city manager Tarron Richardson recently announced that he's suing the city for the way he was treated after he resigned last year.

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EZE AMOS

@cville_weekly

After two years of Democrats holding a trifecta in Virginia government, Republicans came storming back in 2021. Glenn Youngkin beat Terry McAuliffe in the governor’s race, and Republicans gained seven seats in the House of Delegates, turning a 55-45 Dem majority into a 52-48 advantage for the GOP. Youngkin, a former private equity CEO who spent $20 million of his own money on his campaign, will be sworn in on January 15. Democrats were busy during their two years in control: They abolished the death penalty, passed major climate change legislation, and expanded voting rights, among other things. Youngkin’s election could change all that. The fleece vestwearing, aw-shucksing finance baron says his day-one game plan includes eliminating the grocery tax, suspending the gas tax for a year, and establishing new charter schools. He’s shared plans to pull Virginia out of a 10-state regional greenhouse gas alliance, and during the campaign he promised to “go on offense” against abortion access and launch an Election Integrity Task Force. Creigh Deeds, Charlottesville’s longtime state Senator, took the long view when we spoke to him just after the election. “An election is not an event, it’s part of a process,” he said. “We’ll get through this. We just have to work harder.”

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

In one hot July weekend, four of Charlottesville’s racist old statues were pulled off their pedestals. The infamous downtown depictions of Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson were the first to go, wheeled out of town after a 5-0 vote from City Council in June to remove the bronze eyesores. The city then relocated a Lewis, Clark, and Sacagawea monument, and UVA got in on the action the next morning, whisking away a statue showing militia man George Rogers Clark towering over Native Americans. “This is a crucial first step in the right direction, to tell a more historically accurate and complete story of this place, and the people who call this place home,” said Zyahna Bryant on the morning the statues came down. As a high schooler, Bryant started a petition in 2016 that ultimately led to the statues’ removal five years later. “The work did not start here, and it will not end here,” she continued. “To the young people out there, I hope that this empowers you to speak up on the issues that matter and to take charge in your own cities and communities.” At the beginning of December, City Council voted to hand the Lee statue over the Jefferson School of African American Heritage Center, which plans to melt it down and have an artist reshape the monument into a new piece that better reflects the community’s values.

SUPPLIED PHOTO

The statues came down

Charlottesville’s government entered 2021 in turmoil. City Manager Tarron Richardson resigned in September 2020, and in January the hiring firm retained to find his replacement fled the scene as well, with the firm’s principal saying he had “never seen a level of dysfunction as profound as what he was seeing here.” There was nowhere to go but up, right? Wrong. In January, Charlottesville settled on Chip Boyles, the then-executive director of the Thomas Jefferson Planning District Commission, as city manager. Boyles started off just fine, presiding over the removal of the statues. But in September, he fired Police Chief RaShall Brackney, providing reasons that left some community members unsatisfied. Facing backlash for the decision, Boyles resigned. The city hired a new interim manager, Mark Woolley, and introduced him at a press conference in November. Woolley would have become the sixth person to hold the job since 2018, but it turned out his tenure was shorter than anyone’s—he withdrew his application before his first day. The city says it plans to retain a consulting firm to handle day-to-day operations until a permanent manager can be found next spring. The police department is still running under an interim chief, and both Brackney and Richardson are suing the city for the circumstances surrounding their departures. As if that wasn’t enough turnover, Mayor Nikuyah Walker also declined to run for reelection this fall. New councilors Juandiego Wade and Brian Pinkston start January 1. They’ve got their work cut out for them.


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Season Greetings

to the Minority business community, friends, colleagues, and supporters. We hope this message reaches you with a level of holiday cheer that propels you towards the conclusion of another challenging year. As you may know, financial success comes from success in the marketplace. And success in the marketplace comes from success in the workplace. At the heart and soul of this notion is trust; and trust expedites prosperity. As we seize this opportunity to share gratitude for our supporters, the Chamber, and our local business & nonprofit partners who help us carry out the Minority Business Alliance’s mission, we especially thank all the MBA members who continually put their trust in us to create value for the network. Your investment in MBA facilitates our continual pursuit of community wealth building. 2021’s accomplishments could not have been achieved without you. We value our partnerships in the workplace, we value our memberships in the Alliance, and we celebrate the Minority business ecosystem and all the gifts it has to offer our greater community.

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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‘Tis the season for thankfulness, gratitude, and good cheer. And while we navigate the certainty of uncertainty, we relish a new year of opportunity and endurance. We wish you peace, blessings, and all the best of the holiday season. Feliz Navidad! Thank you, The MBA Executive Team Kaye, Alex, Andrea, & Quinton

Minority Business Alliance 2021 Year In Review FUNDING SUPPORT: • $3000 MBA Endurance grant, 3 recipients – Black Women of Central Va; Jefferson School African American Heritage Center; New Hill Development Corporation • Forward Adelante received a grant to put together a Latino business directory

• MBA Endurance Fund awards, Vanguard Award, Minority Business Month promoted across multiple social media sites (Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Twitter) • Sober Pierre and Pearl Island Catering featured in Maupintown Media production on Black-owned businesses

MEMBERSHIP PARTICIPATION: • Strong showing at virtual meetings, even after changing from monthly to bi-monthly • Had strong membership support for MBA Fun Day @ Jefferson School. First time hosting this type of meeting.

• $70,000 in total grant funding awarded to 7 MBA members (partnership with UWGC and MBA)

MBA PARTNERSHIPS:

• Members served as speakers for MBA and other Chamber group meetings including Business Women’s Round Table and Public Policy Committee

MEDIA:

• Allison Partners

• Launched MBA Community Facebook group

• C-VILLE Weekly

• Members participated in United Way’s Envision Launch Party and the Black Business Expo

• MBA executive committee and members featured in C’Ville Weekly for their minority business spotlight

• Central Virginia Small Business Development Center

• Emergent Financial Services launched online show, Today y Mañana • Lifeview Marketing created video with Culinary Concepts AB for UWGC/MBA partnership • MBA JF Bell Vanguard Award recipient CIC Staff highlighted on NBC29 and in The Daily Progress • MBA members interviewed for Chamber’s WINA and NBC29 community spots, featured on United Way’s Uncommon Voices podcast and Neighborhood Law Center

• Community Investment Collaborative • Forezee Marketing Solutions • Fuzzy’s Taco Shop • Jefferson School City Center • The Paramount Theater • Triple C Camp • United Way of Greater Charlottesville • Vinegar Hill Magazine

• Members serve in leadership roles for other chamber groups • Members continue to make an effort to support one another’s business through purchases/contracts, testimonials, referrals, posting and sharing on social media • Had a strong showing from members and supporters at our first Holiday Social & Movie Night at The Paramount. MBA MEMBERS COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION: • Our members continue to be very civicallyengaged, serving on boards, commissions, committees, panels, focus groups, etc.


Virginia legalized weed (sort of)

EZE AMOS

The pandemic strained all public institutions this year, but schools faced a particularly daunting challenge. In early March, Charlottesville City Schools reopened its doors to preschoolers through sixth graders—as well as older students in ESL and special education—for hybrid learning, while Albemarle County Public Schools allowed all grades to receive some face-to-face instruction. The following month, Buford Middle School and Charlottesville High School students were also able to attend in-person classes. Families wary of sending their child to school could continue with all-virtual learning. This fall, CCS and ACPS finally returned to five-days-aweek, in-person instruction. Both school districts required employees to show proof of vaccination or submit a negative COVID test every week, and have implemented universal mask mandates. Meanwhile, at UVA, hundreds of students tested positive for coronavirus after fraternity and sorority rush in February, leading the university—which held mostly virtual classes during the spring semester—to ban all in-person student gatherings and close libraries and gyms for almost two weeks. Though the administration claimed there was no evidence the spike in cases was linked to the unsanctioned parties and celebrations, UVA President Jim Ryan admitted the school could have done more to “discourage” in-person rush events. Before returning to Grounds for full-time, in-person learning in August, every student had to show proof of vaccination or face unenrollment. The university later mandated all faculty and staff get vaccinated by December, and masks are still required on UVA property.

Former city chief Tim Longo now leads UVA's police force.

UVA hired more cops In September, a student was non-fatally shot through the wall of a bathroom at popular Corner bar Boylan Heights. In response, the University Police Department, under the direction of former Charlottesville police chief Tim Longo, established a new unit: the Community Oriented Policing Squad, or COPS for short. (See what they did there?) Four COPS cops have been patrolling the Corner—and some surrounding areas that usually fall under the jurisdiction of the city police—from 7pm to 3am every Thursday through Saturday since September. “They have focused on creating and maintaining relationships among Corner merchants and community members, as well as being highly visible and engaged,” says UPD Sergeant Ben Rexrode. “We look forward to their continued footprint and impact in our off-Grounds community.” The move prompted pushback from students, wary of the dangers of over-policing. UVA law students issued an open letter, calling for the school to get rid of the COPS unit. “If this University wants to protect the students of color who attend this school and repair its relationship with the Black community in Charlottesville, it must take these concerns about policing seriously,” the letter stated. UVA’s Young Democratic Socialists of America chapter protested the increased police presence too, and launched a Defund UPD campaign in November. “We have an abolitionist mindset,” said YDSA Chair Sarandon Elliott.

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63 percent of city residents and 74 percent of county residents have been fully vaccinated.

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As of December 15, 2021, exactly one year after we started vaccinating our doctors and nurses, 63 percent of city residents and 74 percent of county residents have been fully vaccinated. It’s taken a tremendous amount of work from public health officials, leaders, and regular residents to reach those numbers. By February, law enforcement, emergency personnel, corrections and homeless shelter employees, educators, and individuals 65 years and older were eligible for their shots; in March, BRHD started vaccinating people of all ages with high-risk medical conditions; and shots became available to everyone in April. (Many couldn’t wait that long: In March, hundreds of UVA students—as well as community members—headed south to Danville to a walk-in vaccination site, chasing word of surplus doses.) Since the beginning of the vaccine rollout, some people of color—particularly Black and Latino communities— have been hesitant to get vaccinated, due to rampant vaccine misinformation and the United States’ long history of medical racism. To get the vaccine out to more people of color, BRHD ramped up its partnerships with community leaders, hosted pop-up vaccine clinics over the summer, and sent health workers and vaccinators door-to-door in underserved neighborhoods. Especially in light of the new omicron variant, the CDC is now encouraging everyone 16 and older to get COVID-19 booster shots. Since late September, boosters have helped to bring COVID cases down significantly in the BRHD. Appointments and walk-ins are available Monday through Saturday at the Seminole Square community vaccination center, located inside the former Big Lots next to Marshalls. Remember what BRHD spokesman Ryan McKay told C-VILLE in July: “It’s a pandemic of the unvaccinated.”

Students went back to school

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

Charlottesville got vaxxed

After a COVID-altered 2021 graduation in May, UVA held an in-person fall semester.

EZE AMOS

It was high time: Virginia legalized recreational marijuana in 2021.

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SANJAY SUCHAK

Stoners, rejoice: Virginia went green this year. Thanks to legislation passed by the now-broken Democratic trifecta, Virginians over the age of 21 have been allowed to possess and use marijuana recreationally since July 1. Admittedly, the law came with some strange caveats. Retail sales are still illegal, and will be until 2024. The state wants time to set up a new Cannabis Control Authority, which would function like the Alcoholic Beverage Control, to monitor and oversee the legal market. In the meantime, adults are able to possess up to one ounce of marijuana and grow up to four marijuana plants at home, as long as they keep them out of public view and away from children. And while police are no longer able to use the smell of marijuana as a reason to search your car, they can still search you if they see you’re toting a green leafy substance. Specifics of the new laws could change now that Republicans are in control. During the campaign, Youngkin said he wouldn’t try to repeal marijuana legislation, but Republicans and Democrats are likely to differ on some of the criminal justice rules surrounding legalization. A few GOP lawmakers have indicated they’d like to speed up the legal sale date, to minimize illegal activity in the meantime. (If all this policy talk is stressing you out, well, you know what to do.)

NEWS


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Author

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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Janasha “Jay” Bradford is a financial advisor and entrepreneur residing in Charlottesville, Virginia. She is an HBCU Alumni who majored in digital marketing and advertising. She believes life experiences shape who we are. After her father passed, she witnessed her widowed mother’s mismanagement of money due to a lack of financial education and poor financial advice that ultimately led to the loss of their family home. This experience put financial literacy at the forefront of Janasha’s mind; she has set out to be the go-to person for financial guidance, especially amongst children.

Meet Mahogany!

She knows her flying candy machine can be a big hit if she can make it to Wall Street. This is the 1st book in the Mahogany and Friends Series crafted to fill a void in financial literacy that is readily available to children in a story format. Educational, imaginative, and adventurous. Mahogany goes to Wall Street is a fun-filled, inspiring story that serves as an introduction to the Financial Market and amplifies the importance of making your dreams come true.

Illustrator

Dev Flowers is a self-taught Artist. She is an Afro-latina born and raised in Limón, Costa Rica. She enjoys making art in different mediums & styles and lives in Fort Hood, Texas with her Army husband & cat. Mahogany and Friends books are fun-filled, inspiring stories that educate children on subjects that aren’t taught traditionally, especially in the black and brown communities. With beautiful and vibrant illustrations, this BIPOC book series will grow with the child, serve as a reference guide, and help parents spark fun conversations. Mahogany and Friends offer children’s picture books for ages 5-12, although they are great for all ages!

Buy books at www.mahoganyandfriends.com


NEWS

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A sign caused a stir

Incarcerated people struggled with the pandemic

SKYCLAD AERIAL

A monthlong trial determined that Richard Spencer owes $500,000 for his role in organizing the Unite the Right rally.

The organizers of the 2017 Unite the Right rally are liable for $26 million in damages, a jury found after a monthlong civil trial this fall. Jason Kessler, Richard Spencer, and all the rest conspired to commit racially motivated violence under Virginia law, the jury determined. “Our goal was to come here and to prove a conspiracy to do racially motivated violence, as to each and every defendant, and to get damages awarded, compensatory and punitive, and we did all those things,” said attorney Karen Dunn, who represented the nine plaintiffs in the case. UVA alums Jason Kessler and Richard Spencer each owe $500,000 for their role in the rally planning. Over the course of the trial, plaintiffs had to relive the harrowing details of that weekend in August. Natalie Romero, who was present for the August 11 torchlit march through Grounds and injured in the deadly August 12 car attack, recalled the chants she heard on August 11: “I hear it in my nightmares,” she said during the trial. “I literally hear the same cadence to the ‘You will not replace us.’ That one was just so terrifying.” In a statement following the November 23 verdict, the plaintiffs wrote: “Our single greatest hope is that today’s verdict will encourage others to feel safer raising our collective voices in the future to speak up for human dignity and against white supremacy.”

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People incarcerated in the AlbemarleCharlottesville Regional Jail report shoddy COVID protections.

The Unite the Right organizers had to pay up

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Since the beginning of the pandemic, the Albemarle-Charlottesville jail has been hit especially hard by COVID-19. In letters shared this year with C-VILLE by the Charlottesville chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America, people incarcerated at the jail reported insufficient COVID containment procedures, shoddy living conditions, and a range of sanitary issues, including bug infestations, standing water, heating outages, leaky ceilings, and moldy vents. The jail also banned in-person visits, something that has taken a heavy toll on the population’s mental health. After months of waiting, everyone in the jail now has their own tablet, which they can use for video visitations with those outside, as well as for watching TV, listening to music, and sending emails. However, it costs $15 per video call, and 5 cents per minute for other tablet activities. And the tablet system isn’t without flaws. “My papa has no smartphone or computer, so even video visits are not [worth it] for some of us,” wrote one incarcerated woman. In interviews with C-VILLE—and additional letters collected by DSA—incarcerated people claimed that jail leadership had done very little to address these issues over the past year. “This is very unhealthy in here for all,” read one letter. “No one deserves this kind of punishment.”

EZE AMOS

The Lawn room sign above caused UVA to revisit its free speech policies.

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

HIRA AZHER

“FUCK UVA,” read the sign Hira Azher hung on her Lawn room door in October 2020. The sign stuck out like a sore thumb in the university’s well-manicured Academical Village, causing some alumni and community members to urge UVA to remove it (after consulting with its legal team, the school determined the sign was protected under the First Amendment and could stay up). In March, Azher hung another sign, this one featuring a KKK hood and a grim reaper looming over the Rotunda (left). Two days later, UVA told her the new sign had to go because it “advocates physical violence” and was not protected speech. This caused weeks of free speech hand-wringing. In May 2021, UVA President Jim Ryan created a 12-member Committee on Free Expression and Inquiry, charged with “craft[ing] a statement that identifies the role that free expression and free inquiry play in UVA’s academic enterprise.” The school also passed restrictions limiting the size of signs that students could put on their doors. One student was forced to trim the edges off a flier for a Planned Parenthood volunteer event, and fourth-year Emma Camp was required to remove her sign—which included the full text of the First Amendment—because it was too large. “I think without freedom of speech and open inquiry, you just can’t have a functioning university,” Camp told C-VILLE in October. “When students use freedom of expression in a way [UVA leadership] don’t like, the reaction is to limit speech. And to me that’s deeply hypocritical.”


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One brick at a time Area development boom continued in 2021 By Sean Tubbs

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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continued to grow in 2021, and both Albemarle County and Charlottesville took several steps forward this year to increase the number of housing units and to improve the certainty of getting infrastructure in place to accommodate a bigger population. “We continue to see robust building activity, with many projects in varying stages of development throughout the city, and including new residential and commercial buildings,” says Jim Freas, Charlottesville’s new director of neighborhood development services. “Of note has been the completion of a number of new buildings downtown, contributing to the ongoing vitality in this area of the city.” Perhaps the biggest development story of the year wasn’t a single new construction, however, but rather the city’s preparation for the next chapter of development. On November 15, Freas presided over the final public hearing for a new Comprehensive Plan. The plan, which City Council passed unanimously, aims “to address the injustice in distribution of housing opportunities and access to affordable housing options” in the area. One key element of the plan is the Future Land Use Map, which builds on an affordable housing policy adopted in March to encourage construction of more, denser residential units in singlefamily neighborhoods across the city. In 2022, those aspirational ideas will be turned into official zoning regulations. Some in those single-family neighborhoods remain concerned the process will not yield the affordability levels that supporters claim will happen by allowing more units per residential lot. The Albemarle Board of Supervisors adopted a new housing policy in July, which also encourages building new dwelling units across the county. The Housing Albemarle framework increases the desired number of designated affordable units in new developments to 20 percent, up from the current 15 percent. In February, supervisors will consider an incentives package to induce developers to build more affordable units. Albemarle too has begun a review of its growth management policy, as the first step in its own Comprehensive Plan review. Supervisors also updated the Crozet Master Plan, which included provisions that would allow for “missing middle housing” in certain areas. But what specifically happened this year? he charlottesville region

In the... I

n march,

the Piedmont Housing Alliance was awarded low-income housing tax credits to build apartments as part of Habitat for Humanity’s redevelopment of the Southwood Mobile Home Park. Construction is underway, and the first phase will consist of 207 total affordable units and 128 market rate units. In October, Habitat submitted an application for the second phase, which will include between 531 and 1,000 additional homes. Of those, 231 housing units would be affordable. A plan to convert a different mobile home park near Hollymead Town Center into over 330 permanent units was met with initial resistance from neighbors in the Forest Lakes community. However, the outof-town firm RST was approved by supervisors on a 5-1 vote in September after the developers agreed to 190 of the units being affordable for a period of 30 years. This year, locally owned Stony Point Development purchased a 27-acre property near the intersection of the John Warner Parkway and East Rio Road, including the plans a previous de velop er

had put forward for a 328-unit apartment complex. That project stalled after a deferral from the county government in July 2020, but Stony Point was ultimately able to get a green light this December. Some neighbors continue to resist additional residential density in Albemarle’s designated growth areas. In October, supervisors approved a rezoning for a development near Glenmore for 80 units, down from an initial request for 200 units. Members of the Village of Rivanna Community Advisory Committee argue that even 80 units is out of scale with the Comprehensive Plan. Meanwhile, at Stonefield, the number of total residential units will soon reach 700, with a 112-unit tower currently under review on a site that is now a surface parking lot. In 2022, there will be a rezoning for 490 units off of Old Ivy Road on currently undeveloped land. Work is underway to secure funding for transportation projects for both. Other new development projects were conceived with more philanthropic aims. In late March, the Charlottesville Area Community Foundation awarded the Piedmont Housing Alliance $4.5 million for a project to work with Virginia Supportive Housing and the Thomas Jefferson Area Coalition for the Homeless to redevelop the Red Carpet Inn as a 140-unit apartment complex for people with extremely low incomes. UVA also announced three sites where it

plans to collaborate with a private developer to construct 1,500 affordable housing units. “We are committed to working with community partners to create more housing intended for local workforce and community members who have been priced out of the local housing market,” Jim Ryan wrote in an announcement about the project. Two of the sites are in the county, on Fontaine Avenue and at North Fork Research Park, and one is in the city, at the corner of Wertland and 10th streets.


NEWS

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The CODE Building opened at the end of the Downtown Mall this fall.

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wait to see how exactly Charlottesville’s Future Land Use Map will shape the city, there’s plenty that already happened in 2021. One major residential development that could be coming down the pipe is a 170-unit rezoning on 12 acres in the Fry’s Spring neighborhood off of Stribling Avenue. After multiple rounds of negotiation, the Planning Commission, city staff, and Southern Development appear to have reached an agreement to move forward: Southern hile we

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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Development will front $2.9 million to upgrade the Stribling Avenue sidewalk, and will be paid back by the city through the increased property tax that will be generated by the development. Council will vote on that rezoning in 2022. Redevelopment of the city’s public housing sites finally got to the construction phase after years of planning. Construction is underway for the first phase of South First Street, which will see 62 new apartments built on a former athletic field. However, renovation of the 105-unit Crescent Halls building hit a major setback in June, when a waterline break forced the evacuation of many residents who had anticipated staying during renovation. Planning work continues for a second phase at South First Street, at the expense of some green space: a four-story, 50-unit building at Sixth Street will displace a community garden. The new affordable housing plan calls for the city to spend $10 million a year on housing, with a large portion of that intended for construction of new units. The five-year Capital Improvement Plan shows $13.5 million for public housing redevelopment and $15.8 million to support the Piedmont Housing Alliance’s redevelopment of Friendship Court. Ground hasn’t yet been broken on that project. In the commercial sector, major office buildings that were skeletons in January have now been fleshed. The Three-Twenty-Three building on Fourth and Garrett streets and the CODE Building on the site of the former Charlottesville Ice Park are now occupied and open for business.

STEPHEN BARLING

In the...

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C-VILLE’s Monthly Guide to Navigating Senior Living Options in Central Virginia

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December 22, 2021 - January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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ANTHOLOGY SENIOR LIVING

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December 22, 2021 - January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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Reach Out, Explore, Get Curious

Even before the pandemic the effects of isolation and loneliness on the health and well-being of people, especially older people, was being recognized as a global health crisis. In 2017, former US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy called loneliness a public health “epidemic” spreading across the Western world, and attributed it to the individualistic nature of modern society. Indeed, in his book, “Together: The Healing Power of Human Connection in a Sometimes Lonely World,” Murthy found that loneliness was at the root of a feeling of disconnectedness. “People wouldn’t come up me and say “I’m lonely,” said Murthy in an interview with Vox, “but they would say things like “I feel like I have to deal with all of these struggles on my own” or “I feel like if I disappeared tomorrow, nobody would even notice” or “I feel like I’m invisible.” What I realized is that wheth-

er people were struggling with addiction or depression or violence in their communities, what was weighing on them most was the sense of having to deal with these challenges all alone.” Of course, the pandemic has exposed and exacerbated that epidemic of loneliness, forcing people into physical isolation and blowing up their routines and the societal structures in place that allowed them to feel connected to each other and their communities. That feeling of separateness has become more acute and familiar to people. Still, as Murthy pointed out, it can be difficult for people to lean on others. Or recognize how dangerous isolation can be. “When you’re lonely, what you need most of all is to reach out and connect with others,” said Murthy. “But the shame around loneliness pushes you in exactly the opposite

W HE R E C A N W E TA K E YO U ?

December 22, 2021 - January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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to battle isolation and loneliness

direction. The longer your loneliness you’ve been meaning to read, learn persists, the harder it is to reach out to play an instrument, start a new hobby to other people because you don’t feel you’re worthy. This is why the • Consider a home-delivered meal downward spiral of loneliness is very program challenging to break.” • Participate virtually or in-person at For older people, many of whom local community senior centers have left the rough and tumble • Look for volunteer opportunities world of work and achievement, or “Not everybody responds to the who may be struggling with mobil- same thing the same way,” says ity and health issues, it’s especially Levitin. “My best advice is to try a easy to feel marooned these days, bunch of different things—whether especially in the United States, it’s a one-on-one Zoom call or phone where almost thirty percent of call with a friend, or a group call with Americans over sixty-five live alone, friends, family, or, maybe, a book mostly women. discussion group or online bridge “The lockdown has affected all of game with people you don’t know. us, but it’s disproportionately affect- Everybody’s going to have a differed older adults for two reasons,” ent reaction to these things, and says Daniel Levitin, author of “Suc- they’re all worth exploring.” cessful Aging: A Neuroscientist ExGood advice for all of us. plores the Power and Potential of David McNair handles communicaOur Lives,” in an interview with tions, media relations, and social Greater Good Magazine. “ They’re media efforts for the Jefferson Area more vulnerable to the disease and Board for Aging. so they have to follow or should be following stricter protocols, and they tend not to have the social lives of younger people, particularly if they’re retired.” That’s why it’s important to take isolation seriously and reach out. Here are a few ways you can do that: • Don’t be shy about reaching out to a neighbor, a family member, or an old friend • Schedule regular Zoom meetings or conference calls with family and friends • Schedule exercise time, get good sleep, watch your diet • Openness and curiosity: read books

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Q&A

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Executive Director, David Ter Borg with Anthology Senior Living of Charlottesville

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At Our Lady of Peace, the health and well-being of our residents remains—as always—our top priority. Welcoming new residents! Call today to learn more about the compassionate care, lovely apartments, wonderful amenities, and active, family-oriented lifestyle that makes our community one-of-a-kind. What Residents Are Saying “Here I feel safe, loved, respected, and not alone.” Barbara Allison, Our Lady of Peace Resident

Residential Living • Assisted Living Memory Care • Nursing Care

434-973-1155 our-lady-of-peace.com 1. How did you first become interested in the senior care industry?

Coordinated Services Management, Inc. Professional Management of Retirement Communities Since 1981

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2. What makes Anthology different from other local senior living options? Anthology is working to change the paradigm in Senior Living. Beautiful boutique inspired settings with best in class amenities. Anthology provides my team with the tools and the training that allow each member to make a remarkable impact on the lives they touch on a daily basis. 3. Favorite space inside Anthology? Dove lounge. It’s a space attached to our Assisted Living Dining Room, one of our larger activity spaces as well as our library. You are simultaneously in the middle of everything and allowed to sit quietly and comfortably with a friend or your own thoughts. The space embodies so much of what we provide here at Anthology – comfort, engagement, peace of mind. 4. Why is Central Virginia the best place for seniors to retire?

Making things possible. Weather it is for our associates, our residents, or their families – I have the opportunity daily to make things possible. 6. What should people know about working with seniors? Being able to listen is a skill. If you ever have the privilege to work with seniors – perfect the skill of listening. It is amazing the things you will learn. Having someone with a lifetime of experience give you their time is a gift. Take it whenever you can.

To learn more about Commonwise, call 434-202-8565 or visit commonwisecare.com

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5. Favorite part of your job?

“We found Commonwise after struggling to find reliable care. We felt the difference immediately and they have provided a consistently high level of service ever since. Every caregiver has been delightful and professional.”

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Just like in our building, I believe it is the people. Central Virginia is a great place for families. Access to first rate schools from preschool programs to graduating with your Ph.D. The history and the geography in Central Virginia is tightly woven with the entire country’s story. We have access to cultural events and fine dining in the setting of the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. We are in the middle of everything and tucked away all at once.

Charlottesville’s premium in-home care provider

December 22, 2021 - January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

I worked as a physical therapist and then a hospital administrator prior to senior living. I had a former colleague who made the switch and she invited me to tour her community. It took about 20 minutes and I was sold. I have had an exciting and very rewarding career as a therapist and hospital administrator, but in Senior Living, I feel more like myself.

751 Hillsdale Dr. | Charlottesville


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ROSEWOOD

December 22, 2021 - January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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VILLAGE

7 time GOLD Winner Assisted Living & 4 Time GOLD Winner Memory Care. Voted one of the “Greatest Places to Work” by Daily Progress

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CULTURE

27

FRIDAY

12/31

38 REASONS TO LEAVE THE HOUSE THIS WEEK PAGE 28 THURSDAY 12/30

ON POINTE

E.T.s have crash-landed on Earth just in time for Studio 51: An Out of This World New Year’s Eve party. The Studio 54-meets-Area-51 event will feature dangerous intergalactic art installations, dancing, and a champagne toast at midnight. And the evening wouldn’t be complete without alien queens emerging from a wrecked UFO to strut their space walk at the Vixen Drag Show before DJ MGM beams in the tunes. $30–40, 9pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

CLOWN AROUND He’s tall, wears white face paint, and…he’s really sad. Puddles Pity Party features a morose seven-foot-tall clown with a hidden talent—he sings. Puddles’ booming baritone and operatic rendition of Sia’s “Chandelier” earned him a trip to the quarterfinals on the 12th season of “America’s Got Talent,” and his “Still Sequestered” streaming show has welcomed Jack Black, Howie Mandel, Patton Oswalt, and others. Puddles’ mostly mute live show mixes silent prop comedy, audience participation, and soulful renditions into an absurdly enjoyable evening. $27–53, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com

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PARTY ON EARTH

EMILY BUTLER

FRIDAY 12/31

WEDNESDAY 12/22

@cville_culture

Christmastime favorite The Royal Ballet’s HD broadcast of The Nutcracker follows Clara and her enchanted Nutcracker doll as they battle the Mouse King, journey through the Kingdom of Sweets, and dance with a delightful array of characters. Tchaikovsky’s beloved music accompanies Peter Wright’s production of the Russian classic. $11–15, 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

Count down the last hours of 2021 with local favorite Chamomile and Whiskey at A Heartbreaker New Year’s Eve. The band rings in the new year with its signature blend of roots, rock, and Americana, and promises a fun night full of surprises, including a special C’ville all-star Tom Petty tribute set. Enjoy a selection of food and drink, and take things up a notch by dressing like a true “Heartbreaker” and reserving a VIP booth stocked with champagne for your group. $25–250, 8pm. Fry’s Spring Beach Club, 2512 Jefferson Park Ave. frysspring.org

December 22 – January 4, 2021 c-ville.com

SUPPLIED PHOTO

RICH TARBELL

CHEERS TO THE NEXT ONE


CULTURE THIS WEEK

28

Wednesday 12/22 music Music in the Atrium. Weekly performance with Jim Richardson on vocals and guitar. Free, noon. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville. org Paramount Presents: Met Live in HD Holiday Encore—The Magic Flute (from December 30, 2006). Under the baton of Maestro James Levine, a winning ensemble cast brings fresh life to Mozart’s timeless fairy tale. $11-15, 2pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net Puddles Pity Party. The semi-mute clown with a booming baritone presents an “Unsequestered Show.” $27-53, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com

dance

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Offering Power Yoga, Vinyasa, Power Sculpt, Yin, Hot HIIT, Outdoor Yoga Classes, Workshops & Private Sessions

Square Dancing. Enjoy a night of square dancing. All levels are welcome. Free, 12:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

Thursday 12/23 music Berto and Vincent. Wild gypsy rumba and Latin guitar. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com Music in the Atrium. A weekly performance from Jazz 1-2-3. Free, noon. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

dance International Folk Dance. Learn a dance or two, or just watch and listen to the music. Free, 2:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville. org

etc. Arts Underground. Artmaking, drinks, and karaoke inside The Looking Glass. $25, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

@cville_culture December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

Bachata Fusion Class. Edwin Roa teaches a fun beginner-to-intermediate-level bachata lesson to get the party started. $6-8, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

Sunday 12/26 music SHANNON BURNS

WINNER BEST YOGA INSTRUCTOR

Vincent Zorn. Enjoy brunch with live music. Free, noon. South and Central Latin Grill, 946 Grady Ave., Suite 104. southandcentralgrill.com

Monday 12/27 music

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Monday Music Series. Live Latin music from Vincent Zorn, Berto and Vincent, or Beleza. Free, 7pm. South and Central Latin Grill, 946 Grady Ave., Suite 104. southandcentralgrill.com

dance English Country Dance. Partake in some English country dancing, or just come to enjoy the performance. Free, 1pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

etc. Monday Night Trivia. Hosted by Brandon

Hamilton. Free, 6pm. Prince Michel Vineyard & Tap 29 Brewery, 154 Winery Lane, Leon. princemichel.com

Tuesday 12/28 music Vincent Zorn. Wild gypsy rumba. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com

dance English Country Dance. See listing for Monday, December 27. Free, 1pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

etc. After Hours at Highland. James Monroe reenactor Beau Robbins will guide you through Highland, with a private viewing of the newly opened exhibits in the 1818 guest house. $25, 4:30pm. James Monroe’s Highland, 2050 James Monroe Pkwy. highland.org

Wednesday 12/29 music Music in the Atrium. See listing for Wednesday, December 22. Free, noon. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

dance Bachata Fusion Class. See listing for Wednesday, December 22. $6-8, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org Square Dancing. See listing for Wednesday, December 22. Free,12:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

etc. After Hours at Highland. See listing for Tuesday, December 28. $25, 4:30pm. James Monroe’s Highland, 2050 James Monroe Pkwy. highland.org

Thursday 12/30 music Berto and Vincent. See listing for Thursday, December 23. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com Music in the Atrium. See listing for Thursday, December 23. Free, noon. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

dance International Folk Dance. See listing for Thursday, December 23. Free, 2:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

etc. Arts Underground. See listing for Thursday, December 23. $25, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org Paramount Presents: The Royal Ballet in HD—The Nutcracker. The Christmastime favorite follows Clara and her enchanted Nutcracker doll as they embark on an epic journey. $11-15, 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net Trivia in the Orchard. Hosted by Katalin Magyar. Free, 6:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com

Friday 12/31


CULTURE SOUND CHOICES music Chamomile & Whiskey: A Heartbreaker New Year’s Eve. Featuring special guests and a Tom Petty Tribute set. Free, 8pm. Fry’s Spring Beach Club, 2512 Jefferson Park Ave. frysspring.org

Pandemic pressings

etc.

A 2021 local music roundup

Studio 51: An Out of This World New Year’s Eve. Tunes from DJ MGM, an alien queen drag show, and more. $30-40, 9pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St SE. ixartpark.org

arts@c-ville.com

Saturday 1/1 music Berto and Vincent. Lively Latin guitar. Free, 11am. Tavern & Grocery, 333 W. Main St. tavernandgrocery.com

etc. Met Live in HD: Cinderella—Holiday Presentation. Laurent Pelly’s storybook staging of Massenet’s Cendrillon is presented with an all-new English translation. $18-25, 12:45pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount. net

Sunday 1/2 music Vincent Zorn. See listing for Sunday, December 26. Free, noon. South and Central Latin Grill, 946 Grady Ave., Suite 104. southandcentralgrill.com

Monday 1/3 Jazz First Mondays. Jazz quartet playing standards and originals. Free, 5pm. Starr Hill Brewery Tap Room, 5391 Three Notched Rd, Crozet. starrhill.com Monday Music Series. See listing for Monday, December 27. Free, 7pm. South and Central Latin Grill, 946 Grady Ave., Suite 104. southandcentralgrill.com

dance English Country Dance. See listing for Monday, December 27. Free, 1pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

etc. Monday Night Trivia. See listing for Monday, December 27. Free, 6pm. Prince Michel Vineyard & Tap 29 Brewery, 154 Winery Lane, Leon. princemichel.com

Tuesday 1/4 Vincent Zorn. See listing for Tuesday, December 28. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero. com

dance

etc. Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. A 20-minute introduction to Indigenous Australian art. Free, 10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

 38KEA, Seeds, Thy Divine Thresher (hip-hop)  7th Grade Girl Fight, 7th Grade Girl Fight (post-punk)  Abby Huston, AH HA (indie-rock)  Bryan Elijah Smith, Apocalyptic Blues (Americana)  Butcher Brown, Encore (funk, jazz)  Darzo, Single Cell (pop)  David Wax Museum, Euphoric Ouroboric (folk) Disco Risqué, D3P (pop, funk) DJ Harrison, Tales from the Old Dominion (funk): Inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement and the removal of Confederate statues in his hometown of Richmond, DJ Harrison crafted a multifaceted commentary on race and space that taps into his prowess in a variety of genres, from funk and jazz to garage rock and punk. With Jimi Hendrix and Roy Ayers covers sprinkled in, Tales from the Old Dominion makes for a captivating listen.

 DJ Williams, Short Stories (funk)  Fahim Rahman, Phototherapy EP (indie)  Fellowman, Walking Tours (hip-hop)  Høly River, Courage (indie)  Free Union, No Pressure (pop)  John-Robert, Healthy Baby Boy Pt. 1 (pop)  Kendall Street Company, The Year the Earth Stood Still: Ninurta + Inertia double LP (rock)  Lael Neale, Acquainted with Night (folk, pop)  Lowland Hum, At Home (folk)

Lucy Dacus, Home Video (indie): Released over the summer, Lucy Dacus’ opus still holds up at the end of the year, with predictions of album of the year coming to fruition: Home Video is NPR Music’s No. 3 album of the year, Consequence of Sound’s No. 6, and one of the top 30 rock albums of year as ranked by Pitchfork. The Richmond singer-songwriter’s well-deserved ascent is a triumph, and on Home Video, she harkens back to where she came from—creating an intimate portrait that draws on her high school experiences and also serves as a spotlight on our region, with music videos shot in downtown Richmond.  Matthew E. White, K Bay (indie)  Matthew E. White & Lonnie Holley, Broken Mirror, A Selfie Reflection (indie)  McKinley Dixon, For My Mama And Anyone Who Look Like Her (hip-hop)  Michael Clem, Rivannarama (Americana)  Mitchel Evan, Mitchel Evan (Americana)  Pet Moose Project, Goat Tracks (rock)  Prabir Trio, Haanji (indie)  Root Cellar Remedy, The Quarantown EP (blues, rock, country)  Sally Rose, Tread Light (pop, folk)  Ships In The Night, Latent Powers (dance)  The Steel Wheels, Everyone A Song Vol. Two (Americana)  Stray Fossa, With You For Ever (indie-pop, shoegaze)  Tyler Meachum, Into the Fray (indie)  Vivian Leva & Riley Calcagno, Vivian Leva & Riley Calcagno (Americana, folk)  Will Overman, The Winemaker’s Daughter (folk)

Reissues, remixes, covers Diet Cig, Don’t Like Driving Like I Used To + Live at Studio Two Three (pop-punk): The duo of Alex Luciano and Noah Bowman recently relocated from New York to

Richmond, and settled in with an EP of reimagined songs from their 2020 album, Do You Wonder About Me?. On the heels of this three-song set came the release of Live at Studio Two Three, an album that showcases Diet Cig’s unmatched live shows. While Bowman holds down the beat on the drum kit, Luciano bounces around the stage, accenting her fluid vocals with buoyant jumps and high kicks—making Diet Cig a solid addition to the commonwealth.

Singles…and what’s to come in 2022  Ben Butterworth, “Purgatory Emporium” (indie)  Blake Hunter, “I Can’t Lose You” (indie)  David Wax Museum ft. Devon Sproule, Lauren Groans, and Dan Molad, “Love Light” (Americana)  Deau Eyes, “When” (indie)  Dropping Julia, “Chesapeake,” + “My Room” (pop)  Free Union, “Somethin’”+ “The Other Side” (R&B)  Good Dog Nigel, “My Whole Life” (indie)  Gold Connections, “Confession” (indie)  Isaac Friend, “How is LA” + “American Made” (Americana)  Kate Bollinger, “Shadows” + “Yards/ Gardens” (indie-pop)  Lord Nelson, “Tooth and Nail” off the upcoming album Transmission (release date: January 21) (Americana)  Minor Poet, “Dissonance of Love/Silent Violent Creatures” (indie-pop)  Sleepwalkers, “Until the Night is Gone” (indie)  Suz Slezak, Our Wings May Be Featherless (release date: March 4) (Americana)  The Judy Chops, “Ready My Heart” + “Good Days Are Gone” + “Goodbye Sunday Morning” (Americana, jazz)  Trout Baseline, “One Baby World” (indie)

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English Country Dance. See listing for Monday, December 27. Free, 1pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org

D

idn’t it feel good to see that first live show after nearly a year without live music? The return of concerts this summer fall and marked one major bright spot in 2021, a year that was otherwise filled with uncertainty. (In some cases, even festivals came back!) But the pseudo-post-pandemic music scene looks much different. Wait times and lines at most venues are long, as proof of vaccination is checked at the door, and most club shows continue to be masked at the request of artists. Kudos to the artists, venues, and production companies that have been working hard to keep the industry afloat while providing a safe and comfortable experience for audiences. While touring has been inconsistent, there’s one robust constant: creativity. There’s been no lack of new music in our region. It’s important to support the artists and venues in our community from the ground up—purchase tickets, purchase merch, and purchase music—and there’s a lot to choose from. Here’s a slice of central Virginia’s creative output in 2021.

@cville_culture

music

By Desiré Moses

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

music

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CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

31

Gettin’ full Charlottesville’s food scene is rebounding nicely By Will Ham

ples Thai Kitchen is a welcoming bright spot in the former Timbercreek Market space in the Coca Cola building. Al Carbón added a second location at 5th Street Station. The debut of Laura Fonner’s first restaurant, Siren, had food followers buzzing, as Fonner, the former executive chef at Duner’s Restaurant, revealed her culinary vision of Mediterranean cuisine with a seafood focus. Next to Siren, Vision BBQ offers classic smoky goodness and comfort sides from former Maya cooks.

Students on the Corner are enjoying new options at Inka Grill Peruvian Cuisine and Sammy’s On The Corner. You’ll find upscale dining at The Ridley (modern Southern cuisine), Keswick Hall’s Marigold by Jean-Georges (“rustic chic”), and The Wool Factory’s Broadcloth (elegance in a historic textile mill). Finally, we have hearty sandwiches from Taste Shack and good ol’ surf sammys and baskets from Skrimp Shack—and love it or hate it, the new Chick-Fil-A is now open at the Barracks Road Shopping Center.

@cville_culture Laura Foner, former executive chef at Duner’s Restaurant, opened Siren in the old Shebeen space, where she’s serving up Mediterranean cuisine with a seafood focus.

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touchstones for the community over the years. (One, Tokyo Rose, even moonlighted as a goth nightclub). The biggest foodie boon this year might be the opening of Dairy Market, a modern food hall that began serving hungry customers in December of 2020. With 16 eateries and two retailers, visitors can score a cone at Moo Thru, a burger at Citizen Burger Stand, lumpia at the food truckturned-brick-and-mortar restaurant Manila Street, and mac ‘n’ cheese at Angelic’s Kitchen—or hit South and Central Latin Grill, an upscale, casual full-service restaurant. And across the street is Cou Cou Rachou, a new French bakery from pastry chef Rachel De Jong. The Shops at Stonefield introduced Akira Ramen & Sushi and Torchy’s Tacos, and the “coming soon” Organic Krush Lifestyle Eatery. The Downtown Mall welcomed Crush Pad Wines, an intimate location to sample fine wines from all over the globe, and Café Frank, a casual eatery with a classic French style by the notable chef Jose de Brito. In addition, a familiar place got a new look when a rebranded Citizen Bowl became Lucky Blue’s Bar, with a menu update that keeps customer favorites intact. Some old favorites offered new options this year. The Monsoon Siam team expanded to two new locations—in Crozet, Coconut Thai Kitchen boasts many of Monsoon’s popular dishes, and Pineap-

EZE AMOS

S

ince the beginning of the pandemic, Charlottesville has lost more than 20 restaurants. And while we mourn the losses, there’s plenty to be excited about, too. The year has seen 30 new restaurants and a bustling food court open. As we tally things up at the end of another tumultuous year, all signs point to a culinary comeback. From well-established brands to visionary new ventures, there’s plenty to dig in to. But before we roll out the red carpet for our newcomers, let’s take a moment to thank the local spots that weren’t able to weather the slowdown, but still left a lasting impression on the culture and taste buds of our city. Charlottesville staples Tokyo Rose and The Shebeen Pub & Braai closed their doors this year after a combined 29 years of service. We lost some newbies in Kama, a modern Japanese venture, and Glaze Burgers and Donuts. And some hot spots have moved on in less permanent ways. Lampo Neapolitan Pizzeria and Keevil & Keevil Grocery and Kitchen both offer online-only ordering, while hoping to get back to in-person service in the future. Moe’s Original BBQ closed its downtown branch, but continues serving Southern soul food at its Ivy Road location. Junction in Belmont has put its accessible Southwestern plates on pause. All these restaurants have been important cultural

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

living@c-ville.com


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December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

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TWO LATEST BOOKS & MORE

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from local Author William A. James, Sr.

In, A MURDER ON FIFTH AND DICE AND THE RUIN OF FIFEVILLE,

IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, James

James shows how drug-dealing and gang violence led to the condemnation, demolition, and gentrification of Fifeville. It is a Sequel to his IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, 2007. (He is writing a play based upon this latest Book)

reveals how fear and misunderstandings caused The Charlottesville City Council to condemn and Demolish a 20 Acre Tract (30 Black businesses and 600 residents) from the Downtown area from 1958-1964.

In, HARD TIMES AND SURVIVAL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN AFRICANAMERICAN SON,

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CULTURE THE WORKING POUR

Shiny and new

Add some winter sparkle to your glass

White wines that weather the colder months By Paul H. Ting living@c-ville.com

T

he change of season may inspire you

Produced in Waynesboro, Thibaut-Janisson sets the bar for Virginia sparkling wines.

Thibaut-Janisson Extra Brut NV ($36) Thibaut-Janisson offers four wines, but the extra brut is the most serious and complex. It’s made with 100 percent chardonnay grapes from the first pressing (considered to be the best quality juice) with a higher proportion of older reserve wine added to increase complexity. Share this with your loved ones and closest friends. Trump Winery 2015 Blanc de Noir ($55) The 2014 sparkling reserve was included in the 2021 Virginia Governor’s Cup case and is now sold out. This alternative recently won America’s Best Sparkling Wine at the San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition. Flavors of citrus, green apple, and Asian pear combine with hints of chestnuts and brioche. Veritas Vineyards and Winery 2020 Viognier ($27) Flavors of apricots, peaches, and other stone fruits combine with a rich, broad texture to bring weight to this wine that has a refreshing acidity that lifts the finish. Michael Shaps Wineworks 2017 Petit Manseng ($35) Tropical fruit flavors such as pineapple and mango predominate this dry wine, the heaviest white wine the winery produces, which presents with a full mouthfeel while maintaining high acidity. Barrel fermentation and aging in oak bring more texture and weight to an already structured wine. Stinson Vineyards 2019 Wildkat ($29) Skin contact results in a darker amber color, increased texture on the palate (from tannins), and flavors of oranges, almonds, and bruised apples. Serve warmer than most white wines and pair with heavier foods. Barboursville Vineyards 2017 Paxxito ($35/375ml bottle) Made in the traditional Italian method of drying grapes (appassimento) and concentrating sugar, acidity, and flavor. Sweet with honeyed fruits, pears, and almonds followed by a long, full finish. Keswick Vineyards 2019 Nektar ($45/375ml bottle) A floral nose accompanies flavors of honey, apricot, and mango, which give this wine a long, sweet, acidic finish.

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

FILE PHOTO

toward big, bold reds, but there are many white wines worthy of attention during the colder months. These options include sparkling wines, wines made from grape varieties that produce heavier styles, white wines with more textural complexity, and sweet and luscious dessert wines. The Virginia Wine Board marketing office is working with area wine shops to turn the spotlight on local winter whites, and here are some recommendations to pique your interest. Though it often takes center stage as an accompaniment to holiday parties and New Year’s celebrations, sparkling wine should be served year-round, as it brings a sense of celebration to any occasion, is easy to drink on its own, and pairs with almost any food. More Virginia wineries are producing sparkling wines, but Thibaut-Janisson continues to be the standard-bearer for high-quality sparkling wine made in the traditional method (the same winemaking technique used for champagne). Trump Winery deserves mention for producing excellent sparkling wines for many years. Its 2014 Sparkling Reserve, one of the 12 wines selected for the 2021 Governor’s Case, is an example of the quality that winemaker Jonathan Wheeler produces. White wines can show more weight because of the grape variety, certain winemaking techniques, or a combination of both. Viognier fits this niche nicely, with full-bodied wines with textural complexity and full fruit flavors reminiscent of apricot, peaches, and other stone fruits. Veritas Vineyard and Winery produces an excellent example that

is round and full on the palate with a long, opulent finish. Similarly, petit manseng expresses flavors of tropical fruits combined with a full body that comes at least partially from slightly higher alcohol levels. Michael Shaps Wineworks is recognized for making petit manseng in a dry, structured style (something becoming more and more popular in Virginia). By producing white wines in contact with their skins, a technique usually reserved for reds, winemakers can transform the character into something more complex and more highly textured. These wines, referred to as orange or amber, are not for everyone but are often intriguing, delicious, and great options to pair with food. Rkatsiteli is an ancient white grape that historically has been made with skin contact, and Stinson Vineyards produces a version here in Virginia known as Wildkat. Perfect for those looking for a lesser-known variety or something a little different to try. Lastly, dessert wines are often overlooked but can be just right for winter. These full-bodied, full-flavored, luscious wines are perfect for sitting by a fire, paired with dessert, or served on their own as dessert in a glass. Two great options are the Barboursville Vineyards Paxxito, winner of the 2021 Governor’s Cup, and the Keswick Vineyards Nektar. The Keswick wine is produced from 100 percent petit manseng grapes, mimicking one of the traditional expressions of the varietal in southern France, from where it originates.

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Happy Holidays

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Moving tributes

CULTURE EXTRA

37

Derrick J. Waller photographs emotion on foot with the Prolyfyck Run Creww By Maeve Hayden

T

“A Good Cry” by Derrick J. Waller will be on display at Studio IX Gallery through December 31.

DERRICK WALLER

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“This crew means everything to me because they encourage me to accomplish. This is my family.”

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agony or glee, toward finish lines teeming with cheering teammates. Hugs of relief and triumph are shared, and a small tap on the back offers support mid-run. Children run alongside the adults, and fathers hold their victorious sons on their shoulders. Family was a driving force for Waller when creating “A Good Cry,” which is dedicated to his late mother, who passed away 10 years ago this month. “It was her unexpected passing that led me to photography,” he says. “It was the wake-up call for me to stop thinking about picking up a camera and actually do it.” He had his camera ready years later when his 4-month-old daughter was laying in bed, and stuck her little fist up. The resulting image is a serene portrayal of hope and strength—a chubby baby’s fist raised upward, surrounded by ethereal light. Other moments of quiet strength appear throughout “A Good Cry.” One large photograph shows William Jones III almost entirely submerged in the Rivanna River, his fists and head held above water, a look of intense focus on his face. Nothing strange about that—except it was February and the temperature was below 20 degrees. “Will mentioned that he was going to do some natural cryotherapy and take a dip in the Rivanna,” says Waller. “I don’t think anyone believed him.” Waller snapped his shots during Jones’ brave three-minute dip. “A Good Cry” is on display at Studio IX as part of The Prolyfyck Exhibition Series, a year-long program in support of local artists who run, and organizations that work to uplift our community. The idea for an art show came when Creww member and Studio IX curator Greg Kelly realized this group of everyday athletes had something else in common. “It became apparent that the Prolyfyck community included a number of artists, some of whom had never seen themselves as such or shown their work before,” says Kelly. Every month, a different artist from the Creww exhibits work and chooses a local organization as the beneficiary of artwork sales. Waller chose to support Cultivate Charlottesville, a local non-profit working to create food equity, which fosters a community garden on the Prolyfyck Run Creww’s regular route through the city. Clearly not in it just for the exercise, Waller includes an inspiring excerpt from Prolyfyck’s mission statement in his exhibition: “working together with a spirit of unity and love to create a world where everyone can be prolyfyck!” “It’s just running, right?” says Waller. “I dare you to come find out.”

December 22 – January 4, 2021 c-ville.com

he act of running can be solitary and isolating—a way to get the recommended 30 minutes of exercise a day and nothing more. “To be honest, I don’t like running,” says Derrick J. Waller. “I’m not sure if I will ever like running.” Surprisingly, Waller is a member of the local Prolyfyck Run Creww. Prolyfyck isn’t just an exercise group. The organization was founded by runner William Jones III over a decade ago, when he realized he wasn’t seeing many other Black runners. The support he received when he ran through Charlottesville’s predominantly Black neighborhoods led him to start the group’s first iteration, Run These Streets, alongside James Dowell and Dr. Wes Bellamy. Later rebranded as the Prolyfyck Run Creww, (from Nipsey Hussle’s song “Victory Lap”), the group rejects the suppression and co-opting of the talent of Black and brown people by celebrating running, and working for the empowerment of the community. Three mornings a week, runners meet in front of the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center and embark on a walk, run, or jog (all levels of athleticism are welcome). The workouts raise awareness and funds for local causes including The Uhuru Foundation, B.U.C.K. Squad, and Reclaimed Hope Initiative, as well as for PTSD awareness, Indigenous Peoples’ Day, and the #stopasianhate movement. PRC also hosts annual teen gift card and toy drives to support local kids. Running with Prolyfyck is about more than breaking a sweat. “It’s building mental toughness that I can apply throughout life,” says Waller. “This crew means everything to me because they encourage me to accomplish. This is my family.” Waller, a documentary photographer, began photographing the Prolyfyck Run Creww in 2019. “I had no clue if the group would want to use my pictures or not, but I figured shooting the events would be good practice for me.” Three years later, he has carefully combed through thousands of images to create his debut solo exhibition, “A Good Cry.” “A Good Cry” at Studio IX tells the story of a community filled with love, hope, joy, and growth. “The Creww welcomes all,” Waller says. “However, a major focus is the empowerment of those in the historically marginalized Black and brown communities. My goal was to show this through the work. I want us to be seen. I want us to be heard. I want us to be felt.” Waller’s black-and-white photographs capture moments of human connection: Runners hustle up hills, faces contorted in

IMAGES COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

arts@c-ville.com


38

CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT

Order up! These local establishments are open and waiting to take your order. Email living@c-ville.com to add your restaurant to the list. Asian Cuisine Afghan Kabob Palace Authentic Afghan cuisine. 400 Emmet St. N. 245-0095. $$. Asian Express Chinese and Japanese with healthy options. 909 W. Main St. 979-1888. $. Bamboo House Korean and Chinese options. 4831 Seminole Trail. 973-9211. $$. Chimm Thai Thai street food. The Yard at 5th Street Station. 288-1122. $$. Coconut Thai Kitchen Curries, noodles, fried rice, soups, salads and vegetarian dishes from the Monsoon Siam team. 1015 Heathercroft Ln., Crozet. 205-4292 $$. Doma Korean Kitchen Korean-style barbecue, kimchi, and more. 701 W. Main St. 202-1956. $. Kanak Indian Kitchen Offering traditional homemade Indian food, plus cocktails to go. 385 Merchant Walk Sq. Ste. 400. 328-2775. $. Lemongrass Vietnam meets Thailand. Veggie options and delivery, too. 104 14th St. NW. 244THAI. $$.

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Lime Leaf Thai A tad more upscale than the average Thai place. Rio Hill Shopping Center. 245-8884. $$. Maru Korean BBQ & Grill Traditional Korean food with modern additions. 412 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 956-4110. $.

Milan Indian Cuisine Authentic Indian cuisine with all the standards; beer and wine available to go. 1817 Emmet St. 984-2828. $$. Mochiko Good Hawaiian eats (and suggested Hawaiian beer pairings, too). The Yard at 5th Street Station. $. Monsoon Siam Delicious, unpretentious favorites like pad Thai, tom yum noodle soup, and vegetarian dishes. 113 W. Market St. 971-1515. $$. Mashumen Japanese ramen and rice bowls. 2208 Fontaine Ave. 400-9007. $$.

Now & Zen Gourmet Japanese and sushi spot. 202 Second St. NW. 971-1177. $$. Pad Thai Homestyle Thai cooking from an experienced chef. 156 Carlton Rd. 293-4032. $$.

Vu Noodles Fresh, vegetarian Vietnamese noodles, pho, bahn mi, and more. 111 E. Water St. 465-1267. $.

Bakeries Albemarle Baking Company Get your ABCs of baked goods. 418 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 293-6456. $. Bowerbird Bakeshop Pastries, breads, and cookies using locally sourced ingredients, delivered right to your doorstep. 120 10th St. NW, bowerbirdbakeshop.com. $ Cou Cou Rachou Croissants, tatins, financiers, danishes, cake slices, muffins, and more. 917 Preston Ave. Suite B; 1837 Broadway St. coucourachou.com. $ Gearharts Fine Chocolates Freshly baked pastries, cakes, cookies, and brownies—plus chocolates! 243 Ridge McIntire Rd. 972-9100. $. Great Harvest Bread Company Sandwiches, sweets, and bread baked from scratch every day. McIntire Plaza. 202-7813. $. MarieBette Café & Bakery French pastries for breakfast, more pastries for lunch. 700 Rose Hill Dr. 529-6118. $. Paradox Pastry Known for the biscuits, European pastry, and the legendary DMB cookies and brownies. 313 Second St. SE #103. 245-2453. $.

Petite MarieBette MarieBette’s little sister. 105 E. Water St. 284-8903. $. The Pie Chest Homemade breakfast and hand pies, plus by-the-slice options (for those who can’t decide). 119 Fourth St. NE., 977-0443; 1518 E. High St., 984-0555. $. Quality Pie In the former Spudnuts spot, exMas tapas chef Tomas Rahal serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. 309 Avon St. 284-5120. $$. Sliced. cake bar Mobile bakery offering whole cakes, cake flights, cake pops, and buttercream shots, for delivery or curbside pickup. 242-5501. $.

Bars and Grills

Texas Roadhouse Steaks, ribs, and fromscratch sides. Albemarle Square. 973-4700. $$. Timberwood Grill All-American eatery and after-work watering hole. 3311 Worth Crossing, 975-3311. $$. Three Notch’d Craft Kitchen & Brewery Locally sourced, beer-infused dishes including Southern classics and a kids menu. 520 Second St. SE. 956-3141. $$. The Whiskey Jar Saloon-style Southern spot with, naturally, more than 90 varieties of whiskey. 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2021549. $$. Whistlestop Grill Southern comfort foods in Crozet. 1200 Crozet Ave. 823-9000. $.

Multiverse Kitchens Digital food hall that’s home to six different restaurants. 1747 Allied St., 989-8807. $ Riverside Lunch Popular joint known for smashburgers. 1429 Hazel St. 971-3546. $. Royalty Eats Soul food goodness including Chicken & Waffles, ribs, and specialties like teriyaki salmon. 820 Cherry Ave. $

Breakfast Joints Farm Bell Kitchen New-Southern cuisine with local farm-to-table ingredients. 1209 W. Main St. 205-1538. $$.

Wayside Takeout & Catering Famous Ole Virginia fried chicken and barbecue sandwiches. 2203 Jefferson Park Ave. 977-5000. $.

First Watch Breakfast, brunch, and lunch chain with locally grown ingredients. 1114B Emmet St. N. 202-5383. $$. Villa Diner Mainstay with housemade pancakes, biscuits, roast turkey, soups, sides, and salad dressings. 1250 Emmet St. N. 2969977. $. Murphy’s Coffee & Bagel House Breakfast spot serves delicious coffee and freshly baked New York bagels. 26 Buck Dr. 939-6033. $$.

Burgers, BBQ, Dogs and Diners Ace Biscuit & Barbecue Breakfast and lunch spot with BBQ and soul food by the biscuit. 600 Concord Ave. 202-1403. $. Blue Moon Diner Beloved local diner serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner options like pancakes, breakfast burritos, burgers, and BLTs. 600 W. Main St. 980-6666. $$ Burger Bach New Zealand-inspired gastropub. The Shops at Stonefield. 328-2812. $$.

Pineapples Thai Kitchen Thai favorites from the Monsoon Siam team. 722 Preston Ave. 2021682. $$. Peter Chang China Grill Authentic Sichuan cuisine by a renowned chef. Barracks Road Shopping Center North Wing. 244-9818. $$.

Beer Run Massive tap and packaged beer offerings, killer nachos, three meals daily. 156 Carlton Rd., 984-2337. $$.

Dairy Market Find something for everyone at this food market, from burgers to barbecue to pulpo con brasa. 946 Grady Ave. 326-4552. $-$$$.

Red Lantern Chinese cuisine by the pint or the quart. 221 Carlton Rd. 979-9968. $.

Fardowners Restaurant Local ingredients liven up pub fare like sliders and sandwiches. 5773 The Square, Crozet. 823-1300. $$.

Doodle’s Diner Country cookin’ from breakfast to burgers. 1305 Long St. 295-7550. $.

Firefly Craft beer, burgers, salads, vegetarianfriendly menu. 1304 E. Market St. 202-1050. $.

Moose’s by the Creek American favorites, plus mounted moose antlers for photo ops. 1710 Monticello Rd. 977-4150. $.

Vision BBQ Meats smoked the old fashioned way with wood and a match. 249 Ridge McIntire Rd. 443-4352. $

Alamo Drafthouse Burgers, pizzas, salads, snacks, and desserts prepared fresh from locally sourced ingredients. Served in the cafe or while you watch a movie. 5th Street Station. 326-5056. $.

Silk Thai Fresh, authentic Thai, plus specials like marinated wings. 2210 Fontaine Ave. 9778424. $$.

Moe’s Original BBQ Alabama-style pulled pork smoked in-house. 2119 Ivy Rd., 244-7427; 200 W. Water St., 202-2288. $.

Cavalier Diner Breakfast all day, traditional diner fare, and Greek food. 1403 N. Emmet St. 977-1619. $

Five Guys Two locations for local carnivores. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 975-GUYS; Hollymead Town Center, 963-GUYS. $.

Coffee Places with Kitchens Baine’s Books & Coffee Wide selection of coffee, tea, pastries, and paninis. 485 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-3577. $. Belle Coffee & Wine Breakfast and lunch sandwiches. Free kids meals with adult meals. 9964919. $$. C’ville Coffee & Wine Full menu of coffee, sandwiches, and wines. 1301 Harris St. 8172633. $. Greenberry’s Java and specialty drinks, fresh baked goods. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-0200. $. Milli Coffee Roasters Espresso drinks, chai, hot chocolate, light fare, wine. 400 Preston Ave, Suite 150. 270-9706. $. Whole bean delivery available. $ The Workshop A coffee and wine shop featuring Grit Coffee and pastries from Cou Cou Rachou, located in The Wool Factory. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $.

Family-Friendly Ann’s Family Restaurant Good old country cooking. 1170 Thomas Nelson Hwy. (Rte. 29, south of Lovingston). 263-8110. $. The Light Well Coffee-kitchen-tavern serves healthy ingredients in original recipes. 110 E. Main St., Orange. (540) 661-0004. $. Michie Tavern Traditional Southern lunch from an 18th-century tavern. 683 Thomas Jefferson Pkwy. 977-1234. $$.

Tara Thai Affordable Thai faves, with multiple meat, fish, and veggie options. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 984-9998. $$.

Kardinal Hall An extensive list of brews, plus bocce on the patio. 722 Preston Ave. 295-4255. $$

Taste of China Chinese favorites on 29N. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 975-6688. $$.

Matchbox Charlottesville Wood-fired pizzas, salads, salmon and steak dinners, gourmet burgers, and a happy hour. 2055 Bond St., 284-8874. $$.

Lazy Parrot Backyard BBQ The Lazy Parrot Grill’s sister restaurant. Pantops Shopping Center. 244-0723. $$.

Taste of India Indian fare favorites on the mall. 310 E. Main St, Downtown Mall. 984-9944. $$.

Peloton Station Cycle-centric tavern and bike shop. 114 10th St. NW. 284-7786. $$.

Luv’n Oven Gizzards, livers, fries, and shakes. 162 Village Sq., Scottsville. 286-3828. $.

Ten Upscale second-floor spot serving modern Japanese. 120B E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-6691. $$$.

Sedona Taphouse Lots of craft beers and an all-American menu. 1035 Millmont St. 296-2337. $$.

Martin’s Grill Delicious hamburgers, veggie burgers, and fries. Forest Lakes Shopping Center. 974-9955. $.

Thai ’99 II Thai noodle and rice dishes, curries, and stirfrys in an inspired interior. Gardens Shopping Center. 964-1212. $.

Selvedge Brewing New brewery in The Wool Factory serves elevated bar fare from Chef Tucker Yoder. 1837 Broadway St. 270-0555. $$.

Mel’s Café Southern soul-soothing food. A longtime favorite on West Main. 719 W. Main St. 971-8819.

Kirt’s Homemade Ice Cream Ice cream made fresh in the store. Albemarle Square Shopping Center. 202-0306. $.

Thai Cuisine & Noodle House Traditional Thai food, noodle dishes, and vegetarian specials. 2005 Commonwealth Dr. 974-1326. $$.

TCO 2go Specialty sandwiches like pulled pork and fried fish from The Catering Outfit . 221 Carlton Rd. 951-4699. $$.

Mission BBQ Pulled turkey, pork, and chicken, plus racks by the bone. The Shops at Stonefield. 260-7740. $.

La Flor Michoacana Homemade paletas (popsicles), ice cream, and ice cream cakes, plus other sweet treats. 601A Cherry Ave. 984-1603 $.

Fox’s Café Daily specials, burgers, dogs, and dinners. 403 Avon St. 293-2844. $.

Frozen Treats Chaps More than 20 years of gourmet homemade ice cream. Diner fare including breakfast and burgers. 223 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4139. $. Corner Juice UVA alum-owned juice spot with cold-pressed options. 1509 University Ave. $.


CULTURE ALL YOU CAN EAT Smoothie King Chain features smoothies, supplements, and healthy snacks. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 295-8502; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center, 975-5464. $.

Gourmet Groceries and Gas Stations Batesville Market Sandwiches to order, salads, and baked goods plus cheeses, produce, and packaged goods. 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. $. Bellair Market Gourmet sandwich spot on Ivy Road. 2401 Ivy Rd. 971-6608. $. Blue Ridge Bottle Shop Craft beer store with both bottles and growlers available—plus sample before you buy! 2025 Library Ave, Crozet. 602-2337. $. Brownsville Market Breakfast starting at 5am, plus burgers, sides, and famous fried chicken. 5995 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. 823-5251. $. Feast! Nationally noted cheese, wine, and specialty food shop. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 244-7800. $$. Foods of All Nations Sandwiches, deli, and salads at this gourmet grocery. 2121 Ivy Rd. 296-6131. $. Greenwood Gourmet Grocery Made-to-order sandwiches, fresh soup, and a deli with mac-n-cheese, bread pudding, and rotating dishes. 6701 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. (540) 456-6431. $. Hunt Country Market A rotating menu for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus wine offerings. Call to order. 2048 Garth Rd. 296-1648. $. Integral Yoga Natural Foods All-natural food, organic produce, supplements, plus a deli and juice/ smoothie bar. 923 Preston Ave. 293-4111. $.

Market Street Café Gourmet breakfast, rotisserie chicken, and deli meats. 1111 E. Rio Rd. 964-1185. $. Market Street Market Deli in the downtown grocery serves sandwiches and prepared foods. 400 E. Market St. 293-3478. $. Market Street Wine An expertly curated selection. 305 Rivanna Plaza Dr., Suite 102, 9649463; 311 E. Market St., 979-9463. $$. Mill Creek Market The Southern sister of Bellair Market. Avon Street, across from the Southside Shopping Center. 817-1570. $. Trader Joe’s This grocery chain boasts top quality at low cost, including “Two Buck Chuck” wine (which is actually $3.50). The Shops at Stonefield. 974-1466. $$. Whole Foods Market Fresh, all-natural sandwiches ranging from classic favorites to vegan delights. 1797 Hydraulic Rd. 973-4900. $$. Wyant’s Store Country-store fare like coffee and donuts, with daily specials and a great (cheap!) cheeseburger. 4696 Garth Rd., Crozet. 823-7299. $.

Anna’s Pizza No. 5 In the family for 35 years. 115 Maury Ave. 295-7500. $. Belmont Pizza and Pub Fresh, stone-baked pizza on hand-tossed pies. Beer, too! 211 Carlton Rd., Suite 10. 977-1970. $.

College Inn Late-night goodness. Pizza, gyros, subs, and its delivery can’t be beat. Breakfast items, too. 1511 University Ave. 977-2710. $. Crozet Pizza Unpretentious, family-owned pizza parlor with nationally recognized pies. 5794 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet, 823-2132; 20 Elliewood Ave. 202-1046. $. Dr. Ho’s Humble Pie Pizza joint in the Crossroads mini-mall. 4916 Plank Rd., on 29S at North Garden. 245-0000. $$.

Luce Literal hole in the wall serving fresh, handmade pasta to go. 110 Second St. NW. $$. Mellow Mushroom Trippy-themed franchise, with great pizza and even better beer selection. 1321 W. Main St. 972-9366. $. Red Pump Kitchen Tuscan-inspired restaurant. 401 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-6040. $$. Tavola Rustic Italian with housemade pastas, craft cocktails, and a Wine Spectator awardwinning list. 826 Hinton Ave. 972-9463. $$. Vita Nova Creative ingredients on hearty pizza by the slice. 310 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-0162. $. Vinny’s Italian Grill & Pizzeria This regional chain has pies plus a slew of subs, pastas, and stromboli. Hollymead Town Center. 9734055. $$. Vivace Every kind of pasta imaginable, plus seafood. 2244 Ivy Rd. 979-0994. $$. Vocelli Pizza Pizza, pasta, panini, salads, and stromboli plus antipasti. Woodbrook Shopping Center. 977-4992. $.

Latin American Al Carbon Chicken prepared in an Indigenous Mexican coal-fire, flame-roasted rotisserie manner, plus sides like fried yucca and fried plantains. 1875 Seminole Trail. 964-1052. $. Brazos Tacos Austin, Texas-style breakfast, lunch, early dinner, and brunch tacos. 925 Second St. SE. 984-1163. $. The Bebedero Upscale authentic Mexican, plus cocktails and made-to-order guac. Order from sister restaurants Revolutionary Soup and The Whiskey Jar and pick up food from all three, at once. 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2343763. $$. Chipotle Simple menu of made-to-order burritos and tacos. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 872-0212; 2040 Abbey Rd. Suite 101, 984-1512. $. Continental Divide Charlottesville’s favorite hole-in-the-wall spot has delicious tacos and enchiladas. 811 W. Main St. 984-0143. $$. Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Fresh, handmade, Bajastyle Mexican food. 435 Merchant Walk Sq., Suite 600. 214-0500. $. Guadalajara Family-run Mexican food celebrating 30 years. 805 E. Market St., 977-2676; 395 Greenbrier Dr., 978-4313; 2206 Fontaine Ave., 979-2424; 108 Town Country Ln., 293-3538; 3450 Seminole Trail, 977-2677. $. Guajiros Miami Eatery Food inspired by the everyday meals of Miami, with strong Cuban influence as well as Central and Southern American dishes. 1871 Seminole Trail. 465-2108. $ Junction Innovative Southwestern cuisine with locally sourced ingredients in Belmont. 421 Monticello Rd. 465-6131. $$. La Michoacana Mexican deli serves budgetfriendly burritos, tacos, and enchiladas. 1138 E. High St., 409-9941; 2291 Seminole Ln., 9564299. $. Little Star Spanish- and Mexican-inspired food expertly prepared in a wood-fired oven. Great craft cocktails, too. 420 W. Main St. 252-2502. $$. Mas Spanish tapas and wines in the heart of Belmont. 904 Monticello Rd. 979-0990. $$. Morsel Compass Popular food truck’s brickand-mortar spot. 2025 Library Ave., Crozet. 989-1569. $$. Qdoba Mexican Grill Spicy burritos, quesadillas, and Mexican salads made before your eyes. 3918 Lenox Ave. 244-5641. $. Sombrero’s Mexican Cuisine & Café Healthy, authentic Mexican cuisine. 112 W. Main St., Suite 6. 979-0212. $.

Basil Mediterranean Bistro Mediterranean fare from grape leaves to tapas, plus wine. 109 14th St., 977-5700; 5th Street Station, 202-7594. $. Cava Fast-casual Mediterranean with lots of vegetarian options. 1200 Emmet St. N, #110. 227-4800. $. Orzo Kitchen & Wine Bar Dishes from Spain to Greece and wines of the world. 416 W. Main St., in the Main Street Market. 975-6796. $$. Otto Turkish Street Food Go for the doner kebabs and stay for the rosemary fries. 111 W. Water St. 328-8786. $ Sticks Kebob Shop Everything tastes better on a stick! 917 Preston Ave. 295-5262; 1820 Abbey Rd. 295-5212. $. Sultan Kebab Authentic Turkish cuisine with plenty of meat and vegetarian options, and notable appetizers, too. 333 Second St. SE, 981-0090. $. Thyme & Co. Traditional Lebanese flat­­ breads and salads. 104 14th St. NW, Suite 2. 282-2436. $.

Miscellaneous Nationalities Bang! Tapas Asian fusion cuisine served tapasstyle. 213 Second St. SW. 984-2264 $$. Bizou Playful French-American bistro with a beloved meatloaf dish. 119 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-1818. $$. Mahana Fresh Tropical themed, fun flavored ingredients in bowls and sweets. 2142 Barracks Rd. 284-5846 $. Pearl Island Caribbean-inspired lunch spot in the Jefferson School City Center. 233 Fourth St. NW. 466-0092. $. Sticks A fast-food alternative: kebobs (veggie options available), sides, salads, desserts. Preston Plaza, 295-5262; Rivanna Ridge Shopping Center. 295-5212. $. Soul Food Joint A homecooked meal made up of your favorite Southern staples, sides, and fixin’s. 300 E. Market St. 465-2969. $

Soups, Salads, Sandwiches Baggby’s Gourmet Sandwiches Satisfying sandwiches, salads, soups, and super-friendly service. 512 E Main St. Downtown Mall. 9841862 $.

Bodo’s Bagels Still the king of bagels. 1418 N. Emmet St., 977-9598; 505 Preston Ave., 293-5224; and 1609 University Ave., 2936021. $. Chopt Creative salad chain with ingredients from local purveyors. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 328-8092. $. Citizen Bowl Shop Speciality salads, grainbased bowls, and burritos with gluten-free, vegetarian, and vegan options. Full bar too! 223 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 234-3662. $.

Jimmy John’s Low-cost sandwiches on 29N. “Freaky fast” delivery. 1650 E. Rio Rd. 9752100. $. Kitchenette Sandwich Shop From meatloaf with cheddar and jalapenos to tofu Reubens, these sammies satisfy. 920 91/2 St. NE. 260-7687. $ Panera Bread Co. Ubiquitous chain with casual fare. Barracks Road Shopping Center, 2456192; Fifth Street Station, 973-5264. $. Revolutionary Soup Choose from a slew of enticing soups made daily. 108 Second St., Downtown Mall. 979-9988. $. Roots Natural Kitchen Fast-casual salad and grain bowls. 1329 W. Main St. 529-6229. $. Which Wich Superior Sandwiches Create your own sandwiches by marking up the pre-printed brown bags. Hollymead Town Center. 977-9424. $.

Steaks and Seafood Bonefish Grill Sister to mega-popular Outback Steakhouse featuring seafood, grilled non-fish specialties. Hollymead Town Center. 975-3474. $$. Outback Steakhouse Bloomin’ onions and giant steaks. 1101 Seminole Trail. 975-4329. $$. Public Fish & Oyster Simply prepared, responsibly sourced seafood. 513 W. Main St., 9955542. $$.

Upscale Casual C&O Serving up a three-course $68 prix fixe menu. 515 E. Water St. 971-7044. $$$. Café Frank French-influenced café with special attention to its wine and cocktail lists. 317 E. Main St. 825-9496. $$ Fig Bistro & Bar Mediterranean and New Orleans-inspired dishes with housemade ingredients. 1331 W. Main St. 995-5047. $. Hamiltons’ at First & Main Contemporary American cuisine in the heart of downtown C’ville. 110 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 2956649. $$$. Ivy Inn Fine dining in a charming tollhouse. 2244 Old Ivy Rd. 977-1222. $$$. The Local Belmont neighborhood spot featuring comfort favorites. 824 Hinton Ave. 9849749. $$. Marigold Committed to sustainable and seasonal dishes by an acclaimed chef. 701 Club Dr. 2844200. $$$.

Maya Upscale Southern cuisine. 633 W. Main St. 979-6292. $$. The Melting Pot Fondue fun for all. 501 E. Water St. 244-3463. $$$. The Mill Room Upscale resort eatery with an American menu. 200 Ednam Dr. 972-2230. $$$. Oakhart Social Seasonal, creative modern American food for sharing. 511 W. Main St. 995-5449. $$. Oakhurst Inn Coffee & Café Southern style breakfast and lunch. 1616 Jefferson Park Ave. 872-0100. $.

Durty Nelly’s Down-home pub and deli now offering five subs (except the Dagwood) for $35. 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. $.

Restoration Great views and delicious food, ranging from fried green tomatoes and burgers to crab cakes and pasta. 5494 Golf Dr., Crozet. 823-1841. $$.

HotCakes Fancy sandwiches, housemade entrées, and desserts. Barracks Road Shopping Center. 295-6037. $.

Riverbirch Restaurant Fresh and local American-style cuisine on Pantops. 630 Riverside Shops Way. 465-2421. $$

Iron Paffles & Coffee Pastry dough + waffle iron + savory or sweet insides. 214 W. Water St. 806-3800. $.

Southern Crescent Cajun and Creole fare in Belmont. 814 Hinton Ave. 284-5101. $$.

Ivy Provisions Local deli and retail food shop offering fresh, housemade breakfast and lunch all day, plus wine and craft beer by the bottle and on draft. 2206 Ivy Rd. 202-1308. $. Jack’s Shop Kitchen Farm-to-table brunch, lunch, and supper spot with elevated classics. 14843 Spotswood Trail, Ruckersville. 939-9239. $$.

Tonic Seasonal, local café fare with craft cocktails and curated wine list. 60≠9 E. Market St. 226-4270. $$ Wayland’s Crossing Tavern Pub food, vegetarian plates, and kid-friendly fare. 1015 Heathercroft Cir., Crozet. 205-4669. $$. Zocalo Flavorful, high-end, Latin-inspired cuisine. 201 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 977-4944. $$.

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Christian’s Pizza The place to get fresh pies, by-the-slice or the whole darn thing. 118 W. Main St., Downtown Mall, 977-9688; 100 14th St. NW, 872-0436; 3440 Seminole Trail, 973-7280. $.

Lampo Authentic Neapolitan pizzeria in Belmont. 205 Monticello Rd. 282-0607. $.

Aromas Café Mediterranean and Middle Eastern fare. Sandwiches, salads, and famous falafel. 900 Natural Resources Dr. 244-2486. $.

Jersey Mike’s Subs Subs from Jersey. 2040 Abbey Rd. #104, 529-6278; 5th Street Station, 328-8694. $.

@cville_culture

Italian and Pizza

Fellini’s #9 A local landmark featuring Italian favorites plus some inventive new takes. 200 W. Market St. 979-4279. $$.

Mediterranean

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

J.M. Stock Provisions Whole-animal butcher shop with sandwiches to go, great craft beer selection, and nicely curated wine selection. 709 W. Main St. 244-2480. $$.

Fabio’s New York Pizza Pizza, subs, salads, and calzones made by natives of Naples. Get your pie the Sicilian way. 1551 E. High St. 872-0070. $.

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C

RESTAURANT WEEK

FRIDAY, JANUARY 28THSATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5TH

R

W

3 prices:

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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$19 $29 $39

BON APPETIT!

C-VILLERESTAURANTWEEK.COM

$1 per meal benefits the Blue Ridge Area Food Bank

More To Be Announced Soon!


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At Home Oasis You’ve Earned An

BEST LANDSCAPE COMPANY

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

WINNER

@cville_culture

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CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

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December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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#1

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CROSSWORD

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© 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

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Never gets old B O R G I A

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ANSWERS 12/15/21

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DOWN

26. “____ Baby” (“Hair” tune) 28. Surrounded by 29. QB-turnedcommentator Tony 31. En pointe, in ballet ... or how to describe 3-, 9-, 11- and 25-Down 36. Clothing brand since 1938 37. Co. captains? 39. Rain-on-the-roof sounds 41. Scratch the surface? 44. Shower love (on) 46. Cameo stone 51. “SNL” castmate of Shannon and Gasteyer 52. World leader who’s a judo black belt 53. Subject of lessons at an island resort 55. Like some small dogs 57. Yale students 59. Recipe amts. 60. “Hamilton” Tony winner Leslie ____ Jr. 63. Pigpen 64. “Sex Education” actor Butterfield

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

1. Toot your own horn 5. 1980s-2000s Texas senator Phil 10. Discoveries of Michael Faraday 14. Morrison who wrote “Love” and “Beloved” 15. Apt first name of Fleming’s Goldfinger 16. “Doggone it!” 17. It may be topped with tempura 18. Gable’s costar in “Gone With the Wind” 19. Ruination 20. Gut feeling 22. Jig, say 24. State flower of New Mexico 27. Wee bit 28. Inoculation location 30. Depression era wanderer 32. World of Warcraft spellcaster 33. Dairy farm sound 34. “Chocolat” actress Lena 35. Ipecac, e.g. 38. “That’s my cue!” 40. Try to stop 42. King or queen, but not princess 43. Hoedown move 45. Apt name for a car mechanic? 47. Dove’s sound 48. Classic moonroof alternative 49. Subj. for Janet Yellen 50. Some ESPN highlights, for short 51. Morphine and codeine, for two 54. 2003 #1 hit with the lyric “Shake it like a Polaroid picture”

56. Cost of a bag to feed the birds in the “Mary Poppins” song “Feed the Birds” 58. Cutting-edge brand? 61. James played by Beyoncé in a 2008 biopic 62. Oklahoma city with a Golden Driller statue 65. Affliction for many a vet 66. Ridiculously funny person 67. Celebrations of lives, for short 68. Law enforcers, in slang 69. Model/actress Sastre 70. GPA booster 71. Polite reply to a schoolmarm


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A boutique for everybody, sizes XS to 3X. Apparel, accessories, gifts, & more. Preloved, vintage, handmade, & new. Since 2013.

www.rethreadscville.com

Charlottesville’s favorite spot for antiques, vintage decor and one-of-a-kind treasures.

Live • Learn Work • Play

1700 Allied St. near 250/McIntire Rd. Interchange.

434.295.5760

www.circainc.com

MONDAY–SATURDAY 10–5:30 • SUNDAY 1–5

Charlottesville’s favorite spot for antiques, vintage decor and one-of-a-kind treasures. 1700 434.295.5760 Allied St. near 250/McIntire Rd. Interchange. 434.295.5760 www.circainc.com www.circainc.com 10–5:30 • 1–5 Tuesday-Saturday 10-5:30 MONDAY–SATURDAY

SUNDAY

1700 Allied St. near 250/McIntire Rd. Interchange.

434.295.5760

www.circainc.com

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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MONDAY–SATURDAY 10–5:30 • SUNDAY 1–5

1700 Allied St. near 250/McIntire Rd. Interchange.

434.295.5760

www.circainc.com

Charlottesville’s bulk refill and zero waste shop Make the transition to a low-waste lifestyle by refilling your bottles www.refillrenew.com

MONDAY–SATURDAY 10–5:30 • SUNDAY 1–5

Charlottesville’s Largest Multi-Vendor Marketplace 1747 ALLIED STREET - NOW OPEN DAILY

www.gryphon gymnastics.com (434) 284-7364

Charlottesville Brazillian Jiu-Jitsu Judo • Krav Maga • Muay Thai

www.cvillebjj.com • (434) 825-6202

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By Rob Brezsny

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Sometime during the Northern Song Dynasty that ruled China from 960 to 1127, an artisan made a white ceramic bowl five inches in diameter. About a thousand years later, a family in New York bought it at a garage sale for $3. A short time later, the bowl was sold at an auction for $2.2 million. I’m not saying that 2022 will bring a financial event as dramatic as that one. But I do expect that your luck with money will be at a peak.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): In the Quechuan language spoken in parts of Peru, the word takanakuy means “when the blood is boiling.” Every year at this time, the community of Chumbivilcas stages a holiday called Takanakuy. People gather at the town center to fight each other, settling their differences so they can forget about them and start over fresh. Is there some humorous version of this ritual you could enact that wouldn’t involve even mild punching and kicking? I recommend you dream one up!

Aries

Taurus (April 20-May 20): Taurus author May Sarton wrote a poem celebrating her maturation into the person she had always dreamed she would be. “Now I become myself,” she exulted. “It’s taken time, many years and places; I have been dissolved and shaken, have worn other people’s faces.” But at last, she said, “All fuses together now, falls into place from wish to

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): To ensure that (Dec. 22–Jan. 19): 2022 will bring you the most interesting and useful kind of progress, take good care of your key friendships and alliances, even as you seek out excellent new friendships and alliances. For best results, heed these thoughts from author Hanya Yanagihara: “Find people who are better than you are—not smarter, not cooler, but kinder, and more generous, and more forgiving—and then appreciate them for what they can teach you, and listen to them when they tell you something about yourself, no matter how bad—or good—it might be.”

action, word to silence. My work, my love, my time, my face: gathered into one intense gesture of growing like a plant.” I invite you to adopt Sarton’s poem as a primary source of inspiration in 2022. Make it your guide as you, too, become fully and richly yourself.

Gemini (May 21–June 20): In 2012, the writer Gore Vidal died the day after Gemini writer Maeve Binchy passed away. They were both famous, though Binchy sold more books than Vidal. Vidal was interesting but problematic for me. He was fond of saying that it wasn’t enough for him to succeed; he wanted others to fail. The misery of his fellow humans intensified his satisfaction about his own accomplishments. On the other hand, Binchy had a generous wish that everyone would be a success. She felt her magnificence was magnified by others’ magnificence. In 2022, it will be vital for your physical and mental health to cultivate Binchy’s perspective, not Vidal’s. To the degree that you celebrate and enhance the fortunes of others, your own fortunes will thrive.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): Cancerian political leader Nelson Mandela was wrongly incarcerated for 27 years. After his release, he became president of South Africa and won the Nobel Peace Prize. About leaving jail in 1990, he wrote, “As I walked out the door toward the gate that would lead to my freedom, I knew if I didn’t leave my bitterness and hatred behind, I’d still be in prison.” Although you haven’t suffered deprivation anywhere close to what Mandela did, I’m happy to report that 2022 will bring you liberations from limiting situations. Please adopt Mandela’s approach as you make creative use of your new freedom.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): French poet André Breton wrote, “Je vous souhaite d’être follement aimée.” In English, those words can be rendered as “My wish is that you may be loved to the point of madness” or “I wish you to be loved madly.” That’s got a romantic ring to it, but it’s actually a curse. Why would we want to be loved to the point of madness? A person who “loved” you like that might be fun for a while, but would ultimately become a terrible inconvenience and ongoing disruption. So, dear Leo, I won’t wish that you will be loved to the point of madness in 2022—even though I think the coming months will be an interesting and educational time for amour. Instead, I will wish you something more manageable and enjoyable: that you will be loved with respect, sensitivity, care, and intelligence.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Many people in our culture are smart intellectually, but not very smart emotionally. The wisdom of feelings is undervalued. I protest! One of my great crusades is to champion this neglected source of insight. I am counting on you to be my ally in 2022. Why? Because according to my reading of the astrological omens, you have the potential to ripen your emotional intelligence in the coming months. Do you have ideas about how to take full advantage of this lucky opportunity? Here’s a tip: Whenever you have a decision to make, tune in to what your body and heart tell you as well as to what your mind advises.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl said that a sense of meaning is crucial. It’s the key gratification that sustains people; the feeling that their life has a meaning and

that particular experiences have meaning. I suggest you make this your theme for 2022. The question “Are you happy?” will be a subset of the more inclusive question, “Are you pursuing a destiny that feels meaningful to you?” Here’s the other big question: “If what you’re doing doesn’t feel meaningful, what are you going to do about it?”

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio guitarist Rowland S. Howard spoke of “the grand occasions when love really does turn into something far greater than you had ever dreamed of, something auto-luminescent.” Judging from the astrological configurations in 2022, I have strong hopes and expectations that you will experience prolonged periods when love will fit that description. For best results, resolve to become more generous and ingenious in expressing love than you have ever been.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I’ve been trying to go home my whole life,” writes poet Chelsea Dingman. I know some of you Sagittarians resist the urge to do that. It’s possible you avoid seeking a true and complete home. You may think of the whole world as your home, or you may regard a lot of different places as your homes. And you’d prefer not to narrow down the feeling and concept of “home” to one location or building or community. I suspect that 2022 will bring you unexpected new understandings of home—and maybe even give you the sense that you have finally arrived in your ultimate sanctuary. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888

FRIED CHICKEN AND BUBBLES

Family style fried chicken + choice of sides Grower Champagne, and other bubbles Festive cocktails + Holiday Desserts Christmas Eve + New Year's Eve 11am-10pm Reserve your table at www.tonic-cville.com

609 E. Market St - 434-226-4270 - www.tonic-cville.com

photo by Shenandoah Imagery

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Experience two of our favorite things fried chicken and bubbles!

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

(March 21-April 19): You may become a more audacious storyteller in 2022. You could ripen your ability to express the core truths about your life with entertaining narratives. Bonus: The experiences that come your way will provide raw material for you to become even more interesting than you already are. Now study these words by storyteller Ruth Sawyer: “To be a good storyteller, one must be gloriously alive. It is not possible to kindle fresh fires from burnedout embers. The best of the traditional storytellers are those who live close to the heart of things—to the earth, sea, wind, and weather. They have known solitude, silence. They have been given unbroken time in which to feel deeply, to reach constantly for understanding.”

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

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Find gifts with

Meaning...

Mineral:

A naturally occurring inorganic chemical compound with a given composition, crystal form, and physical properties.

Mystic: A spiritual seeker looking for ways to expand their knowledge while connecting to the divine and exploring their own intuition.

Gift:

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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A token given freely to another with affection and thoughtfulness.

www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive • Charlottesville VA 22901

434-284-7709


CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE

Friday at 5 PM for inclusion in the next Wednesday’s paper.

SIZES AVAILABLE Full Page Half Page Quarter Page Eight Page 1/16 (Business Card)

EMPLOYMENT

We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet & C’ville!

We're Hiring!

bout Us

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Pre-payment Required. We accept all major credit cards, cash or check.

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Graphic Designer & Digital Marketing Creator (Full-time) Monticello seeks a Graphic Designer & Digital Marketing Creator to work within Monticello’s retail and marketing teams to develop, produce, and support initiatives for Monticello’s ecommerce website, social media channels, and Visitor Center Shop. The Graphic Designer & Digital Marketing Creator will design both print and digital marketing including emails, web assets, social media posts, flyers, product packaging, and store signage. The candidate will work closely with the retail and marketing teams in strategic planning, developing editorial content and story-driven marketing materials, and managing the Retail email marketing program. The candidate will assist with content management for the retail website and will become proficient in all aspects of digital marketing. The candidate will also be responsible for monitoring, identifying and analyzing key online trends. A bachelor’s degree in Graphic Design, Marketing, Communications or a similar field is preferred. Candidates should have a minimum of 3-5 years of experience in a professional graphic design role and expert knowledge of Adobe Creative Cloud (InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop), responsive HTML 5, CSS, and Microsoft Office. Successful candidates will also have excellent written and verbal communication skills, the ability to work independently and on a team, and be a creative thinker. This position requires working at a computer station for many hours during the day and may require availability during non-standard business hours to monitor timely social media issues. Position open until filled. Please apply here: https://monticello.applicantpro.com/jobs/

Want to apply your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so, The Arc has these opportunities to offer.

ur mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental sabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the ading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we ge you to consider the following career opportunities:

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $17- $19/hr) Direct Support - Residential Services We're very eager to hear from candidates interested inProfessionals working in Crozet and C’ville! (FT and PT, $15 - $17/hr) To see additional details and a full listing of all our positions or to apply, please visit our web site at http://arcpva.org/employment Direct Support Professional - Floaters ($18 - $19/hr)

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $15-$17/hr) rect Support Professionals- Charlottesville Day Support ($13-$15/hr) ct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr)

addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience, The Arc also offers competitive ompensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive benefits package including paid ave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance. The Arc the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population.

PRICING

Rates starting at $40. Email for specific pricing.

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For more details and positions, and to apply, please visit

http://arcpva.org/employment

Offering competitive compensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive434-977-4002 benefits package paid leave, health, dental & vision insurance, arcpva.orgincluding x124 @arcpiedmont.va as well as life & long-term disability insurance.

Apply now!

The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

434-977-4002x124 arcpva.org • @arcpiedmont.va

LOOKING TO HIRE? Advertise your Employymnet ad HERE

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COME WORK WITH US! $2500 SIGN ON BONUS FOR NEW DRIVERS!* Paid out in three installments:

$500 paid after training completed (approximately two weeks after your start date).

$500 paid once your CDL has been issued.

$1,500 paid one year after your initial start date.

*Former employees are not eligible candidates for sign-on bonuses.

LEGALS

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ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 _ General District Court Charlottesville X Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court __ Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: T.R. vs

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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Apply at www.ridejaunt.org

Looking for a part time sales job or side hustle? Now hiring part time sales reps. to build and manage new business. Commission based, flexible job in a fun work environment that includes great perks. Perfect for an outgoing and energetic person who enjoys building relationships with local businesses. Must be 21+ and have both reliable transportation and a home office (computer and internet access). A good fit for a grad student, someone who works restaurant shifts in the evening or a stay at home Mom looking to ease back into the workforce. Sales experience is a plus (and yes, bartending and waiting tables counts!). Could potentially become a full time position for the right candidate.

Email your resume to anna@c-ville.com EOE

The object of this suit is to: Approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residential parental rights of Unknown Father in the child born to him and Amy Herrera on July 11th, 2016 in Charlottesville, Virginia It is ORDERED that the X defendant Unknown Father, appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before January 19th, 2021 at 2:45 p.m. 11/17/2021 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

Need to apply for an ABC License? Need to run a legal? Contact Chloe for more information : Gabby@c-ville.com **Notarized Affidavit Included in Price


FORECLOSURE SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE AT PUBLIC AUCTION

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0.22 Acre Vacant Lot located on Porter Avenue Lot 13, Oaklawns City of Charlottesville Tax Map No. 200019100 SALE: FRIDAY, DECEMBER 31, 2021 AT 10:30 A.M. ON THE SIDEWALK IN FRONT OF THE CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE CIRCUIT COURT, 315 E. HIGH STREET, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22902 In execution of a Credit Line Balloon Deed of Trust, dated August 14, 2019 and recorded on August 14, 2019, in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court for the City of Charlottesville, Virginia, as Instrument No. 2019-00002814, the undersigned as Trustee under said Credit Line Balloon Deed of Trust, will offer for sale at public auction the parcel listed below: ALL THAT certain lot or parcel of land together with the appurtenances thereto, situated in the City of Charlottesville, Virginia, shown as Lot 13 and strip, Block B, Oaklawns Subdivision, on a plat entitled “Plat Showing Boundary Line Adjustment for T.M.P. 20-19 And Boundary Survey On T.M.P. 20-19.1 Lots 13, 14, 15 and Strip Block B, Oaklawns, Porter Avenue, Oaklawn Court And Oaklawn Drive, Charlottesville, Virginia”, by Residential Surveying Services, dated September 29, 2015, and recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of the City of Charlottesville, Virginia, as Instrument No. 201700001299. City of Charlottesville Tax Map No. 200019100 (the “Property”)

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Flora Pettit PC, Trustee Nancy R. Schlichting 530 E. Main Street P. O. Box 2057 Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 220-6108 NRS@fplegal.com

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

TERMS OF SALE: A bidder’s deposit of the lesser of $10,000 or 10% of the winning bid, shall be paid at the sale by cashier’s check made payable to Bidder (to be assigned to Trustee if Bidder is successful), with the balance upon delivery of a trustee’s deed within 30 days of sale. Settlement shall be held within 30 days after the date of sale unless otherwise postponed at the sole discretion of the Trustee. Sale is subject to the covenants, conditions, restrictions, rights of way, and easements, if any, contained in the deeds and other documents forming the chain of title to the property. Property is sold “AS IS, WHERE IS,” “WITH ALL FAULTS” and “WITH ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTIES.” TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO SETTLEMENT. The deposit shall be applied to the credit of successful bidder at settlement; or, in the event of failure to complete settlement within the time set forth after the date of sale, in accordance with the terms of sale, the deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs of sale, including Trustee’s fee, and the Property shall be resold at the cost and expense of the defaulting Purchaser. Risk of loss or damage to the Property shall be borne by successful bidder from the time of auctioneer’s strikedown at the sale. Purchaser shall pay all settlement fees, title examination charges, title insurance premiums, and recording costs. Current real estate property taxes will be prorated at closing as of date of sale. Rollback taxes, if any, will be the responsibility of the Purchaser. THE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT: (i) to waive the deposit requirements; (ii) to extend the period of time within which the Purchaser is to make full settlement; (iii) to withdraw the Property from sale at any time prior to the termination of the bidding; (iv) to keep the bidding open for any length of time; (v) to reject all bids; and (vi) to postpone or continue this sale from time to time, such notices of postponement or setting over shall be in a manner deemed reasonable by the Trustee. Announcements made on day of sale take precedence over all other advertised terms and conditions. FOR INFORMATION SEE: www.fplegal.com/foreclosures


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SERVICES

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AUCTIONS ATTN. AUCTIONEERS: Advertise your upcoming auctions statewide and in other states. Affordable Print and Digital Solutions reaching your target audiences. Call this paper or Landon Clark at Virginia Press Services 804-521-7576, HYPERLINK “mailto:landonc@vpa. net” landonc@vpa.net

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RICHMOND'S TURNTABLE EXPERTS SINCE 1978 WE ARE LOOKING FOR VINTAGE

December 22, 2021 – January 4, 2022 c-ville.com

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Receivers, Amplifiers, Pre Amps, Tape Decks & Tube Gear from the 60’s & 70’s and beyond. We have a large in-store selection that is updating weekly.

CONTACT US (WE'RE IN RICHMOND) Call or email with questions & pictures 6007 W. Broad St. Richmond (804)-282-0438 sales@audio-exchange.com

. 6007 W. AUDIO-EXCHANGE.COM BROAD ST. RICHMOND, VA 23230 . (804).282.0438 .

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VOL. 30 NO. 51-52 n DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022

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FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

ORANGE COUNTY Lifestyle to Love BY CARLA HUCKABEE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Close-In with a


DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

52

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers IVY FARM

MOORELAND

Classic Virginia brick home, circa 1855, on 22 acres, just seven miles south of Charlottesville. Property includes a cottage, outbuildings, shared ownership in a beautiful pond. Lovely mature landscaping and mountain views. $985,000 MLS#624421 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.moorelandva.com

THE GLEASON

Open, extremely spacious floor plan with 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths. Enjoy expansive mountain and city views from inside or from one of 2 balconies. Secure garage parking. Ting Available. Walk to dining, shopping, and entertainment! MLS#621646 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434. 981.1863

ROBINSON WOODS

Bright, comfortable, and recently renovated house with a flexible floorplan. 4 bedrooms & 3.5 baths. Features gas fireplace, wood floors, new appliances, granite countertops. Conveniently located in the city minutes from Downtown & UVA. MLS#620141 $670,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

This charming, spacious 4 bedroom home is privately situated in a picturesque setting on 4.5 acres just minutes west of Charlottesville. The main level has living room with fireplace, dining room, kitchen opening into large multi-use family room with fireplace, master suite with sitting area and attached 2-car garage. Upstairs has a second master and 2 additional bedrooms. Lower level has home office, half bath and flexible space. Convenient to University of Virginia. MLS#625007 $1,195,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250 Andrew Middleditch, 434.981.1410

RIVER LAWN

Delightful combination of wood and pastureland with a spectacular bluff for a building site overlooking the James River in southern Albemarle County. Property is under easement with the Virginia Outdoors Foundation. MLS#569753 $745,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MADISON

Over 560 acres of wooded land on Thoroughfare Mountain in Madison County. Three contiguous parcels, completely private, with endless possibilities. Hunt, ride ATVs, camp, build a weekend retreat or a permanent residence in total serenity. MLS#621697 $2,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WOODFIELD

Rare opportunity to purchase an architecturallydesigned, gracious 3,530 square foot residence with 4 bedrooms and 3 baths on a secluded 4.59 acres in the heart of Garth and Owensville Road yet close to all Charlottesville/UVA amenities. MLS#623814 $949,000 Robert Mellen, 434.996.7386

GREENFIELDS FARM

Impressive 763-acre country estate approximately 25 miles south of Charlottesville. The property showcases a stately southern residence, built circa 1904, extensive equestrian facilities, recreation opportunities, creeks and a pond. MLS#623792 $6,295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

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BLENHEIM ROAD

Newly renovated and move-in ready country home with 4 bedrooms and 2 baths on 5+ acres in a private, peaceful and relaxing setting just 20 miles from Charlottesville, and a quick 5 miles from the Town of Scottsville. Residence has plenty of natural light, hardwood floors, stainless steel appliances, new roof, full unfinished basement, 2-car garage and more! Lot is a nice balance of open, rolling land and woods with many opportunities. One not to miss!! MLS#625017 $399,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

GALLISON HALL

Beautifully sited amidst 43 acres of expansive lawns and gardens stands this extraordinary, 1931-1933 Georgian Revival-style residence. Tranquil, private setting with magnificent Blue Ridge Mountain views, 3 miles west of town. MLS#617686 $8,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


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BLOOMFIELD FARM

29 acres fronting Blenheim Rd. a small agricultural and residential subdivision with CCR’s, but NO HOA. 2 buildable lots,with an historic red barn and silo,and 8-stall stable. Driveway in place, underground power, well and water, and several building spots with mountain views. MLS#624834 $495,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

RAGGED MOUNTAIN

4.32 acres, half open, with gently rolling, cleared homesite on a high plateau with lovely pastoral and mountain views. Situated in Ivy Valley, just off I-64 west of Charlottesville, less than 10 miles to the University of Virginia. MLS#622663 $465,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

EMERALD RIDGE

Spectacular 22-acre lot in Western Albemarle! Wooded, wonderfully private and offers the ideal location for an elevated building site with the potential for big year-round views. Western schools! MLS#621504 $295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

COMMONWEALTH DRIVE

1-story, 2,147 sf. commercial office building at corner of Westfield Road just off Rt. 29S. Zoned Commercial Office (CO) use includes administrative and business offices, medical, dental and more. CVCMLS#30317750 $799,000 Mark Mascotte, 434. 825.8610

RAGGED MOUNTAIN FARM

Two wonderful estate parcels comprised of 185.01± acres in coveted Ragged Mountain Farm. Excellent elevated building site, complete privacy, and beautiful views. Murray/Henley/Western school district. MLS#621083 $1,895,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville and the University of Virginia. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SIMMONS GAP ROAD

5-acre lot with mature hardwoods. Great opportunity to build with no HOA. Private building site amongst beautiful woods. Located between Free Union and Earlysville but so convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. MLS#621177 $140,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

MURPHY’S CREEK FARM

Wonderful gently rolling parcel of land with just under 26 acres, 18 miles south of Charlottesville. The land is wooded (mostly hardwoods) with an elevated building site, stream/creek, total privacy, and long road frontage. MLS#619394 $285,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WESLEY CHAPEL ROAD

Nice, mostly wooded residential building lot in Meriwether Lewis School District! Great privacy, 1.72± acres, beautiful rural setting in an area of large farm and estate properties. Located approximately 15 miles NW of Charlottesville. MLS#613685 $125,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MEADOWBROOK HILLS

Lovely 3-bedrooms, 3-baths, circa 1958 brick home located in one of the City’s most desirable neighborhoods- convenient to all that Charlottesville has to offer! Walkable to Barracks Road & UVA, and just a short drive from Downtown. MLS#622783 $598,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

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NEWS & VIEWS Local Real Estate News LEAP Assists Piedmont Housing Alliance to Replace Old HVAC Systems

55

Got News? Send your newsworthy submisssions to editor@caarrew.com No PDFs please only text files will be considered.

Annie Gould Gallery

NEWS & VIEWS

Just in time for the winter cold, the Local Energy Alliance Program (LEAP) recently replaced 26 space heating and cooling systems (HVAC) at Monticello Vista and Virnita Courts in the City of Charlottesville. Replacing the apartment building systems will not only save the residents money on their individual energy bills but will also alleviate the need for a large investment by Piedmont Housing Alliance in the near future, as the systems were coming up for replacement soon. “This was a great opportunity for LEAP to help some of Piedmont Housing Alliance’s low- and fixed-income residents reduce their energy bills by installing more energy-efficient HVAC systems,” stated Chris Meyer, LEAP’s Executive Director. “We were able to update the systems thanks to $225,000 of additional funding under one of Dominion Energy Virginia’s mandated low-income energy-efficiency programs,” continued Meyer.

The 16-SEER replacement heat pump systems are estimated to save residents 10-20 percent on their energy use and will function for both heating in the winter and cooling in the summer. Heat pumps use electricity and refrigerant to move heat from one location to another, operating by extracting heat from the outside air and transferring it to refrigeration coolant— the coolant is then compressed, which increases the temperature inside your home. Heat pumps are significantly more efficient than other electric heat options, which often resort to resistance heating, not unlike a toaster oven. To cool a home, the process is reversed, transferring heat out of your home and returning cool air inside. Virnita Court, built in 1966, is in central Charlottesville, serving families with incomes as low as 40 percent AMI, including families on housing choice vouchers. Monticello Vista Apartments is a re-purposed textile factory, originally constructed in 1924. With apartments ranging from efficiencies to 3-bedroom, the community serves extremely low-income individuals and families. LEAP supplied Monticello Vista with 12 HVAC units, Virnita Court with 14 units, and provided the mainte-

LEAP delivers a number of low-income energy-efficiency programs for Charlottesville Gas, Dominion Energy, Albemarle County, and the City of Charlottesville. Contact LEAP at info@leap-va.org or 434-227-4666 to see if you qualify for assistance. About LEAP. The Local Energy Alliance Program (LEAP) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit headquartered in Charlottesville, VA. As a trusted nonprofit, LEAP delivers direct education and services for improved energy performance that address climate change; create cost savings for families and businesses; enable healthier, safer, and more durable buildings; and bolster local jobs and economic growth. About Piedmont Housing Alliance. Founded in 1983, Piedmont Housing Alliance is the largest affordable housing organization in the Charlottesville, VA area. The mission is to create affordable housing opportunities and foster community through education, lending, and equitable developmen

DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY

nance staff at both properties with HVAC installation training. “The replacement of older HVAC equipment with new high-efficiency ones provides direct benefit to the residents, increasing indoor air quality and reducing utility costs. It indirectly helps the property overall, by removing the cost burden of replacement and allowing maintenance dollars to be stretched for other uses,” shared Sunshine Mathon, Piedmont Housing Alliance’s Executive Director. LEAP wants to remind everyone that an efficient HVAC system is important to keep your home comfortable while reducing energy usage. While HVAC systems can be expensive to replace ($8,000-$15,000) depending on the size of the home, properly insulating and air sealing your home are normally the most cost-effective steps a homeowner can take to increase comfort and reduce energy usage. Prior to replacing the HVAC systems at Monticello Vista and Virnita Courts, LEAP utilized a different funding source to insulate and air seal units a few years ago.

A unique art gallery located in the heart of Historic Downtown Gordonsville. Offering an assortment of works by artists from around the country.

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA

(540) 832-6352

anniegouldgallery

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121-B South Main Street Gordonsville • (540) 832-6352 www.facebook.com/anniegouldgallery www.instagram.com/anniegouldgallery


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CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

DECEMBER 22 - JANUARY 4, 2022, 2021 ISSUE 3051

PHOTO CREDIT: PC-ORANGE COUNTY TOURISM

Y

ou expect to hear local real estate agents and the county tourism manager rave about how great Orange County is. After all, it’s their job to advocate for the hometown. But when the data back up that enthusiasm, it’s hard not to become part of the cheering squad. Real estate sales are surging in Orange County. Purchases are up more than 20 percent this year, which is impressive considering they are battling the same low inventory of available homes that plagues the rest of Central Virginia. A more typical increase for the county is less than five percent. Figuring out what’s behind the ramped-up enthusiasm for Orange County is not hard. Tremendous outdoor experiences, historic attractions, the up-and-coming towns of Orange and Gordonsville, and the growing demand in Lake of the Woods, which alone is enough to draw a crowd. Layer on the desirable location and it’s clear there is a movement underway.

Prime Location Draw a line from Washington to Richmond to Charlottesville and back to Washington. Wait, the lines are already drawn—I-95, I-64 and U.S. Route 29. Smack dab in the middle lies Orange County, just far enough removed from the urbanization and traffic to provide a retreat from the chaos. U.S. Route 15 runs north to south through the town of Orange making it easy to hop on any of the major highways

ORANGE COUNTY Close-In with a

Lifestyle to Love BY CARLA HUCKABEE PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE ORANGE BOARD OF TOURISM

to access the surrounding cities and what they offer. Employment, cultural attractions, airports, and other city amenities abound. From Gordonsville and Barboursville, Charlottesville is less than a 20-mile drive. Richmond and Washington are each about 70 miles, and Fredericksburg is

only 20 miles from the eastern side of Orange County. In 2022, construction will begin on one of the country’s largest Veterans Administration outpatient clinics in Fredericksburg. This VA Health Care Center adds another major employer to those already within commuting distance from the county.

With remote and hybrid work models becoming standard, Orange County’s already prime location is even more desirable. As REALTOR® and Managing Partner with Licata Group Real Estate Advisors, John Licata sees the trend only continuing. “Orange County will continue to benefit from the ability to work from home. Think of all the office workers in Northern Virginia. Strong broadband and internet access here make it easy to transition from the office to home and a lifestyle to love in Orange County.”

Historic, Outdoorsy, and Highly Acclaimed Among all the historic and outdoor attractions in Orange County, four stand out as national or regional treasures. Montpelier, James and Dolley Madison’s former estate, combines an American history museum, a center for constitutional education and engagement, tours, exhibitions, and more than eight miles of walking trails. Highlights of the trails include Montpelier’s OldGrowth Landmark Forest and the Civil War Trail. Historic and outdoorsy in its own right, nearby Grelen combines a 1935 Georgian Revival style home with a farmto-table casual café, garden shop, pickyour-own nursery, event venue, and a 1,000-acre tree nursery. The home and site are on the US national Register of Historic Places. Its five miles of trail connect to Montpelier’s, creating a network of more than 13 miles of beautiful walking trails through historic and natural grounds.


57 DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

Plenty of locales in Virginia and elsewhere can show off their history or their farms. Few, however, do it as well as Orange County where there is a commit-

PHOTO CREDIT: OC TOURISM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Authentic and Home Grown

PHOTO CREDIT: AARON WATSON

ment to preserve the large-scale estates and grounds and make the most of them for residents and visitors. “You can’t be what you’re not,” says Lori Landes-Carter, Tourism Manager for Orange County. “What we have in Orange County is natural and authentic, borne out of our history. ‘Agritourism’ is all the rage now, and that’s what we have always done best. People come to see our history and how we have retained the rural farms, vineyards, historic sites, and natural areas that make up most of the county. “There has been an incredible resurgence of people wanting to recapture a natural element in their lives. It gained traction a few years ago and has become nearly universal in COVID’s wake. Gardening, farm-to-table, local agricultural experiences like corn mazes and pickyour-own orchards and berry farms, local vineyards, and cideries are all right here.” A local network of residents wants to expand on what’s already here. This Town to Trail network is actively connecting green spaces within Gordonsville in partnership with the Piedmont Environmental Center. Long-term, they are working to build a trail to connect Gordonsville to the Montpelier trail system and it’s Landmark Forest. Few places can lay claim to old-growth forests. Because local leaders and citizens embraced their story and are staying true to it, Orange County can. “Preservation has allowed us to keep our green space.”

FEATURE

On the western edge of Orange County, Barboursville Vineyards is an 18th century estate playing a legendary role in Virginia viticulture, with roots dating back to Jefferson. The estate hosts wine tastings in the Discovery Tasting Room and other historic sites on the grounds. Library 1821 displays historic documents such as a letter from President John Quincy Adams and other artifacts. This Fall’s Sommelier International Wine Competition named Barboursville Vineyards “Winery of the Year.” In an appropriate pairing, the acclaimed Palladio Restaurant, on grounds, serves an Italian fine-dining experience to match the elegant 870-acre estate. Perhaps the best kept secret is The Inn at Willow Grove. Named first in “The Top 15 Resort Hotels in the South by Travel + Leisure Magazine, this restored 1770s plantation and estate is now a five-star boutique luxurious country hotel and spa. The grounds are highlighted by oldgrowth trees and beautifully manicured gardens and surrounded by Virginia farms and vineyards. Dining at the Vintage Restaurant & Pub, immersing in the saltwater pool, and being pampered in the Mill House Spa are guest favorites. Classified as a “world-class escape,” The Inn with its 40-acre grounds is one more star in Orange County’s quiver of expansive historic properties.


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FEATURE

DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

58 Something’s Brewing Here

Why would a high-profile national law firm move its entire practice from Alexandria to Orange? And then, what would possess the heads of that law firm to open a coffee kiosk, and eventually a full-service restaurant in Gordonsville? That’s exactly what Nancy Miller did with her late husband, Mike. Practicing law together in Alexandria, they wanted a place in the country. It didn’t take them long to find and fall in love with Orange County, eventually moving their home to near Gordonsville and The Miller Firm to the town of Orange. The full-service restaurant they built, East of Maui Coffee, operates in Gordonsville serving coffee grown on the Millers’ coffee plantation in Maui. Since Mike’s death just a few weeks ago, Nancy reaffirms their decision to move and invest in Orange County. “I love Gordonsville, and so did Mike. And Orange has been a great place for The Miller Firm. We have been just as effective here as we were in D.C. My son-in-law roasts the restaurant’s coffee beans in the old Orange Review Building. Orange and Gordonsville are home now.” Nancy and Mike weren’t the only ones to see the appeal of these two small towns. Seasoned and new entrepreneurs are recognizing the opportunity to be part of something special. Champion Brewing Company owner Hunter Smith partnered with BBQ Exchange owner Craig Hartman to open Champion Ice House in historic Memorial Hall on Main Street in Gordonsville. Less than a mile away, Patch Brewing Company moved into the old VFW space. With outdoor pavilions winterized for the season, Patch offers 14 acres of green space to be enjoyed via walking trails, ball fields, firepits, and covered seating. With these historic gathering spaces coming back to life, and other rehab projects in the works, Gordonsville is being transformed into a vibrant destination. Orange, too, has it’s share of investment taking place. The historic Silk

PHOTO CREDIT: PC-ORANGE DOWNTOWN ALLIANCE

PHOTO CREDIT: PC-ORANGE COUNTY TOURISM

Mill Building is being repurposed into a thriving marketplace. The former mill, nicknamed the parachute factory for its role in providing silk for parachutes during both world wars, sits on six acres. It is the perfect setting for Iron Pipe Alewerks brewpub. Spoon and Spindle is also under roof offering a fine dining experience for lunch and brunch. Other businesses include the Silk Mill Grille and event planners Madison and Mill. While Gordonsville and Orange have been small and quaint for decades, they are enjoying a serious uptick in activity. New restaurants and breweries are often leading indicators of a coming surge in residential buying.

Concentration in Locust Grove To retain the county’s mostly rural nature, much of the concentrated development is focused in the Locust Grove area in eastern Orange County. The resortstyle private gated community of Lake of the Woods is the largest population center, attracting commuters and vacationers alike.

Licata notes that at the start of COVID, Lake of the Woods was popular for Northern Virginians to have a getaway. “As COVID continues, lots of those buyers are making their escape homes permanent. They see that they don’t need to go to Florida when they can have the best of both worlds here without the travel hassles. Twin Lake Villas is a new 55+ active adult community that Licata says has been selling briskly with 10 to 12 homes per month, in the range of $350,000. Developer D. R. Horton is offering new single family “express homes” in the Wilderness Shores area of Locust Grove, starting at just over $400,000. Licata explains, “Horton is able to offer a quick turnaround time, as little as 90 days, because they put the houses on the market as they are beginning the dry wall process. So very little customization can be done, but it’s a great way for a buyer to get a new home without waiting for a year or two on construction. “These two new developments are helping with the low inventory of existing

homes. Demand in this area is only going to grow. Right now, a waterfront house in Lake of the Woods will cost you $2 million. The community has the infrastructure and location that buyers need, and the amenities and features they want.” Donna Waugh-Robinson, REALTOR® with Jack Samuels Realty agrees. “The high quality of life in Orange County and the ability for many to work from home is enticing. People want to move here and I’m seeing more out of state clients. With that higher demand and the low supply, prices will continue to go up. At the same time, we’re seeing land sales ticking up. But those buyers need to be patient to get through the lengthy building process.” Given all the good that is coalescing here, building or buying an existing home are both good options. For buyers yearning to be immersed in historic and outdoorsy settings, with vibrant small-towns, or resort-style living, Orange County is a great choice. Carla Huckabee writes about high-performing real estate.


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Ashley Balazs

Michael Blackmore

Carol Clarke

Brad Conner

Carol Costanzo

John Farmer

Alice Fitch

Curt Bradley

Doug Burke

Frankie Carl

Anita Dunbar

Kelly Faillace

Jonathan Drolshagen Pam Drumheller

Our Charlottesville office wishes everyone a Joyous Holiday, & a special Thank You to all our wonderful customers and clients. May songs of joy fill your homes with warmth & happiness this Holiday Season!

Peter McFarrren

Carter Montague

Percy Montague

Yates Nobles

Kyle Olson

Trish Owens

Jessica Saadut

Laurel Smith

Edwina St Rose

Pat Sury

Leadership: Percy Montague, Pam Drumheller, Rives Bailey, Carter Montague and Carol Clarke

w w w. M o n ta g u e m i l l e r . c o m

Charlottesville | Amherst | Culpeper | Madison | Orange

Mike Gaffney

Amy Harper

Barbara McMurry Dustin Medley

Lauren Padlo

Wes Sury

David Rogers

Dana Watson

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Simon Joseph

Peggy Rooth

Tinsley Campbell

DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

Rives Bailey


DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

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NOW IS THE TIME TO PLAN FOR 2022! SOLD!

SOLD!

350 CLAIBOURNE ROAD

SOLD!

1460 CANFIELD LANE

Like new construction without the wait! This beauEscape to a cottage in the woods while only tiful home is less than two years old & filled with minutes from Downtown! This beautiful home ofupgrades. Walk into your foyer to find tall ceilfers first floor living with a two bedrooms on the ings& wonderful luxury vinyl plank flooring that main floor including the big master bedroom. flow through the main level. Turn the corner to see The full bath is completely updated and feels an open floor plan with your gourmet kitchen & like it was built for a spa. The kitchen overover sized island overlooking your light filled livlooks the dining area and living room to give a ing room. Perfect for entertaining! Off the living feeling of openness. Upstairs you will find two room is your deck with plenty of room to lounge additional spacious bedrooms and a full bath. or grill out. Walk into your large 1st floor master Off your kitchen there is a lovely screen porch suite complete with en suite bath, tiled shower & to sit or go onto the large deck to enjoy the feeldual vanities. The main level is completed by a ing of nature. The fire pit adds another potential visit to your laundry room. Great main floor living! space to sit and relax. Walk just through the Head upstairs to find two more bedrooms plus trees to an open lawn area perfect for playtime. a big loft area perfect for a family or recreation All of this is just 15 minutes from Downtown or room. As a bonus there is a combination room UVA Hospital and 11 minutes to Wegmans!! to be used for an office, hobby. MLS# 622259 $490,000 MLS# 622295 1544 Sawgrass Ct $365,000 2142 Avinity

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Gorgeous describes this Craig Builders home. Grand foyer leads to chef’s dream kitchen full of upgraded cabinets, stainless appliances & granitecounter tops. Hardwood floors lead to a dining area & wonderful living room with fireplace. Living room opens up to large balcony with a captivating view of CarterMountain. Natural light flows into every room! Upstairs has dual master bedrooms. The master suite sports a large walkin closet & upgraded bathroom with doublesinks along with a claw foot tub. Bottom level includes a 3rd bedroom, full bath, and home office perfect for working from home. Attic has flooring to give Sunday 1-3 pm extra storage.Walk out to your patio with access to large grass common area.Magnolia Warranty on all Dr the 2808 Loop appliances to than the 15 new owner. Peace &transfers tranquility less minutes from Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhousekitchen w/mountain Avinity is minutes away from UVA, MLS#house 624092 Downtown! Enjoy this wonderful on over an views! Open floorplan, perfect for entertaining $440,000 acre with beautiful mature trees. $469,900 with private patio. $365,000

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& SELLERS CALL ME TODAY!

PUT YOUR in 6 days! HOUSE Under Contract HERE:

900 GARDENS BLVD #100 CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22901 WWW.AVENUEREALTYGROUP.COM

4161 Presidents Rd

63 Soapstone Ln

Country living 15 minutes of Downtown & within Albemarle County. This single floor home has beautifully updated kitchen & bathrooms. $260,000

Here’s your chance to live in a 1906 farmhouse with all the style and character while enjoying the conveniences of a modern home. $130,000

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/578197

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/572219

Semi-Custom Detached Villa Homes Surrounding ainBelvedere Pocket Park! From $549,900 Tour our Newest Model Homes and Old Trail Village Tour Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere Belvedere and and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Sales Center Now Open on-site off Rt 29 North! Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 | 434-987-6522 Villa Model in Old Trail Village | 406 Astel St, Crozet, VA 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in OldinTrail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change


61 DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

REAL ESTATE SERVICES WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

STUNNINGLY CHARMING STONE HOME

5453 Markwood Road 3 BR, 3 BA, 1843 SQ FT $695,000 mls 624885 Virginia Gardner, 434-981-0871

THE BROOKWOOD

3161 Chopping Road 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 1610 SQ FT $383,900 mls 624922 Susan Stewart, 434-242-3550

COZY TOP FLOOR UNIT!

1243 Cedars Court 1 BR, 1 BA, 690 SQ FT $159,000 mls 624797 Jan Shiflett, 434-242-6057

UNDER CONTRACT

SUN-DRENCHED HOME AT LAKE MONTICELLO

20 Zephyr Road 4 BR, 2.5 BA, 2395 SQ FT $355,000 mls 624535 Katelyn Mancini, 703-203-3388

LAKEFRONT DUTCH COLONIAL

312 Sunset Drive 4 BR, 3.5 BA, 2882 SQ FT $438,000 mls 622706 Jan Shiflett, 434-242-6057

SIX ACRE BUILDING LOT

Bairs Trail Lane – Madison Panoramic views of the Blue Ridge $295,000 mls 624877 Lee Wyatt, 540-718-3065

VIEW MORE LISTINGS ONLINE

24.85 ACRES WITH POND

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME

Ragged Mountain Drive 3.02 acres, Ivy Creek frontage $365,000 mls 580314 Jim McVay, 434-962-3420

Charlottesville 434.951.5155 | Greene 434.985.2348 | Zion Crossroads 434.589.2611 | Western Albemarle 434.205.4355 WWW.ROYWHEELER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Hatton Ferry Road Homesite has 3-car garage in place $349,900 mls 623388 Mike Peters, 434-981-3995


DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

62

BUY AND SELL CVILLE

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

BUY AND SELL CVILLE Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

LOW INVENTORY

+ PATIENT L O WBUYERS INVENTORY

PENNY LANE

Fabulous cottage tucked away on 12.5 acres with 1 division right. Top quality craftsmanship features; a copper roof and downspouts, vaulted ceilings, dramatic windows and artistic stonework.The first floor bath features a stone fireplace. Mature landscaping, wrap around porch, spring, stream and a detached studio all work to make this a compelling property. The studio has a fireplace with a beautiful walnut mantle. There are 2 sheds (a potting shed and another set up for miniature goats) $850,000

+ PATIENT BUYERS = A MORE CRITICAL THAN A TIME MOR E C REVER ITICAL TIME THAN EVER TO HAV TO HAVE...

A PROFESSIONAL REALTOR The Buy and Sell Cville Team Seller'sGuide REPRESENT A shows PROFESSIONAL you THE MOST REALTOR aspects IMPORTANT REPRESENT YOU! sale YOU! of a successful Staff: CLUB DRIVE

French Normandy style home set on a 2.7 acre corner, wooded lot in Keswick Estate. Elegant, custom designed residence built by Baird Snyder. Composite slate roofing, turrets and copper finials. Cast stone work on the exterior and solid mahogany arched front doors. 20’ sweeping entry with curved staircase. Amazing master suite, chef ’s kitchen and a wine cellar with tasting room. Arched windows and doors, carved white statuary marble fireplace. Extensive gardens and terraces. $3,000,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

THE

& the #1 thing you The Buy and should NEVER do SellCville Team when selling! Seller’s Guide shows you THE MOST IMPORTANT aspectsof a successful sale & the #1 thing you should NEVER do when selling!

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

NOMINATE ME

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.996.4019

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®. the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed

Buythat and Sell Cville Team all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. Nominees: Candice & Bert

CALL CANDICE TODAY FOR A CONSULTATION! Candice van der Linde, Realtor

@Candice_Realtor

Real Estate Weekly PassionateCAAR about Helping Is printed on 100% recycled paper People SELL & BUY Residential Real Estate in the Charlottesville Area. We can’t East Main Street wait308 to E. connect with you• Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com & Share SomeSend of our Best

Adventures!


63

Let an agent who knows guide you.

LOUISA COUNTY

Bev Nash

$299,900

434-981-5560

• Construction is underway on 5 wooded acres • 1400 sf, 3 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms • Similar to photo, covered porch, rear deck • Superior stick built construction • Conditioned crawl space • Paved State road • Granite counters, real fireplace • February completion

14 Tallwood Trl

Dan Corbin

$364,000

434-531-6155

• Exciting Listing at Lake Monticello • 2688 sq ft, 4 bd, 3 ba, Cedar Cape • Floor to Ceiling Stone Fireplace, Open Loft • Updates include Hardwoods, Appliances and Paint • 1st & 2nd Level BRs, Ample Closets, Huge Master Suite • Wonderful Home for Family and Entertaining • MLS 623551

Piney Mountain Subdivision, Palmyra

10+ acre Lots

$139,900

Ruth Guss

NELSON COUNTY

434-960-0414

• 3 Bedrooms, 1 Bath, 1,078 Sq. Ft. • Charming 1930’s Updated Two Story • First Floor Bedroom, First Floor Laundry • Painted Wood Cabinets, Mahogany Kitchen Countertop • .46 Acres Within Walking Distance of the Rockfish River • 466 Riverside Dr Schuyler, VA 22969

500 DAVID RD

$765,000

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • Marshall Manor Community - very private & NO HOA dues • Minutes to UVA & Downtown Cville • Elevated on almost 5 Acres • Multi-Level Main Home with 5 BR & 3 Full BA • Updated Kitchen & Baths, Hardwood Flooring • Det. Cottage w/1.5 Baths, Large BR & Flex Office/BR • Private Wooded Views adj. to UVA Preservation Land • MLS # 623721

$340,030

14 ELM CT/TROY

SHADWELL ESTATES

Bev Nash

$89,900

DECEMBER 22, 2021 - JANUARY 4, 2022 ISSUE 3051

A DREAM HOME IS GREAT, BUT THE RIGHT ONE IS BETTER.

434-981-5560

• The last vacant lot available • Located just East of Shadwell. • Beautiful mature timber on 1.5 acres • Paved private road • Just 10 minutes to Pantops shops 5 minutes to Keswick Golf Club and Glenmore

$99,900

Pat Burns

434-465-4444

• Sitting amidst estates and horse properties this beautiful 5 acre lot in Keswick area for sale to build your dream home. Convenient to Charlottesville, Gordonsville. 99,900.

FLATTOP MTN RD

$700,000

4 LOTS REMAIN

434.985.0021 410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 Downtown

Lori Click

434-326-7593

• To Be Built! The Brookwood, Similar to Photo! • 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Attached Garage, 1.66 Acres • Upgraded Siding Accent, Wide Window Trim, 10’x16’ Rear Deck • Master Suite with Garden Tub, Double Bowl Vanity • Kitchen with Granite Countertops, Stainless Appliances • Luxury Vinyl Plank Floors, Forest View s/d offer DSL, Fiber Optic

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • Live year round comfortably • Retreat style custom home • Hi speed century link internet • Double lot & never ending spring • 3 bedrooms 2.5 baths • Wrap around deck

434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Gorgeous NEW 10+ Acre Homesites • No HOA, Common Sense C&Rs, Firefly • Close to the Lake, Dining, Shopping, Schools • Ready to Build? Be In Your New Home Summer 2022 • Your Choice of Remaining 4 Lots - $109,000 • Call for A Personal Tour - MLS 602021


JANUARY 3RD 2022


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