C-VILLE Weekly | December 1 - 7, 2021

Page 1

KAREN DUNN, ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFFS, AFTER THE VERDICT IN THE SINES V. KESSLER LAWSUIT AGAINST UNITE THE RIGHT ORGANIZERS VOL. 30 NO. 48 n DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 WWW.CAAR.COM A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A RLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOC I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange,

Augusta

Making Spirits Bright:

Yet another departed official sues the City of Charlottesville PAGE 9

Shop Local!

Discovery Museum celebrates 40 years of imagination PAGE 21

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS! BY KEN WILSON

INSIDE

CHECK OUT OUR HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE INSIDE (PAGE 26-28)

EZE AMOS

DECEMBER 1 – 7, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

“Our goal was to come here and to prove a conspiracy to do racially motivated violence, and get damages awarded. We did all those things.”


2

Have a

y r r Me g n i n r o M enter C g n i p p d Sho a o R s k c a at Barr

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Saturday, December 4th 10 am - 1 pm

Live Music

Selfies with Santa

Merchant Promotions

Tina Hashemi Jazz Duo by the Fountain

Find Santa near Origins for a memorable selfie

Enjoy holiday savings throughout Barracks Road

Toy & Book Drive

Donate a new toy or book in front of Barnes & Noble and recieve a $5 gift card to Greenberrys* *While supplies last, one per family.

Save the Date! The Barracks Road Holiday Parade will return in 2022 on December 3!


3

THE BELOVED HOLIDAY TRADITION RETURNS

LIVE ON STAGE!

A CHRISTMAS CAROL DECEMBER 10–30 BLACKFRIARS PLAYHOUSE, STAUNTON, VA Actress Natasia Reinhardt (photo by Amy Wolf)

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! AmericanShakespeareCenter.com • 540.851.1733 or 1.877.MUCH.ADO

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com facebook.com/cville.weekly


INSIDE THIS ISSUE

4

V.33, No. 48

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

EDITORIAL EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (434) 373-0073 editor@c-ville.com NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny tami@c-ville.com

12 NEWS

9

10 A look at how Afghan refugees are settling in locally. 11 County electeds discuss 2022 legislative priorities.

25 Galleries: What’s on view this month. 30 Sudoku 31 Crossword 33 Free Will Astrology

12 Jury says Unite the Right organizers have to pay—but will they?

Q&A

CULTURE

CLASSIFIED 36

19

21 Extra: Virginia Discovery Museum turns 40. 23 Screens: Cumberbatch shines in The Power of the Dog.

35 Who would you like to trade lives with?

COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Kristin O’Donoghue CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Amelia Delphos, Carol Diggs, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Lisa Provence, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Courteney Stuart, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Max March max@c-ville.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING

Real Estate Weekly Page 39

advertising@c-ville.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Gabby Kirk (434) 373-2136 gabby@c-ville.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Chloe Heimer, Lisa C. Hurdle DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman

facebook.com/cville.weekly

REAL ESTATE WEEKLY Beth Wood (434) 373-0999 beth@caarew.com PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

BUSINESS PUBLISHER Anna Harrison anna@c-ville.com CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Debbie Miller debbie@c-ville.com A/R SPECIALIST Nanci Winter (434) 373-0429 CIRCULATION MANAGER Billy Dempsey circulation@c-ville.com

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle, and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2021 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

Virginia Press Association


434.328.8573 301 E. Main Street

www.skooma.com

Delivery now available!

5

Want to stay in while it's chilly? Give us a call or place an order online!

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com facebook.com/cville.weekly


6

THIS WEEK The four-week civil trial against organizers of the Unite the Right rally ended last week, with the court finding the defendants owe $26 million for their actions leading up to that deadly weekend (p. 12). Just editing our daily trial updates this month has been exhausting. I can only imagine how draining the entire experience was for the plaintiffs, who relived the traumatic moments of August 11 and 12, 2017, and endured sneering questioning from the rally’s odious organizers. I hope they rest easier with the trial in the rearview mirror. The trial is yet another reminder that many people in this city are still living with the effects of the Unite the Right rally. As the plaintiffs described during testimony, some are still recovering from their physical and emotional injuries. Both structural and symbolic reforms have come slowly: It took more than four years for the civil trial to be completed. The Confederate statues that were central to the rally just came down last summer. A group of civic leaders put in place to lead the city’s post-rally transformation are all ending their relationship with the city government on difficult terms. After the rally, Charlottesville elected a Black mayor and hired a Black police chief and a Black city manager. Four years later, the mayor decided not to run for reelection and the police chief and city manager are both suing the city, alleging that city councilors broke the rules in dismissing them from their positions (p. 9). (At press time, City Council was in an emergency closed session to discuss personnel matters, so there could be more news coming.) Charlottesville has a lot of work to do. Still, I sense that the conclusion of this trial is a step in the right direction, one more victory for the people who deserve it. The plaintiffs should be proud of the effort they put in over the last four weeks, and four years.—Ben Hitchcock

12.1.21

434-971-4880

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Auto Repair – Domestic & Imports – In Business Since 1961

SHUTTLE SERVICE AVAILABLE

We Go the Extra Mile for Our Customers!

Winter Preparedness Checklist:

• Battery power Optimal winter performance. • Switch to winter tires/ Maintain tread thickness • Check Tire pressure Every 10° change in ambient temperature • Belts, hoses, spark plugs, wires, and cable • Brakes - Ensure the best performance • Cooling system Antifreeze/water ratio • Install new winter wipers • Washer fluid formulated for winter conditions

Winterize Your Vehicle with Us API has been providing quality car care in Charlottesville since 1961. We are a family-owned business that takes pride in delivering honest and professional service. Come by and visit our clean and professional shop. We offer free snacks, drinks, coffee, and shuttle service to make your time with us as comfortable and convenient as possible. We look forward to continuing to serve you and truly appreciate you all.

• Engine Replacement with warranty • Transmissions Replacement with warranty • Wheel alignment • Brakes repair • Cooling System • Tires • Batteries • Electrical Services • Heating and Cooling Services • Oil Change Services • Virginia State Inspections

MACHINE SHOP SERVICES • Cylinder Head Operations • Block Operations • Cleaning Operations • Piston and Rod Operations • Flywheel Operations • Brake Operations • Press Work Operations

Call Today 434-971-4880 • www.apiservicecenter.com M - Fri 7:30am - 5:30pm 1242 Harris St - Charlottesville, VA 22903

your holiday headquarters . gifts, wrapping, décor & cards 321 east main street . downtown mall . 434.979.6366 . hey@thinkrockpaperscissors.com @rps_cville . www.thinkrockpaperscissors.com


ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL

JEFFERSONTHEATER.COM

THESOUTHERNCVILLE.COM

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2

MIPSO

WITH LOWLAND HUM

7TH GRADE GIRL FIGHT

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3

ROBERT EARL KEEN’S CHRISTMAS SHOW

7

WITH COLIN PHILS

DARLINGSIDE

WITH WAYLON PAYNE

JUST ANNOUNCED!

Rocky will be at the Eternal Attic on Friday, December 10th 10 – 4

paying you top dollar for your gold and silver and antiques.

gold and silver are still up!

MATT KEARNEY

12-11 | DAN TYMINSKI BLUEGRASS BAND 12-15 | THE MOUNTAIN GOATS NEW DATE 12-22 | PUDDLES PITY PARTY

now is the time to sell!

UNSEQUESTERED TOUR

01-22 | SAVED BY THE 90’S 01-23 | ANDERSON EAST

WITH BENDIGO FLETCHER

02-07 | CORY AND THE WONGNOTES FT. ANTWAUN STANLEY

ROCKY BUYS:

SPECIAL GUEST SIERRA HULL

buying gold silver and antiques daily

02-12 | RIPE WITH THE CONNECTION 02-13 | YOLA WITH SPECIAL GUEST JAC ROSS 02-16 | DAVID BROMBERG QUINTET 02-17 | THE CADILLAC THREE 02-19 | THE STEEL WHEELS 02-20 | THE MOVEMENT

WITH BALLYHOO! AND LITTLE STRANGER

rockysgoldandsilver.com

RENT THE JEFFERSON FOR YOUR EVENT!

jewelry repairs done on the premises often while you wait paying $2,000 - $3,000 for ladies Rolex watches and $2,500-$3,500 for men’s two-tone Rolex watches

Antiques open at 9:00

VISIT ROCKY’S EBAY SITE FOR SPECIALS ON GOLD, SILVER, ANITQUES AND COINS

RENTALS@JEFFERSONTHEATER.COM • 434-245-4917

STUDEBAKER HUCK + SEVEN BENDS WITH THIEVES OF BURDEN

JUST ANNOUNCED! JANUARY 13-ON SALE FRIDAY

JOCELYN & CHRIS

12-07 | SIERRA FERRELL LONG TIME COMING TOUR SOLD OUT WITH MELISSA CARPER

12-08 | DAR WILLIAMS 12-09 | JULIAN LAGE 12-10 | BULLY WITH GRAHAM HUNT BAND 12-11 | ZACK MEXICO WITH NEW BOSS AND PIRANHA RAMA

12-17 | DISCO RISQUE + FREE UNION XMAS SPECIAL 01-30 | LOST DOG STREET BAND WITH CASPER ALLEN

02-10 | JOE PURDY 02-11 | WILD RIVERS WITH COREY HARPER 02-12 | SUSTO 02-20 | ANDY SHAUF WITH YVES JARVIS 02-21 | SUN JUNE WITH DAPHNE TUNES 03-04 | SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS

EAT AT THE SOUTHERN CAFÉ look for our daily specials!

café opens 2 hours prior to performances RENT THE SOUTHERN!

(434) 977-5590 or rentalinfo@thesoutherncville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

HOURS: tues - sat 9:30 - 5 • 1-800-296-8676

02-25 | LUCY DACUS 03-01 | SAMMY RAE & THE FRIENDS 03-21 | SOCCER MOMMY 03-28 | WELCOME TO THE NIGHT VALE 04-04 | CAR SEAT HEADREST 04-06 | FRIENDS! THE MUSICAL PARODY 04-13 | SHOVELS AND ROPE 04-15 | TOMMY EMMANUEL 04-20 | ERIC JOHNSON 05-03 | LAWRENCE 05-05 | CAT POWER

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Rocky pays more for gold, silver and many other items he can resell GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM JEWELRY (EVEN BROKEN) GOLD, SILVER PLATINUM COINS, BULLION HE PAYS EXTRA FOR GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS HE CAN RESELL ROCKY WILL PAY UP TO $3000 FOR A GOOD ONE CARAT DIAMOND SOLITAIRE STERLING FLATWARE, HOLLOWWARE ANTIQUE GUNS AND AMMUNITION, SWORDS, CIVIL WAR ITEMS POST CARDS, OLD QUILTS, OLD CLOCKS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE SOME GLASSWARE SOME COSTUME JEWELRY SOME POCKET AND WRIST WATCHES LIKE ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE, OMEGA, AND MORE RUNNING OR NOT SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY

APRIL 25 -ON SALE FRIDAY


8

Classical Homeopathic Medicine Bioidentical Hormonal Therapy

The Jefferson Cup at

“Disease severity and quality of life demonstrated marked and sustained improvements following a homeopathic treatment period.” - from “Homeopathic medical practice: long-term results of a cohort study with 3981 patients” (BMC Public Health 2005 Nov 3;5:115) Hospital admissions, drug and antibiotic use and sick days are significantly reduced in patients utilizing long-term homeopathic medical care according to a German insurance company, Securvita, and based on a 3-year study of 15,000 clients.

Homeopathy Works! EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICINE acute and chronic healthcare for all ages Available for phone or online video consultations. George Guess, MD, DABHM

– on the– on Historic downtown the downtown mall – mall – 319 east main main street 319 east street

Board certified in homeopathic medicine 14 years experience in hormone therapy

“Your Friendly Jewelry Store Since 1945”

Your Friendly Full Service Family Jewelry Store 434-295-4258 since 1945

since 1978

434-295-4258

u

WINDOWS • DOORS • SIDING • BLINDS

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Visit Our Showroom in the Rio Hill Shopping Center!

SAVE $500 OFF NEW WINDOWS FOR YOUR HOME!

*When You Buy 5 or more Premium Vinyl (Signature Gold or Platinum), High-End Composite, or Real Wood Double Hung Windows. Ask About Our No Payment - No Interest Finance Options! With approved credit. Expires 12-31-2021. *Not valid on previous purchases. Offers cannot be combined.

Call Today for a FREE No Pressure Consultation

(434) 465-6558

charlottesvillereplacementwindows.com Class A Contractor # 2705145469

NOT YOUR TYPICAL WINDOW REPLACEMENT COMPANY!


“I’m not going to make a comment on that.”

9

—UVA Football Coach Bronco Mendenhall, when asked what it was like to see visiting Virginia Tech fans rush the field at Scott Stadium after the Hokies beat the Cavaliers on Saturday

NEWS UVAToday, the university’s in-house media outlet, published a story congratulating law school alum Elizabeth Sines for her victory in Sines v. Kessler (more on p. 12). Sines was among the plaintiffs who successfully sued the white nationalists who organized the Unite the Right rally. What UVAToday conveniently forgot to mention, however, is that some of those organizers graduated from the school, too. Infamous white nationalists Richard Spencer and Jason Kessler were both Wahoos, as much as the school might wish they weren’t.

No Christmas tree, no Christmas tree

STAFF PHOTO

Two area churches shared Governor Ralph Northam’s 2021 Volunteerism and Community Service Award, the governor’s office announced last week. Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church and Church of the Incarnation were recognized for hosting regular COVID testing events over the last year. More than 8,000 individual tests have been conducted at the two sites.

In January 2021, Richardson decided to write an op-ed that would “address the conduct and leadership failures of the City Council and Mayor Walker by name,” as well as describe what he felt was racist treatment during his tenure. Richardson notified Robertson that he planned to write the op-ed. She responded that the proposal would violate the non-disparagement clause he had signed, and that the city could sue for the return of his severance package if he moved forward with publication. Richardson says this was an unconstitutional breach of his free speech. Richardson’s filing is the latest twist in a messy stretch for city government. Last month, former police chief RaShall Brackney filed a formal complaint against the city, threatening to sue for wrongful termination.—Ben Hitchcock

Oatmeal?? In a breathtaking rejection of convention, the citizens of Charlottesville voted to give this year’s Grand Illumination holiday tree a truly nonsensical moniker: The tree will be named Oatmeal. Proposed names were submitted by the community, and thousands voted in an online poll to choose from among the finalists. Oatmeal took 35.6 percent of the 3,359 votes cast. This year’s runners-up included Chicken Tree, Treeyoncé Noels, Timotree Chalamet, and Snoop Logg. The last three years, the trees have been named Spruce Bader Ginsburg, Spruce Springsteen, and Spruce Willis, respectively.

Some users on the Charlottesville Reddit forum have theorized that Oatmeal is a reference to the 1969 "Frosty the Snowman" holiday special—when the children are deciding what to name Frosty, one suggests Oatmeal. We can’t confirm the original intention of the suggestion, however, and have not ruled out the possibility that the name was put forward by a lover of hearty, wholesome breakfast grains. The Grand Illumination event will take place outside the Ting Pavilion on Friday, December 3, from 5-8pm.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Local churches win statewide service award

Tarron Richardson

@cville_weekly

For the first time in decades, Christmas trees will not be sold in downtown Earlysville.

F

ormer Charlottesville city manager Tarron Richardson is suing a handful of top Charlottesville officials, alleging misbehavior around his departure in September 2020. The entire City Council, as well as individuals Mayor Nikuyah Walker, Councilor Heather Hill, City Attorney Lisa Robertson and former city attorney and Interim City Manager John Blair are listed as defendants. Richardson says he was terminated unjustly in advance of a mutually agreed upon resignation date, that councilors disparaged him in public after his departure, and that the city attorney hampered his free speech by threatening a lawsuit over an op-ed he wanted to write in January 2021. He seeks a trial by jury and “significant money damages.” A key element of the case is a C-VILLE interview with Richardson from the week of his departure. When asked about his relationship with City Council, Richardson named all the councilors he worked well with—everyone except Hill and Walker. (The lawsuit says Walker and Hill’s “chicanery and obstruction” encroached on Richardson’s professional responsibilities.) The story was published on September 23, 2020, and though Richardson was supposed to leave on September 30, the lawsuit says that after publication, Blair called Richardson in and relieved him of his duties, effective immediately. Richardson’s $205,000 severance pay was not affected by the early dismissal. Richardson’s lawsuit also argues that Walker and Councilor Lloyd Snook disparaged him on Facebook after his departure. Walker wrote that she “never supported” Richardson; Snook wrote that “bringing back Dr. Richardson would mean that we were going to keep fighting battles of the past year rather than moving forward.” The lawsuit argues that these statements harmed Richardson’s reputation.

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Pining for a lush tree in your living room this holiday season? Get cracking, because farms across the commonwealth are reporting Christmas tree shortages, thanks to a combination of pandemic-related supply chain issues and labor shortages. The situation has gotten intense: Little River Farm tells CBS19 that multiple people have broken in at night to steal trees. That will certainly land you on the naughty list.

Richardson sues city

STAFF PHOTO

Did they even go here?

PAGE 10

EZE AMOS

IN BRIEF

Welcome home


Hang Settling in Out... NEWS

10

ANDREW OBERSTADT/IRC

IRC searches for homes for Afghan refugees

Since the beginning of October, over 200 Afghan refugees have resettled in Charolottesville.

reporter@c-ville.com

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

S

Inside. Outside. Home. FALL 2021

OM, AHHH

A zen box ce for holds spa ist a local art

ker Woodwor Tate Pray returns to d form—an function

SHOP HO

P

or Three déc we’re retailers over obsessing

XING IT UP

MI the Rethinking a nce of performa chen family kit

e toward With an ey nd life, a its seco imagines designer rety cottage a ci

To be ed continu

Abode

on stands now!

ince the Taliban took control of Afghanistan in August, more than 70,000 Afghans have fled to the United States. For weeks, many refugees stayed at temporary resettlement camps located on military bases across the country, as they waited for their immigration pro­ cessing to be completed. But over the past two months, the federal government has allowed some to leave the camps and move to a variety of cities, where they can finally begin their new lives. According to the local International Res­ cue Committee, 210 Afghan refugees—in­ cluding 75 families—have arrived in Char­ lottesville since the beginning of October. Most came over the course of just two weeks, giving the IRC little time to make preparations. “With a lot of these people, they arrive to us at very short notice. It’s very common to get a notice and people are coming the next day...We had multiple times where we had a couple of hours notice,” explains Charlottes­ ville IRC Executive Director Harriet Kuhr. “It was very much an emergency response.” The government is currently working to close all the military base refugee camps by February 15, says Kuhr. More than 80 percent of the refugees the IRC agreed to resettle in Charlottesville are here, but the organization expects a few more to arrive in the coming months. “Now [the government] is having people come in an even flow each week, not just to Charlottesville but everywhere, so we can manage them more properly,” says Kuhr. “These people have been in those facilities since July and August, so they’re ready to move on.” Because staff had no time to explore housing options, the IRC is temporarily housing the refugees in local hotels, where they are provided with food, clothes, and other necessities.

“It’s been very, very challenging with the amount of people arriving one after the other.” HARRIET KUHR, IRC EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

“It’s been very, very challenging with the amount of people arriving one after the other. We had all of our staff turn to just immediate reception needs,” says Kuhr. “Now we’re focusing on going back and catching up on all of the other services they need.” Due to Charlottesville’s affordable hous­ ing crisis, finding permanent housing for the refugees in or near the city has been difficult. The IRC is currently working to form housing partnerships with area faith groups, neighborhood associations, and other community organizations, as well as in surrounding communities like Waynesboro and Lynchburg. After helping to find suitable housing for an individual

EZE AMOS

By Brielle Entzminger

family, partners will fundraise to help cover the family’s housing costs and assist with resettlement for six months. Though the IRC does not permit home­ stays, residents who have a house or apart­ ment they are not currently living in can contact the IRC to see if a refugee family could stay there. One Afghan family moved into a downtown Airbnb this week, after owner Debra Weiss volunteered to have refugees live there temporarily. Around one-third of the refugees are school-aged children, says Kuhr. Since they have been living in hotels, the kids have not been enrolled in school yet. “We were a little wary to enroll kids in school. If a month or two later they got an apartment that was in a different county or jurisdiction, we would have to pull them out and move them to other schools,” says Kuhr. “But at this point we’ve realized we can’t wait any longer, so we are just starting to enroll kids.” As for the adults, most are still waiting to receive their social security cards, em­ ployment authorization, and other impor­ tant documents they need to resettle. “Things we would normally do locally were done for them at a national level, with 10,000 people applying all at once,” says Kuhr. “We’re hoping that kind of stuff is going to start coming in soon...but because of how they arrived, and the emergency nature of it, there’s just a lot of challenges.” Until more refugees are moved into per­ manent housing, the IRC is no longer accept­ ing in-kind donations. However, the agency is in huge need of financial donations to cover hotel bills, as well as gift cards to local stores—especially Walmart. “[At Walmart], they can buy food, clothes for their kids, toiletries,” says Kuhr. “It al­ lows the family the choice to get what they want and what is most important to them.” To volunteer to help with Afghan resettle­ ment efforts, email sponsor.va@rescue.org.

According to Charlottesville IRC Executive Director Harriet Kuhr, the organization had very little time to prepare for the Afghan refugees who arrived in the city. “It was very much an emergency response,” she says.


NEWS

11

On the agenda County, state representatives discuss legislative priorities

Larimar

SKYCLAD AERIAL

is a rare stone from the Dominican Republic. Known as The Gem of the Caribbean, Larimar brings calm, cool energy like the ocean. It is a perfect stone to help people with anxiety, anger and the stress of everyday life, especially during the holidays! Pick up a piece today for you and for your loved ones that need a little extra peace.

The Albemarle County Board of Supervisors presented their legislative priorities to a selection of state-level representatives on Monday.

By Kristin O’Donoghue

T

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com @cville_weekly facebook.com/cville.weekly

he Albemarle County Board of Supervisors met Monday morning with area House of Delegates Representatives Rob Bell, Chris Runion, Matt Fariss, and Sally Hudson, and state Senator Bryce Reeves, to discuss legislative priorities for the upcoming year. The board asked the legislators to pursue legislation that would enable the county to levy civil rather than criminal penalties for violations of local ordinances, expand the county’s authority to use photo speed monitoring devices, and require agricultural buildings used by the public to be subject to minimum safety standards. By amending Virginia law to institute a schedule of civil penalties, localities would be empowered to decriminalize numerous activities. “As a former prosecutor, defense counselor, and criminal trial judge during my time in the Navy, I have long been troubled by overcriminalization of minor misconduct,” said Supervisor Donna Price. Most representatives present expressed a desire to meet with the police department to discuss their perspective on the proposal. The second proposal calls for an expansion of the use of speed cameras, specifically to target secondary roads with speed limits above 35 mph where speeding has been identified as a problem. Hudson wanted to ensure that the cameras would be placed equitably, and not target certain neighborhoods. Supervisor Ned Gallaway said the camera locations would be determined by safety concerns and reports from the police. Like the proposal regarding civil penalties, proponents of the measure

say it would free up law enforcement officers to do other critical police work. The third proposal would beef up safety standards for agricultural buildings used by the public, which requires changing the legal definition of “farm building or structure” and adding a new designation for “public use agricultural buildings.” “This is about people and safety,” said Supervisor Diantha McKeel. The delegates also shared their priorities for the session. Reeves wants to focus on combating illegal gambling, which he says is taking place across the commonwealth under the guise of “charitable gaming,” in addition to restoring funding to state police. Bell hopes to address crowding in state hospitals, and wants to extend a policy instituted during COVID that assists those with special needs by allowing the parent to be the paid provider for the person in need of services. Runion wants to pass the Virginia Tuition Aid Assistance Grant for private education, work on digitizing historical records, and respond to the over-capacity problem observed in local and regional jails. With the virus still mutating, Hudson said she believes that the commonwealth should focus on providing support to people who have offered essential services during the pandemic. She said the rising cost of living in Virginia was a recurring theme on the campaign trail, and that she’ll be working on the consumer protection front to lower the cost of energy and prescription drugs, and to protect patients from medical debt. “These are things we can do to make it easier to make ends meet,” she said.

www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive • Charlottesville VA 22901 434-284-7709


12

NEWS

Payback time Jury finds Unite the Right organizers liable for $26 million in damages By Lisa Provence and Courteney Stuart

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

Plaintiffs’ attorneys declared victory November 24, calling the jury’s $26 million award to their clients “eye-opening.”

Kaplan denied any loss. “They weren’t able to reach a verdict on the claim before the Thanksgiving holiday,” she said of the jury, promising that the plaintiffs plan to pursue a verdict on the two deadlocked claims. Attorney James Kolenich, who represented defendants Jason Kessler, Nathan Damigo, and Identity Evropa, showed less bluster in his post-trial statements than Smith. “We’re disappointed in the verdict,” Kolenich said. “We think that some of our arguments weren’t considered entirely…however the jury did put in hard work. We respect the verdict and there’s hard work to be done.” The defendants had argued that their speech was protected by the First Amendment and that they had acted in self-defense. Kolenich and Smith both said they will file motions to reduce the damages awarded and suggested plaintiffs will have a hard time collecting any money at all. “The defendants in the case are destitute,” said Smith. That might mean the plaintiffs won’t see any award money. In the hours after the trial, defendants Richard Spencer and Kessler both tweeted that they intend to appeal the decision. “Today’s verdict sends a loud and clear message that facts matter, the law matters, and that the laws of this country will not tolerate the use of violence to deprive racial and religious minorities of the basic right we all share to live as free and equal citizens,” reads a statement from Dunn and Kaplan. The trial forced traumatized victims to relive their suffering and endure direct

EZE AMOS

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

A

fter nearly three days of deliberations, the jury in Sines v. Kessler found that the white nationalists accused of conspiring to commit racially motivated violence at the Unite the Right rally are liable for $26 million in damages. Despite the high-dollar award, the plaintiffs were deprived of complete victory after the jury deadlocked on the first two claims in the suit, both of which alleged conspiracy to commit racially motivated violence in violation of a federal law known as the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871. The jury did find the defendants liable for conspiracy under Virginia law. Following the verdict, attorneys for both sides claimed victory. “Our goal was to come here and to prove a conspiracy to do racially motivated violence, as to each and every defendant, and to get damages awarded, compensatory and punitive, and we did all those things,” said plaintiffs’ attorney Karen Dunn, who delivered the bulk of the plaintiffs’ closing argument November 19. Dunn emphasized that the jury ruled in the plaintiffs’ favor on the third claim in the case, conspiracy to commit racially motivated violence in violation of Virginia state law. For that claim, the jury awarded $11 million in punitive damages. Each of the 12 individual defendants are on the hook for $500,000, and each of the five white nationalist groups named in the suit owe $1 million. “Those numbers were eye-opening,” plaintiffs’ lead counsel Roberta Kaplan added. James Fields, who drove his car into a crowd of counterprotesters on August 12, 2017, was found liable for $12.5 million in punitive damages—$6 million each for claims of assault and battery and for intentional infliction of emotional distress. The nine plaintiffs were awarded a total of $1.5 million in compensatory damages. Those ranged from over $622,000 to Natalie Romero, who was injured in James Fields’ car attack on August 12, to zero for the Reverend Seth Wispelwey. Attorney Josh Smith, the self-described “pro-white advocate” representing defendants Matthew Parrott, Matthew Heimbach, and the Traditionalist Worker Party, spun the partial verdict as a loss for the plaintiffs. “I think they expected to waltz through and get everything they wanted and more, and that they were going to humiliate their political opponents. I think it actually worked quite the opposite,” said Smith, who was interrupted at times by protesters calling him out as a Holocaust denier and demanding he leave Charlottesville. “I think that at the end, they lost to a few pro se defendants, some solo practitioners,” said Smith. “I think they underestimated their opponents big time.”

Defendant Richard Spencer leaves the courthouse on the first day of the trial.

“Facts matter, the law matters, and that the laws of this country will not tolerate the use of violence to deprive racial and religious minorities of the basic right we all share to live as free and equal citizens.” PLAINTIFFS’ ATTORNEYS ROBERTA

questioning from pro se defendants Christopher Cantwell and Spencer. Plaintiff Natalie Romero, a UVA student in 2017, was at both the Thomas Jefferson statue after the tiki-torch march through UVA Grounds and on Fourth Street when Fields drove through a crowd of counterprotesters, fracturing her skull and scarring her face. Her friend and fellow UVA student Devin Willis thought he was going to be burned alive at the Jefferson statue on August 11. “I hear it in my nightmares,” Romero said during the trial. “I literally hear the same cadence to the ‘You will not replace us.’ That one was just so terrifying.” Romero and Willis were each awarded $250,000 in compensatory damages for ra-


NEWS rently serving 41 months in prison for unrelated threats and extortion charges, and he pleaded guilty to two counts of assault at the Thomas Jefferson statue after the tiki-torch march through UVA. The “Radical Agenda” podcaster made his pro se representation into a performance that seemed more geared to his followers than to convincing the jury he didn’t conspire to commit violent acts. He used the n-word at least three times in front of the jury, and clips of his show were laden with racist, profanity-laden calls to violence. In a Vice documentary of the Unite the Right weekend, where Cantwell earned the “crying Nazi” moniker after he learned an arrest warrant had been issued, he showed off the arsenal of firearms he brought to Charlottesville. In stark contrast to his previous loud behavior and remarks during proceedings, Cantwell remained quiet as he was escorted out of the courtroom in handcuffs to go back to jail. The complaint was filed in October 2017, and originally was scheduled for trial in 2019, but has been delayed because some defendants flouted orders to produce evidence. A judge has granted default judgments against seven defendants, including Andrew Anglin, the neo-Nazi founder of The Daily Stormer. An arrest warrant has been issued for his colleague Ray, who has blown off every court order and didn’t show up for the trial. Also earning default judgments are the Nationalist Front; the East Coast Knights of the Ku Klux Klan; the Fraternal Order of the Alt-Knights; the military arm of the Proud Boys; FOAK leader Augustus Invictus; and the Loyal White Knights of the KKK, who protested in Charlottesville in July 2017. Before dismissing the jury from the trial that lasted over four weeks, federal Judge Norman Moon thanked them for their service and said, “There aren’t any jurors in the Western District of Virginia who have endured a case as long as you have.” Following the jury’s decision, the plaintiffs issued a collective written statement. “Our single greatest hope is that today’s verdict will encourage others to feel safer raising our collective voices in the future to speak up for human dignity and against white supremacy.”

THE BLACKBURN

Home for the Holidays with

Robin and Linda Williams FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10 Doors open at 6 pm. Music starts 7 pm. Concerts take place in The Blackburn Inn’s new Conference and Wellness Center in Staunton, Virginia. Tickets and information at Blackburn-Inn.com

OUR SERVICES

acknowledged

heard

PRENATAL POSTPARTUM COMFORT/CARE LABOR SUPPORT EDUCATION RESOURCES

affirmed

honored

respected

cared for

celebrated

photo by Ella Jardim, Unsplash

birthsisterscville.org

EZE AMOS

Thank you for voting for us as a runner up for best DOULA OR BIRTHING COACH. We’re committed to addressing maternal health disparities impacting black and brown mothers and babies in our community through care, support, education and advocacy. Unite the Right rally organizer Jason Kessler (center) says he will appeal the jury’s verdict.

RUNNER-UP

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Birth Sisters of Charlottesville is a women of color community based doula collective supporting women of color through their birth journey and into motherhood.

@cville_weekly

admin@birthsisterscville.org (434) 207-2151

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

cial intimidation at the August 11 tiki-torch march. Romero was also awarded over $370,000 for assault and battery and emotional distress. Plaintiffs Marcus Martin and then-fiancée Marissa Blair joined a celebratory group of counterprotesters with Blair’s friend Heather Heyer. Martin was struck by Fields’ car, and testified that the attack left lasting physical injuries—and cost him his marriage to Blair. Martin was awarded nearly $260,000 in compensatory damages, and Blair was awarded $102,000. Fields also struck Thomas Baker and Chelsea Alvarado, leaving them with ongoing physical and psychological scars. Plaintiffs Elizabeth Sines and April Muniz were each awarded $50,000 for intentional infliction of emotional distress; Muniz was awarded an additional $108,000 in compensatory damages for assault and battery. Twelve individual defendants were found liable for a minimum of $500,000 in punitive damages: organizer Kessler, former alt-right leader Spencer, Cantwell, Heimbach, and Parrott, League of the South leaders Michael Hill and Michael Tubbs, former National Socialist Movement leader Jeff Schoep, Identity Evropa’s Damigo and Elliott Kline, The Daily Stormer’s Robert “Azzmador” Ray, and car attack driver Fields. Five organizations were found liable for $1 million each: Vanguard America, Traditionalist Worker Party, LOS, Identity Evropa, and National Socialist Party. Fields was represented by an attorney for his insurance company. He’s serving multiple life sentences for killing Heyer and injuring dozens. Four of the plaintiffs in Sines v. Kessler were struck by his Dodge Challenger. The lengthy trial pitted a prestigious pro bono legal team led by Dunn and Kaplan, who represented Edie Windsor in the landmark case that struck down laws against gay marriage, against a patchwork of lower-profile attorneys and pro se defendants. Nonprofit Integrity First for America supported the plaintiffs’ precedent-setting suit, and has said it wants to bankrupt the defendants and show that hate doesn’t pay. Spencer called the suit “financially crippling.” Cantwell’s former attorneys asked to be released from representing him after he threatened Kaplan. Cantwell is cur-

13


14

Small

SWEET ON C-VILLE?

Local More like tweet on C-VILLE.

We have Gifts for All Ages!

Get the scoop on our news, arts, and living content before anyone else. Clocks, wall art, home décor, and more!

Great selection of La-Z-Boy recliners in stock! Open Mon-Fri 9:00-5:00 Saturday 10:00-3:00 540879-9372

Follow us on Twitter @cville_weekly, and @cville_culture to find out what we’re covering this week!

11 Killdeer Lane Dayton, VA 22821

www.towncofurniture.com

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

TWO LATEST BOOKS & MORE from local Author William A. James, Sr.

In, A MURDER ON FIFTH AND DICE AND THE RUIN OF FIFEVILLE,

James shows how drug-dealing and gang violence led to the condemnation, demolition, and gentrification of Fifeville. It is a Sequel to his IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, 2007. (He is writing a play based upon this latest Book)

IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, James

reveals how fear and misunderstandings caused The Charlottesville City Council to condemn and Demolish a 20 Acre Tract (30 Black businesses and 600 residents) from the Downtown area from 1958-1964.

In, HARD TIMES AND SURVIVAL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN AFRICANAMERICAN SON,

James relates His Story and the Reader learns what He means when He Says: “Do not GiveIn to Adversity, but overcome it by Steady and Constant Perserverance.”

Give the gift of a great book! Local Author William A. James, Sr. Call or Write, William A. James, Sr. 434-985-8987 PO Box 6991, Charlottesville, VA 22906 Wjpublications@aol.com

SOLD AT: The University of Virginia Bookstore 400 Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (on UVA Grounds). Patsy Goolsby, Manager, 434-924-1075 | bookshop@virginia.edu 2nd Act Books 214 East Main Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 Daphne Spain, Owner, 434-202-0754 | daphnespain@gmail.com


THE

WINE

DOWN HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE VINES

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD Kelso and Chelsey Port-Style Wines Our two Port-style wines Kelso and Chelsey are both excellent as we move into the winter weather. Chelsey shows off unique earthy and dark fruit characters with a warming sensation from the neutral brandy used during fermentation. Kelso has bright ruby red fruit flavors, and more floral notes of sweet violet. Make sure to swing by to purchase these or any of our other wines, as we donate one dollar from each bottle sale in December to the Louisa County food bank! We are open 7 days a week, 11am to 5pm offering our 100% Virginia wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights. Enjoy your visit at our intimate, meadow-like setting in rural Louisa County. we offer well-spaced indoor and outside seating and customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs and blankets. Children and pets are welcome, but pets must always remain outside of buildings and on a leash. Quality wine, friendly staff at a great escape! Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our operating procedures. Saturday, December 4th: Live music by Adeline Tanous Saturday, December 11th: Live music by Denise O’Meara

13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

DUCARD VINEYARDS 2019 XOXO Blanc de Blancs

WINERY Guide Map

29

15

STANARDSVILLE

KILAURWEN WINERY

340

ORANGE

HORTON VINEYARDS

29

KESWICK VINEYARDS LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE

EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS

ZION CROSSROADS

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD 64

29

SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

Saturdays- Music on the Patio (2:30 – 5:30 pm) enjoy a wide variety of artists each Saturday Saturday, December 4thCustomer Appreciation Day with live music by Annie Stokes 40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 www.ducardvineyards.com

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY Blancs de Blancs Happy Holidays! Celebrate this season with a glass of our sparkling brut Blanc de Blancs. Made from Virginia Chardonnay, it is dry and crisp with notes of almond and lemon zest. Delicious to enjoy with holiday meals and it also makes a great gift.

GORDONSVILLE

33 CROZET

64

Fridays- Friday Night out at DuCard (5:30 - 8:30 pm) come out and kick off the weekend with dinner and live music at DuCard.

15

facebook.com/cville.weekly

REYNARD FLORENCE VINEYARD

AFTON

Open daily – Mon-Thurs. 12-5 pm Fri. 12-9 pm Sat/Sun. 12-6 pm

@cville_weekly

HARRISONBURG

Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and plenty of beautiful views along scenic back roads. The tasting room is near hiking and biking trails along the Shenandoah National Forest and is a perfect respite after your day out! Enjoy some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit on our lawns and sip or pick up a bottle or three of our awardwinning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walk-ups accommodated on a spaceavailable basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website!

MADISON

33

81

Chardonnay and expresses notes of toasted almonds, brioche and tropical fruit. Soft small bubbles delight the palate with a bright

DUCARD VINEYARD

15

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm

acidity and touch of minerality. Every day is a celebration, so enjoy this wine at every chance!


SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

16

tone. Citrus, stone fruit, and some floral notes showcase a balanced aroma. Meanwhile, the palate has lots of bright citrus flavors making this a perfect summertime sipper on the porch. Enjoy with a variety of salads, herb roasted chicken, or an afternoon scone while enjoying the last of the summer days.

While we have a wide variety of wines to pick from, we offer different themed flights each month to highlight our wine throughout the year! Wine flights, glasses and bottles are available. To ensure time for a tasting please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to closing.

Tasting Room Hours

Open Daily from 10 am – 5 pm

facebook.com/cville.weekly @cville_weekly December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

wine, deep garnet color with berry aromas ad a lingering effervescent finish. Knots and Shuttles is also the last installment of the Gears & Lace, Steam Punk line of wines. It’s a perfect wine to celebrate the holidays, and pairs beautifully with hard cheeses, creamy soups, and roasted lamb.

Wednesdays- Wine Wednesday (7-7:30 pm) Join Horton Vineyards live on Facebook every Wednesday at 7pm to learn about a different wine each week! Join us for Winter Wineland on Saturday, January 15th, 2022. We will have tastings, flights, and glasses of mulled wine available for purchase. Kaas & Cure Food Truck will be joining us with their charcuterie trays to pair with your wine. We will also be selling Horton Vineyards blankets throughout the winter. For every blanket we sell, we will be donating one to a local homeless shelter. Blue Bird Book Shop will be here selling books. Plan to stay for the day and get cozy with your wine and books in front of the fireplace in our outdoor pavilion!

Let us pop the cork on a bottle for you to enjoy with oysters this month! Salty Bottom Blue Oysters will continue to serve grilled and raw oysters at Eastwood on Fridays. Whether you are seated at a fire pit, on the Veranda or indoors, sit back and enjoy live music on the stage in The Barn on Friday nights.

website for all of the details.

Visit the winery this winter! Live music on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays throughout December. We also offer cider (hard & nonalcoholic), s’mores, wreath making workshops, paint & sip classes, yoga, events for families and kids, and more. See the upcoming calendar of events on our

HORTON VINEYARDS

6399 Spotswood Trail, Gordonsville, Virginia (540) 832-7440 www.hortonwine.com

Knots & Shuttles Sparkling Tannat

KESWICK VINEYARDS

*New* Winery Hours: Wednesdays-Saturdays (12-8 PM), Sundays (12-5 PM) 2531 Scottsville Rd. (5 mi from Downtown Charlottesville) Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

Red sparkling was inconceivable many years ago and it is still rare. Knots and Shuttles is Horton’s flight into red sparkling. It is a dry red

2020 LVA Chardonnay Pale yellow in color, our LVA Chardonnay has a fun and bright

We look forward to continuing to serve all of our wonderful guests this summer during our daily hours of 10am-5pm. We offer first come, first served seating at our outdoor courtyard tables or open seating for those who wish to bring their own blankets and chairs to spread out in our designated lawn area. Wine is available by the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of pre-packaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase. 1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

KILAURWEN WINERY Kilaurwen Red A bold, luscious red wine crafted from Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Touriga Nacional grapes. Structure and balance enhance this deep hued blend. Complex layers of dark cherry, tobacco, leather and almond evoke a full mouth feel that ends with a lingering spicy finish. The wine pairs well with hearty stews and soups, with grilled or smoked meats as well as with a wide range of cheeses including Mozzarella, Fontina, Gruyere and Swiss.


SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

17

Happy Holiday Greetings! We are sending Happy Holiday Greetings to all our friends and family who have visited the Tasting Room during this unique and challenging year. We thank you for your loyal support. We wish you a fun holiday season and a healthy, happy 2022! Although our tasting room is closed as of the end of November, our B & B, The Loft at Kilaurwen, will continue to welcome guests throughout the winter months. 1543 Evergreen Church Rd Stanardsville, VA 22973 (434) 985-2535 www.kilaurwenwinery.com

2018 Wild Common

Plan to visit: Pippin Hill is a culinary vineyard in the heart of Virginia’s wine country. There are

December 8th- Cocktails and Canapés Cooking Class! Purchase tickets in advance. 5022 Plank Rd., North Garden, VA 22959 (434).202.8063 www.pippinhillfarm.com

REYNARD FLORENCE VINEYARD Holiday Pairing Pack This Holiday Pairing Pack is sure to compliment any holiday dish and includes: 2019 Reynard Blanc: A crisp and zesty, white blend that pairs perfectly with turkey, mashed potatoes and green bean casserole. 2018 Ti-Rey Rosé: A bold and flavorful Rosé made from Cab Franc. A dynamic wine that pairs great with honey ham, stuffing and pumpkin pie. 2017 Cabernet Sauvignon: This fruit forward red will compliment any dish including Prime Rib, Macaroni and cheese and chocolate cake. Visiting Reynard Florence We look forward to welcoming you to our small, cozy, and intimate

winery. As you drive down our driveway, you will be greeted by our stunning mountain view. We are truly a hidden gem. Our service is warm, friendly, and you will likely have an opportunity to meet the owners and their two corgies Ti Rey and Brixie. Reservations are not required, and seating inside the tasting room is first-come-firstserve. We have lots of outdoor seating and space available on our front patio, back deck, and pergola. Umbrellas and canopies provide

shelter from the sun and rain. Picnics are welcome outside! Enjoy live jazz every Sunday on the back deck from 2-5 pm. Hours: Thrus/Fri 12-5pm; Sat/Sun 11am – 5pm Open Holiday Mondays, as well as by appointment or chance! Don’t hesitate to give us a call! 16109 Burnley Rd. Barboursville, VA 22923 540.832.3895 / 434.962.1849 www.reynardflorence.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

*Holiday Bundle* Make sure to swing by and pick up our Holiday bundle deal! Includes our 2020 Cab Franc, 2019 Cannon Red, 2018 Petit Verdot, and 2019 Chard Reserve.

Sundays- Live music on the hill! Each Sunday from 1-4 PM, Pippin Hill welcomes local musicians to perform on our Veranda. Check our website for varying artists.

@cville_weekly

Our Wild Common shares its name with our sister property and celebrated restaurant in Charleston, SC. The 2018 vintage is 100% Merlot, aged 20 months in a combination of neutral and new French oak barrels and lives up to the high standards set by our award-winning 2017 vintage. The intense nose features raspberry and dark cacao, with subtle hints of fruit and spice, underscored by brooding dark cherries and fig on the palate. Medium plus tannins and medium acid make a lively finish, just like the conversation you’re enjoying across the table.

Hours: Tuesday – Thursday: 11 am – 5 pm; Friday – Sunday: 11am to 4:30pm

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS

two types of standard reservations available: Indoor Table or Covered Veranda for table service. Walkins are welcome for lawn seating. Reservations via Resy are recommended for Indoor and Veranda seating.


18

Are you turning 65 or new to Medicare? Has your Medicare plan changed?

CHARLOTTESVILLE

SYMPHONY

AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F V I R G I N I A

BENJAMIN ROUS, MUSIC DIRECTOR

I can help you get Medicare ready.

Call a licensed Humana sales agent Tiffany Zambrana 540-226-0490 (TTY: 711) Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. tzambrana@humana.com Humana.com/tzambrana Facebook.com/tiffanyinsuranceagent

FAMILY

Holiday Concerts Michael Slon, Conductor

Jeannette Jang and David Sariti,Violinists

Protect the ones you love,

get your flu shot today.

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Jolly, Joyous and Not-to -be -Missed ! SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4 | 8:00PM SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5 | 3:30PM OLD CABELL HALL Masks Required for All Ages

@cville_weekly

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Y0040_GHHHXDDEN21_C

artsboxoffice.virginia.edu 434.924.3376 Free parking at Central Grounds Garage The 2021-22 season is generously supported by

@vaccinatevirginia


CULTURE

19

SATURDAY 12/4 SANJAY SUCHAK

HOLIDAY HOPS 64 REASONS TO LEAVE THE HOUSE THIS WEEK

PAGE 20

HARK! DO YOU HEAR SINGING?

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Herald in the holiday season with the Virginia Women’s Chorus, the University of Virginia’s oldest women’s music organization. Directed by KaeRenae Mitchell, the group is back beneath the vaulted ceilings of the UVA Chapel for its 38th annual candlelight concert. These beloved performances feature a diverse selection of music, from Benjamin Britten’s harp-accompanied “A Ceremony of Carols” to the jolly classic “Deck the Halls.” $7-20, times vary. UVA Chapel, 200 McCormick Rd. virginiawomenschorus.org.

NEW BLUES

@cville_culture

With imaginative compositions and an eye for eclectic experimentation, guitarist and vocalist Corey Harris has his own vision of the blues. Drawing on his origins as a New Orleans street singer and his travels through the South and Cameroon, Harris takes the traditional blues formula to the next level with influences from reggae, soul, rock, and West African music. Harris will celebrate the release of his new album, Insurrection Blues, and book, Bluespeople Illustrated: Legends of the Blues, while also raising money for the Charlottesville-Winneba Foundation, a nonprofit that works to strengthen the sister city partnership of Charlottesville and Winneba, Ghana. $25-35, 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

THURSDAY 12/2

SUPPLIED PHOTO

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

FRIDAY 12/3 & SATURDAY 12/4

Craft brews and mountain views await at the Crozet Winter Brews Festival, a celebration of dark beers and winter sips from Virginia breweries and cideries. Enjoy toasty stouts, chocolatey browns, crisp ciders, and neverbefore-seen beers as you relax in a heated lounge. Lord Nelson and Matthew O’Donnell bring the tunes, and a variety of retail and food vendors will be on hand all day. $10-30, 11am-5pm. Claudius Crozet Park, 1075 Park Rd., Crozet. crozetbeerfest.com


20

The Virginia Glee Club

CULTURE THIS WEEK Wednesday 12/1 music

81st Annual

Christmas Concerts Frank Albinder, Conductor

Beleza Duo. An evening of samba soul with Madeline Holly-Sales on vocals and keys and Berto Sales on guitar, voice, and loops. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com.

Tea Time Recitals. UVA students present a varied menu of musical delights. Free, 1pm. UVA’s Old Cabell Hall. music.virginia.edu.

Music in the Atrium. Weekly live performance in the atrium with Jim Richardson on vocals and guitar. Free, noon. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org.

International Folk Dance. Learn a dance or two, or just watch and listen to the music. Free, 2:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org.

dance

Daniel Hine, Accompanist

Bachata Fusion Class. Edwin Roa teaches a fun beginner-to-intermediate-level bachata lesson to get the party started. $6-8, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St SE. ixartpark.org.

Old Cabell Hall On the Lawn at UVA

Friday, December 3, 2021 8 PM

University Baptist Church 1223 W. Main Street

Saturday, December 11, 2021 8 PM

$20.00

$5.00

General Admission

Students

Tickets at UVA Arts Box Office artsboxoffice.virginia.edu 434.924.3376 VirginiaGleeClub.org The Virginia Glee Club is an affiliated group of the Department of Music at the University of Virginia

Virginia Glee Club Harmony, Love, & Brotherhood since 1871

Square Dancing. Enjoy a night of square dancing. All levels are welcome. Free, 12:30pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org.

words The Future of Native Americans. Michael Wilson moderates a panel of Native young adults as they describe their personal journeys in a culture that’s been impacted by constant attempts at erasure of Native Americans. Free, 5:30pm. Online. thecentercville.org.

etc. Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. A 20-minute introduction to Indigenous Australian art. Free,10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org.

Thursday 12/2 music

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

7th Grade Girl Fight with Colin Phils. Sometimes a trio, sometimes a quartet, sometimes a quintet, but always a good time. $7, 8:30pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com. Berto Sales and Vincent Zorn. A night of wild gypsy rumba and Latin guitar. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St. the bebedero.com. Corey Harris: Insurrection Blues. The blues legend raises money for the Charlottesville-Winneba Foundation and celebrates the release of his newest album and book. $2535, 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net. Jazz Jam Session. Not a musician? Just come and listen. Free, 6pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecenter cville.org.

®

METROPOLITAN

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

2020

Music in the Atrium. A weekly performance from Jazz 1-2-3. Free, noon. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org.

dance

words Shelf Life: Any Murders in the Building? A mystery panel discussion with Maggie Blackburn (Once Upon a Seaside Murder), Amita Murray (Arya Winters and the Tiramisu of Death), and RV Raman (A Will to Kill). Free, noon. Online. vabook.org/schedule.

etc. Arts Underground. Art making, drinks, and karaoke inside The Looking Glass. $25, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org. Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, December 1. Free,10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org.

Friday 12/3 music Anthony Semiao. Kick back with a glass of wine and listen to live music at the indoor tasting room. Free, 4pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwood farmandwinery.com. Darlingside. Praised for its harmonies and intelligent songwriting, the band is a live-performance favorite. $20-25, 8pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com. Making Noise in the Library: Acoustic Guitar with Greg C. Brown. An afternoon of guitar music with free refreshments. Free, noon. Music Library, Old Cabell Hall. music.virginia.edu. Miss Tess. Vintage Blues, country, and jazz fusion. $18-20, 8pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. frontporchcville.org. Tea Time Recitals. See listing for Thursday, December 2. Free, 1pm. UVA’s Old Cabell Hall. music.virginia.edu. Virginia Glee Club’s 81st Annual Christmas Concert. Ring in the Holiday season with a cherished Charlottesville tradition. $5-20, 8pm. UVA’s Old Cabell Hall. music.virginia.edu. C ONTINUED ON PA GE 23

Color My World

METROPOLITAN LIFE SUITS YOU.

METRPOLITAN LIFE SUITS YOU. Visit the gallery Monday–Thursday, 10AM – 6PM Friday–Saturday, 10AM – 7PM Sunday 12–5PM Shop Online Anytime https://cvillearts.org/store

powersports.honda.com

ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING. NEVER RIDE AFTER CONSUMING DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, AND NEVER USE THE STREET AS A RACETRACK. OBEY THE LAW AND READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. For rider training information or to locate a rider training course near you, call the Motorcycle Safety Foundation at 1-800-446-9227. Metropolitan® is a registered trademark of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. ©2020 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (02/20)

1370 MY20_Product AdMats Rnd.8 7.625” x 5.25” MODEL: METROPOLITAN Category: SCOOTER

copper jewelry and more by Gillian Ruffa at C’ville Arts during December Meet Gillian on First Friday, Dec. 3, 5–7PM

open daily | 118 E. Main Street | Downtown Mall | 434-972-9500 | cvillearts.org | follow us on Facebook and Instagram!


CULTURE EXTRA

21

Hands on The Virginia Discovery Museum celebrates 40 years and COVID resilience By Julia Stumbaugh arts @c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

A

The Virginia Discovery Museum, a source of fun for generations of Charlottesville families, will celebrate its 40th anniversary with a renovation of its historic carousel on the Downtown Mall.

Hand sanitizer dispensers, mask-wearing mandates, and regularly-cleaned exhibits made these gatherings possible. “The museum’s policies during COVID have been very, very strict,” says Jacquie Pickering, who has volunteered at the museum for 37 years. “We’ve gotten a lot of positive feedback from families that they feel safe there…but from what visitors say, the kids seem to be enjoying everything just as much as they did before.” Even children who were born pre-COVID have grown up in the world of the pandemic, and Dozier reports that they act differently upon their return to the museum. Unprompted, they clean their hands before interacting with an exhibit. They conscious-

ly space themselves out during crowded activities. And, after a year and a half of limited interaction with others, they must re-learn how to share. “Children, much like adults, are learning how to navigate the world after being out of the world for a long time…but they’re figuring it out, and they’re resilient,” says Dozier. Kids whose siblings are undergoing treatment at UVA’s nearby medical center can interact with a friendly kid-sized version of the children’s hospital; young members of locally placed refugee families can make connections at the train-track table, which is so large that it requires more than one child to get the train to chug all the way around.

OPEN POSITIONS

@cville_culture

PVCC IS HIRING!

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

s any parent knows, kids share more than just toys when they play—so it’s no surprise that a pandemic spells disaster for children’s museums. A century after the 1918 Spanish flu caused health boards to shutter kids’ museums across the United States, the 2020 coronavirus again made touch-heavy exhibits impossible. Satellite branches of the Children’s Museum of Richmond in Fredericksburg and at Short Pump have permanently closed. The Virginia Discovery Museum on the Downtown Mall, however, stayed alive, and helped keep children who were forced apart by COVID together, with everything from mail-delivery craft kits to interactive Zoom storytimes. It’s been a rough stretch for little ones and their parents. “That is the age group and demographic that has had very limited interaction with the world in the past year and a half, just because people obviously want to keep their babies as safe as possible… many of these babies have never seen another baby before, because everybody’s been at home,” says Janine Dozier, Executive Director of the Discovery Museum. The museum fully reopened this Labor Day, but sales are only a third of their usual numbers. Half of the organization’s regular revenue comes from ticket purchases and yearly memberships. To recoup missing sales, the Discovery Museum will celebrate its upcoming 40th birthday with fundraising campaigns, including a drive to refurbish the carousel that has been spinning outside its doors since 2006. Because the museum has been open for reservations-only visits since May, it spent months as the only available place for kids attending school remotely to socialize. In fact, the Baby Buds program—where the VDM opened early to welcome parents with kids 2 years old or younger—was the first time many wee ones ever saw children outside their family.

“If kids share a common interest with another child, they’re inclined to get to know them,” says Dozier. “They’re not concerned with another child’s background, or where they’re from, or what’s their life experience. They just live in the moment and think, ‘Well I like trains, you like trains, let’s get this track to go all the way around.’” Although it sometimes takes gentle encouragement from some of the museum’s 300-plus volunteers, who range in age from 13 to 83, even the shyest children leave the museum with new friends. Hands-on activities like the track-building station and car-racing ramp are invaluable learning opportunities, says Isaiah Woo, a fourth-year mechanical engineering student at UVA and a Madison House volunteer. He once watched a 9-year-old discover core engineering principles at the Discovery Museum by spanning the gap between two block towers. “He figured out that ‘If I place the next one half off and then I weigh the back one down, then it won’t tip over’, because there’s torque,” says Woo. “I didn’t tell him to do that, I watched him figure it out on his own. I think that’s a lot of what the museum tries to get at, is not telling kids, not lecturing to them, but encouraging them to find creative, innovative solutions on their own.” Over four decades, the VDM has established itself as one of Charlottesville’s longest-running nonprofits. In the six years before the pandemic, attendance soared, and partnerships with community organizations allowed the museum to welcome 25 percent of these visitors free of charge. “We want to focus on what the next 40 years will bring, and what a new, renovated, beautiful carousel will bring,” says Dozier. “We can’t get the past 18 to 20 months back, but we can be optimistic, and we can be united, and we can be very much focused on supporting our community and setting our children up for success and joy and excitement moving forward, because they deserve it.”

Piedmont Virginia Community College invites applications for the following positions: • • • • •

Full-Time Faculty – Culinary Arts Full-Time Faculty – Nursing Library Specialist – Part-Time Workforce Services Operations Supervisor Workforce Services Program Manager – Healthcare

Detailed job descriptions and application procedures are available at: https://jobs.vccs.edu/postings/search | Questions? Email jwills-payne@pvcc.edu. Piedmont Virginia Community College is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer and actively seeks applications from women and minority candidates.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

• Accounting Tutor – Part-Time • English as Second Language (ESL) Instructor – Part-Time • Enrollment & Records Specialist • Full-Time Faculty – Computer Science/ Information Systems Technology


22

When the Rain Stops Falling

by Andrew Bovell

Directed by Marianne Kubik November 18-20 at 8pm December 3, 4 at 8pm December 5 at 2pm Culbreth Theatre The year is 2039. It’s been raining for days when a sudden omen forecasts a great flood to end all life on earth. Climate change becomes the companion to a family tree whose branches span four generations and two continents in this intricate story that considers how patterns of abandonment and betrayal shape a damaging legacy that may test the resilience of its inheritors. For mature audiences. Please be advised that this play contains potentially distressing topics. For detailed information please read the content warning at drama.virginia.edu/content-warnings.

@cville_culture

Lit±l= S|ster.

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Big S|ster.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

www.drama.virginia.edu 434-924-3376

Open for Breads, Pastries, Cof fee, and Takeout Breakfast, Lunch & Br unch. MarieBette Café & Bakery · 700 Rose Hill Drive, Charlottesville · 434.529.6118 Petite MarieBette · 105 E Water Street, Charlottesville · 434.284.8903 mariebette.com


CULTURE SCREENS

Sit and stay

C O N TI N U E D F R O M PA GE 2 0

Friday 12/3 Virginia Women’s Chorus: Candlelight Concert. The 38th annual concert features a diverse selection of songs. $7-20, 8pm. UVA Chapel, 200 McCormick Rd. virginia womenschorus.org.

23

The Power of the Dog is a captivating gothic western

stage It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play. The beloved American holiday classic comes to life as a live 1940s radio broadcast, complete with foley artists. $10-18, 8pm. Four County Players, Barboursville Community Center, 5256 Governor Barbour St., Barboursville. fourcp.org. When the Rain Stops Falling. Spanning four generations and two continents, the play explores how damaging legacies test the resiliency of its inheritors. Free-$14, 8pm. Culbreth Theatre, 109 Culbreth Rd. drama. virginia.edu

classes Yoga in the Orchard with Joanna Hughes. Let the serenity of the mountain air and the peace of the orchard views revitalize your body and prepare you for the day. Free, 9:45am. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com.

etc. Charlottesville’s Grand Illumination. Community tree lighting event features music, food, games, prizes, special guests, and plenty of holiday fun. Free, 5pm. Ting Pavilion, 700 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. tingpavilion.com.

The Power of the Dog, a western starring Benedict Cumberbatch (above), Jesse Plemons, and Kirsten Dunst, is one of the best films of the year.

Saturday 12/4

By Deirdre Crimmins

music

arts@c-ville.com

Bak ’n Da Day. The R&B vocal quintet performs as part of the December Downtown Outdoor Concert Series. Free, 2pm. The Bricks at Third and Main Street, Downtown Mall. thebridgepai.org. Berto and Vincent. A night of wild gypsy rumba and Latin guitar. Free, 11am. Tavern & Grocery, 333 W. Main St. tavernand grocery.com.

Family Holiday Concerts: The Charlottesville Symphony & UVA University Singers. The one-hour program is brimming with festive favorites for concertgoers young and old. $11-47, 8pm. UVA’s Old Cabell Hall. music.virginia.edu.

Met Live in HD: Eurydice. With a libretto by MacArthur “Genius” Grant recipient Sarah Ruhl, adapted from her acclaimed 2003 play, the opera reimagines the familiar tale from Eurydice’s point of view. $18-25, 12:45pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net. C O N T I N UE D ON PAGE 2 4

The Power of the Dog R, 125 minutes Netflix, Alamo Drafthouse Cinema the surly cattleman—from each drag of a cigarette to his snide and tormenting attitude toward Rose. Phil is more than meets the eye, but he works hard to keep people from ever discovering that. While the politics are occasionally stale, and a character arc or two a bit simplistic, The Power of the Dog is a cinematic triumph; one of the best films of 2021. It is vivid, intriguing, contemplative, entertaining, and capped off with one of the most discussable endings in recent memory.

Jesse Plemons and Kirsten Dunst are excellent in their performances, but Cumberbatch owns this film.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Holiday Band Concert. Enjoy the sounds of the season with the Second-Wind and First-Wind Bands. Free, 3pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecenter cville.org

where they are, and what it feels like to be around them. Wegner and Campion (The Piano) make each frame a full assault on human perception, and they make it look awfully pretty in the process. Plemons and Dunst are excellent, but Cumberbatch owns this film. He inhabits the character to an extent that borders on haunting, and he disappears entirely into

@cville_culture

Chamber Music Seminar Recital. Several groups of student musicians performing works they have perfected over the course of the semester. Free, 3:30pm. UVA’s Brooks Hall. music.virginia.edu.

W

hile most traditional westerns take place around 1890 or so (when the American frontier was officially no longer deemed unsettled), Jane Campion’s gripping, brilliantly acted The Power of the Dog begins in 1925. We know this because brothers Phil (a mesmerizing Benedict Cumberbatch) and George (Jesse Plemons) get nostalgic during a cattle drive, and reminisce about where they started. Mild George clearly embraces modernity in style and manner, while ornery Phil seems stuck in the past. He hates to bathe and wears formal clothes. Phil also spends his time poking fun at those he thinks are beneath him (he calls George “fatso”), hanging with his bevy of worshipful ranch hands, and rehashing stories from years ago. Still, Phil and George at first seem perfectly happy with their “Odd Couple” routine—until tension percolates when George meets prim and proper Rose (Kirsten Dunst), the widowed owner of a local inn. She’s strong-willed but sensible, and despite Phil’s palatable disdain for both her and her mousy son Peter (Kodi Smit-McPhee),

George marries her, and mother and son move to the brothers’ ranch. Adapted from Thomas Savage’s 1967 novel, The Power of the Dog, Oscar-winner Campion’s first film in 12 years, moves along at its own deliberate pace, revealing its characters and their changing relationships in five chapters. Phil is abusive, gruff, and spoiled, which makes him an enticing study. The question of why he’s so cruel is at the center of the film; something that is explored only through what Phil will admit to himself. There are a lot of moving parts here. The Power of the Dog weaves from one relationship to the next, beginning with Phil and George, later George and Rose, and then Peter and Phil—and the intrigue remains constant throughout. Visually, the film is unparalleled. Early 20th-century Montana is played by Campion’s native New Zealand, and its vast emptiness is a wonder. The Power of the Dog might be cinematographer ​​Ari Wegner’s (Zola) starkest artistic palette thus far, and she was clearly up to the challenge of conveying how open and untamed this land is. The contrast between George looking forward and Phil looking back is shown not only through what they say and wear, but

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Kluge-Ruhe Gift Shop Holiday Sale. Fair trade, one-of-a-kind gifts you can’t get anywhere else, with gorgeous patterns designed by top Indigenous artists. Free, 10am- 4pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org.

NETFLIX

Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, December 1. Free,10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org.


24

CULTURE THIS WEEK

W E N

C ONTINUED FR OM PA GE 23

Saturday 12/4 Mipso. The North Carolina-bred band captivates audiences with its finely layered harmonies. $15-20, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com.

FEATURING

WINTERFEST Friday, December 3

4:30 - 7:30 Family Friendly Activities Scavenger Hunt AHS Choir Dance Performances Versa Food Truck Musicians Open Art Studios

• •

Tara Mills. Enjoy wine and live music at the Terrace Bar. Free, noon. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwood farmandwinery.com. Virginia Women’s Chorus: Candlelight Concert. See listing for Friday, December 3. $7-20, 3:30pm. UVA Chapel, 200 McCormick Rd. virginiawomenschorus.org.

stage It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play. See listing for Friday, December 3. $10-18, 8pm. Four County Players, Barboursville Community Center, 5256 Governor Barbour St., Barboursville. fourcp.org. When the Rain Stops Falling. See listing for Friday, December 3. Free-$14, 8pm. Culbreth Theatre, 109 Culbreth Rd. drama. virginia.edu

outside First Saturday Bird Walk. An early morning walk with a leader from the Piedmont Virginia Bird Club. Free, 7:30am. Ivy Creek Natural Area, 1780 Earlysville Rd. ivycreek foundation.org

etc.

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Crozet Winter Brews Festival. A celebration of dark beers and winter brews. Free, 11am. Claudius Crozet Park, 1075 Park Rd., Crozet. crozetbeerfest.com.

l to r: Shop, Zoe Edgecomb, Cones with 544s, Charles Peale, Red is the Color, Jane Skafte, Stained Glass Design on Silk

Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, December 1. Free, 10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org.

HOLIDAY HOURS November 24 — January 2

First Street Holiday Fair. Retail, food, and beverage vendors will set up with holiday goodies, gifts, and treats. Free, 10am. Darling Boutique, 115 First St. S. shopatdarling.com.

Monday-Saturday 10am-6pm Sunday 1pm-5pm 24 hours a day at

Holiday Open House. Enjoy hot chocolate and holiday music, and meet Santa at this family-friendly event. Free, 11am. Prince Michel Vineyard & Tap 29 Brewery, 154 Winery Ln., Leon. prince michel.com.

mcguffeyartcenter.com

Sunday 12/5 music Beleza Duo. Enjoy brunch with some samba soul. Free, 10am. The Ridley, 1106 W. Main St. theridleyva.com. Berto Sales and Vincent Zorn. A night of wild gypsy rumba and Latin guitar. Free, 3pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com.

Cynthia Burke, Detail, Christmas Monkey, oil on panel

Family Holiday Concerts: The Charlottes­ ville Symphony & UVA University Singers. See listing for Saturday, December 4. $1147, 3:30pm. UVA’s Old Cabell Hall. music. virginia.edu Festival of Advent Lessons & Carols. The choirs of St. Paul’s Memorial Church present a candlelight performance. Free, 5:30pm. St. Paul’s Memorial Church, 1700 University Ave. spmcuva.org. Tina Hashemi. Enjoy yourself with live music, award-winning wine and cuisine, and a view that is sure to complete your weekend. Free, noon. Pippin Hill Farm & Vineyards, 5022 Plank Rd., North Garden. pippinhillfarm.com.

Vincent Zorn. Enjoy Sunday brunch with live music. Free, noon. South and Central Latin Grill, 946 Grady Ave., Suite 104. south andcentralgrill.com.

stage It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play. See listing for Friday, December 3. $10-18, 2:30pm. Four County Players, Barboursville Community Center, 5256 Governor Barbour St., Barboursville. fourcp.org. Paramount Presents: Christmas with Elvis. Elvis is in the building this Christmas as Matt Lewis takes the stage along with Big Ray and the Kool Kats. $24-34, 7pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net. When the Rain Stops Falling. See listing for Friday, December 3. Free-$14, 2pm. Culbreth Theatre, 109 Culbreth Rd. drama. virginia.edu

etc. Pawliday Pet Photos Benefiting Animal Care Assistance Program. Get your pets ready for their close-ups. Free, 11am. Crate & Marrow, 2035 Bond St. crateand marrow.com. Orchard to Table Cider Pairing Dinner. Celebrate Repeal Day, the anniversary of the repealing of Prohibition, with ‘20sthemed cocktails and fabulous food. $100, 5:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarle ciderworks.com.

Monday 12/6 classes Meditation on the Lawn. A virtual drop-in meditation or guided reflection hosted by the Contemplative Sciences Center. Free, 7:45am. Online. csc.virginia.edu.

dance English Country Dance. Partake in some English country dancing, or just come to enjoy the performance. Free, 1pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org.

music Jazz First Mondays. Jazz quartet playing standards and originals with occasional guest performers. Free, 5pm. Starr Hill Brewery Tap Room, 5391 Three Notched Rd., Crozet. starrhill.com/crozet. Monday Music Series. Enjoy delicious food and drink paired with live Latin music from Vincent Zorn, Berto & Vincent, or Beleza. Free, 7pm. South and Central Latin Grill, 946 Grady Ave., Suite 104. southandcentralgrill.com.

Tuesday 12/7 music Sierra Ferrell. The Long Time Coming Tour with Melissa Carper. $15-18, 8pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com. Vincent Zorn. Enjoy great food, tequila, and mescal paired with some wild gypsy rumba. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com.

dance English Country Dance. See listing for Monday, December 6. Free, 1pm. The Center at Belvedere, 540 Belvedere Blvd. thecentercville.org.

etc. Daily Tours of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, December 1. Free, 10:30am. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org.


IMAGES COURTESY THE GALLERIES

CULTURE GALLERIES

25

PIECED WITH LOVE

“I

Brad Birchett at Chroma Projects

Aimee Joyaux at Quirk Gallery

Janice Walker at Create Gallery

DECEMBER SHOWS Suite 101, Ruckersville. “The Red Exhibit” features work from ARCH members. Opens December 4. Baker Gallery Woodberry Forest School, 898 Woodberry Forest Rd. “Nothing in Particular” features large-scale photographs by John Berry. Through December 18.

The Bridge Progressive Arts Initiative 209 Monticello Rd.

“Give & Take” transforms the gallery space into a swap shop of rotating items. Coming in December. Chroma Projects Inside Vault Virginia, Third St. SE. “Sugar

Create Gallery Inside Indoor Biotechnologies, 700 Harris

St. “Rock, Pebble and Stone” is a group show by the Fiber and Stitch Art Collective. Through December 20. C’ville Arts Cooperative Gallery 118 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. “Color My World” showcases Gillian Ruffa’s latest work in copper jewelry. Through December 31.

New City Arts 114 Third St. NE. In the Welcome Gallery, “New City Artist Exchange” features works in a variety of mediums from 11 local artists. Opens December 3. Northside Library 705 Rio Rd. In the lobby, acrylics by Camille Gerrick. In the Quiet Room, melted crayon and acrylic works by Sara Gondwe. Second Street Gallery 115 Second St. SE. In the Main Gallery, “Inside the Artist’s Studio,” a group exhibition. In the Dové Gallery, “The Third Mind.” Opens December 3. Studio IX 969 Second St. SE. Features work by Marley Nichelle

as part of the Prolyfyck Exhibition Series. Opens December 3. Unitarian Universalist Inside the Sanctuary, 717 Rugby Rd. “Season of Light” showcases works by artists of all ages. Opens December 4. Quirk Gallery 499 W. Main St. “Maybe/Sometimes,” large-

Invitational Gallery Inside Shenandoah Valley Art Center, 126

scale works on canvas by Aimee Joyaux. Through January 16.

S. Wayne Ave., Waynesboro. Pottery show and sale features affordable works from members. Through January 15.

Visible Records 1740 Broadway St. The Visible Records

Group Show. Opens December 17.

Scheline Crutchfield’s “Hip Chick on Green” is part of her collage series at the new gallery at Neroli Spa.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Plum Dreams of the Anthropocene” showcases works by Brad Birchett and Aggie Zed. Opens December 3.

Neroli Spa 507 W. Main St. Paintings and collages by Scheline Crutchfield. Through December 31.

@cville_culture

Battle Building 1204 W. Main St. On the ground floor, viewable from outside, “The Bodice Project” is an exhibition of torso sculptures, some of actual women and men who have undergone mastectomies or reconstructive surgery. Through January 2022.

McGuffey Art Center 201 Second St. NW. First Friday event with three floors of art and open studios. In the hallways galleries, the holiday show and sale features two floors of art. December 3.

COURTESY OF SUBJECT

Artistic Remedies for Creative Hearts 8767 Seminole Tr.,

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

t is a real thrill when someone sees one of my paintings and feels a connection,” says painter and collage artist Scheline Crutchfield. “It’s almost like we were in the same place at the same time.” Like many artists, Crutchfield was missing that connection during COVID closures. “I created a lot of new art during the pandemic, but there were no venues for showing it,” she says. Things changed when Suzanne Owen, owner of Neroli Spa, expressed interest in creating a gallery space. Crutchfield jumped at the chance to share her work with the public again, and saw it as an opportunity to pay it forward. Ten percent of proceeds from the show will be donated to The Women’s Initiative, a local nonprofit that provides counseling, social support, and education programs to women in need. Primarily known for her oil paintings on canvas, Crutchfield recently started “experimenting with collage as a method to plan out my oil paintings,” she says. “I liked it so much that I began to use [it] as a medium.” Inspired by women who remained “beautiful, bold, and confident, sort of the opposite of how many women and girls were feeling during the pandemic,” Crutchfield says she was drawn to collage as a way to represent female power. Her mix of paper, texture, and layering captures the beauty of her subjects. Crutchfield’s “Hip Chick’’ series uses recycled Starbucks K-cup boxes, and vintage wallpaper samples appear in many of her fashion-based collages. The finished products are small but mighty portraits of powerful women. Perhaps the most meaningful piece in the show? A blank canvas that represents the challenges women may face when seeking help. “A blank canvas is intimidating. You never know if things will work out the way you want, but making that first mark sets you on a path toward progress.” —Maeve Hayden


26

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

WINTER AT THE WINERY

NOW OPEN AT NOON WEDNESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY ONLY 5 MILES FROM THE DOWNTOWN MALL

eastwoodfarmandwinery.com


HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

27

The Jefferson Cup at

– on the– on Historic downtown the downtown mall – mall – 319 east main main street 319 east street “Your Friendly Jewelry Store Since 1945”

Your Friendly Full Service Family Jewelry Store 434-295-4258 since 1945

434-295-4258 December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Christopher William Jewelers

SCAN TO SHOP

100 or OFF $500

GIFT CARD MORE

Beautiful gifts for the creatives on your list.

CODE: MERRY100

3287 LEE HIGHWAY, WEYERS CAVE | 540-234-9075 4090 EVELYN BYRD AVE., HARRISONBURG | 540-689-0027 www.christopherwilliamjewelers.com

custom invitations . stationery . paper goods & gifts 321 east main street . downtown mall . 434.979.6366 . www.thinkrockpaperscissors.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

EXCLUDES PANDORA. ONE COUPON PER CUSTOMER TOWARDS REGULAR PRICED MERCHANDISE ONLY. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH ANY OTHER OFFER. NO CASH VALUE. COUPON EXPIRES 12/31/21

@cville_culture

$


28

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE

gifts for everyone you love (or just those you like) located in dairy market find us @brigidandbess

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

facebook.com/cville.weekly

andrewmintonjewelers.com | 434-979-7672 | Seminole Square

Find the perfect gift for the Holiday season with our stock of high end, high quality products. We are Charlottesville's finest destination for all things CBD and THC Delta 8. Ask about our best-selling infused edibles! 434.328.8573 - 301 E. Main Street - www.skooma.com


29

Give the Gift of Imagination!

Fine Designs in Jewelry & Accessories SHOP

lynnegoldmanelements.com OR

32 PC BUILDER MAGNATILES

601 West Main Street (434) 295-4797 www.SHENANIGANS.toys Mon-Sat 10-6 • Sun 12-5

On The Downtown Mall 407 East Main Street Charlottesville 434 . 977 . 9644

Watch her eyes light up with the beautiful glow of Moonstone!

FOR FORTHE THETHRILL THRILLOF OFVINTAGE VINTAGE||TAYLOR TAYLORHARRIS' HARRIS'UPCOMING UPCOMINGMEMOIR MEMOIR||LESSONS LESSONSIN INLOVE LOVEOVER OVEREGO EGO

10/10 WOULD WOULDBUY BUY

30+ 30+GIFT GIFTIDEAS IDEAS

FROM FROMFAMILIAR FAMILIARFACES— FACES— EVERY EVERYTHING THINGBUT BUT THE THEKITCHEN KITCHENSINK SINK

1 ABODE (INCLUDING BATHTUB!) 1 ABODE THE (INCLUDING THE BATHTUB!)

facebook.com/cville.weekly

www.mineralsandmystics.com Facebook.com/MineralsMystics 345 Hillsdale Drive Charlottesville VA 22901 434-284-7709

WINTER 2021 WINTER 2021

@cville_culture

Rainbow Moonstone

All Allabout abouttown. town.

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Pick up the new edition of 434 for more holiday gift ideas! On Stands December 3rd 1st!


30

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


31

CROSSWORD

Halo BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK 53. High employment rate, e.g. ... or a punny clue for 6-Across 1. Super Bowl XXI MVP 61. “I meant to tell u ...” Phil ____ who was the 62. Sundance Film Festival first to say “I’m going local to Disney World!” 63. Army base about 16 mi. 6. Purity ring? (... and for from Trenton more punny clues, see 65. Chess piece between 20-, 39- and 53-Across) dame and fou 10. Frequently, poetically 66. Emmy-winning chore13. Bugged incessantly ographer Debbie 14. Slack-jawed 67. Colorful upholstery 16. “Don’t think so” fabric 17. Arms and legs attach to it 68. Qty. 18. Like about 97% of 69. Blokes U.S. land 70. Actor Ed 19. Mao ____-tung 20. What a chandelier proDOWN vides ... or a punny clue for 6-Across 1. Couldn’t stand, maybe 23. Lunch bread 2. “Was ____ harsh?” 24. Fly catchers 3. “Jeopardy!” creator 26. Capital of Samoa Griffin 29. Like pets and parking 4. Auto pioneer Alfieri meters 5. “Long ____ short ...” 32. Researcher’s rodent 6. Loser in an Aesop fable 34. It forms at the mouth 7. The rain in Spain, e.g. 36. Barbecue glowers 8. Pie crust ingredient 38. Cheer at a flamenco 9. Autumn birthstone show 10. Not neat 39. Group of fellow wor11. Pitcher who can throw shipers ... or a punny 97 miles per hour, say clue for 6-Across 42. KJ who plays Archie on 12. Word ignored in indexing “Riverdale” 15. ____ Young Band (country group) 43. 0 to 60, e.g. 21. Defendant in a 1963 44. Prepared for a TV interobscenity trial, for short view 22. 43rd prez 45. Charge toward, with a lance 25. Knights’ horses 47. “You ____ me at hello” 26. Madison Ave. cost 49. Ukr. and Lith., once 27. One who’s looking the wrong way? 50. Photo blowups: Abbr. 28. Line from a permissive 51. Bed-Ins for Peace judge participant

ACROSS

#3

3

4

5

6

13

14

17

18 20

7

8

Fancy Nancy F A N C A E I O T R A N J G O S O R O B B A M A S N P R T A R S H O P R A M E I T A L R O N I A N I M

9

27

15

29

31

32

O I L S U P

12

25

64

44 47

48 51

55

56

57

49 52

58

59

62

63

65

66

67 69

70

O R O S C O

A T E I R C Y

41

46

54

H O O P L H A E L I E N N A A N

33

61

68

11

A A S D O C T C H

38

43

53

T A C K E D O N

C R A Y O N S

16

37

50

#6 solution © 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

#5 solution

30

40

45

N E W D O

22

36

35

39

#6

A R Z E L I T C E R E V A C E Q L I A B O L E N T A E O N

D E M O O W A N E R I I D E L E E D G G O

24

28

42

E X A M

19

21

34

R A C Y

10

23 26

Y U S U D F T S

facebook.com/cville.weekly

2

ANSWERS 11/24/21

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

1

30. Subj. for Janet Yellen 31. Baker’s need 32. Cousin of “Inc.” 33. “____ sure you already know ...” 35. Taj Mahal’s city 37. Off the coast 40. “Can ____ least think it over?” 41. Dishes prepared alla Milanese 46. General with a dish named after him 48. OB or ENT 52. ‘90s commerce pact 54. “Levitating” singer Lipa 55. “____ be a cold day ...” 56. Kiara’s mother in “The Lion King” 57. Batted but didn’t field, in MLB lingo 58. Roadside stopovers 59. Frigga’s husband 60. Vex 61. Maidenform purchase 64. Child of the ‘70s, e.g.

60


December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly 32


By Rob Brezsny

Capricorn

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Sagittarius

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn author Susan Sontag unleashed a bizarre boast, writing, “One of the healthiest things about me—my capacity to survive, to bounce back, to prosper—is intimately connected with my biggest neurotic liability: my facility in disconnecting from my feelings.” Everything about her statement makes me scream NO! I mean, I believe this coping mechanism worked for her; I don’t begrudge her that. But as a student of psychology and spirituality, I know that disconnecting from feelings is, for most of us, the worst possible strategy if we want to be healthy and sane. And I will advise you to do the opposite of Sontag in the coming weeks. December is Stay Intimately Connected with Your Feelings Month.

I’d love to see you open your heart to the sweet dark feelings you’ve been sensing, and open your mind to the disruptive but nourishing ideas you need, and open your gut to the rumbling hunches that are available. Be brave, Aries! Strike up conversations with the unexpected, the unknown, and the undiscovered.

Aquarius

Taurus

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In some small towns in the Philippines, people can be punished and fined for gossiping. Some locals have become reluctant to exchange tales about the sneaky, sexy, highly entertaining things their neighbors are doing. They complain that their freedom of speech has been curtailed. If you lived in one of those towns, I’d advise you to break the law in the coming weeks. In my astrological opinion, dynamic gossip should be one of your assets. Staying well-informed about the human comedy will be key for your ability to thrive.

(April 20-May 20): A Tumblr blogger named Evan addressed a potential love interest. “Do you like sleeping, because so do I,” he wrote. “We should do it together sometime.” You might want to extend a similar invitation, Taurus. Now is a ripe time for you to interweave your subconscious mind with the subconscious mind of an ally you trust. The two of you could generate extraordinary healing energy for each other as you lie together, dozing in the darkness. Other recommended activities: meditating together; fantasizing together; singing together; making spiritual love together. (PS: If you have no such human ally, sleep and meditate with a beloved animal or imaginary friend.)

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): “Originality consists in thinking for yourself, and not in thinking unlike other people,” wrote Piscean author James Fitzjames Stephen. Another way to say it: Being rebellious is not inherently creative. If you primarily define yourself by rejecting and reacting against someone’s ideas, you are being controlled by those ideas. Please keep this in mind, dear Pisces. I want you to take full advantage of your astrological potential during the next 12 months, which is to be absolutely original. Your perceptions and insights will be unusually lucid if you protect yourself from both groupthink and a compulsive repudiation of groupthink.

(March 21-April 19): It’s a favorable time to get excited about your long-range future— and to entertain possibilities that have previously been on the edges of your awareness.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “All my days I have longed equally to travel the right road and to take my own errant path,” wrote Norwegian-Danish novelist Sigrid Undset. I think she succeeded in doing both. She won a Nobel Prize for Literature. Her trilogy about a 14th-century Norwegian woman was translated into 80 languages. I conclude that for her—as well as for you in the coming weeks and months—traveling the right road and taking your own errant path will be the same thing.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): Gemini author Chuck Klosterman writes, “It’s far easier to write why something is terrible than why it’s good.” That seems to be true for many writers. However, my life’s work is in part a rebellion against doing what’s easy. I don’t want to chronically focus on what’s bad and sick and desolate. Instead, I aspire to devote more of my energy to doing what Klosterman implies is hard, which is to write sincerely (but not naively) about the many things that are good and redemptive and uplifting. In light of your current astrological omens, Gemini, I urge you to adopt my perspective for your own use in the next three weeks. Keep in mind what philosopher Robert Anton Wilson said: “An optimistic mindset finds dozens

of possible solutions for every problem that the pessimist regards as incurable.”

Cancer (June 21-July 22): An organization in Turkey decided to construct a new building to house its workers. The Saruhanbey Knowledge, Culture, and Education Foundation chose a plot in the city of Manisa. But there was a problem. A three-centuries-old pine tree stood on the land. Local authorities would not permit it to be cut down. So architects designed a building with spaces and holes that fully accommodated the tree. I recommend you regard this marvel as a source of personal inspiration in the coming weeks and months. How could you work gracefully with nature as you craft your future masterpiece or labor of love? How might you work around limitations to create useful, unusual beauty?

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Author Melissa Broder wrote a preposterous essay in which she ruminated, “Is fake love better than real love? Real love is responsibility, compromise, selflessness, being present, and all that shit. Fake love is magic, excitement, false hope, infatuation, and getting high off the potential that another person is going to save you from yourself.” I will propose, Leo, that you bypass such ridiculous thinking about love in the coming weeks and months. Here’s why: There’s a strong chance that the real love at play in your life will feature magic and excitement, even as it requires responsibility, compromise, selflessness, and being present.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo author Andre Dubus III describes times when “I feel stupid, insensitive, mediocre, talentless and vulnerable—like I’m about to cry any second—and wrong.” That sounds dreadful, right? But it’s not dreadful for him. Just the opposite. “I’ve

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The problem with putting two and two together is that sometimes you get four, and sometimes you get 22.” Author Dashiell Hammett said that, and now I’m passing it on to you—just in time for a phase of your cycle when putting two and two together will probably not bring four, but rather 22 or some other irregularity. I’m hoping that since I’ve given you a heads-up, it won’t be a problem. On the contrary. You will be prepared and will adjust faster than anyone else—thereby generating a dose of exotic good fortune.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In her poem “Is/Not,” Scorpio poet Margaret Atwood tells a lover, “You are not my doctor, you are not my cure, nobody has that power, you are merely a fellow traveler.” I applaud her for stating an axiom I’m fond of, which is that no one, not even the person who loves you best, can ever be totally responsible for fixing everything wrong in your life. However, I do think Atwood goes too far. On some occasions, certain people can indeed provide us with a measure of healing. And we must be receptive to that possibility. We shouldn’t be so pathologically self-sufficient that we close ourselves off from tender help. One more thing: Just because that help may be imperfect doesn’t mean it’s useless and should be rejected. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888

WINTER 2021

CAN’T-MISS SIPS: We’re starting with Lightwell Survey’s Strange Hybrid Moments. PAGE 17

Taste is everything.

VERY FINE WINES What to drink, where to drink it, and who to know in the world of Virgini a vino

Meet

CHRISTINA MARTIN,

the baker with no bakery

on stands now!

SUSHI! Thai meets Japan ese at the hands of the Tauchis PIZZA! A Lampo alum takes his slice of the local pie game BURRITOS! Lucky Blue’s Bar serves up something for everyone

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Eat up!

found that when that happens,” he concludes, “it usually means I’m writing pretty well, pretty deeply, pretty rawly.” I trust you will entertain a comparable state sometime soon, Virgo. Even if you’re not a writer, the bounty and fertility that emerge from this immersion in vulnerability will invigorate you beyond what you can imagine.

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Aries

33


34

RESTAURANT WEEK ™

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

SAVE THE DATES

C R

FRIDAY,

W

3 prices:

$19 | $29 | $39

JANUARY 28TH SATURDAY,

FEBRUARY 5TH

&

FRIDAY,

JULY 15TH -

SATURDAY,

JULY 23RD

C-VILLERESTAURANTWEEK.COM


Q&A

35

Who would you like to trade lives with?

My cat! Sleep in the sun, free meals twice a day, adoring owner... livin’ the dream! @LALALALALAFALALALA/INSTAGRAM

I don’t know how to couch this but… What is the best way to describe the one you are with if you are not married?

I’ve had a pretty good “ride” for the last 80 years. Some ups, some downs. Made a lot of mistakes too. But trade lives? Nope, not me . . .

SYLVIA NEW STRAWN/EMAIL

HANK HAGENAU JR/EMAIL

Hmm, if you can’t be content with your own existence and reality in life, trading places with someone else isn’t going to do you a damn bit of good honestly.

Dream team

Wedding pros work together at The Bradbury downtown

Copy this

How to use styled shoots for inspo

@MELISSASHIRLEYMILLER/INSTAGRAM

Forever love

Don't toss the bouquet— a new way to keep it 'alive'

FALL/WINTER 2021

Next week’s question: What do you think of the new CODE Building on the Downtown Mall?

PAGE 23

So much

joy

Four weddings—from itsy bitsy to Italian-inspired—that got every detail just right

This is our town.

NEW ISSUE ON STANDS NOW!

facebook.com/cville.weekly

.com

C-VILLE Weddings provides brides-to-be with a comprehensive guide to planning their big day. Make us the first stop on the road to wedded bliss.

December 1 – 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

Plan on!

A month-bymonth guide to the big day


36

CLASSIFIEDS DEADLINE

Friday at 5 PM for inclusion in the next Wednesday’s paper.

SIZES AVAILABLE Full Page Half Page Quarter Page Eight Page 1/16 (Business Card)

EMPLOYMENT

PRICING

QUESTIONS?

Pre-payment Required. We accept all major credit cards, cash or check.

classifieds.c-ville.com

Rates starting at $40. Email for specific pricing.

Email chloe@c-ville.com

Looking for a part time sales job or side hustle? Now hiring part time sales reps. to build and manage new business. Commission based, flexible job in a fun work environment that includes great perks. Perfect for an outgoing and energetic person who enjoys building relationships with local businesses.

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Must be 21+ and have both reliable transportation and a home office (computer and internet access).

We're Hiring!

We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet & C’ville!

A good fit for a grad student, someone who works restaurant shifts in the evening or a stay at home Mom looking to ease back into the workforce.

Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population.

Sales experience is a plus (and yes, bartending and waiting tables counts!). Could potentially become a full time position for the right candidate.

Want to apply your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our community members in need? Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of peoplefellow with developmental disabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we If so, The Arc has these opportunities to offer. urge you to consider the following career opportunities:

Email your resume to anna@c-ville.com EOE

About Us

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $17- $19/hr) Direct Support - Residential Services We're very eager to hear from candidates interested inProfessionals working in Crozet and C’ville! (FT and PT, $15 - $17/hr) To see additional details and a full listing of all our positions or to apply, please visit our web site at http://arcpva.org/employment Direct Support Professional - Floaters ($18 - $19/hr) December 1 - 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $15-$17/hr) Direct Support Professionals- Charlottesville Day Support ($13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr)

In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience, The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive benefits package including paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Apply now!

For more details and positions, and to apply, please visit

http://arcpva.org/employment

Offering competitive compensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive434-977-4002 benefits package paid leave, health, dental & vision insurance, arcpva.orgincluding x124 @arcpiedmont.va as well as life & long-term disability insurance.

Apply now!

The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

434-977-4002x124 arcpva.org • @arcpiedmont.va

LOOKING TO HIRE? Advertise your Employymnet ad HERE


TRAIL OF LIGHTS

LEGALS

Winter Wander

37

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 _ General District Court Charlottesville X Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Earn some extra money for the holidays.

Boar’s Head Resort is hiring for their Winter Wander Trail of Lights illuminated lakeside stroll taking place from November 26 through January 30. Full-Time, Part-Time and Seasonal Positions are also Available: Hotel Operations:

• • • • • • • •

• • • •

Banquet Chef Banquet Manager Restaurant Manager (outlets) Cooks Dishwashers Host/Hostess Supervisor and Servers Food Runner/Busser

Spa: • Licensed Massage Therapist • Spa Receptionist/Attendants

Housekeeping Engineer Groundskeeper Front Desk Agent

Golf and Sports: • • • •

Assistant Golf Pro Childcare Provider Golf Course Maintenance Outside Greeters and Starters

Contact: MJackson@BoarsHeadResort.com or call (434) 972-2223

The object of this suit is to: Approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residential parental rights of Unknown Father in the child born to him and Amy Herrera on July 11th, 2016 in Charlottesville, Virginia It is ORDERED that the X defendant Unknown Father, appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before January 19th, 2021 at 2:45 p.m. 11/17/2021 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

Contact Chloe for more information : Chloe@c-ville.com **Notarized Affidavit Included in Price

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Need to apply for an ABC License? Need to run a legal?

December 1 - 7, 2021 c-ville.com

Food & Beverage:

__ Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: T.R. vs


38

COMMUNITY AND MISCELLANEOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS

A Smarter Way to Power Your Home. REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

ACT NOW TO RECEIVE A $300 SPECIAL OFFER!*

(833) 688-1378

*Offer value when purchased at retail. Solar panels sold separately.

BACKED BY A YEAR-ROUND

Prepare for power outages with a Generac home standby generator REQUEST A FREE QUOTE!

844-947-1479

FREE

7-Year Extended Warranty* A $695 Value! Limited Time Offer - Call for Details

December 1 - 7, 2021 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Special Financing Available

CLOG-FREE GUARANTEE CALL US TODAY FOR

A FREE ESTIMATE

15

%

OFF

YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE*

+

1-877-614-6667

10

%

OFF

+

SENIOR & MILITARY DISCOUNTS

Mon-Thurs: 8am-11pm, Fri-Sat: 8am-5pm, Sun: 2pm-8pm EST

5

%

OFF

TO THE FIRST 50 CALLERS!**

| Promo Number: 285

*For those who qualify. One coupon per household. No obligation estimate valid for 1 year. **Offer valid at time of estimate only 2The leading consumer reporting agency conducted a 16 month outdoor test of gutter guards in 2010 and recognized LeafFilter as the “#1 rated professionally installed gutter guard system in America.” Manufactured in Plainwell, Michigan and processed at LMT Mercer Group in Ohio. See Representative for full warranty details. CSLB# 1035795 DOPL #10783658-5501 License# 7656 License# 50145 License# 41354 License# 99338 License# 128344 License# 218294 WA UBI# 603 233 977 License# 2102212986 License# 2106212946 License# 2705132153A License# LEAFFNW822JZ License# WV056912 License# WC-29998-H17 Nassau HIC License# H01067000 Registration# 176447 Registration# HIC.0649905 Registration# C127229 Registration# C127230 Registration# 366920918 Registration# PC6475 Registration# IR731804 Registration# 13VH09953900 Registration# PA069383 Suffolk HIC License# 52229-H License# 2705169445 License# 262000022 License# 262000403 License# 0086990 Registration# H-19114

NEW!

Subject to Credit Approval

*To qualify, consumers must request a quote, purchase, install and activate the generator with a participating dealer. Call for a full list of terms and conditions.

Advertise your House for Sale or Rent, your Open Positions, your Big Items for Sale or your Community Announcement

1/6 page business card ads in Classifieds for ONLY

40!

$

AND include a Logo or Photo in your ad.

Email chloe@c-ville.com for more information.


WWW.CAAR.COM 39

VOL. 30 NO. 48 n DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®

i r p i t S s B g r n i i g k h a t: M

BY KEN WILSON

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS!


DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

40

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers WOODLANDS

WOODFIELD

Rare opportunity to purchase an architecturallydesigned, gracious 3,530 square foot residence with 4 bedrooms and 3 baths on a secluded 4.59 acres in the heart of Garth and Owensville Road yet close to all Charlottesville/UVA amenities. MLS#623814 $949,000 Robert Mellen, 434.996.7386

OFF OF GARTH ROAD

12-acre country estate, west of Charlottesville. 2-story, 5-BR, 4.5-BA manor home is surrounded by lovely mature gardens, plantings, trees, and a beautiful springfed pond. Truly a rare offering with unsurpassed beauty, tranquility, and country living. MLS#617622 $2,500,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

ROBINSON WOODS

Bright, comfortable, and recently renovated house with a flexible floorplan. 4 bedrooms & 3.5 baths. Features gas fireplace, wood floors, new appliances, granite countertops. Conveniently located in the city minutes from Downtown & UVA. MLS#620141 $670,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

Beautifully restored 1780s colonial house located on 293 acres in Northampton County. This historic home has 4 bedrooms, 3 full and 2 half baths, a chef ’s kitchen, and a sunroom overlooking the back patio gardens. Fine details include original millwork, heart pine floors, and 5 brick fireplaces. Property has access to the Machipongo River which flows into the Atlantic Ocean! Under conservation easement. Rare offering! MLS#614051 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.WoodlandsFarmVa.com

GREENFIELDS FARM

Impressive 763-acre country estate approximately 25 miles south of Charlottesville. The property showcases a stately southern residence, built circa 1904, extensive equestrian facilities, recreation opportunities, creeks and a pond. MLS#623792 $6,295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GALLISON HALL

Set on 43 park-like acres, this stately Farmington gem features a 1931-33 Georgian house, indoor pool and tennis facilities, spectacular Blue Ridge views, total privacy and an exceptional close-totown location. On historic registers. MLS#617686 $8,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MADISON

Over 560 acres of wooded land on Thoroughfare Mountain in Madison County. Three contiguous parcels, completely private, with endless possibilities. Hunt, ride ATVs, camp, build a weekend retreat or a permanent residence in total serenity. MLS#621697 $2,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.186

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel with convenient location to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views and charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement, but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

MOORELAND

Classic Virginia brick home, circa 1855, situated on 22 acres just off Route 29 South, less than 10 minute drive to Charlottesville and the University of Virginia. This home has mountain views, and is surrounded by large trees and mature landscaping, including numerous perennial and vegetable gardens. Other improvements include a two bedroom guest or rental cottage, several outbuildings and shared ownership on a large lake. The home has four bedrooms and three full baths on three levels. $985,000 MLS#624421 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.moorelandva.com

THE GLEASON

Open, extremely spacious floor plan with 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths. Enjoy expansive mountain and city views from inside or from one of 2 balconies. Secure garage parking. Ting Available. Walk to dining, shopping, and entertainment! MLS#621646 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434. 981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


41

FRAYS MILL

Mostly wooded preservation tract of 81.395 acres next to Frays Mill Subdivision in highly desirable northern Albemarle. This beautiful gently rolling land has a great, private homesite with Blue Ridge Mt. views, and creek on property. MLS#608509 $995,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

RAGGED MOUNTAIN

4.32 acres, half open, with gently rolling, cleared homesite on a high plateau with lovely pastoral and mountain views. Situated in Ivy Valley, just off I-64 west of Charlottesville, less than 10 miles to the University of Virginia. MLS#622663 $465,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

SIMMONS GAP/ ESTES RIDGE

10 acres of mature woods. Property has long road frontage and consists of two parcels being combined and sold as one. No HOA! Design and build your dream residence on this very well-priced parcel. MLS#621178 $189,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville and the University of Virginia. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

KESWICK

Wonderful wooded, 10.56-acre lot in Keswick. Great location, convenient to Pantops, 10 minutes east of Charlottesville with exceptional privacy and frontage on Mechunk Creek. MLS#619380 $149,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BELLAIR

Rare opportunity to purchase a building lot of just under 1 acre in sought-after Bellair. Lush, mature landscaping, partly wooded, stream/creek. Minutes from UVA, shopping, dining, and entertainment. Western Albemarle school district. MLS#614627 $375,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

ESTES RIDGE

Beautiful 14.7-acre tract of pristine land with both open fields and mature woods. So many possibilities for the property - create a small estate parcel with main residence and dependencies or enjoy recreational activities. No HOA! MLS#621176 $289,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

FRAY’S GRANT

3 fabulous home sites mostly in beautiful hardwoods, gently rolling and priced below tax assessments! Each lot is 2+ acres on private setting. Only ten minutes to airport, excellent shopping, including Harris Teeter, Target, Kohls, Bonefish Grill and Starbucks. Jim Faulconer, 434,981.0076

COLONNADE DRIVE

In-fill Development Opportunity – Close to UVA. Corner at Ivy RD (250) behind Shell gas station. Total 1.13 acres Zoned Highway Commercial permits multiple uses: hotels, motels, church, office, food and grocery stores. Quick access to 29 & I-64. CVCMLS #30317866 $1,500,000 Mark Mascotte, 434. 825.8610

GREENTREES

188+ acres in Albemarle, 12 miles south of Charlottesville on Rt 20. This wooded tract, mostly in hardwoods, offers long road frontage with potential for eight 21-acre lots. There is conservation easement potential. MLS#614109 $1,299,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

MURPHY’S CREEK FARM

Wonderful gently rolling parcel of land with just under 26 acres, 18 miles south of Charlottesville. The land is wooded (mostly hardwoods) with an elevated building site, stream/creek, total privacy, and long road frontage. MLS#619394 $285,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MEADOWBROOK HILLS

Lovely 3-bedrooms, 3-baths, circa 1958 brick home located in one of the City’s most desirable neighborhoods- convenient to all that Charlottesville has to offer! Walkable to Barracks Road & UVA, and just a short drive from Downtown. MLS#622783 $598,000 Will Faulconer, 434.987.9455

DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

42

i r p i t S s B g r n i i g k h a t: M BY KEN WILSON

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS!


Grand Illumination The City of Charlottesville’s Grand Illumination is a special family affair. This time festivities are set for the Ting Pavilion, at the east end of the Downtown Mall, on Friday, December 3 from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. While the highlight is the spectacular lighting of the 30-foot, 30-year-old Norway Spruce community tree in City Hall Plaza, the event will also feature music, food, games, and prizes, plus special guests. The American Military Spouses Choir and the Voices of

decorations along with the usual bounty of produce and crafts, fresh food and baked goods for taking home or eating on site. See what strikes your fancy on Saturdays from 8:00 a.m. till 1:00 p.m. through December 18. The Key’s Corner Indoor Market in the Herman Key Recreation Center (formerly the Carver Recreation Center) bridges the gap between the Holiday and warm weather City Markets and begins January 8.

Waldorf School Holiday Bazaar “To market, to market, to buy a fat (fruitcake)” is what we learned as little kids, and if you grew up thinking that sounded like multiple markets, around here you were right. Charlottesville Waldorf School’s Holiday Bazaar offers its own fine selection of handmade gifts, including jump ropes, beeswax candles, and holiday wreaths. Other activities include storytelling, and a holiday singalong with Blue Ridge Music Together, and a silent auction and raffle. Admission is free. Activity tickets will be sold on-site, and credit cards accepted. No pets. The Bazaar’s adults-only shopping preview is Friday, December 3 from 6:00

43

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

CLUB DRIVE

French Normandy style home set on a 2.7 acre corner, wooded lot in Keswick Estate. Elegant, custom designed residence built by Baird Snyder. Composite slate roofing, turrets and copper finials.Cast stone work on the exterior and solid mahogany arched front doors. 20’ sweeping entry with curved staircase. Amazing master suite, chef ’s kitchen and a wine cellar with tasting room. Arched windows and doors, carved white statuary marble fireplace. Extensive gardens and terraces. $3,000,000

DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

R

eady or not, and whoever is, the holidays are upon us—and boy do we have some unusual things to celebrate this year. Like we can leave the house again. Like we can celebrate leaving home with a crowd of other people happy to join us. The return of the simple stuff we took for granted sweetens a season already cherished for its merriment, fun and family spirit—so let’s see what’s in store.

PENNY LANE

Fabulous cottage tucked away on 12.5 acres with 1 division right. Top quality craftsmanship features; a copper roof and downspouts, vaulted ceilings, dramatic windows and artistic stonework.The first floor bath features a stone fireplace. Mature landscaping, wrap around porch, spring, stream and a detached studio all work to make this a compelling property. The studio has a fireplace with a beautiful walnut mantle. There are 2 sheds (a potting shed and another set up for miniature goats) $850,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200

Annie Gould Gallery

Charlottesville City Market The Charlottesville City Market on Water Street and in IX Art Park sips a little eggnog each November and morphs into a holiday market stocked with gifts, wreaths and

to 9:00 p.m. On Saturday, December 4 the bazaar is open to the public from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Run for Charity, Run Off the Calories The little ones don’t notice, but the Santa on the Mall is probably not the same guy as the Santa at the shopping center last week, who is probably not the same as...you get it, even if they don’t. Santa is its own job category in December. Not all Clauses are real, and some are extra nice. You can “Be a Claus for a Cause” yourself by supporting The Arc of the Piedmont at the Charlottesville Santa Fun Run, Saturday, December 4 at 11:00 a.m. All proceeds from the event will support the group’s programs for people in Charlottesville and the surrounding community who live with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Register online. Participants (walkers are also welcome) will follow a one-mile

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Service, both veterans of America’s Got Talent, will entertain, and Santa plans a grand entrance, accompanied by friends from the North Pole. Kids will love the bounce houses, face painting, games, and rides on the Holiday Train. Local nonprofits and businesses will hold raffles and give away goodies; the Charlottesville Holiday Market will sell treats and holiday crafts; food trucks will serve hot food and drinks, and the Charlottesville Ale Trail will provide local craft beer and wine selections. Good Shot Judy will play holiday swing music at the After Party beginning at 7:15 p.m. The Grand Illumination is free and open to the public, with complimentary parking at Water and Market Street garages after 4:00 p.m.

FEATURE

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

44

route beginning and finishing at the Ting Pavilion on the Downtown Mall. Adults will receive Santa suit costumes; kids will get elf ears. Light refreshments will be served starting at 9:30 a.m. Spectators are welcome. The run will take place rain, snow, or shine. Awards and prizes will be presented to the top corporate and family team fundraisers. Joggers, elf enthusiasts, thrill-seekers, and Cotton-headed Ninnymuggins are invited to get in the holiday spirit with the Paramount’s 5th Annual Brew & Buddy Run. Starting at the theater at 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, December 19, runners will make a three-mile loop around the Downtown area with stops at Champion and Three Notch’d for beers before returning to the Paramount for a 6:00 p.m. screening of Elf. For their registration fee, runners receive a 2021 Brew & Buddy Run souvenir cup, a free pour at each brewery, a dollar off beer purchases at the Paramount’s concessions, and free admission to the film.

FEATURE

The Oratorio Society of Virginia Presents: Christmas at The Paramount The Oratorio Society of Virginia returns to public performance on Saturday, December 18 at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. with its annual Christmas at the Paramount program. Music Director Michael Slon and 60 of the community’s finest singers will present this beloved Charlottesville holiday tradition. The choir will be accompanied by an orchestra as it sings excerpts from Antonio Vivaldi’s timeless and joyful Gloria and Sergei Rachmaninoff’s stirring and powerful All-Night Vigil. Holiday works from Virginia’s own Adolphus Hailstork, Abbie Betinis, and familiar seasonal favorites round out the concert.

The Magic Flute Mozart’s The Magic Flute is best known for “Queen of the Night,” a dazzling aria for a fearless soprano. Julie Taymor’s shortened, English-language version of Mozart’s timeless fairy tale, conducted by James Levine with a winning ensemble cast including Nathan Gunn, Ying Huang, Matthew Polenzani, and René Pape, was a hit when the Metropolitan Opera staged it in 2006. The Paramount will offer an encore livestream of this family favorite on Wednesday, December 30 at 2:30 p.m.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Cendrillon On New Year’s Day the Paramount will present another Metropolitan Opera hit, Laurent Pelly’s storybook staging of Massenet’s Cendrillon. This new and abridged 90-minute adaptation, also sung in English, will star mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard as its rags-to-riches princess, mezzo-soprano Emily D’Angelo as Cinderella’s Prince Charming, soprano Jessica Pratt as her Fairy Godmother, and mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe and bass-baritone Laurent Naouri as her feuding guardians. Emmanuel Villaume will conduct; Mary Ann Archer, a flutist with the Met for 26 years, will give a complimentary pre-opera lecture at noon.

Theater Elvis will be in the building when Matt Lewis takes the stage at the Paramount Theater with Charlottesville’s own Big Ray and the Kool Kats on Sunday December 5. The tribute artist that USA Today called “The Best in Las Vegas!” will sing “Blue Christmas,” “I’ll be Home for Christmas,” “Here Comes Santa Claus” and more holiday hits, plus classic Elvis songs from his rockabilly era, his Vegas years and, perhaps best of all, his 1968 Comeback Special.

Monticello For Thomas Jefferson, Christmas was “the day of greatest mirth and jollity,” and the high point of a social and religious season extending from Advent through Christmastide. Monticello’s Holiday Evening Tours, December 10, 11, 17-23, and 26-30, offer an opportunity to see Monticello as it may have looked in Jefferson’s time, decorated with the then popular style of holiday greenery. Ticketholders will tour both public and private areas of the home, including the iconic Dome Room, and will also learn about the holiday traditions of Monticello’s enslaved community. Annual Wreath Workshops are a tradition up on the mountain now. Led by Monticello Guide and Floral Designer, Lou Hatch and Monticello Curator of Plants, Peggy Cornett, attendees will create a door decoration that will last throughout the season. Guided instruction will be given for different styles of wreaths, including, traditional, natural and modern. These three-hour wreath-making workshops will be held on Thursday, December 2 at 9:30 a.m., Friday, December 3 at 4:00 p.m., Saturday, December 4 at 9:30 a.m., and Sunday, December 5 at 2:00 p.m. Lou Hatch will also present a Virtual Wreath Workshop, on Saturday, December 4. Virtual workshop ticket buyers will receive a shopping list of required materials. Joseph C. Cabell, a Jefferson protégé who later helped him found the University of Virginia and served on its Board of Visitors for almost 40 years, once gave his mentor a walking stick as a Christmas gift. Walking sticks are not for sale in the Monticello gift shop, but shoppers will find ornaments, jewelry, clothing, furniture, books and much more.

Highlands James Monroe’s Highlands estate’s own holiday tour tradition, scheduled this year for December 11 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., is called After Hours at Highland. Participants will be greeted by James Monroe reenactor Beau Robbins and given a private candlelit viewing of newly opened exhibits in the 1818 guesthouse. Time will be allowed for questions and discussion.

A Christmas Carol A year ago, we had a choice of streams or DVDs, on flat screens, laptops, I-Pads, or phones. “Bah Humbug” that ‘twas, because nothing is finer than the anticipation of walking through the doors of our local theaters. “God bless us everyone,” the theaters are open again, including


Making Spirits Bright You can dance in your seat—or all around your living room—when Valley Dance Theatre presents Making Spirits Bright, Sunday, December 5 at 2:00 and 5:30 p.m., both live at Waynesboro’s Wayne Theatre and streaming online. Dancers aged 3 and up will perform Nutcracker excerpts and classic and contemporary holiday favorites.

A Christmas Story: The Musical Is there anything for making spirits bright quite like a troupe of beaming actors taking a bow after a live musical? If you doubt, get yourself to Waynesboro’s Wayne Theater, December 9-12 and 16-19, for A Christmas Story: The Musical. Based on the holiday movie classic and set in the 1940s in the fictional town of Hohman, Indiana, the play follows 9-year-old Ralphie Parker on his quest for the Holy Grail of Christmas gifts—an Official Red Ryder carbine-action 200shot Range Model air rifle. Imagine accidentally shoving Santa off your roof on Christmas Eve, then magically recruited to take his place in

the sleigh. That’s what happens to Scott (Tim Allen) in the 1994 film, The Santa Clause. The Wayne will show this Christmastime romantic comedy on Monday, December 20 at 2:00 and 7:00 p.m.

Dark Tales and Haunts of The Queen City—Christmas Edition Are you brave enough for a haunted tour of downtown Staunton? The Christmas edition of the Dark Tales and Haunts of The Queen City starts at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, December 4 and Saturday, December 11, and stops at Western State Asylum, the Depot Station, Miss Charlotte Coffman’s House, and other local spots where history is strange and scary.

45 DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

Blackfriars Playhouse in Staunton, one of the world’s best settings for Shakespeare, and the annual haunt of Jacob Marley and the spirits of Christmas Past, Present and Yet to Come. The Charles Dicken’s Christmas classic, A Christmas Carol, previews at Blackfriars on Friday, December 10, opens officially the following evening, and runs through December 30. Masks are required and seats spaced.

Artisan Christmas Fair Tired of Black Friday frenzy over the latest must have tech toys? The Artisan Christmas Fair at Staunton’s Frontier Culture Museum, November 26 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., offers gifts with real personality and handmade by local artisans. The food is good too, and the costumed staff bring to life holiday traditions from around the world. The fair is a pay-what-you-will event, with all donations gladly accepted. Santa’s made his list, gotten his shots, and is hitting town soon. We are so ready.

NOW IS THE TIME TO PLAN FOR 2022! SOLD!

UNDER

350 CLAIBOURNE ROAD

CONTRA

CT

1460 CANFIELD LANE

Price Drop!

434.305.0361 paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/575169 pdmcartor@gmail.com

2095 AVINITY LOOP

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/575473

Buyers BUYERS & Sellers!

pdmcartor@gmail.com HONORABLE MENTION

& SELLERS CALL ME TODAY!

Call Me Today!

434.305.0361 FINALIST

Best of Cville Real Estate Agents in 2016 & 2017, and a Finalist in 2018

GE T YO UR HO M E SO LD HE RE !

Best of Cville Real Estate Agents

CT

Gorgeous describes this Craig Builders home. Grand foyer leads to chef’s dream kitchen full of upgraded cabinets, stainless appliances & granitecounter tops. Hardwood floors lead to a dining area & wonderful living room with fireplace. Living room opens up to large balcony with a captivating view of CarterMountain. Natural light flows into every room! Upstairs has dual master bedrooms. The master suite sports a large walkin closet & upgraded bathroom with doublesinks along with a claw foot tub. Bottom level includes a 3rd bedroom, full bath, and home office perfect for working from home. Attic has flooring to give Sunday 1-3 pm extra storage.Walk out to your patio with access to large grass common area.Magnolia Warranty on all Dr the 2808 Loop appliances to than the 15 new owner. Peace &transfers tranquility less minutes from Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhousekitchen w/mountain Avinity is minutes away from UVA, MLS#house 624092 Downtown! Enjoy this wonderful on over an views! Open floorplan, perfect for entertaining $440,000 acre with beautiful mature trees. $469,900 with private patio. $365,000

! Under Contract

Complete 1st floor living, lg MBR & BA w/laundry. Hardwoods on main floor. Gourmet kitchen & loft open to LR. Outside patio. $410,000

CONTRA

Contact me today to find out about our New Listing Program. Let’s get your home

LISTED, UNDER CONTRACT & SOLD!

Open House

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/577468

! N e w L is ti n g

PUT YOUR in 6 days! HOUSE Under Contract HERE: Plan now to sell in Spring 2022! Special incentives offered now for Spring 2022 listings and it’s not too late to sell in 2021. Call now for details to create your 2357and Middle River Rdplan!

Come enjoy the peace and tranquility of your own lake front retreat! Single floor living home includes both MB & laundry on the main floor. $240,000 paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/576182

Price Drop! RUNNER UP

900 GARDENS BLVD #100 CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22901 WWW.AVENUEREALTYGROUP.COM

4161 Presidents Rd

Country living 15 minutes of Downtown & within Albemarle County. This single floor home has beautifully updated kitchen & bathrooms. $260,000

63 Soapstone Ln

Here’s your chance to live in a 1906 farmhouse with all the style and character while enjoying the conveniences of a modern home. $130,000

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Like new construction without the wait! This beauEscape to a cottage in the woods while only tiful home is less than two years old & filled with minutes from Downtown! This beautiful home ofupgrades. Walk into your foyer to find tall ceilfers first floor living with a two bedrooms on the ings& wonderful luxury vinyl plank flooring that main floor including the big master bedroom. flow through the main level. Turn the corner to see The full bath is completely updated and feels an open floor plan with your gourmet kitchen & like it was built for a spa. The kitchen overover sized island overlooking your light filled livlooks the dining area and living room to give a ing room. Perfect for entertaining! Off the living feeling of openness. Upstairs you will find two room is your deck with plenty of room to lounge additional spacious bedrooms and a full bath. or grill out. Walk into your large 1st floor master Off your kitchen there is a lovely screen porch suite complete with en suite bath, tiled shower & to sit or go onto the large deck to enjoy the feeldual vanities. The main level is completed by a ing of nature. The fire pit adds another potential visit to your laundry room. Great main floor living! space to sit and relax. Walk just through the Head upstairs to find two more bedrooms plus trees to an open lawn area perfect for playtime. a big loft area perfect for a family or recreation All of this is just 15 minutes from Downtown or room. As a bonus there is a combination room UVA Hospital and 11 minutes to Wegmans!! to be used for an office, hobby. MLS# 622259 $490,000 MLS# 622295 1544 Sawgrass Ct $365,000 2142 Avinity

UNDER


DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

46

HOME SALES STATS

Life Is A Team Sport. Life Is A Team Sport.

ENDING THE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 28, 2021 THERE WERE 67 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS

n 19 were in Albemarle with an average price of $384,248 n 3 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $315,667 n 5 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $317,800 n 3 were in Greene with an average price of $385,000 n 14 were in Louisa with an average price of $415,136 n 5 were in Nelson with an average price of $546,995 n 8 were in Orange with an average price of $295,936 n 4 were in Staunton with an average price of $310,352 n 6 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $225,483

HOMES SOLD

You don’t even have to choose sides. You don’t even have to choose sides. But you should try to surround yourself with as much talent as possible on the field...and in your neighborhood. Encouraging and accepting diversity in your community But you should try to surround yourself with as much will promote a greater sense of engagement, better prepare your talent as possible on the field...and in your neighborhood. Enchildren for the global community they will inhabit... couraging and accepting diversity in your community give us all a richer life. To better understand how neighborhood diwill promote a greater sense of engagement, better prepare your versity will benefit you and your family, please log onto children for the global community they will inhabit... www.ARicherLife.org. give us all a richer life. To better understand how neighborhood di-

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act

versity will benefit you and your family, please log onto www.ARicherLife.org.

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act

THE 1711 BELVEDERE PLACE BELVEDERE

117 WASHINGTON AVENUE 501 FOUR SEASONS DRIVE CHARLOTTESVILLE FOUR SEASONS

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.996.4019

887 HICKORY CREEK RD LOUISA

123 SUNNYSIDE LANE AFTON

LOCAL GOVERNMENT CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

257 WILLOWSHIRE CT WAYNESBORO

(Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY.

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®.

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered.

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47 DECEMBER 1 - 7, 2021 ISSUE 3048

BUYING OR SELLING?

When I get to know what your interests are I can best assist you achieve your goals with buying or selling in the Charlottesville area CONTACT US TODAY!

Candice van der Linde Buy and Sell Cville Team Realtors 943 Glenwood Station Ln, Ste 203, Charlottesville, VA 22901

Follow us @buyandsellcville

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Candice van der Linde, Realtor @buyandsellcville


DECEMBER 1ST - 31ST

PRODUCE

Organic Carrots & Local Carrots $1.59/lb

Organic Sweet Potatoes $2.49/lb

Organic Satsumas $3.39/lb

OUR REGULAR HOURS FOR IN STORE SHOPPING ARE:

8 AM - 8 PM Mon - Fri 9 AM- 6 PM Saturday 11 AM - 6 PM Sunday

BULK

All Granola 15% Off! New Varieties Available!

Raw Walnut Halves $8.99/lb (SRP $10.99)

GROCERY

HEALTH & BODYCARE

Endangered Species Chocolate 3 oz. $2.99 (SRP $3.99)

Gaia Herbs Supplements 15% Off

Fage Total Yogurt 5.3 oz $2.29 (SRP $2.69)

Aura Cacia Essential Oils 15% Off

Organic Roasted Salted Pistachios $11.99/lb (SRP $13.99)

Organic Raw Almonds $12.99/lb (SRP $17.99)

Bluebonnet Supplements 15% Off

Garden of Eatin’ Tortilla Chips 5.5 oz. $3.99 (SRP $4.69)

Enjoy Life GF DF Chocolate Chips 10 oz $6.99 (SRP $7.99)

Weleda Body Care Products 15% Off

Curbside phone orders available from open until 5 PM daily!

923 PRESTON AVENUE • 293-4111 • WWW.IYFOODS.COM


Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.