C-VILLE Weekly | November 2 - 8, 2022

Page 1

Good and Throneburg duel in their first and only forum PAGE 13

Mariana Bell’s new music record rises from tragedy PAGE 29

VOL. 31 NO. 44 n NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022

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YEARS OF REAL ESTATE

CHARLOTTESVILLE MADISON, NELSON, ALBEMARLE, FLUVANNA, GREENE, LOUISA, ORANGE, AUGUSTA

STORYBOOK

Crozet: Living the Go

BY CARLA HUCKABEE

od Life

INSIDE

BIG P I CTU RE Writer and director Jamie Sisley sees through the stigma of addiction with his debut Stay Awake EZE AMOS

NOVEMBER 2 – 8, 2022 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

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Solutions start in the South. We are the Southern Environmental Law Center, one of the nation’s most powerful defenders of the environment, rooted right here in the South. As lawyers, policy and issue experts, and community advocates and partners, we take on the toughest challenges to protect our air, water, land, wildlife and the people who live here. Together, we can solve the most complex environmental challenges right here in Virginia.

southernenvironment.org

©Leslie Restivo

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November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

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Proud sponsor of the Virginia Film Festival’s environmental film series.


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November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

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Residency supported by: UVA Arts Council, Office of the Provost and Vice Provost of the Arts, Division of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Dept. of Art, Dept. of Music, Spectrum Theater, Charlottesville Jazz Society, Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, WTJU Radio and by private donations.

NOVEMBER 16, 2022

Violet Crown • Charlottesville, VA Attend in-person, or view on-demand WEBLINK FOR TICKETS: LIVINGEARTHVA.ORG/WILD-AND-SCENIC-FILM-FESTIVAL/

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November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

ONLY 5 MILES FROM DOWNTOWN CHARLOTTESVILLE eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

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NOVEMBER & DECEMBER CALENDAR


Eat up!

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

V.34, No. 44

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

SUPPLIED PHOTO

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EDITORIAL

FEATURE 18

Moving pictures Our picks for must-see flicks at this year’s Virginia Film Festival. NEWS

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13 Good and Throneburg discuss a variety of issues at Hampden Sydney forum. 15 UVA police, Black Law Enforcement Officers host procedural justice workshop.

CULTURE

33 Galleries: What’s on view this month. 40 Sudoku 41 Crossword 42 Free Will Astrology

CLASSIFIED 43

27

29 Feedback: Mariana Bell on the making of her new album. 31 The Works: Poet Brian Teare ponders misdiagnoses and chronic illness.

REAL ESTATE WEEKLY Page 47

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Richard DiCicco richard@c-ville.com NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Lauren Dalban CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Amelia Delphos, Matt Dhillon, Carol Diggs, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Will Ham, Erika Howsare, Justin Humphreys, Kristin O’Donoghue, Lisa Provence, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Julia Stumbaugh, Courteney Stuart, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

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DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman REAL ESTATE WEEKLY Beth Wood (434) 373-0999 beth@c-ville.com HUNT! truffles Want to find rt here Sta in Virginia?

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Melissa Close-Hart on her new Southern restaurant

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ROCKY BUYS:

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November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

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THIS WEEK

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Hello, Charlottesville! I’m pleased to introduce this week’s paper, which highlights the 35th annual Virginia Film Festival, hosted right here in our city. Several writers, who look at a variety of films, directors, and actors showcased in this year’s fest, contributed to the feature (p. 18). Movies start screening soon after C-VILLE hits stands, so I hope you’ll carry a copy of the paper with you as a companion piece. This is my first year attending the VAFF, and I’m excited to see Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery, Corsage, and She Said during the week. I’ve been to a handful of film festivals before—my old favorite being Richmond’s French Film Festival, which I highly recommend—but the Virginia film fest frankly seems like a more spectacular event than any I’ve attended. Or maybe I’m just star-struck by the celebrity presence! I’ve always been fascinated by film. It’s a magical medium, one that is still so remarkably young. That some of the classics of the artform are just turning 100 years old is a testament to its youthfulness. To watch a contemporary movie is to encounter an artistic thesis: This is how you tell a story today. And, surely, there is another director or cinematographer or editor out there who disagrees, who will set out to present their own thesis. Film is a constant conversation, and a festival lets us see that dialogue crackle in real time.—Richard DiCicco

11.2.22

THE ANNUAL

CHARLOTTESVILLE

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

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“I don’t want to persecute my brother when I’m supposed to love him, but he done vile.”

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­— cyclist Kenyon Barnes, filing a police report on October 25 against a driver who knocked him off his bike and injured him on East High Street on October 18

NEWS

All talk PAGE 13

Local publisher killed by girlfriend

Shooter arrested

S

Marcel Darell Washington, a Charlotte, North Carolina, resident, was arrested in Tennessee on October 28 for shooting Devonn J. Wilson at Lucky Blue’s Bar on the Downtown Mall on October 23. Wilson died of his wounds at the hospital. Two bystanders were also shot during the incident, and sustained non-life-threatening injuries. Washington was charged with the seconddegree murder of Wilson and use of a firearm during the commission of a felony, according to an October 31 Charlottesville Police Department press release.

Hate crime solved

Matthew Sean Farrell, a local publisher, writer, and connoisseur of the arts, was killed on October 25. His girlfriend was arrested and charged with second-degree murder and using a firearm in the commission of a felony.

lishing street to forest in 2010, Farrell handed out 100 free copies of the book, which involved around 30 local collaborators, to people experiencing homelessness downtown, and took no profits from it.

In 1992, Farrell also opened an art gallery called Galerie Oktoberfaust inside the Jefferson Theater, and created a cable television variety show called “Let’s Get Lost,” reports the Progress.

On October 27, the state education department delayed implementation of Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s proposed transgender student policy an additional 30 days, citing public comments claiming the measure violates state law, reports The Washington Post. The department will respond to those comments, and may suggest changes to the controversial policy.

Cyndi Richardson with state Senator Creigh Deeds.

“If I can make you feel better about yourself, just about these five minutes that we are talking, then it’ll give you time to focus on you and make better choices,” said Richardson, recognizing her own mental health recovery journey. “It’ll give you a chance to go, ‘Maybe I can’ ... [and] that hopelessness that you have may go away for a minute. Then, the chase begins. I’m going to chase that feeling again.” Richardson has worked with OOO for over a decade, leading many CIT trainings. She is also a caseworker for People and Congregations Engaged in Ministry. “I have no intention of retiring,” said Richardson. “I love what I do.”

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Policy delayed

Cyndi Richardson, a longtime peer support specialist for On Our Own, received a commendation from state Senator Creigh Deeds that honored her efforts assisting people living with mental illness and substance abuse disorder. During the October 26 ceremony, Deeds also congratulated Richardson on receiving the Dr. Fred Frese People with Mental Illness Lived Experience of the Year award from Crisis Intervention Team International, which helps those with mental illness and substance abuse disorder access treatment, instead of being placed in the criminal justice system. Richardson said that serving people is her “purpose” in life during Deed’s visit.

FACEBOOK PHOTO

UPD

Shane Dennis was arrested for placing a noose around the neck of the UVA Homer statue.

@cville_weekly

‘I love what I do’

November 2 - 8, 2022 c-ville.com

The Albemarle County Police Department arrested Shane Dennis, a county resident, on October 24 for placing a noose around the neck of the Homer statue at the University of Virginia on September 7. Dennis was charged with violating a state code that prohibits displaying a noose “on the property of another [or] public place with intent to intimidate.” The University Police Department served Dennis, who has no known prior relationship with the university, a No Trespass Order. Police also suspect Dennis is responsible for leaving two masks, a “civil peace flag,” a Christian cross, and an envelope containing a letter—which claimed the statue “glorifies pedophilia”—near the statue on October 22, according to The Cavalier Daily.

hawna Marie Natalie Murphy was arrested on October 25 for the murder of her boyfriend, Matthew Sean Farrell, at his home. Shortly before 8:30am, Albemarle County police and fire rescue responded to a domestic disturbance report on the 2100 block of Stony Point Road. When officers arrived, they found Farrell dead from a gunshot wound. Murphy, 38, was charged with seconddegree murder and using a firearm in the commission of a felony. She had dated and lived with Farrell, 53, for several years, reports The Daily Progress. The ACPD did not publicize the victim’s identity until October 27. “A need for additional resources was determined … due to explosive materials found at the scene. These materials posed no threat to the public,” read a press release. Farrell, who grew up near Farmville, moved to Charlottesville in 1990 after college and a brief stint in the military. It was here where he became a locally beloved publisher, writer, and connoisseur of the arts—or, as he told C-VILLE in a 2011 interview, “an arts person, a fop, and a dandy.” In 1991, Farrell, who earned a master’s degree in philosophy, founded Hypocrite Press, which published works by “local writers who are writing about Charlottesville,” he told C-VILLE. His published books include street to forest: a scattered guide for the charlottesville unresidenced, described by Farrell as a guidebook containing tips, commentary, and entertainment “for local homeless street persons, slackers, and train-hobo kids.” After pub-

RICH TARBELL

IN BRIEF


12

University of Virginia

JAZZ ENSEMBLE Directed by John D'earth

PLAYIT IT PLAY IT PLAY FORWARD! FORWARD! FORWARD! JoVia Armstrong Armstrong featuring the music of faculty composer JoVia Leslie Deshazor Deshazor and guest violinist Leslie

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SPECIAL GUESTS

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Friday, November 4 8 PM | Old Cabell Hall

November 2 - 8, 2022 c-ville.com

OFFICIAL OSCAR® SELECTION — MEXICO

BARDO, FALSE CHRONICLE OF A HANDFUL OF TRUTHS WITH PRODUCTION DESIGNER EUGENIO CABALLERO

SATURDAY, NOV. 5 | 7:00 PM CULBRETH THEATRE TICKETS: $14 Presentation of Craft Award to designer Eugenio Caballero Presented by VPM and support by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

THE INSPECTION WITH ACTOR RAÚL CASTILLO

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NEWS

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Face to face Good and Throneburg square off in forum By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

COURTESY JOSH FOR VIRGINIA

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Republican Representative Bob Good and his 5th District Democratic challenger Josh Throneburg avoided discussing local issues at their October 26 Hampden-Sydney College forum.

only benefits “the wealthy elite.” Throneburg admitted he wished Biden had addressed the student loan crisis with a systemic solution, such as by lowering all loan interest rates. He also expressed support for expanding Pell Grants and making community college free. Good has sponsored 37 pieces of legislation so far during his first term, focusing largely on national issues like border security. (None of his bills have made it out of committee.) Last week, the Republican reiterated his support for finishing the border wall, increasing border patrol funding, and implementing E-verify everywhere, among other Trump immigration policies. He accused Biden of allowing “an invasion” of undocumented immigrants—5 million have entered the country since the president took office, Good claimed. According to a report by factcheck.org, apprehensions of people trying to enter the country illegally through the Southwest border increased by 336 percent from July 2021 to 2022, compared with former president Donald Trump’s last year in office—however, apprehensions cannot be used to adequately determine the number

of undocumented immigrants in the country, and many people who are apprehended are turned around, or later deported. “We have a very real immigration problem,” agreed Throneburg, vowing to support immigration reforms, like expanding guest worker visa programs. Addressing the $31 trillion national debt, Good lambasted Democrats for spending government funds “recklessly” during the pandemic, which he referred to as the “China virus situation.” He vowed to vote against any spending that does not “secure the border,” “return us to American energy,” and “limit COVID vaccine mandates.” Throneburg argued that both parties have a “spending problem”—Trump added an equal amount to the national deficit as former president Barack Obama did, but in only four years. As Russia’s war against Ukraine rages on, Throneburg, who believes the U.S. has a “responsibility” to “stand up for democracy,” said he would vote in favor of additional aid to Ukraine. If China takes military action against Taiwan, he would support “a coordinated response” with U.S. allies.

November 2 - 8, 2022 c-ville.com

epublican Representative Bob Good and his 5th District Democratic challenger Josh Throneburg met for their first and only forum on October 26 at Hampden-Sydney College—after Good refused or ignored multiple debate requests from Throneburg. The two candidates shared their starkly different positions on a string of hot-button national and international issues, including student loan debt, border security, Russia’s war against Ukraine, and climate change. However, the forum’s questions—provided to moderator Mark Spain of WSET by students at the college—did not cover local issues, like broadband expansion and affordable housing. Throneburg, an ordained minister and small business owner, kicked off the onehour event by delving into his Republican past. He identified as a conservative until his late 20s, when he “found that oftentimes the things in [his] faith [were] being played out in the Democratic Party.” Good, a self-proclaimed biblical conservative, railed against the Democratic Party and President Joe Biden during his opening statement—and throughout the entirety of the forum. He claimed the party has not improved anything in the country under Biden and his congressional majority, citing a national increase in crime, gas prices, and inflation. He accused Democrats of “declaring war on America [and] the Constitution.” Throneburg argued that Good defied the Constitution when he voted against certifying the 2020 election results. “I think faithfulness to our Constitution means that when the voters elect someone, that we listen to the voters,” he said. To bring down college costs, Good advocated for cutting subsidies—“the federal government ought to get out of education,” he said. He also denounced Biden’s student loan forgiveness program, “a transfer scheme” that

Good has voted against most of the $66 billion that Congress has given Ukraine since the war began in February. The U.S. should not spend more money on Ukraine, or give aid to Taiwan if it’s invaded, he said, citing the growing national debt. Stressing the urgency of the climate crisis, Throneburg pushed for investments in renewable energy and green jobs. “This dishonest demonization of fossil fuels and petroleum energy needs to stop,” said Good. During the final 20 minutes of the forum, when the candidates could ask each other questions, Throneburg questioned the congressman’s vote against awarding Congressional Gold Medals to the police officers who protected lawmakers during the January 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection. Good called the medal a Democratic “political stunt,” and said he voted for a different bill, “without a political agenda,” that honored the officers. When asked about gender-affirming care for transgender children, Throneburg pledged to look to medical professionals— and not politicians—for guidance on the issue. And in regard to vaccine mandates, he expressed his support for “personal freedom,” but criticized Good for encouraging students to defy mask mandates. Closing out the event, Good touted his voting record’s alignment with his conservative platform, and the work he’s done for constituents. “[My office] resolved over 3,000 cases … and recovered over $14 million that was owed to citizens of the 5th District by the federal government,” he said. Throneburg pointed out that abortion rights were not discussed during a forum at an all-men’s college—“we can do better than that,” he said. If elected, he promised to work on everyone’s behalf. “If you want someone who’s going to fight about culture wars, I think this is your candidate,” said Throneburg, motioning to Good. “If you want someone who is just going to fight for you, I would love to have your vote on November 8.”

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NEWS

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Promoting unity UVA police host community workshop By Lauren Dalban news@c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

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University of Virginia Police Chief Tim Longo was among those who answered questions at the recent procedural justice workshop held at UVA.

ROBERT STEWART, NOBLE

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“We had Black chiefs who promoted their friends and couldn’t discipline them.”

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best officers, he insisted, are often taken out of patrol to be trained in specialized units—positions that have very little interaction with the public. During the question and answer portion of the workshop, C-VILLE questioned UPD Chief Tim Longo about the department’s lack of transparency in the early days of its investigation into the September 7 Homer statue hate crime, during which Albemarle County resident Shane Dennis placed a noose, a weapon used to lynch Black people for centuries, around the neck of the Central Grounds statue. In the weeks following the discovery of the noose, student groups learned that the perpetrator left documents at the foot of the statue. Though UPD confirmed that the perpetrator had left items, police provided no further details, sparking widespread student protest. The university administration did not reveal until September 22 that one of the documents contained the words “TICK TOCK.” Longo pushed back against this criticism, explaining his initial decision to keep the contents of the document private. “We keep information private that only the suspect would know. We need to be sure that they can only know that information if they were involved [in the crime],” he explained. He argued that there must be a balance between being transparent with the community without compromising the integrity of the investigation. Closing out the event, officers shared their stories of enjoying their decades of service, and encouraged the Charlottesville community to “come to the table” with local police departments to foster a greater sense of trust and accountability.

November 2 - 8, 2022 c-ville.com

he University Police Department and National Organization of Black Law Enforcement hosted a procedural justice workshop, titled Policing With Our Community, at UVA on October 26. The event provided insight into not only the ways in which police departments could improve their relationship with the communities they serve, but also foster trust and loyalty within their internal structure. UPD officers and staff, two former FBI agents, and many university students and professors attended the free gathering. Former UNC-Chapel Hill police chief David Perry, a speaker for NOBLE, described the ways in which police officers have come “together all over the country to advance their partnership with communities.” He explained 21st-century policing and how it is driven by procedural justice—“it helps the root system grow,” he said. Through examples taken from various facets of college and police life, he demonstrated the importance of transparency and impartiality when it comes to the implementation of policies. NOBLE’s Robert Stewart, who worked for the Washington, D.C., police department for nearly two decades, provided attendees with a better understanding of the day-to-day operations of a police department, stressing that “cliques” within police departments can obscure accountability for officers. He asserted that this problem is not just limited to white-dominated police departments. “We had Black chiefs who promoted their friends and couldn’t discipline them,” Stewart said. Stewart also emphasized the importance of educating police officers before they pick up their badge and gun. He suggested that a solution to constant police understaffing could be to have unarmed trainee officers address and write up non-violent crime reports, such as robberies and road accidents—75 to 80 percent of all crime reports do not require being armed. This way, trainees could do the “simple stuff ” before dealing with any violent crime offenses, he said. It takes five years for new police officers to become fully educated in their profession, explained Stewart, stressing the importance of “tactical soundness” on the job, and the problems with the current promotion system within police departments. The


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EXHIBITIONS: November 1 - 20, 2022 Dominique Astruc Anderson Visions of the Rainforest Lisa Macchi Mindscapes, Landscapes, and Insights Jeannine Barton Regan and Lindsay Heider Diamond Do The Trees Speak Back to the Wind? McGuffey Group Show Everything Paper McGuffey Associates Dreams

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Music at UVA

8:00 PM Old Cabell Hall

Jazz Ensemble: PLAY IT FORWARD! Featuring JoVia Armstrong & guest violinist, Leslie Deshazor

Sunday, 11/6

BrassFest Master Class *

Sunday, 11/6

UVA Flute Ensemble *

Sunday, 11/6

BrassFest Recital *

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Charlottesville Symphony:

Sunday, 11/13

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Sunday, 11/13

Jazz Chamber Ensembles *

Monday, 11/14

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follow uvamusic on Subscribe to our weekly music email bit.ly/subscribe-uvamusic Web: music.virginia.edu/events Music: 434.924.3052 | music@virginia.edu Tickets: 424.924.3376 | artsboxoffice.virginia.edu

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Friday, 11/4

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Cavalier Marching Band *

6:30 PM Carr's Hill Field

November 2 - 8, 2022 c-ville.com

Friday, 11/4


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Now in its 35th year, the Virginia Film Festival continues to bring stellar guests, panel discussions, and the opportunity for film-lovers from Charlottesville and beyond to attend exclusive movie screenings.

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

Virginia Film Festival

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Virginia native Jamie Sisley will receive the Governor Gerald L. Baliles Founder’s Award at the November 4 screening of Stay Awake, his movie about a family’s struggles with a mother’s addiction.


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PILL PERSPECTIVE

Filmmaker Jamie Sisley hits the mark with unique look at drug addiction

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November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

EZE AMOS

ith a prime-time Vir“I didn’t want to make another film about addiction,” Sisley says. “It takes ginia film fest screena lot out of you from the writing side.” But make it, he did. ing at the Paramount Stay Awake is different from most addict pics because it focuses on the Theater, the movie Stay caregiver, Sisley says. The angle has resonated—both with star talent and Awake has made longcritics. Chrissy Metz of “This Is Us” fame took on the role of the mother time Charlottesville battling addiction, and the film made it back to the Berlin festival for its world premiere, this time being nominated for four awards. It won two of resident Jamie Sisley them. Variety called Stay Awake “especially resonant,” and IndieWire said an indie-festival darling again. it was a “sensitive drama [that] illustrates a key truth about addiction: It Sisley first prodoesn’t only affect one person, but sucks everyone around into its vortex.” With some reservations, the reviewer went on: “It’s an earnest look at the duced Stay Awake, collateral damage surrounding addiction.” which chronicles a family’s struggles with In addition to Metz, Wyatt Oleff headlines the Stay Awake cast as Ethan, a mother’s addiction, one of two brothers trying desperately to handle their mother’s drug use. in 2015 as an award“Stay Awake was an unforgettable experience with an excellent cast and winning short. After crew who bonded together like a real family,” Oleff says about working securing Best Narrawith Sisley. “Such a great team to tell such an important and impactful tive Short honors at the Slamdance Film Festival, the picture went on to story, and there’s not one thing about it that I would’ve changed.” be nominated for another award at the acclaimed Berlin International Oleff had a major role in the two-part 2017 adaptation of the Stephen Film Festival. King novel It and a minor role in Guardians of the Galaxy. Fin Argus, a multi-talent artist whose biggest role was on Marvel’s “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” Now, Sisley is back with a full-length version of the movie, a semi-autobiographical story drawing on the UVA grad’s childhood in Chantilly and rounds out the cast as Derek, the film’s second dogged brother. Leesburg near the well-known drug trafficking corridor along Interstate 81. At the screening, Sisley will receive another honor, the festival’s own But, as Sisley considers the geographic touchpoints that have made him Governor Gerald L. Baliles Founder’s Award, which recognizes “excelwho he is today, he focuses not on his more rural place of birth and early lence in Virginia filmmaking and honors an exceptional filmmaker who life, but rather on Charlottesville. has roots in Virginia or prominently spotlights Commonwealth locales, “I did most of my growing up in Charlottesville,” he says. “I have an almost history, and culture.” Discussion of Stay Awake will follow, featuring Metz obnoxious affinity for my home state … and the Virginia Film Festival was and Oleff in addition to Sisley. USA Today’s Brian Truitt will moderate. such an education for me. It brought films and people to contextualize The post-screening discussion is certain to hit on addiction, still a sigthose films in a way that really opened my mind.” nificant and growing problem in the commonwealth. Opioid overdoses While earning his business degree from the McIntire School of Commerce, in Virginia increased by one-third from 2019 to 2022, as measured by Sisley heard a Red Light Management rep was speaking at James Madison emergency department visits. Sisley hopes his film humanizes the folks who struggle. “In the vast University. He skipped class, drove to Harrisonburg, and sat in a JMU classmajority of the films I saw growing up … addicts were demonized,” he says. room as Randy Reed talked about what it meant to be an artist manager. He The filmmaker says he still has so much love for his mother, who is asked Reed if he could join the agency as an intern. He got the gig. Sisley says his time at Red Light started it all—his desire to work in the doing well handling her own addiction. But the battle continues. “She arts, his understanding of the way business and creativity could mingle, how would be the first to say that it is a daily struggle,” Sisley says. “I don’t artists could find their voice, and what it meant to be the kind of leader he’d think you’re ever cured of addiction.”—Shea Gibbs have to be to someday sit in the director’s chair. “Red Light was probably the greatest and luckiest opportunity I’ve ever gotten,” Sisley says. “It was a master class in business, but it was more than that. Coran [Capshaw] really brought the best out of me, and I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about how he did that and trying to replicate it on set.” While working at Red Light, Sisley began watching movies in bunches—titles by Fellini and Bergman and Carlos Reygadas. He bought a book about directing by Nick Proferes. He teamed up with another local filmmaker, Miguel Martinez, and applied for a PBS grant to make a documentary. Against all odds, Sisley and Martinez won the funding. Next for Sisley was film school at Columbia University. While in New York, he also worked on his funded documentary, Farewell Ferris Wheel, which followed Mexican migrants in the U.S. carnival industry. Absorbing theory in the classroom while shooting and budgeting for the doc was like “going to film school twice,” he says. Sisley released the 14-minute version of Stay Awake as his capstone grad school project in 2015, and Farewell Ferris Wheel in 2016 after seven years of production. It was on Stay Awake’s first festival circuit run that Sisley decided to write and direct a full-length. So many people approached him to talk about their own issues with addiction—and their family members’ issues. Stay Awake, starring Fin Argus and Wyatt Oleff, screens at the Paramount Theater on November 4.


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COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

Virginia Film Festival

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‘BLOODY LOWNDES’

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Sam Pollard will participate in a discussion of his film, Lowndes County and the Road to Black Power, at the November 6 Vinegar Hill Theatre screening.

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

he first use of a black panther in the Black power movement didn’t start in Oakland, California. The symbol came from one of the poorest counties in Alabama, where 80 percent of the population was Black and none were registered to vote, a place nicknamed “Bloody Lowndes.” Lowndes County and the Road to Black Power, the latest film from noted documentary filmmaker Sam

Pollard and co-director Geeta Gandbhir, tells the story of the community’s grassroots organization that, with the help of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, worked to get Black citizens not only the right to vote, but to hold power in a community that had long shut them out. “It’s an unknown story that deserves to be told,” says Pollard in a phone interview from his home in Baltimore. “Most people think the high point of the civil rights movement was the march from Selma to Montgomery. They forget what SNCC was doing after that period.” The march went through Lowndes County in Alabama’s Black Belt, where SNCC members, including Stokely Carmichael, connected with people there and realized they needed support. “It was called ‘Bloody Lowndes,’” says Pollard, “because Black people who tried to vote were either turned away at the polls or murdered.” Black citizens formed the Lowndes County Freedom Organization and ran their own candidates. Each political party in Alabama had to have a logo for voters who couldn’t read, and the Lowndes party used the black panther as its symbol on the ballot.

COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

Little-known story of the path to Black power

The film uses a trove of footage unearthed by archivist Lizzy McGlynn, with whom Pollard had worked on his 2020 film MLK/FBI. “She found materials that even surprised me, knowing it was a story that hadn’t been told,” says Pollard. Members of SNCC lived there for over a yearand-a-half at a time when it was dangerous to be Black and to be walking on the road at night. The commitment of the community and SNCC impressed Pollard. Many of those original activists are interviewed in the film. “To have the people who were there on the ground day-to-day, fighting the good fight, is what makes the documentary, in my opinion, stand out, what makes it special,” he says. Pollard has produced, directed, and edited dozens of films, some with Spike Lee, who was his colleague at New York University and who calls him a “master filmmaker.” He edited Lee’s Jungle Fever, Mo’ Better Blues, and 4 Little Girls, which received an Academy Award nomination in 1998. The International Documentary Association gave him a career achievement award in 2020, and the Virginia Film Festival will bestow its Chronicler Award upon Pollard at the November 6 screening. Pollard laughs when asked about his favorite films, but lists 4 Little Girls, MLK/FBI, and Sammy Davis Jr.: I’ve Gotta Be Me, as movies that “speak to me about the importance of the African American experience.” Stokely Carmichael called for Black power after James Meredith was shot in Mississippi in 1966. “Any time I hear those things from films I’ve done, it’s always invigorating and exciting and makes one thoughtful about the process of what it means to be an American, and how complicated America is,” says Pollard. “It has a lot of baggage.”—Lisa Provence


COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

22

A FORCE IN HER FIELD

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

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Director Joyce Chopra tells all in her memoir

oyce Chopra, known for her documentary, television, and filmmaking career, recounts her experiences in a new noholds-barred memoir, Lady Director: Adventures in Hollywood, Television and Beyond. But it wasn’t until she read her book’s promo blurbs that Chopra says she understood she had completed “a history of how hard it was for women to ever get a chance to make fiction films.” Lady Director makes it clear that Chopra, a Charlottesville resident, always had the people skills and the business sense needed for a successful artistic life. As a bored 21-year-old graduate

of Brandeis University, she opened Club 47 in Boston for jazz aficionados, but soon an unknown Bob Dylan was playing there, and Joan Baez was singing on Wednesdays for $10 a ticket. In her book, Chopra talks about casting her 1985 feature debut, Smooth Talk, which won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. She cast Treat Williams as the malicious hunk Arnold Friend, but struggled to find someone to play the young female lead. A friend suggested a neighbor’s daughter, the gifted teen actor Laura Dern, resulting in a performance that propelled Dern’s career. Chopra and her husband, playwright and screenwriter Tom Cole, asked a different neighbor, James Taylor, if he’d give them the rights to his song “Handyman” for two scenes in which Dern and screen mom Mary Kay Place dance. Taylor asked if he could write music for the film. Other vivid anecdotes in Lady Director include being bullied in an editing room (but not assaulted) by lecherous producer Harvey Weinstein, as well as details of other toxic Hollywood behe-

Joyce Chopra will be interviewed by Paul Wagner following a screening of Smooth Talk at the Virginia Film Festival on November 4 at Violet Crown Cinema. The filmmaker and author will read from Lady Director: Adventures in Hollywood, Television and Beyond at New Dominion Bookshop on November 11.

moths’ behavior, including Oscar winners. When producers in Paris grabbed her up and down, “It was considered annoying but normal,” she says. Hollywood’s aggressors do destroy people, such as Marilyn Monroe in Chopra’s TV miniseries “Blonde” (not the Blonde currently on Netflix), but the director was more interested in portraying the lives of typical young women, like in her short, bittersweet documentary Girls at 12. Chopra’s own path was easier with Cole, who assisted greatly once their daughter was born. When it was suggested that Chopra make a documentary about her pregnancy and childbirth, her reaction was that it was “the most narcissistic thing imaginable.” But she did, and the film, Joyce at 34, captures tough decisions, exhaustion, and the beauty and bedevilment of another lifeform altering a body. Fast forward to the COVID-19 pandemic, when that adult daughter, a UVA dean, made a new creative suggestion: Write a book about your life. (Her daughter is the reason Chopra moved to Charlottesville, a few years after Cole died in 2009.) The director pulled out a familiar argument when she said, “Writing a memoir is narcissistic!” But restless without film work, she wrote one sentence, and finally some more. Memoirist Honor Moore showed the work to an agent who contacted San Francisco’s City Lights Books, a well-known publisher of the Beat writers. Now that Chopra’s book is out, the accomplished yet modest director asks how she might get followers on Instagram. Make a note to follow her when her Insta and other feeds go live.—Mary Jane Gore


Virginia Film Festival

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FIVE DOCUMENTARIES THAT WILL STAY WITH YOU Descendant

THE UNITED STATES OUTLAWED INTERNATIONAL SLAVE TRADE IN 1808, BUT MORE THAN A HALF century later a ship called the Cotilda smuggled a group of enslaved Africans into Mobile, Alabama. The expedition was illegally chartered by a plantation owner named Timothy Meaher, who ordered the Cotilda be burned and sunk to hide all evidence of his crime. Now, most of the descendants of the Cotilda have settled in Africatown, a small community just north of Mobile. Margaret Brown’s documentary, Descendant, follows residents of Africatown as they come together to search for the Clotilda, reclaim their ancestors’ narrative, and demand accountability. A discussion with subject Kern Jackson and moderator Robert Daniels follows the screening. November 5, Violet Crown Cinema

Imagining the Indian: The Fight Against Native American Mascoting DESPITE THE ONGOING MOVEMENT TO REMOVE THE USE OF HARMFUL AND EXPLOITATIVE stereotypes of Native Americans from the sporting world, appropriation of Native American culture still runs rampant. While teams like the Washington Commanders and the Cleveland Guardians made tardy name changes, others, like the Chicago Blackhawks and the Atlanta Braves, cling to their reductive imagery. In Imagining the Indian, directors Ben West and Aviva Kempner chronicle the movement to end the use of Native American logos, mascots, slurs, and names. A discussion with Kempner, documentary subject Rhonda LeValdo, and moderator Adriana Greci Green accompanies the screening. November 6, Violet Crown Cinema

Dani’s Twins IN THE MIDST OF THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, DANI IZZIE BECAME ONE OF THE FIRST QUADRIPLEGICS to give birth to twins. Dani’s Twins follows the Madison County resident as she navigates her unique pregnancy, grapples with biases faced by women with disabilities, gives birth to her children at UVA Medical Center, and begins the journey of parenthood. A discussion with producer Angie Gentile, subjects Dani and Rudy Izzie, and Dr. Robert Fuller is moderated by Eric Swensen, and accompanies the screening. The documentary will be presented with open captions, and on-stage presentations will include ASL interpretation. November 3, Culbreth Theatre

FILMMAKER BYRON HURT EXPLORES THE HISTORY AND CULTURE OF HAZING WITH SENSITIVITY AND care in his new documentary. “As a filmmaker who is a fraternity member (I am a proud member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated) and someone who has been hazed and has hazed young men, I feel uniquely qualified to make this film,” says Hurt. Hurt examines the sometimes-deadly practice from all sides, conducting heartfelt interviews with survivors and families who’ve lost loved ones, while also delving into issues of systemic racism, toxic masculinity, and groupthink culture. Hurt will discuss the film with subject James Vivenzio and moderator Angie Miles. November 4, Vinegar Hill Theatre

WHIMSICAL, EXHILARATING, AND OMINOUS, ETERNAL SPRING IS NOT YOUR AVERAGE DOC. TOLD through alternating present-day footage, first-person recounts, and 3D animation, the official Oscar-selected flick follows comic book illustrator Daxiong, a member of outlawed spiritual group Falun Gong. In an attempt to counter the government’s narrative about its spiritual practice, Falun Gong hijacks a state TV station, forcing Daxiong to flee the country. Now, 20 years later, Daxiong sets out to retrace the events of the hijacking through his artwork, but finds his views challenged by another surviving hijacker. November 5, Violet Crown Cinema —Maeve Hayden

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IMAGES COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

Eternal Spring

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

Hazing


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Virginia Film Festival

EVOKING THE VISION

‘DAMAGED BUT SPECIAL’

First-time filmmakers journey down the James River

Eugenio Caballero will discuss his work with Carlos Aguilar following a screening of Bardo, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths at Culbreth Theatre on November 5.

COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

facebook.com/cville.weekly November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

In hindsight, the encounter with the possibly drug-crazed gun-toting guy who didn’t want to share camping space on an island was a gift, says Black. “We had a climax in Act 1.” The James River was once considered one of the most polluted waterways in America. Its health has improved, but it still faces peril, from Dominion Energy power plants, excessive damming that makes 25 miles of the river unnavigable, and both industrial and agricultural runoff. As recently as July 2022, the Virginia Department of Health issued a recreational water advisory to refrain from swimming, wading, tubing, and whitewater kayaking after a ruptured pipe allowed 300,000 gallons of raw, undiluted sewage to reach parts of the James. The crew started in the crystal-clear water of the Cowpasture River—until it converged with the Jackson River and turned black. A paper mill on the Jackson is allowed to discharge certain dyes, says Black. “But it’s really jarring to see the change and 12 miles of blackish-brown water.” Tires have been tossed into the James apparently for as long as the rubber has hit the road. The James River Association has removed thousands, says Black, but they still litter a section of the upper river. Yet there’s also the great blue heron, the catchof-a-lifetime musky, the historic Kanawha Canal and the beauty of floating down a river. “What comes through thematically is their joy in navigating the river and how important it is to preserve it,” says Wagner. The screening at Culbreth Theatre is a “full circle moment” for the three friends to return to UVA 11 years after their graduation, he says. “We’re guest lecturing on the power of storytelling and the environment.” And they’re planning a sequel and traveled from Richmond to the Chesapeake Bay in June to complete the entire 348 miles of the James. “A big part of this is to encourage people to take their own adventures in their own backyards,” says Black. —Lisa Provence

COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

ustin Black grew up on the James River and didn’t realize some people thought it was “disgusting,” including two friends he met at the University of Virginia. Years later, the three paddled 250 miles down the James—and made a documentary. Black, Will Gemma, and Dietrich Teschner had never made a film before. What they had done was paddle parts of the James with two other friends. The five decided to embark in three camera-laden canoes from the headwaters in the Blue Ridge Mountains where the Cowpasture and Jackson rivers converge. In the course of the 13-day journey to Richmond, they were threatened with a gun, lost a boat, and endured soaking rain. And they saw the best—and the worst—of the James River. The result is Headwaters Down with three codirectors. Black, a musician, did the soundtrack, Gemma, who studied poetry at UVA, narrates, and Teschner, an actor, is the film’s editor. “We had no budget,” says Black. “We had our own cameras. We had boats. Everybody paid their own way.” Local documentarian Paul Wagner will moderate the November 6 Headwaters screening panel. “What struck me and I found so pleasurable is when you get to the credits and you realize the guys who are in it filmed it, edited it, did the sound,” he says. “I just love this idea of adventuring down the river and into documentary filmmaking.” “We didn’t know it was going to be a feature film,” says Black. “We did a ton of research, but we didn’t know things were going to happen.”

Oscar-winning production designer gets Virginia Film Fest award

Justin Black will participate in a discussion of his film, Headwaters Down, which screens on November 6 at Culbreth Theatre.

YOU DON’T FORGET EUGENIO CABALLERO’S production designs. There’s the otherworldly Pan’s Labyrinth, for which he won an Academy Award. There’s the black-andwhite Mexico City in Roma, for which he was nominated for another Oscar. And his most recent efforts in director Alejandro Iñárritu’s Bardo, False Chronicle of a Handful of Truths will be screened at this year’s Virginia Film Festival. Caballero will also be presented with the film fest’s first Craft Award, which recognizes a distinguished and outstanding practitioner of behind-the-scenes craft. A production designer is “the artist hired to create everything you see in the environment that the actors inhabit on screen,” explains film critic Carlos Aguilar, who writes for the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, and The Wrap, and who is the festival’s first critic-in-residence. “I think [Caballero] is an incredible artist with a talent for creating worlds that either existed in the past or that are sort of fantastical,” says Aguilar. Caballero has worked with Mexico’s three most renowned directors: Guillermo Del Toro, Alfonso Cuarón, and Iñárritu. Aguilar’s review of Bardo for The Wrap describes Caballero as “a magician dexterous at turning places long frozen in the directors’ unreliable memory tangible once more for the screen.” Says Aguilar, “In Roma, he basically brought to life the Mexico City of the ’70s and Alfonso Cuarón’s childhood home.” In Pan’s Labyrinth, “he built the magical world Guillermo had envisioned that is really striking.” Pan’s Labyrinth had “very strict rules with colors and shapes,” says Caballero in a podcast called Decorating Pages. The filmmaker chose a cold palette for the reality of Franco’s Spain, and a warm palette for the fantasy “that’s supposed to be scary, but at the end it’s a refuge or shelter for this girl,” he says. The furniture was built to be a little bigger. “We really wanted to change the scale.” Aguilar notes Caballero’s “incredible attention to detail in painstakingly bringing to life these worlds. In Roma, making it seem organic and natural, not artificial, is part of the magic he does.”—Lisa Provence


COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

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Dustin Lance Black retraces his past in Mama’s Boy

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

Dustin Lance Black appears at From Page to Screen: Screenwriter’s Panel on November 5 at the Code Building’s Irving Theater, and for a Q&A at the screening of Mama’s Boy at the Culbreth Theatre on November 6.

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riter/director/producer Dustin Lance Black’s films and television work—including his Academy Award-winning Milk script—are frequently outspoken about LGBTQ+ issues. The Mormon Church also resurfaces throughout his work, as in the hit FX series “Under the Banner of Heaven.” The two topics merge in director Laurent Bouzereau’s new documentary Mama’s Boy, which focuses on Black and his late mother, Anne. And they’re more deeply personal than ever. Black, 48, half-jokingly calls the film “This Is Your Life and Mostly the Painful Bits.” Working

from Black’s memoir Mama’s Boy: A Story from Our Americas, Bouzereau follows him as they retrace his experiences growing up gay among strict Mormons in Texas. There, homosexuality was considered venal, and he was terrified to reveal his true self. Meanwhile, Black’s resilient mother bravely lived with polio. Mama’s Boy explores how his coming out to her revealed her extraordinary gift for compassion. An Instagram DM from Bouzereau concerning Black’s book led to their collaboration. Black was already aware of Bouzereau from his filmrelated documentaries, and was “very interested” in working with him. As they became acquainted, Black discovered that “to know Laurent is to love Laurent. … It’s easy to trust him. And I do feel that that trust was well placed.” Black wrote his memoir “from the safety of my home now as a grown man,” he points out. But facing his tough childhood memories on camera— particularly where they occurred—was another matter. “I would imagine many a therapist would say it’s incredibly bad therapy,” he says. Black stresses that he deliberately didn’t write, produce, or direct Mama’s Boy: “I hate it when I watch documentaries and then at the end it says ‘directed by’ or ‘produced by’ the person who was just featured because then you don’t necessarily trust it.”

COURTESY FILM FESTIVAL

BUILDING BRIDGES

“This is my mom’s story more than mine,” he says, “and I feel like the lessons that I learned from her are vital now—are even more necessary now than when she shared these lessons with me when she was still around.” Despite her background, Black’s mother not only accepted her son’s sexual orientation, but his friends’, as well. He was moved, he says, “to see how a conservative military Mormon woman showed the courage back in the ’90s to share space with a bunch of my queer friends … who she had been taught her whole life were immoral and illegal and hellbound. … And [show] the curiosity to listen. And we found common ground.” Eventually, he recalls, she “challenged me to do the same in the other direction. And it’s not easy. … But what you find is you can build a bridge because you still do, for the most part, have more in common than what the 24-hour news channels and the newspapers would claim.” Black hopes the film will encourage greater civility and humaneness, especially in the current climate of intense political polarization. “Perhaps we can just learn to live and let live a little bit more,” he says. “That’s the way we’ve kept the country together for nearly a quarter of a millennium. Are we going to make it any further? Not if we keep on like this.” Looking back, Black says, “Everything I do in my activism is for that next generation so they don’t have to grow up having their adolescence spoiled by homophobia. … Frankly, we’ve already lived our youth. We’ve already survived those years, thank God. “It’s really not for us, is it? It’s all for that next generation. That’s why we do it.” —Justin Humphreys


26

Charlottesville’s Newest Independent Bookstore!

Dedicated to the local reading community.

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Meet Our 2022 All Stars

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

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Soulful Mediterranean Food & Wine


CULTURE

27

SATURDAY 11/5

CIRQUE NOIR

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Haunting, hopeful, and striking, No Home but Ropes and Stakes is an original one-act play written and directed by Charlottesville High School senior Stella Gunn. Set in the 1930s, the atmospheric play follows an intriguing group of performers as they navigate the dark underbelly of a magnificent yet derelict circus. Eddie the Clown narrates as characters like the Dancer and the Strong Man search for acceptance and autonomy while grappling with social prejudices and structures of oppression. $6, 7:30pm. Charlottesville High School’s Martin Luther King, Jr. Performing Arts Center, 1400 Melbourne Rd. theatrechs.weebly.com

SATURDAY 11/5

SUGAR RUSH

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70 REASONS TO STEP OUT THIS WEEK

PAGE 28

@cville_culture

SATURDAY 11/5

Michael Clem

Andy Thacker

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DOUBLE DOWN AND GET UP Local musicians Michael Clem and Andy Thacker team up for an afternoon of bluegrass and folk jams. Clem, known for his songwriting and multi-instrument talent, is also a member of Eddie From Ohio, has his own trio, and hits the stage with a number of other bands. Clem’s recent solo release, Rivannarama, features five new songs written and recorded during pandemic downtime. Virtuoso mandolinist Thacker can be found teaching at The Front Porch, performing in a variety of side projects, and traveling with Love Canon, his band that plays ’80s and ’90s pop tunes adapted to bluegrass instrumentation. Free, 1pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

Sunflower Bean’s third album, Headful of Sugar, is a psychedelic head rush made to be played loud with the windows down. Laden with catchy basslines, punk energy, and vocals that alternate between gritty and divine, the record marks a new freedom for the indie rock trio. “We weren’t precious about anything, there was a gleeful anarchy,” says guitarist Nick Kivlen about the album’s production. That chaotic energy paid off on songs like “Who Put You Up to This?” and “Roll the Dice,” a loud, careening indictment of capitalism and the so-called American dream. $15-18, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 First St. S. thesoutherncville.com


CULTURE THIS WEEK

28

Wednesday 11/2

Friday 11/4

music

music

Beleza Duo. Funkalicious samba soul. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com Sarah Shook & The Disarmers . With Sunny War. $15-18, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesouthern cville.com The Wavelength. A midweek music boost. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskey jarcville.com

etc. Crafty Date Night. Enjoy a complimentary beverage with every craft purchase. Free, 6pm. Pikasso Swig Craft Bar, 333 Second St. SE. pikassoswig.com Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. Explore the only museum in the U.S. devoted to Indigenous Australian art. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org Gojira. Celebrate Godzilla’s 68th birthday Presented in Japanese with English subtitles. $10, 7pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com Virginia Film Festival. Celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Virginia Film Festival. Prices, times, locations vary. virginiafilmfestival.org

Thursday 11/3 music

stage

home.

There’s no place like

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

Traditional geometry

on stands now

An angular home in Ivy takes cues from Virginia vernacular

Penny & Sparrow. With Special Guest Annika Bennett. $25-30, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jeffersontheater.com Rachel Baiman. The Americana songwriter and multi-instrumentalist has emerged as a fearless voice of the American female experience. $18-20, 8pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. frontporchcville.org Tara Mills Band. An original blend of folk, bluegrass, and Americana. Free, 6pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

words Shadwell Speaker Series. Featuring science evangelist Ainissa Ramirez. Free, 6pm. Jefferson Scholars Foundation, 112 Clarke Ct. jeffersonscholars.org Friday Night Writes: A Reading Series for Emerging Writers. An evening of emerging writers performing their short stories, poetry, and music. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

Paint & Sip. Learn how to paint “Sunset Over C’ville” and sip some cider. $35, 5pm. Castle Hill Cider, 6065 Turkey Sag Rd., Keswick. catelynkelseydesigns.com

Arts From Underground. Artmaking, drinks, and karaoke inside The Looking Glass. Free, 7pm. Ix Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

FALL 2022

FarAway. Live music, wine, and food from the Eastwood food truck. Free, 5pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

words

etc.

Inside. Outside. Home.

UVA Jazz Ensemble: PLAY IT FORWARD! Featuring the music of JoVia Armstrong and guest violinist, Leslie Deshazor. Free-$10, 8pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA Grounds. music. virginia.edu

classes

MFA Reading Series. Fiction and poetry students from the University of Virginia’s MFA program in creative writing read from their work. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

WHAT A JOLT Downtown, the city’s first residential charger OPENING UP An architect captures attic space for a home reno PIZZA, PIZZA The perfect recipe for a domed outdoor oven

Day of the Dead All Stars. With Andy Tichenor’s Almost Acoustic. $10-12, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com

VHSL One-Act Competition. Local high schools compete with original one-act plays and performances. Free, 4pm. Monticello High School, 1400 Independence Way. monticellodrama@gmail.com

Fowzia Karimi. Fowzia Karimi, UVA Rea Visiting Writer in fiction, reads from her work. Free, 5pm. Minor Hall 125, UVA Grounds. creativewriting.virginia.edu

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Berto and Vincent. A night of wild gypsy rumba and Latin guitar. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com

Cavalier Marching Band: Hits from Broadway. An open dress rehearsal for the halftime show “Hits from Broadway.” Free, 6:30pm. Carr’s Hill Field, UVA Grounds. music.virginia.edu

Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, November 2. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org The “Cav Futures Show” Live. Lo Davis and Luke Neer host this live radio show that features interviews with UVA studentathletes, a social media livestream, and in-person photo and autograph opportunities. Free, 7pm. Dairy Market, 946 Grady Ave. cavalierfutures.com Virginia Film Festival. Celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Virginia Film Festival. Prices, times, locations vary. virginiafilmfestival.org

Kizomba Fridays. A bi-monthly social in Kizomba and related dance. Free, 8pm. Ashtanga Yoga of Charlottesville, 906 Monticello Rd. core4kizomba@gmail.com

outside Blue Ridge Mountain Maze & Fall Festival. Get lost in this five-acre corn maze. Free-$12, all day. Blue Ridge Mountain Maze, 165 Old Ridge Rd., Lovingston. blueridgemountainmaze.com Playdates at the Playscape. BYO buddies and snacks and enjoy nature play. $20, 9:30am. Wildrock, 6600 Blackwells Hollow Rd., Crozet. wildrock.org

etc. Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, November 2. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org Virginia Film Festival. Celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Virginia Film Festival. Prices, times, locations vary. virginiafilmfestival.org

Saturday 11/5 music Keller Williams. Celebrating the 20th anniversary of Laugh, with Dave Watts and Tye North. $28-30, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. jefferson theater.com


CULTURE FEEDBACK

Sunflower Bean. With Good Dog Nigel. $1518, 8:30pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com The Wavelength. Late-night tunes and whiskey. Free, 10:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskeyjarcville.com

stage No Home but Ropes and Stakes. An original one-act play from CHS senior Stella Gunn. $6, 7:30pm. Charlottesville High School, 1400 Melbourne Rd.

words Artists in Conversation.Exhibiting artist Megan Marlatt and fellow artist and friend, Akemi Ohira in conversation. Free, 11am. Second Street Gallery, 115 Second St. SE. secondstreetgallery.org Brian Teare: The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven. In conversation with Irène Mathieu and Ben Martin. Free, 4pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com Storytime. Featuring recent storybooks and classics kids know and love. Free, 11am. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

outside Blue Ridge Mountain Maze & Fall Festival. See listing for Friday, November 4. Free-$12, all day. Blue Ridge Mountain Maze, 165 Old Ridge Rd., Lovingston. blueridgemountainmaze.com

Fifeville Trail Opening. Join local community leaders to celebrate the opening of the Fifeville Trail, which creates new connections between Tonsler Park and surrounding neighborhoods. Free, 10am. Tonsler Park, 500 Cherry Ave. pecva.org Greenbrier Neighborhood Arts and Crafts Sale and Stroll. View and buy a large variety of beautiful art, woodcrafts, toys, papercrafts, crystal jewelry, and many other handmade objects. Free, 10am. Greenbrier Neighborhood, 1412 Kenwood Ln. Playdates at the Playscape. See listing for Friday, November 4. $20, 9:30am. Wildrock, 6600 Blackwells Hollow Rd., Crozet. wildrock.org

etc.

Dog Video Fest 2022. A 75-minute reel of the best, funniest, most touching, and surprising canine vids, with proceeds benefiting the Charlottesville-Albemarle ASPCA. $10.75, 1pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com Virginia Film Festival. Celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Virginia Film Festival. Prices, times, locations vary. virginiafilmfestival.org CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

arts@c-ville.com

M

ariana Bell had a divergent pandemic experience from most musicians. Ask any songwriter, or any creative person for that matter, and most will say they experienced heightened inspiration during the C-word era. Not Bell. And she’s okay with that. That’s her journey. A longtime singer-songwriter who’s now a mother of two small children, Bell found she didn’t have the time or energy to retreat into an introspective world of music production in 2020. And she didn’t have the experience or inclination to clamber aboard the web-streaming craze that fueled so many others. “I went to school for performance,” Bell says. “The interaction between an audience and a performer is a palpable, visceral thing.” She did a few shows at The Front Porch that got the livestream treatment, but it didn’t “feed her.” Bell longed for the joy of in-studio and onstage collaboration. By late last year, she was ready to emerge from her self-imposed choral-cocoon, and as a result 2022 has been a “creative boom time.” Her eighth studio album, Still Not Sleeping, will drop on November 4, and Bell and her band will play a live Front Porch show on November 6 to celebrate the record, a more mature effort than anything she’s attempted before. “It is probably less edgy and a little more satisfying to listen to—if that is the word. I’m a little less angst-ridden,” she says. “I was less working from a place of, ‘What do I have to say,’ and more, ‘What do I want to hear— what do I need to hear?’” Bell wasn’t without reason for angst. In the lead up to recording Still Not Sleeping, her close friend and fellow musician Derek Carter moved to Charlottesville, having spent years on the Los Angeles and Nashville music scenes. The two planned to work with a nearly matching group of studio players, some imported from L.A., and record albums in parallel. It was a heady time for Bell, rekindling her love for music making and reuniting with folks she had spent years with on the West Coast—not to mention her close confidant Carter. Then, tragedy. In March of this year, just before the two songwriters would both begin recording records, Carter died. Bell was crushed. She considered her options. Give up on the project—to which Carter had been such a critical party—or move forward. She talked to the band, some of whom were days from boarding planes to Charlottesville. In the end, so much had been set in motion that everyone agreed it made sense to lay down Still Not Sleeping. The record, however, would be dramatically affected. “We all loved [Derek] dearly, and we didn’t know what else to do,” Bell says. “We wanted to honor him in some way.” The resulting album, dedicated to Carter’s memory, isn’t a funeral dirge; it’s oftentimes lighthearted and fun. Mostly, the vocals and instrumentation are soaring, hopeful. Sure, Still Not Sleeping dips into melancholy here and there, but according to Bell, mourning loss wasn’t the goal.

Mariana Bell will celebrate the release of Still Not Sleeping at The Front Porch on Sunday, November 6.

“I don’t think trauma goes away—sadness and disappointment and the whole life journey—but I think that processing them as an artist grows differently,” she says. “I no longer feel I need the listener to suffer with me. Hopefully, there is a way to process grief that can allow for beauty and depth without making the problem or the trauma someone else’s.” Being back in the studio and collaborating with other musicians was a cathartic recovery process for Bell. Working with new co-producer Eddie Jackson, she made her latest record in a more collaborative way than anything she’d done before—with almost no instruments tracked individually and everything produced in concert. Joining Bell in the studio were drummer Jordan West (Grace Potter), bassist Kurtis Keber (Grace Potter), guitarist Rusty Speidel (Mary Chapin Carpenter), guitarist Zach Ross, violinist Molly Rogers (Hans Zimmer), trumpeter JJ Kirkpatrick (Phoebe Bridgers), and keyboardist Ty Bailie (Katy Perry). EmiBell’s eighth studio album drops ly Herndon and Speidel co-wrote some of on November 4. the songs. At The Front Porch, fans can expect to see Aly Snider and John Kokola of We Are Star Children and James McLaughlin, along with Herndon and Speidel. Genna Matthews will join as a special guest. Bell, who grew up in Charlottesville, lived in Los Angeles and New York, and has been back home for the past seven years, feels she’s learned enough about music after eight albums simply to be herself. On Still Not Sleeping, that means being as “cheesy as possible” when it feels right, shifting among vintage ’70s, pop, folk, and country vibes and “letting go of any preciousness” about genre. “I kind of cringe when I hear that it sounds country, but that’s okay,” Bell says. “We just leaned into it without trying too hard to define it.” And of course, being herself meant processing the death of someone close, a feeling she’d never before had to confront. It meant saying goodbye, dealing with unan“Hopefully, there is a way to process swered questions, and asking herself what she could have done differently. grief that can allow for beauty and “I was just trying to be really present and take it one depth without making the problem or day at a time,” Bell says. “And the more I’ve gotten back into making music, the more I want to keep it going.” the trauma someone else’s.”

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Day of the Dead Celebration. Celebrate the Day of the Dead with a Danza Tecuanes mask making demonstration, children’s activities, luminary crafting, food, and more. Free, 4:30pm. McGuffey Art Center, 201 Second St. NW. mcguffeyartcenter.com

By Shea Gibbs

@cville_culture

Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, November 2. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

Local music scene fixture Mariana Bell is creating again after painful loss

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

Farmers Market at Ix. Over 60 local vendors with produce, prepared foods, artisan goods, and more. Free, 8am. Ix Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

Bell is back

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Michael Clem and Andy Thacker. Michael Clem pairs up with Love Canon mandolinist Andy Thacker. Free, 1pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glass housewinery.com

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Berto and Vincent. Turn up the heat. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

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CULTURE THIS WEEK

30

CHARLOTTESVILLE

SYMPHONY

AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F V I R G I N I A

BENJAMIN ROUS, MUSIC DIRECTOR

C ONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

Monday 11/7

Sunday 11/6

music

music BrassFest 2022. The day culminates with a recital featuring Amy McCabe, Robert Rearden, and Matthew Guilford. Free, 3:30pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA Grounds. music.virginia.edu

M ILY A F

Holiday Concerts Michael Slon, Conductor

Eastern Exotic: Slavic, Romanian & Hungarian. Three Notch’d Road opens its 2022-23 season, The Four Corners of Europe. $10-80, 4pm. Grace Episcopal Church, 5607 Gordonsville Rd., Keswick. tnrbaroque.org Mariana Bell. The Charlottesville native returns for her album release show. $20-25, 7pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. frontporchcville.org UVA Flute Ensemble. Celebrating music written by Christopher Caliendo, Ian Clarke, Gabriel Fauré, Jennifer Higdon, Mike Mower, J.J. Quantz, and Jay Unger. Free, 1pm. The Rotunda Dome Room, UVA Grounds. music.virginia.edu Willie DE. Solo acoustic tunes. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

classes

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Paint & Sip. Learn to paint “Rainy Fall Drive.” $35, 1pm. Hazy Mountain Vineyards & Brewery, 8736 Dick Woods Rd., Afton. catelynkelseydesigns.com

A joyous holiday tradition perfect for the entire family! SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3 | 8:00PM SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4 | 3:30PM OLD CABELL HALL

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

Masks Optional

artsboxoffice.virginia.edu 434.924.3376

Berto & Vincent. Rumba rumba. Free, 7pm. South and Central Latin Grill, Dairy Market. southandcentralgrill.com Gin & Jazz. Brian Caputo Trio performs in the hotel lobby bar. Free, 5:30pm. Oakhurst Hall, 122 Oakhurst Cir. oakhurstinn.com Jazz Connection. The quartet plays standards and originals, with occasional guest performers. Free, 5pm. Starr Hill Brewery Tap Room, 5391 Three Notched Rd., Crozet. starrhill.com

words Storytelling, Film, and Design. Join filmmaker and UVA School of Architecture alumna Din Blankenship for a conversation about her journey from architect to professional filmmaker and producer. Free, 5pm. Campbell Hall 153, UVA Grounds. arch.virginia.edu

Tuesday 11/8 music Vincent Zorn. Olé. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. the bebedero.com

outside

outside

Blue Ridge Mountain Maze & Fall Festival. See listing for Friday, November 4. Free-$12, all day. Blue Ridge Mountain Maze, 165 Old Ridge Rd., Lovingston. blueridgemountainmaze.com

Playdates at the Playscape. See Friday listing, November 4. $20, 9:30am. Wildrock, 6600 Blackwells Hollow Rd., Crozet. wildrock.org

etc.

Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, November 2. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org

Casablanca Brunch. Celebrating the 80th anniversary of the iconic romance. $10, 12:30pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com Daily Tour of Indigenous Australian Art. See listing for Wednesday, November 2. Free, 10:30am and 1:30pm. Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection of UVA, 400 Worrell Dr. kluge-ruhe.org Mezcal Art Pairing. Sample mezcal and tequila, view the art inspired by the spirit, and converse with the artists. $30, 6pm. The Bebedero, 201 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com Virginia Film Festival. Celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Virginia Film Festival. Prices, times, locations vary. virginiafilmfestival.org

etc.

Family Game Night. Enjoy dinner, refreshing cocktails, mocktails, and beers, and play a variety of games for all ages, including corn hole, jumbo Jenga, cards, and more. Free, 5pm. Dairy Market, 946 Grady Ave. dairymarketcville.com Geeks Who Drink Trivia Night. Useless knowledge means everything at this authentic homegrown trivia quiz. Free, 8pm. Firefly, 1304 E. Market St. firefly cville.com Strangers on a Train. Alfred Hitchcock’s classic shocker about the danger of talking to strangers. $10, 7pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com

Walks with Color

Free parking at Central Grounds Garage The 2022-23 season is generously supported by

Baby Jo’s. Tunes from the seven-piece, New Orleans-inspired boogie and blues band. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskeyjarcville.com

Visit the gallery Monday–Thursday, 10AM – 6PM Friday–Saturday, 10AM – 7PM Sunday 12–5PM Shop Online Anytime https://cvillearts.org/store

functional pottery by Trina Player featured at C’ville Arts during November Meet Trina on First Friday, Nov. 4, 5–7Pm

open daily | 118 E. Main Street | Downtown Mall | 434-972-9500 | cvillearts.org | follow us on Facebook and Instagram!


CULTURE THE WORKS

31

Reading the body Brian Tare examines chronic illness through poetry in reissue By Sarah Lawson

chronic pain, cognitive fog, and other symptoms, and yet, as a patient, I was constantly called upon by Western allopathic medicine to narrate myself … I believed my suffering would end if we could just find the right words to describe my illness.” This sensation is also echoed in the poem, “Any mistake in the scale and it doesn’t work out. It’s pretty hard because it’s such a small picture.,” where Teare writes:

arts@c-ville.com

T

SUPPLIED PHOTO

the problem with illness is I think there might be a way to be ill that would free me from suffering the way correctly placed needles calm symptoms

sciously expect texts to be like able bodies—legible, unified, meaningful in predictable ways—and I wanted to frustrate that unconscious expectation in poems about disability,” says Teare in response to Gould. “In the end, I hope the self-consciousness of not knowing how to proceed makes a reader aware that chronic illness and disability frequently demand a long and profound confrontation with not knowing, a confrontation that permanently changes what it means to know.” This question of legibility is also probed in poems such as “One must see the ideal in one’s own mind. It is like the memory of perfection,” in which Teare writes: the doctors treat my body only as the site of disorder the way it’s easy to think meaning arises from words as though a body or lyric doesn’t begin outside itself

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Brian Teare will read from The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven on November 5 at New Dominion Bookshop, where UVA’s Dr. Ben Martin and Dr. Irène Mathieu also join the conversation during the free event.

Teare’s newly reissued book explores the poet’s experiences with misdiagnoses and chronic illness.

In part, The Empty Form is a book about the ways in which language can fall short, as Teare also recalls to Gould that “I found undiagnosed illness to be both wordlessly corporeal and hyper-discursive, a paradox the poems often try to enact. For many years, my sense of self was often subsumed by

As a poet, Teare has published six critically acclaimed books, including Doomstead Days, winner of the Four Quartets Prize and finalist for both the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Lambda Literary Award. He is also an associate professor at UVA and runs Albion Books, a one-man poetry micropress that specializes in limited-edition chapbooks and broadsides, among other printed matter. Still a relatively recent transplant to the area, Teare explains that, “During the three years I’ve been in Charlottesville, first Dr. Daniel Becker and Dr. Ben Martin, and then Dr. Martin and Dr. Irène Mathieu have invited me to be in dialogue with members of the medical community about poetry, narrative medicine, and the medical humanities more broadly. After many years of disappointing and alienating experiences as an uninsured and low-income patient, and after many years of writing about chronic illness and medicalization, I found that these dialogues allowed me to do new kinds of thinking and feeling about being a patient and a person with chronic conditions.” Teare adds, “I hope hearing the poems and being a part of our conversation afterward will also allow local readers a similar opportunity: to think and feel in new ways about poetic language, chronic conditions, and care. I also hope my work gives people permission to write from what I call the non-narrative experience of illness: the ephemeral feeling-states of pain, discomfort, and dysphoria that are intrinsic to chronic conditions, but which are hard to put into words, and even harder for medicine to acknowledge and validate.”

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hanks to the tireless work of disability justice activists, as well as an increased attention to chronic conditions that the COVID-19 pandemic necessitates, discussions around disabilities and chronic illness are more present in mainstream culture than at any other time in recent history. Artists, poets, and other writers have also contributed heavily to this awareness, including celebrated Charlottesville-based poet Brian Teare, whose book The Empty Form Goes All the Way to Heaven is a newly reissued examination of his relationships with these topics. The Empty Form is a gorgeous collection of ekphrastic poetry—that is, poems influenced by works of visual art—drawing inspiration from the writings and grid paintings of Agnes Martin, and exploring Teare’s own experiences of misdiagnoses and chronic illness, as well as the harms perpetrated by the American medical-industrial complex. Teare began writing the poems in this collection in 2009, while coping with an undiagnosed chronic illness and finding comfort in Martin’s work. He writes in the book’s preface, “These poems set my life in relation to my long encounter with her painting, drawing, writing, and the metaphysics she argued was implicit in them.” With this expanded reissue of the book—now including an interview by Declan Gould that shares Teare’s perspectives on COVID-19, capitalism, and contemporary disability poetics, among other topics—Teare hopes the poems will find a broader audience, reaching “those with chronic conditions and those who are caregiving, those who love Agnes Martin, and those who are simply hungry for poems with an adventurous sense of beauty.” The poems in this collection are experimental in nature, each creating their own unique grid on the page as words and typographic symbols are positioned to provide visual meaning atop the linguistic, their angles echoing Martin’s best-known paintings—and titled with references to, and quotes from, Martin’s work. Teare asks readers to examine the embodied life, to question ideas of normativity and definitions of healing, and to trouble the divide between sickness and health. “Most readers uncon-


32

NOV. 2-6

2022

SPECIAL GUESTS LOWNDES COUNTY AND THE ROAD TO BLACK POWER

MAMA’S BOY WITH ACADEMY AWARD-WINNING SCREENWRITER DUSTIN LANCE BLACK

WITH DIRECTOR SAM POLLARD

SUNDAY, NOV. 6 | 11:00 PM CULBRETH THEATRE TICKETS: $12

SUNDAY, NOV. 6 | 4:30 PM VINEGAR HILL THEATRE TICKETS: $12

Presentation of Changemaker Award to screenwriter and subject Dustin Lance Black (Milk)

Presentation of Chronicler Award to director Sam Pollard Conversation moderated by Robert Daniels (IndieWire)

Conversation moderated by Bilal Qureshi (NPR)

Presented by United Way of Greater Charlottesville

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

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CULTURE GALLERIES

33

November Exhibitions

Artisans Studio Tour Various locations

around central Virginia. Tour the workshops of over 30 artisans. November 12-13.

The Bebedero 201 W. Main St. “Art Inspired

by the Spirit.” Local artists created original art based on their experiences with mezcal and tequila. $30, November 6, 6pm. The Center at Belvedere 540 Belvedere Blvd.

A small works exhibit featuring over 30 artists, including Meredith Bennett, Joan Griffin, and Judith Ely. Through December 19. Reception November 8, 4pm. First Fridays opening. Corner Gallery Campbell Hall, UVA Grounds.

“Edankraal en Route: Reviving an African American Space of Cultural Exchange in Segregated Lynchburg,” projects by UVA faculty, students, and area middle school students inspired by Harlem Renaissance poet, Anne Bethel Spencer. Through November 30. Reception November 10, 5pm.

Megan Marlatt at Second Street Gallery

Crozet Artisan Depot 5791 Three Notch’d

Rd. “Small Graces” features photography by Bill Mauzy. Through November 30.

C’ville Arts Cooperative Gallery 118 E.

Main St., Downtown Mall. “Walks with Color,” works from ceramic artist Trina Player. First Fridays opening.

Elmaleh Gallery Campbell Hall, UVA

Grounds. “Mise-en-Scène: The Lives and Afterlives of Urban Landscapes,” from urbanist Chris Reed and photographer Mike Belleme. Through November 18.

Samari Jones at Studio Ix

The Fralin Museum of Art 155 Rugby Rd.,

Richard Guy Wilson at Jefferson School African American Heritage Center

November 2 – 8, 2022 c-ville.com

UVA Grounds. “Power Play: Reimagining Representation in Contemporary Photography,” “Earthly Exemplars: The Art of Buddhist Disciples and Teachers in Asia,” and other exhibitions. Jefferson School African American Heritage Center 233 Fourth St. NW. “Of Anoth-

er Canon: African American Outsider Art,” includes works from 11 African American artists. Through January 7. Place,” works by Richard Crozier and David Hawkins. Opens November 18.

Phaeton Gallery 114 Old Preston Ave. Kris-

topher Castle’s “Curriculum Vitae” explores Thomas Jefferson’s Academical Village at the University of Virginia through a series of paintings. Through December 2.

PVCC Gallery V. Earl Dickinson Building,

501 College Dr. Through September 9, the Annual Student Exhibition. Opening September 23, the Annual Faculty Exhibition and a retrospective of works from PVCC’s “The Fall Line” literary magazine. Through November 9. Quirk Gallery 499 W. Main St. “Conversa-

tions,” recent individual mixed-media works by Mary Scurlock and Diego Sanchez, as well as nine works that are the result of months of collaboration between the two artists. Through December 11.

Ellen Moore Osborne at Random Row Brewery

Random Row Brewery 608 Preston Ave. A.

“Three Decades,” mixed-media collage from Ellen Moore Osborne. Ruffin Hall Gallery 179 Culbreth Rd., UVA

Megan Marlatt. In the Dové Gallery, “The Ceremony of Innocence,” paintings by Los Angeles-based surrealist artist Deirdre Sullivan-Beeman. Through November 18.

Grounds. “Breaking Water,” the collaborative work of Calista Lyon and Carmen Winant examines the profound psychological impact of ecological breakdown. Through December 9.

Studio Ix 969 Second St. SE. “About Face:

Second Street Gallery 115 Second St.

Visible Records 1740 Broadway St. “Any

SE. In the Main Gallery, “Mummers,” a series of paintings and large sculptural big head masks inspired by the theme carnival by

Pt.1 Siren Eyes,” digital portraits by 12-yearold, self-taught artist Samari Jones. Through November 27. Artist talk and happy hour, November 17, 5pm. First Fridays opening. Person I Have Robbed Was Judged By Me,” a solo show of photography by Sebastien Boncy. Through December 2.

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McIntire Connaughton Gallery Rouss and Robertson Halls, UVA Grounds. “From Water and Wheels to Abstracted Ideals,” acrylic and oil on canvas by Eric Cross and Stan Sweeney. Through December 9.

Judith Ely at The Center at Belvedere

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McGuffey Art Center 201 Second St. NW. In the Smith Gallery, “Visions of the Rainforest,” mixed-media paintings by Dominique Astruc Anderson. In the First Floor Hallway, “Mindscapes, Landscapes, and Insights” by Lisa Macchi, and “Do the Trees Speak Back to the Wind” by Lindsay Diamond and Jeannine Regan. In the Second Floor Hallway, “Everything Paper,” a McGuffey member group exhibition. The Holiday Member’s Show and Shop opens November 22. First Fridays openings.

IMAGES COURTESY THE GALLERIES

Live Arts 123 E. Water St. “Perspectives on


34

YOUR FESTIVAL GUIDE!

SPOTLIGHT FILMS

NOVEMBER 2-6, 2022 GLASS ONION: A KNIVES OUT MYSTERY

WOMEN TALKING

November 2 –8, 2022 c-ville.com

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EMPIRE OF LIGHT

SHE SAID

CORSAGE

SAINT OMER

EO

CLOSE

HARD SHELL, SOFT SHELL

BROKER

LIQUOR STORE DREAMS

REFUGE

LADY CHATTERLEY’S LOVER

PRESENTING SPONSOR

GALA SCREENING: CORSAGE

THE HOLE IN THE FENCE

THE FIVE DEVILS


35

SPECIAL GUESTS DEVOTION BREAKTHROUGH STAR AWARD: JONATHAN MAJORS THURSDAY, NOV. 3 | 7:30 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $20

Set in the Korean War, Devotion captures the tale of the U.S. Navy’s first Black aviator, Jesse Brown (Jonathan Majors), and his dedicated wingman Tom Hudner. Discussion with actor Jonathan Majors, moderated by Tyler Coates (The Hollywood Reporter) Presented by Truist

STAY AWAKE SPECIAL GUEST: CHRISSY METZ + GOVERNOR GERALD L. BALILES FOUNDER’S AWARD: JAMIE SISLEY FRIDAY, NOV. 4 | 8:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $20

Two brothers navigate teenage life while dealing with their mother's prescription drug addiction. Discussion with director Jamie Sisley, actor Chrissy Metz, and actor Wyatt Oleff, moderated by Brian Truitt (USA Today) Presented by UVA Health

FAMILY CENTERPIECE FILM MY FATHER’S DRAGON SCREENWRITING ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: MEG LEFAUVE SATURDAY, NOV. 5 | 10:00 AM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $10, $5 CHILD

CENTERPIECE FILM WOMEN TALKING TRIBUTE TO JUDITH IVEY SATURDAY, NOV. 5 | 5:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $20

A PREVIEW OF THE 35TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL NOV 2-6. VIEW ALL 100+ FILMS AND EVENTS AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG

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One evening, eight Mennonite women climb into a hay loft to conduct a secret meeting. Discussion with actor Judith Ivey, moderated by Jenny Wales (UVA) Presented by The Paramount Theater

November 2 –8, 2022 c-ville.com

An animated fable based on the beloved children’s book. Discussion with director Nora Twomey, producer Julie Lynn, screenwriter Meg LeFauve, and supervising sound editor Zach Seivers moderated by Carlos Aguilar (LA Times, The Wrap, AV Club) Presented by UVA Arts: supported by the Office of the Provost & the Vice Provost for the Arts Supported by Nest Realty


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FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS

GOOD NIGHT OPPY THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 8:00 PM CULBRETH THEATRE TICKETS: $14 Supported by Charlottesville Dogwood Foundation and Crutchfield

THE SON FRIDAY, NOV 4, 5:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $14

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Presented by Charlottesville Radio Group Supported by UVA Deparmtent of Drama

CORSAGE FRIDAY NOV. 4, 4:30 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATRE TICKETS: $12 Official Oscar® Selection — Austria Supported by Woodard Propoerties

SHE SAID FRIDAY, NOV. 4, 8:00 PM CULBRETH THEATRE TICKETS: $14 Presented by CVILLE Weekly

THE LOST KING

LADY CHATTERLEY’S LOVER

SATURDAY, NOV. 5, 1:30 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $12

SATURDAY, NOV. 5, 9:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $14

November 2 –8, 2022 c-ville.com

CLOSING NIGHT FILM

LIVING SUNDAY, NOV. 6, 3:15 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $12 Presented by The Daily Progress Supported by UVA Gamma Knife Center

EMPIRE OF LIGHT SUNDAY, NOV. 6, 7:00 PM THE PARAMOUNT THEATER TICKETS: $20 Presented by AV Company

A PREVIEW OF THE 35TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL NOV 2-6. VIEW ALL 100+ FILMS AND EVENTS AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG


FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS DANI’S TWINS THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 5:00 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $14 Dani’s Twins follows the pregnancy and early parenting life of Dani Izzie, a Virginia resident who became one of the first quadriplegics to give birth to twins in 2020. Her unique pregnancy not only put her at risk for an array of serious medical risks, it also forced her to grapple with intense biases faced by women with disabilities. Discussion with producer Angie Gentile, subjects Dani Izzie, Rudy Izzie, and Dr. Robert Fuller, moderated by Eric Swensen (UVA Health) Presented by UVA Health

KARAOKE | WITH ACTOR SASSON GABAY THURSDAY, NOV. 3, 8:30 PM | VIOLET CROWN 5 | TICKETS: $14 A comedy about a married middle-class suburban couple in their 60s who are drawn to their new neighbor, a charismatic bachelor who has karaoke evenings at his apartment. Discussion with actor Sasson Gabay and director Moshe Rosenthal, moderated by Harry Chotiner (VAFF) Supported by WTJU 91.1 FM

REFUGE SATURDAY, NOV. 5, 5:00 PM | VINEGAR HILL THEATRE | TICKETS: $14 Clarkston, Georgia, is a small rural town reminiscent of a United Nations refugee camp. People from all corners of the world live here, seeking safety and opportunity for a better life in America. Clarkston is also home to Chris Buckley, a military veteran and former Klansman harboring a hatred for Muslims since 9/11. Chris is forced to face his prejudice when contacted by Dr. Heval Kelli, a Kurdish cardiologist with a mission to challenge the looming presence of white nationalism threatening his community. Discussion with Directors Din Blankenship and Erin Bernhardt, and Executive Producer Katie Couric, moderated by Stephen Mull (UVA) Presenting partners include UVA School of Architecture and Welcoming Greater Charlottesville Supported by VMDO and UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

BARDO, FALSE CHRONICLE OF A HANDFUL OF TRUTHS CRAFT AWARD: EUGENIO CABALLERO SATURDAY, NOV. 5, 7:00 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $14 A nostalgic comedy set against an epic personal journey, chronicling the story of a renowned Mexican journalist and documentary filmmaker who returns home and works through an existential crisis as he grapples with his identity, familial relationships, and the folly of his memories as well as the past of his country. Discussion with production designer Eugenio Caballero, moderated by Carlos Aguilar (LA Times, The Wrap, AV Club)

A PREVIEW OF THE 35TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL NOV 2-6. VIEW ALL 100+ FILMS AND EVENTS AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG


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FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS MAMA’S BOY | CHANGEMAKER AWARD: DUSTIN LANCE BLACK SUNDAY, NOV. 6, 11:00 AM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $12 The true story of Oscar-Winning Screenwriter and Director Dustin Lance Black (Milk) and his mother, Anne—a conservative Mormon woman from the American South, who contracted polio as a child, forcing her to endure brutal surgeries and leaving her reliant on braces and crutches for the rest of her life. Discussion with Dustin Lance Black, moderated by Bilal Qureshi (NPR) Supported by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

THE INSPECTION | TRIBUTE TO RAÚL CASTILLO SUNDAY, NOV. 6, 2:30 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $12 Elegance Bratton’s remarkable debut, inspired by the filmmaker’s own life story, follows a man (Jeremy Pope) who joins the Marine Corps after being thrown out of his mother’s home at 16 for being gay and living for years in housing precarity. Discussion with actor Raúl Castillo, moderated by Carlos Aguilar (LA Times, The Wrap, AV Club) Supported by Verizon

LOWNDES COUNTY AND THE ROAD TO BLACK POWER CHRONICLER AWARD - SAM POLLARD SUNDAY, NOV. 6, 4:30 PM | VINEGAR HILL THEATRE | TICKETS: $12

November 2 –8, 2022 c-ville.com

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Charts efforts to organize disenfranchised Black voters in rural Alabama in 1965 in the wake of the Selma to Montgomery marches. Connects voter suppression from the ’60s to today’s political landscape. Discussion with director Sam Pollard, moderated by Robert Daniels (IndieWire) Presented by United Way of Greater Charlottesville Supported by UVA Division for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

HEADWATERS DOWN SUNDAY, NOV. 6, 5:30 PM | CULBRETH THEATRE | TICKETS: $14 Once considered the most polluted waterway in the United States, the James River is no stranger to the manmade damages inflicted to commoditize natural resources. Told through the lens of five friends, this adventure-filled documentary captures a 250-mile journey down the James River to the group’s hometown of Richmond, Virginia. Discussion with directors and subjects Will Gemma, Dietrich Teschner, and Justin Black, moderated by Paul Wagner (UVA) Presented by Southern Environmental Law Center Supported by UVA Office for Sustainability

A PREVIEW OF THE 35TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL NOV 2-6. VIEW ALL 100+ FILMS AND EVENTS AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG


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FREE PANEL DISCUSSIONS PLEASE ARRIVE 15-30 MINUTES BEFORE THE LISTED START TIME TO FIND A SEAT Saturday, Nov. 5 Irving Theatre, CODE Building Supported by The Jefferson Trust and Violet Crown Cinema 10:00 AM | From Page to Screen — Screenwriter’s Panel Oscar-winning screenwriter Dustin Lance Black (Milk) and Oscar-nominated screenwriter Meg LeFauve (Inside Out) in conversation with VAFF Board Member and screenwriter/director/producer John Lee Hancock (The Blind Side). 12:00 PM | The Power of Media, Storytelling, and The Muppets of Sesame Street Featuring Sesame Workshop President Sherrie Westin, moderated by Marshall Persinger (VAFF Board) Supported by VPM 2:00 PM | Making It — Film Industry Career Panel Featuring Erin Bernhardt, Lyle Friedman, and Jamie Sisley, moderated by Scot Safon (VAFF Board)

HOW TO GET YOUR TICKETS Online at VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG, or up to two hours prior each film. UVA Arts Box Office and Festival Headquarters at Violet Crown: Open during business hours (scan QR code below for exact hours) as well as one hour before each screening. The Paramount Theater & Vinegar Hill Theatre: Open one hour before each screening. We accept all major credit cards and checks at our in-person box office locations. Cash payments are also accepted at the UVA Arts Box Office location.

FREE TICKETS FOR FULL-TIME UVA STUDENTS All full-time UVA students can receive one complimentary ticket to all films, as available, made possible by the Art$ program. UVA student tickets must be reserved in advance and are not available the day of a film.

You’re in luck! Unclaimed tickets may become available at the door. Here are the details: 1. Ten minutes prior to the start of a film, we sell any unclaimed tickets to a standby line. While there is no guarantee that we will have unclaimed tickets at the door, we typically do have a small number to release to a standby line. 2. We have no control over when standby lines begin to form, and we do not permit the saving of places in standby lines. 3. A max of four tickets per person will be sold to each patron in the standby line. Scan the QR code below to visit our Tickets webpage for complete information on our ticketing policies, exact hours of our box office locations, and more!

ACCESSIBILITY

A PREVIEW OF THE 35TH ANNUAL VIRGINIA FILM FESTIVAL NOV 2-6. VIEW ALL 100+ FILMS AND EVENTS AND TICKET INFORMATION AT VIRGINIAFILMFESTIVAL.ORG

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All screening and event venues are accessible via ramp or elevators, offer wheelchair areas for viewing performances, and have accessible restrooms. Additionally, we strive to be accessible to all our patrons. Select films offer closed captions or open captions, and we also offer ASL interpretation at select in-person discussions. Also, all foreign-language films are presented with English subtitles, but not all films with subtitles are fully captioned. For more information, visit virginiafilmfestival.org/accessibility.

November 2 –8, 2022 c-ville.com

WHAT IF ADVANCED TICKETS ARE UNAVAILABLE?


40

CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

November 2 –8, 2022 c-ville.com

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#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


41

CROSSWORD

Silent Cal BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK ACROSS 1. “You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you ____”: James Baldwin 5. Tab 9. “Beavis and Butt-head” spin-off 14. Hankering 15. Singer Redding 16. They’re dragged and dropped 17. Messed (up) 19. Crystal-filled rock 20. Company originally called Vacation Rentals by Owner 21. Tuskegee ____ (World War II regiment) 22. Pairing of actor Diesel with philosopher Thomas? 27. Steered clear of 28. “____ the ramparts ... “ 29. Bonobo, e.g. 30. The brilliant friend in Ferrante’s “My Brilliant Friend” 31. Carpenter’s tool 33. Headed up law enforcement? 40. Lizard: Prefix 41. “____ pronounce you ...” 42. Palindromic Turkish title 45. Food writer/TV personality ____ Drummond 46. Cry from a jealous girlfriend, perhaps 49. Temperament held by a recurring James Bond character? 52. “This is a tough call”

#3

53. Ski resort near Salt Lake City 54. “The Discovery of India” writer 55. Nickname for U.S. president #30 ... or a hint to understanding the answers to 17-, 22-, 33- and 49-Across 60. Third-stringers 61. Tommie of the “Miracle Mets” 62. Giga : billion :: ____ : billionth 63. Recovers 64. ‘Do for a while 65. Bring (out)

DOWN 1. Documentarian Burns who’s the brother of Ken 2. “When will u b here?” 3. MRI target in a knee 4. UPS competitor 5. Recurring action role for Matt Damon 6. “Things aren’t looking so great” 7. Rest atop 8. “Acid” 9. “It’s not delivery, it’s ____” (frozen pizza brand slogan) 10. Sharp, as criticism 11. iRobot vacuum 12. Seriously committed 13. In ____ (sort of) 18. “Metamorphoses” poet 21. Oodles 22. AP math subject 23. Running shoe brand 24. Lounge around 25. Pharmacy bottles

26. Agricultural giant founded in Hawaii in 1851 31. “A good bowl of ____ will always make me happy”: Anthony Bourdain 32. “Middlemarch” author 34. They’re found in canals 35. Scheduled to arrive 36. Uno y dos 37. Crucifix inscription 38. Villa-studded Italian lake 39. Bremner of “Trainspotting” and “Wonder Woman” 42. Easy as pie 43. Reproductive cell 44. Tennis great Gibson 46. Yell 47. Great regard 48. “Knives Out” director Johnson 50. Lesson from Aesop 51. Satchel who pitched in the majors at age 59 55. Weaken 56. Big bang letters 57. Matchbox toy 58. “That’s ____-brainer” 59. Offering for a developer

ANSWERS 10/26/22

Nuts hell

November 2 –8, 2022 c-ville.com

#6 solution © 2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

#5 solution

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#6


42

By Rob Brezsny

Sagittarius

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For decades, the Canadian city of Sudbury hosted a robust mining industry. Deposits of nickel sulphide ore spawned a booming business. But these riches also brought terrible pollution. Sudbury’s native vegetation was devastated. The land was stained with foul air produced by the smelting process. An effort to re-green the area began in the 1970s. Today, the air is among the cleanest in the province of Ontario. In the spirit of this transformation, I invite you to embark on a personal reclamation project. Now is a favorable time to detoxify and purify any parts of your life that have been spoiled or sullied.

Capricorn

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The literal meaning of the ancient Greek word aigílips is “devoid of goats.” It refers to a place that is so high and steep not even sure-footed goats can climb it. There aren’t many of those places. Similarly, there are very few metaphorical peaks that a determined Capricorn can’t reach. One of your specialties is the power to master seemingly improbable and impassable heights. But here’s an unexpected twist in your destiny: In the coming months, your forte will be a talent for going very far down and in. Your agility at ascending, for a change, will be useful in descending—for exploring the depths. Now is a good time to get started!

Aquarius

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Evolved Aquarians are often blessed with unprecedented friendships and free-spirited intimacy and innovative alliances. People who align themselves with you may enjoy experimental collaborations they never imagined before engaging with you. They might be surprised at the creative potentials unleashed in them because of their synergy with you. In the coming weeks and months, you will have even more power than usual to generate such liaisons and connections. You might want to make a copy of this horoscope and use it as your calling card or business card.

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Pisces

(Feb. 19-March 20): I surveyed the history of literature to identify authors I consider highly intuitive. Piscean-born Anais Nin was my top choice. She used language with fluidity and lyricism. She lived a colorful, unpredictable life. No one better deserves the title of intuition champion. And yet she

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Fear is the raw material from which courage is manufactured,” said author Martha Beck. “Without it, we wouldn’t even know what it means to be brave.” I love that quote—and I especially love it as a guiding meditation for you Scorpios right now. We usually think of fear as an unambiguously bad thing, a drain of our precious life force. But I suspect that for you, it will turn out to be useful in the coming days. You’re going to find a way to transmute fear into boldness, bravery, and even badassery. also had a discerning view of this faculty. She wrote, “I began to understand that there were times when I must question my intuition and separate it from my anxieties or fears. I must think, observe, question, seek facts and not trust blindly to my intuition.” I admire her caution. And I suspect it was one reason her intuition was so potent. Your assignment, Pisces, is to apply her approach to your relationship with your intuition. The coming months will be a time when you can supercharge this key aspect of your intelligence and make it work for you better than it ever has before.

Aries

(March 21-April 19): In the coming weeks, I encourage you to work as hard as you have ever worked. Work smart, too. Work with flair and aplomb and relish. You now have a surprisingly fertile opportunity to reinvent how you do your work and how you feel about your work. To take maximum advantage of this potential breakthrough, you should inspire yourself to give more of your heart and soul to your work than you have previously imagined possible. (PS: By “work,” I mean your job and any crucial activity that is both challenging and rewarding.)

Taurus

(April 20-May 20): Here’s my weird suggestion, Taurus. Just for now, only for a week or two, experiment with dreaming about what you want but can’t have. And just for now, only for a week or two, go in pursuit of what you want but can’t have. I predict that these exercises in quixotic futility will generate an unexpected benefit. They will motivate you to dream true and strong and deep about what you do want and can have. They will intensify and focus you to pursue what you do want and can have.

Gemini

(May 21-June 20): Your most successful times in life usually come when all your various selves are involved. During these interludes, none of them is neglected or shunted to the outskirts. In my astrological opinion, you will be wise to ensure this scenario is in full play during the coming weeks. In fact, I recommend you throw a big unity party and invite all your various sub-personalities to come as they are. Have outrageous fun acting out the festivities. Set out a place mat and nametag on a table for each participant. Move around from seat to seat and speak from the heart on behalf of each one. Later, discuss a project you could all participate in creating.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): A Cancerian reader named Joost Joring explained to me how he cultivates the art of being the best Cancerian he can be. He said, “I shape my psyche into a fortress, and I make people feel privileged when they are allowed inside. If I must sometimes instruct my allies to stay outside for a while, to camp out by the drawbridge as I work out my problems, I make sure they know they can still love me—and that I still love them.” I appreciate Joost’s perspective. As a Cancerian myself, I can attest to its value. But I will also note that in the coming weeks, you will reap some nice benefits from having less of a fortress mentality. In my astrological opinion, it’s party time!

Leo

(July 23-Aug. 22): Leo poet Antonio Machado wrote, “I thought my fire was out, and I stirred the ashes. I burnt my fingers.” I’m telling you this so you won’t make the same mistake, Leo. Your energy may be a bit less radiant and fervent than usual right now, but that’s only

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because you’re in a recharging phase. Your deep reserves of fertility and power are regenerating. That’s a good thing! Don’t make the error of thinking it’s a sign of reduced vitality. Don’t overreact with a flurry of worry.

Virgo

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo author Siegfried Sassoon became renowned for the poetry he wrote about being a soldier in World War I. Having witnessed carnage firsthand, he became adept at focusing on what was truly important. “As long as I can go on living a rich inner life,” he wrote, “I have no cause for complaint, and I welcome anything which helps me to simplify my life, which seems to be more and more a process of eliminating inessentials!” I suggest we make Sassoon your inspirational role model for the next three weeks. What inessentials can you eliminate? What could you do to enhance your appreciation for all the everyday miracles that life offers you?

Libra

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You Libras have a talent that I consider a superpower: You can remove yourself from the heart of the chaos and deliver astute insights about how to tame the chaos. I like that about you. I have personally benefited from it on numerous occasions. But for the next few weeks, I will ask you to try something different. I’ll encourage you to put an emphasis on practical action, however imperfect it might be, more than on in-depth analysis. This moment in the history of your universe requires a commitment to getting things done, even if they’re untidy and incomplete. Here’s your motto: I improvise compromises in the midst of the interesting mess. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: RealAstrology.com, (877) 873-4888


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EMPLOYMENT

Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so The Arc urges you to consider opportunities within our organization. Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunity: Quality Assurance Specialist Full Time $47,000 - $52,000 DOE To see a full listing of all our positions and to apply, please visit arcpva.org/job-vacancies In addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience The Arc also offers competitive compensation, paid training, and an attractive benefits package which includes paid leave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance, among other offerings. The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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RESEARCH SCIENTIST Provide research duties in planning/designing/overseeing construction/maintenance of roadway/highway systems. Initiate/monitor/participate in research projects. Analyze/interpret data. Provide technical assistance/consultative advice. Reqd Master of Civil Engineering (or equiv based on combo of education/ training/experience) +1yr exp w/ knowledge & use of Python, R, Tableau, ArcGIS, Vissim & Synchro. Job in Charlottesville. Resume to VDOT, ATTN: Logan Sanchez, 1221 E. Broad St, Richmond, VA, 23219.

Now Hiring For All Positions: Front of House Line Cook Dishwasher Servers Email Maru.cville@gmail.com for more details or to schedule an interview!


LEGALS

FORECLOSURE SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE AT PUBLIC AUCTION 23.99 Acre Vacant Lot Albemarle County Tax Map No. 01900-00-00-029G2 SALE: FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2022 AT 11:00 A.M. AT THE ALBEMARLE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 501 E. JEFFERSON STREET, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22902

CHANG THAI

1232 Emmet St N, Charlottesville, VA 22903 The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) AUTHORITY for a Wine and Beer on Premise & Mixed Beverage Restaurant (Seating capacity 50-99) license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Phollachet Phuangsub, Owner NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license must be Submitted to ABC no later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required newspaper legal notices. Objections should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552-3200.

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE RE: THE ESTATE OF LORENE KNIGHT SHIFFLETT AMENDED SHOW CAUSE ORDER AGAINST DISTRIBUTION

Entered this 13th day of October, 2022 Cheryl Higgins Judge

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE RE: ESTATE OF PATRICIA A. HERRING AMENDED SHOW CAUSE ORDER AGAINST DISTRIBUTION

Entered this 13th day of October, 2022

Flora Pettit PC, Trustee Nancy R. Schlichting 530 E. Main Street P. O. Box 2057 Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 220-6113 lmg@fplegal.com

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It is ordered that the creditors of, and all other persons interested in the above estate show cause, if they can, on the 24th day of January, 2023, at 9:00 a.m. before this Court at its courtroom, against payment and delivery of the estate to the distributees without requiring refunding bonds.

In execution of a Credit Line Deed of Trust, being dated September 14, 2010, and recorded on September 15, 2010, in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court in Albemarle County, Virginia (the “Clerk’s Office”), in Deed Book 3928, page 487, and re-recorded on November 4, 2010, to add the legal description in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 3953, page 452 (together, the “Deed of Trust”), the undersigned as Trustee under said Deed of Trust, will offer for sale at public auction the parcel of real estate listed below: ALL that certain lot or parcel of land containing 23.99 acres, more or less, located on the south side of State Route 664 approximately 1.5 miles northeast of Earlysville, in the White Hall District of Albemarle County, Virginia, shown and described as Revised Parcel B2 on a plat by Roger W. Ray & Assoc., Inc., dated Sept. 4, 1998, entitled “Plat showing Parcels W, X, Y, and Z,” a copy of which is recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of Albemarle County, Virginia in Deed Book 1779, pages 42 and 43. Reference to said plat is hereby made for a more particular description of the property herein conveyed. BEING the same property conveyed to David N. Gaines by deed from David N. Gaines, Elizabeth C. Gaines, Leslie Ann Gaines, and Richard V. Gaines, III dated August 26, 2010, and recorded September 15, 2010, in the abovereferenced Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 3928, page 479. (the “Property”) TERMS OF SALE: A bidder’s deposit of the greater of $10,000 or 10% of the winning bid, shall be paid at the sale by cashier’s check made payable to Bidder (to be assigned to Trustee if Bidder is successful), with the balance upon delivery of a trustee’s deed within 30 days of sale. If the initial deposit is less than 10% of the winning bid, then the successful bidder’s deposit MUST be increased to 10% of the winning bid by cashier’s check or wired funds within three (3) business days. Settlement shall be held within 30 days after the date of sale unless otherwise postponed at the sole discretion of the Trustee. Sale is subject to the covenants, conditions, restrictions, rights of way, and easements, if any, contained in the deeds and other documents forming the chain of title to the Property. The Property is sold “AS IS, WHERE IS,” “WITH ALL FAULTS” and “WITH ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTIES.” TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO SETTLEMENT. The deposit shall be applied to the credit of successful bidder at settlement; or, in the event of failure to complete settlement within the time set forth after the date of sale, in accordance with the terms of sale, the deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs of sale, including Trustee’s fee, and the Property shall be resold at the cost and expense of the defaulting Purchaser. Risk of loss or damage to the Property shall be borne by successful bidder from the time of auctioneer’s strikedown at the sale. Purchaser shall pay all settlement fees, title examination charges, title insurance premiums, and recording costs. Current real estate property taxes will be prorated at closing as of date of sale. Rollback taxes, if any, will be the responsibility of the Purchaser. THE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT: (i) to waive the deposit requirements; (ii) to extend the period of time within which the Purchaser is to make full settlement; (iii) to withdraw the Property from sale at any time prior to the termination of the bidding; (iv) to keep the bidding open for any length of time; (v) to reject all bids; and (vi) to postpone or continue this sale from time to time, such notices of postponement or setting over shall be in a manner deemed reasonable by the Trustee. Announcements made on day of sale take precedence over all other advertised terms and conditions. Employees, directors and officers of Farm Credit of the Virginias, ACA, and their immediate family and companies in which they have an interest are not eligible under federal regulations to purchase the Property at foreclosure. FOR INFORMATION SEE: www.fplegal.com/foreclosures

November 2 - 8, 2022 c-ville.com

It is ordered that the creditors of, and all other persons interested in the above estate show cause, if they can, on the 24th day of January, 2023, at 9:00 a.m. before this Court at its courtroom, against payment and delivery of the estate to the distributees without requiring refunding bonds.

Cheryl Higgins Judge

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46

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316

SERVICES

Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: C.M.G. The object of this suit is to: Terminate the parental rights in C.M.G. (dob 10/12/17) and approve a foster care plan with adoption goal.

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It is ORDERED that the X defendant Francesca Guandalini appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before January 18, 2023. 8/26/2022 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316

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Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: E.M.G. The object of this suit is to: Terminate the parental rights in E.M.G. (dob 10/10/18) and approve a foster care plan with adoption goal. It is ORDERED that the X defendant Francesca Guandalini appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before January 18, 2023. 8/26/2022 DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

CONTACT US (WE'RE IN RICHMOND) Call or email with questions & pictures 6007 W. Broad St. Richmond (804)-282-0438 sales@audio-exchange.com

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VOL. 31 NO. 44 n NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022

CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE, FLUVANNA, GREENE, LOUISA, MADISON, NELSON, ORANGE, AUGUSTA

Crozet: Living the Good Life BY CARLA HUCKABEE

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

STORYBOOK

47 NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

30

YEARS OF REAL ESTATE

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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

COVE TRACE

DOUGLAS AVENUE

Fantastic condo at Belmont Lofts. Great location on a quiet street. Large rooftop terrace with sunrise and sunset views. Mountain views to the East. 3 bedrooms and 3 full bathrooms. Condo features an open kitchen with an island, gas fireplace and large closets. $1,050,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

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Annie Gould Gallery

CHARLOTTESVILLE | ALBEMARLE COUNTY | THE SURROUNDING AREAS Coming from a large family of contractors; my “job” growing up was to be the “helper” which gave me a “hands on” approach from building walls, demolishing old structures, designing layouts etc. This foundation is part of what drove me to begin in Real Estate in the area of Charlottesville, VA. Living in Charlottesville, VA for 20+ years I have been able to see and appreciate all it has and continues to offer with all of the new developments. Charlottesville has been a place about building friendships, community, and having fun! This is the heart of where our business comes from. We provide our clients the best of our time, devotion and attention to detail. Every single person has an individual need and desire; and we enjoy being the voice they need to accomplish their goals in Real Estate! A relationship built on trust and respect that will carry them through to the next time they are ready to make a move!“

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One floor living! Unique floor plan! Fabulous deck with views of the lake. A 2 story entry hall leads to the sunken living room with a wall of windows. First floor master suite with private study or nursery. Large, open formal dining room and spacious kitchen with large breakfast area. Set on .48 acres at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac. Fenced yard. All of the advantages of living in Forest Lakes.;pool, tennis, club house, walking trails and lakes. All convenient to great shopping, restaurants and schools. $625,000

MEET CANDICE

NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

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Price Drop!

Under Contract

1544 Sawgrass Ct

Complete 1st floor living, lg MBR & BA w/laundry. Hardwoods on main floor. Gourmet kitchen & loft open to LR. Outside patio. $410,000

434.305.0361 paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/575169 pdmcartor@gmail.com

Open House

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Peace & tranquility less than 15 minutes from Downtown! Enjoy this wonderful house on over an acre with beautiful mature trees. $469,900

Come enjoy the peace and tranquility of your own lake front retreat! Single floor living home includes both MB & laundry on the main floor. $240,000

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Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhouse w/mountain views! Open floorplan, perfect for entertaining with private patio. $365,000

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NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

BUYERS AND SELLERS... CONTACT ME NOW TO PREPARE FOR 2023!

49

Price Drop!

900 GARDENS BLVD #100 CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22901 WWW.AVENUEREALTYGROUP.COM 63 Soapstone Ln

Country living 15 minutes of Downtown & within Albemarle County. This single floor home has beautifully updated kitchen & bathrooms. $260,000

Here’s your chance to live in a 1906 farmhouse with all the style and character while enjoying the conveniences of a modern home. $130,000

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Semi-Custom Main Level Living Homes Surrounding a Pocket Park From $569,900! Tour our Newest Model Homes Belvedere and Old Trail Village our Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere inDecorated Belvedere and and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village Model Home Now Open!

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urrituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 tuck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 DAILY 12-5 | |434-987-6522 lla Model in Old Trail Village 406 Astel Crozet, 22932 Model Villa Model in OPEN Old inTrail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VAVA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe

ODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com EL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change

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NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

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EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers GREENFIELDS FARM

GREY OAKS

Spectacular 53-acre country estate with incredible custom-designed home, wonderful outdoor spaces, multi-functional 1,800 sf barn, 2-acre lake, Blue Ridge views, and a private, serene setting—all within 15 miles of Charlottesville. MLS#617485 $3,965,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 greyoaksfarmva.com

ROUND HILL

120-acre Albemarle County estate featuring a 5-bedroom manor home with views of the Blue Ridge Mountains and Rivanna Reservoir frontage. Close proximity to the city limits and Charlottesville-Albemarle airport! MLS#625402 $5,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

TURKEY SAG ROAD

33-acre property with beautifully constructed 3/4 bedroom home. Features great room with dramatic stone fireplace and panoramic views and large master suite with private deck. Peace, privacy and tranquility unsurpassed, but close to town. MLS#635341 $2,000,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

Circa 1904, Greek Revival-style manor home set on 763 acres of Virginia’s most beautiful countryside. Updated, 8,600 square foot residence exudes character and southern charm with a grand center hall floor plan. Farming and/or recreation opportunities with the ideal mix of woodland, pasture land and cropland along with streams and ponds. Equestrian facilities include: 48-stall horse barn, indoor riding arena, fenced paddocks, riding trails, and more. Tranquil setting 25 miles from Charlottesville and UVA. MLS#623792 $6,295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WILLOWFIELDS FARM

Stunning Virginia farmhouse on 156 protected acres overlooking a pond and the rolling hills of Southern Albemarle. 4-BR, 4-full & 2-half BA. Enhancing the main residence is a 1-BR, 1-BA log “barn”. Close to Pippin Hill and other vineyards! MLS#629743 $5,985,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farmhouse (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

FRAYS MILL

Mostly wooded preservation tract of 81.39 acres next to Frays Mill Subdivision in highly desirable Northern Albemarle. This beautiful gently rolling land has a great, private homesite with Blue Ridge Mountain views, and creek on property. MLS#608509 $995,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

GREEN ACRES

Pastoral views from this 3-bedroom brick home set on over 159 acres in Southern Albemarle. Ideal for farming with fenced pastures and ample water sources. Property is not under easement and has 4 division rights. MLS#630428 $1,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

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HATTON RIDGE FARM

A most tranquil and private 175 acre grazing and hay farm with two-thirds mile of James River frontage. The centerpiece of HATTON RIDGE FARM is an impressive 4-5 BR brick Georgian home, built circa 2000. The home is in likenew condition. The Owners have added a solar field, which provides extremely low electric bills and powers their electric vehicle!! Fiber optic internet is installed. Pastures and hay fields, surrounded by deep hardwood forest, along with fertile James River bottomland for gardens, plus many recreational uses. MLS#632477 $2,670,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

OWENSVILLE ROAD

Custom 5-BR, 6.5-BA home built in 2003 and significantly enhanced. Open main floor with heart pine flooring, stone fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, office, covered deck, and guest suite. Lower level with exercise, game, family rooms. MLS#634194 $2,395,000 Court Nexsen 646.660.0700 / Steve McLean 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


51

ESTATE PARCEL IN AFTON

820 CONDO

Well-designed corner condo consisting of exceptionally bright great room with high ceilings, fully-equipped kitchen, ample space for both relaxed living and dining, 1-BR, 1-BA, and inviting private balcony/terrace. Views of the Downtown skyline and mountains. MLS#634496 $285,000 C. Dammann, 434.981.1250

SOUTHWIND ESTATES

3 parcels with commanding Blue Ridge Mtn. views, level building sites 15 minutes from Charlottesville. Sites have been perked, have wells, and ready for your dream home. MLS#632482 $375,000 (7.8 acres), MLS#632490 $275,000 (2.4 acres), MLS#632487 $175,000 (2.0 acres), Court Nexsen, 646.660.070

U

N

D ER

C O

N

T

R AC T

Stunning mountain views available on this attractive 14± acre property, possessing lovely streams and woods. This parcel is only 1.5 miles from Route 151 Brew Trail, with easy access to Wintergreen, Charlottesville & UVA. MLS#629702 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250 or Robert Mellen, 434.996.7386

NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers

BROOMFIELD FARM

29 acres fronting Blenheim Rd. a small agricultural & residential subdivision with CCR’s, but NO HOA. 2 buildable lots, with an historic red barn, silo, & an 8-stall stable. Driveway in place, underground power, well & water, & several building spots with mtn. views. MLS#624834 $495,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

MURPHY’S CREEK FARM

Wonderful gently rolling parcel of land with just under 26 acres, 18 miles south of Charlottesville. The land is wooded (mostly hardwoods) with an elevated building site, stream/creek, total privacy, and long road frontage. MLS#619394 $229,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BRIDLEWOOD TRAIL

Private Keswick residence on 18.6 acres with views of the Southwest Mountains. 3-bedroom, 1.5-bath with wood floors, screen porch and 2-car garage. Open and wooded land. Easy access to Charlottesville and UVA. MLS#634905 $695,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

DUDLEY MOUNTAIN ROAD

Unique 88-acre property with 4-bedroom home. Property includes two-car garage, storage shed/ shop and 3760-square foot multipurpose building. Beautiful mountain and lake views just 4 miles from Charlottesville. MLS#635483 $1,275,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

LAMBS ROAD

Private, 6+ acre wooded lot that’s conveniently close to Charlottesville, but still in Albemarle County. The property contains large, mature trees and a small stream that winds through the middle. Three potential division rights. MLS#626128 $180,000 Jeremy Fields, 434.270.1220

GREENTREES

94+ acres 20 minutes from Charlottesville. Originally part of a 188-acre tract, two parcels may be purchased separately or together, with 2 developmental rights each. Mostly maturing pine and very long public road frontage. MLS#635861 $700,000 Tim Michel, 434.960.1124

SIMMONS GAP ROAD

5-acre lot with mature hardwoods. Great opportunity to build with no HOA. Private building site amongst beautiful woods. Located between Free Union and Earlysville but so convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. MLS#621177 $140,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

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ELLERSLIE DRIVE

Fantastic building lot with just under 7 acres adjacent to Trump Winery! A brick, heated conservatory and greenhouse, with bath, is located on the lot which was once used to provide fresh flowers to the Kluge estate. MLS#635939 $645,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

GATEWAY CIRCLE

Prime end-unit residence in a quiet Forest Lakes community. Enjoy the outdoors through views from the many windows, miles of walking trails or recreational activities. Private living with easy access to Charlottesville. MLS#635657 $319,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250


NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

52

Storybook Crozet: Living the Good Life

FEATURE

BY CARLA HUCKABEE

“I

t’s autumn in cozy, idyllic Crozet, Virginia—a time for golden days, crisp nights… and murder.” So opens Book 16 of The New York Times bestselling Mrs. Murphy Mystery series by Afton’s acclaimed author, Rita Mae Brown. Crozet is the perfect setting for a series spanning decades. Fortunately, reallife murders are rare and none of them have been solved by Brown’s “tiger cat born somewhere in Albemarle County.” Crozet’s story is the evolution of a community that grew up in the afternoon shadow of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Twelve miles west of Charlottesville and 21 miles east of Staunton, Crozet residents enjoy breathtaking views, a compact urban setting rich in comforts and amenities, mostly still surrounded by a bucolic quilt of farmland, vineyards, meadows, and forests. While runaway sprawl is curtailed by Albemarle County’s land use policies, there have been some growing pains to get Crozet where it is today and where it’s headed tomorrow.

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Growing, Growing, Grown? Once ancestral lands of the Monacan Indian Nation, this area became part of the Ficklin-Wayland Farm, originally cultivating tobacco before adding fruit orchards and livestock. Wayland lived in the home named Pleasant Green and expanded it to accommodate boarders and travelers along the Three Notched and Buck Mountain Roads bordering his farm. According to historian Phil James’ Secrets of the Blue Ridge, one of those Pleasant Green boarders was Colonel Claudius Crozet, an engineer surveying land for the Blue Ridge Railroad and Tunnel. In 1870 Wayland’s Crossing was renamed Crozet. The Waylands sold parcels from their

estate to develop downtown Crozet’s business district. Today’s Square retains much of its character and charm nearly 150 years later, but the Waylands wouldn’t recognize the rest of Crozet. The appeal of living near the Blue Ridge and Albemarle County’s designation as a growth area has spurred tremendous expansion. In 2000, Crozet’s population hovered around 3,000. And by 2022, it had reached 9,956. Growth will continue, and many residents worry about losing Crozet’s small-town vibe. Perhaps they identify with Rita Mae Brown’s narrator, seeing the influx of new residents as “… the diamond-encrusted ‘come-here’ set who has descended on Crozet with plenty of wealth and no feeling for country ways.” But the purpose of the Crozet Master Plan is to encourage density to efficiently deliver services and infrastructure, such as the Crozet Library, the Downtown Crozet streetscape project, and investments in The Square, and community parks. REALTOR® David Farrell, with Mountain Area Nest Realty, understands how long-time residents feel. “It’s hard to find a place you love and watch it change. But people need great places to live, and this is one of them. It’s not realistic for recent newcomers to say, ‘now that I’m here, all growth should stop.’ We just need to manage it in a way that makes Crozet even better.”

Everything But the Donuts As the Crozet Master Plan adapts to new realities, people continue to flock there. Before it commanded enough gravitas on its own, many people moved to Crozet to be near Charlottesville. Such was the case with Terri Miyamoto and her husband in 2014. Upon retiring they wanted to relocate from New Jersey to “somewhere along the Blue

Ridge Mountains.” Of the towns they explored, they liked Charlottesville the best. Crozet had one of two area homes on the market with one-level living. Miyamoto reports, “I liked the vibe from Crozet and it was near enough to Charlottesville, which is what I really wanted. Today my trips to Charlottesville are much less frequent. Most everything we want is right here in Crozet.” Plopped on the edge of wine country, Crozet lays claim to Grace Estate, King Family, and Stinson wineries. The Chiles orchard and cidery and Pro Re Nata and Starr Hill breweries are also nearby attractions. In 2006, Starr Hill moved from Charlottesville to the vacated Morton Frozen Foods building that shuttered in 2000, laying off 600 employees. Morning beverage fans choose from Grit Coffee, Mudhouse Crozet, or a homegrown shop that just changed hands, reopening as The Yellow Mug. Wherever you are in Crozet, you’re not far from a unique dining experience. In only 3.7 square miles, Crozet serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner better than most larger towns. Smoked Kitchen & Tap, well-known as a Charlottesville food truck barbecue vendor, anchors Piedmont Place in downtown Crozet. The mixed-use building completed in 2016 brought luxury apartments, a marketplace, and a rooftop event space to town. Old Trail is home to Restoration, serving American casual or elegant fare at the golf club. Enjoy wine pairing dinners, special events, outdoor dining, and spectacular mountain views. Near the Old Trail Drive hub, choose from Coconut Thai Kitchen, Mi Rancho Mexican Crozet, and others. Near the Square you’ll find pizza lovers at Crozet Pizza, pub fare and a place to hang out at Fardowners, and specialty breakfast platters, burgers, sandwiches

and salads at the Whistle Stop Grill. Unique storefronts and services abound in Crozet. Think of it as a great small town, before big box stores arrived. Count on Crozet Hardware to have whatever you’re looking for. Even if you can’t find it, Jeff Brickhead and his crew know exactly where every specialty item is tucked away. Brickhead bought the hardware store after working there for 41 years, believing in Crozet’s bright future. Another unique retail operation, Bluebird and Co. is a combination bookstore, clothing, and gift shop. The new Crozet Grow Shop is just what home gardeners were missing. The 20-acre Barnes Lumber property downtown will become a new Crozet Square. With major road and building construction required, the complex will include a lighted promenade with outdoor dining and retail storefronts. A performing and art space will be prominent and much of the business space will be flexible. Developer Frank Stoner is targeting “early summer 2023 to be pushing dirt.” He has commitments from two hoteliers, one a small boutique, the other a selfserve condo hotel. Restaurants, services, and shops open and thrive if there are people to support them. Miyamato says, “Crozet doesn’t need to be preserved in amber. We still have room to grow. I would love a donut shop on Three Notched Road, but we need enough people to support that donut shop. If you want amenities, you need people.”

Hiking and Biking Central Crozet either attracts—or turns residents into—outdoors fans. Hikers and cyclists, golfers and strollers, Crozet has room for everyone. With Shenandoah National Park next door, strenuous hikes and lazy strolls come easy.


“There is still room for Crozet to grow,” says Farrell, “but we are running out of land that is easy to build on, other than the reserved phases of some older neighborhoods—like Pleasant Green. The first phase of Pleasant Green sold out almost instantly. Phase Two just opened.” Stanley Martin Homes has townhomes in Pleasant Green under $400,000 and single-family homes starting from $549,900. Rooftop terraces, finished lofts, gourmet kitchens, and designer finishes, coupled with a community clubhouse and other amenities make this a highly desirable neighborhood. Southern Development also has townhomes available in Old Trail from the low $500s. Sales Manager Sara Hoagland says, “Sales are brisk so don’t wait. Buyers love to be able to do some customization, and the fact that our homes are 100 percent Pearl Certified locks in the value of the home’s energy efficiency.” REALTOR® Kate Colvin, with Howard Hanna Roy Wheeler Realty, says “Craig Builders has two buildings of attached villas in Block 7 of Old Trail. The homes overlook a pond with dra-

Model Growth It’s not even classified as a town, but Crozet can model how a town should grow—dense, confined, with non-car transportation options, and meeting many of the daily needs of residents. Jaunt’s Crozet CONNECT is the weekday commuter service bringing riders from Crozet to UVA and Downtown Charlottesville. It’s a great start, but anyone driving Route 250 during commuter hours knows ridership could improve. Another potential link is the proposed Three Notched Trail shared-use path

1226 Stonegate Way ~ $467,000 One-level living ~ 2-car garage

1508 McAllister Street ~ $525,000 3.89 acres ~ Views & pasture

CONTRACT PENDING

CONTRACT PENDING

2635 White Hall Road ~ $425,000 3.65 acres ~ Blue Ridge views

891 Afton Mountain Rd ~ $685,000 2.43 acres ~ Expansive views

WWW.STEVENSANDCOMPANY.NET

between Charlottesville and Crozet to the Blue Ridge Tunnel in Afton. Albemarle County recently received a $2 million planning award to keep the project moving forward. “We wrote to [Transportation Secretary] Pete Buttigieg and got $2 million!” says Miyamoto. She does her part, working on the Crozet Trail Crew, riding her electric bike for recreation and transportation, and seeing the big picture. “I score Crozet high on my ‘Old Lady Quality of Life Metric.’ I can ride my electric bike to 10 wineries. Pippin Hill Farm and Vineyard is my limit, taking my whole battery charge to get there and back to Crozet. Last year I put more miles on my ebike than I did on my 15-yearold Honda. “We must address climate change as something we can impact. Swapping gas cars for electric vehicles won’t be enough. We need to have and use public transportation, and for public transportation to work we need density. “The best thing about Crozet is in five minutes on my bike, I can be out in the country—mooing at the cows and neighing at the horses. We must allow more density.” If so, that donut shop may yet open on Three Notched Road. And perhaps it will be the backdrop for Brown’s 31st book in the Mrs. Murphy Mysteries, set in Crozet and due to be published next spring. Carla Huckabee writes about high-performing real estate.

53

2236 White Hall Road ~ $698,500 18.77 acres ~ “Treetops”

795 Afton Mountain Rd ~ $345,000 2.16 acres ~ Project property

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Lot 1 Afton Mtn Rd ~ $580,000 17.34 acres ~ Incredible views

New Construction Still Rules

matic mountain views in the background. These are ready to customize with late 2023 deliverables.” “Glenbrook is also opening up some new construction,” says Farrell. Greenwood Homes offers townhomes from $399,900 and single-family homes from the upper $500,000s. Three-bedroom villas are also available from $469,900. Other pockets for future construction include Old Dominion Village along Route 240, which was approved for 110 townhomes and single-family homes on 24 acres. Farrell says, “Montclair is another proposed development. If it moves forward, that’s 150 more homes. “Buyers can find existing homes on the market in Crozet, but inventory is low, and prices are high. Third-quarter numbers show we are cooling off both in year-over-year numbers and one quarter to the next. Million-dollar homes used to come on the market occasionally in Crozet; now they’re common.”

FEATURE

777 Emmaeus Road ~ $1,185,000 7.68 acres ~ Blue Ridge views

Blue Ridge. I can ride right out from my driveway and not encounter much traffic and reach quiet roads without having to drive there. It’s wonderful.” Golfers enjoy the Old Trail Golf Club. The 18-hole championship golf course with practice facilities and a full-service clubhouse also welcomes youth with instructional programming and junior tees.

NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

And the Crozet Trails Crew is bringing trails as close to your door as possible. Instead of lamenting what’s missing, the Crew brings it into existence. Their work on multi-use trails throughout Crozet connects neighborhoods to parks and greenspaces at an enviable pace. Miyamato says “We are close to having a totally bikable community. The county has easements connecting neighborhoods and it’s in the Master Plan. We can make this happen.” One high-profile trail will connect the 22-acre Claudius Crozet Park west to the Square and east to Lickinghole Basin. The park includes athletic fields, tennis and pickleball courts, a walking trail, dog park, a fishing pond, and a pool as part of the aquatics and fitness center operated by ACAC Fitness and Wellness. Plans are in the works to replace the pool bubble with a permanent building and expanded indoor facilities. West of town, Mint Springs Valley Park offers three lakes, an extensive network of hiking trails, and an artificial beach for summer swimming. To the east, stocked Beaver Creek Lake welcomes electric-powered boats and watercraft. Most dry days find cyclists pedaling the quiet back roads around Crozet. One popular scenic ride is out Sugar Hollow Road towards Shenandoah National Park. Peter Aaron lives in the Glenbrook neighborhood and says, “Crozet is a wonderful place—rural enough to be away from the density of Charlottesville and close to less-traveled roads and the


54 NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

Anita Dunbar Helps You Move in the Right Direction An Albemarle County native with over 35 years of experience in the real estate industry! If you are looking for your dream home, selling your current home or just have questions about the market... I know the area and would love to assist you. One of a kind personalized service and one of the most referred agents in the Charlottesville area year after year!

November 12 Annual Wes Smith Memorial Stewing for a Cure 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. Madison Fire Hall - 1223 N. Main St., Madison, VA 22727

November 19 and December 10 Perfectly Piedmont Food, Arts, Craft Market 2022 Madison Farmers Market 9:oo a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 540-948-5515

CRS, SFR, SRES, Associate Broker

434.981.1421

500 Westfield Rd, Charlottesville, VA

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Friday, December 2nd Friday Night Christmas Lights Parade

Saturday, December 3rd Sunday, December 4th Merry Madison shopping event

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • REWeditor@c-ville.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@c-ville.com • 434.996.4019

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November 19 Emy Lou’s Roundup 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Emy Lou’s Boutique - 646 S. Main St., Madison, VA 22727 https://emylous.com/products/emylous-roundup-vip-ticket

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DESIGNER

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the C-VILLE Weekly, assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

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55 NOVEMBER 2 - 8, 2022 ISSUE 3144

WORKMAN COURT, FLUVANNA

HARRISON STREET, SCOTTSVILLE

Five miles to Zion Crossroads and I-64, this 41.84 acre property will make the perfect family compound or live in the cottage while you build. The quaint cottage features an inviting covered front porch, cozy wood stove in the great room, eat-in kitchen, 2 BR, full bath and 2 additional finished rooms on the 2nd floor. Outbuildings include a workshop with electric, run-in shed and more. Bold year-round stream. Bring your horses, ATV’s, etc and enjoy the privacy and natural beauty this land offers. MLS # 632112 $449,900

Hilltop House - Delightful, walkable community of Scottsville. Charming vintage 4 BR cape with apartment, 2 story detached masonry studio and separate city lot. New appliances. 3 full baths. In excellent condition and move in ready. Brand new standing seam roof on both buildings, with natural gas fireplace, beautiful kitchen and porch garden, fenced yard, multi-level decks and terraced gardens overlooking the town. Private parking. MLS # 628406 $425,000 *Also for rent

JAMES RIVER ROAD RECREATIONAL PARADISE Absolutely private and pristine deep water lake of 50+/- acres, with (2) miles of shoreline, in Nelson County, surrounded by nearly 800 acres of commercial pine forest, designed for staggered harvests into perpetuity. An incredibly rare recreational paradise. A new lake home, with quality appointments at waters edge, a boat house with (2) lifts and a large steel storage building to house toys and equipment. Internet and generator are in place. Nearly 7 miles of interior roads and trails with mountain views. Includes access to nearby James River! MLS # 632112 $4,400,000

NORTHERN ALBEMARLE COUNTY LOTS

PLANK RD, BATESVILLE

South River Meadows - 40.70 Acre spectacular one-of-a-kind estate parcel located in Greene County. Create your own family compound. Parcel is dividable and features a mature hardwood forest with driveway in place. MLS # 622032 $590,000

Beautiful 4.93 - acre parcel located just outside the quaint town of Batesville. Parcel is divided into two separate parcels. MLS # 634345 $179,500

Steve White (434) 242-8355 info@stevewhiterealtor.com

29 Years of Specializing in Buyer & Seller Representation for Residential, Farms & Estates

stevewhiterealtor.com

1100 Dryden Lane Charlottesville

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Rolling hills, views and privacy. Lots range from 4.55 to 8.46 acres. Prices start $242,500

FREDERICKSBURG RD, GREENE


Autumn Harvest Sale NOVEMBER 1ST - 30TH BULK PRODUCE

Organic Yellow Onions $1.79/lb

Organic Acorn & Butternut Squash $1.89/lb

Organic Yams $2.39/lb

Organic Regular Rolled Oats $2.49/lb (SRP $2.99)

Organic Evaporated Cane Juice $2.99/lb (SRP $3.49)

Organic Walnuts $9.99/lb (SRP $14.99)

Organic Dried Cranberries (Juice Sweetened) $11.99/lb (SRP $14.99)

Organic Celery $2.39 each

Organic Pecan Halves $15.99/lb (SRP $19.99)

GROCERY

Green & Black Chocolate Bars $4.19 (SRP $5.29)

Organic Canned Pumpkin 15 oz $3.99 (SRP $4.79)

Muir Glen Pasta Sauce 25.5 oz $4.99 (SRP $6.19)

Tofurky Vegetarian Roasts 25 oz $18.99 (SRP $23.99)

HEALTH & BODYCARE

Source Naturals & Planetary Herbal Supplements 15% Off

Boiron Homeopathic Remedies 15% Off

Wild Carrot Face & Body Care 15% Off

Nubian Heritage Body Care 15% Off

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