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REALTORS® LE AREA ASSOCIATION OFAugusta Nelson, Orange, A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVIL Greene, Louisa, Madison, Fluvanna, Charlottesville Albemarle,

l Commercial Rea ion Expansook Estatea Sunn y Outl Delivers

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INSIDE

Council approves Comprehensive Plan after hours of comment PAGE 13

Former police chief Brackney hits back at city for firing PAGE 15

CHRIS MARTIN

17 - 23, 2021 R E A LT O R S ® S S O C I AT I O N O F VOL. 30 NO. 46 n NOVEMBER ESVILLE AREA A F THE CHARLOTT A P U B L I C AT I O N O

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NOVEMBER 17 – 23, 2021 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

THE FOOD & DRINK ISSUE


2

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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Eastwood growlers now available! Take home our Prohibition Cider to enjoy with family this Thanksgiving!

Apple Pie and Mulled Wine, Black Wednesday and Black Friday specials, indoor and outdoor spaces to enjoy awardwinning wines and live music with friends and family! See calendar of events on eastwoodfarmandwinery.com Enjoy firepits and s'mores kits with your out-of-town guests, only 5 miles from the Downtown Mall.


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November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Christmas Eve And Other Stories


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INSIDE THIS ISSUE V.33, No. 46

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 434-817-2749 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

EDITORIAL EDITOR Ben Hitchcock (x40) news@c-ville.com

FEATURE 17

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger (x14) reporter@c-ville.com

Let’s eat!

CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com

From squash to cider to pie, our food and drink issue satisfies all your cravings. NEWS

11

35 Crossword

12 White nationalists interrogate each other in UTR trial.

37 Free Will Astrology

13 Council passes updated Comprehensive Plan.

Q&A

CULTURE

31

33 Screens: Tightly wound Hollywood agent tries to pass The Beta Test.

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Kristin O’Donoghue

34 Sudoku

15 Will city have to pay fired police chief $3 million?

COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen

39 How are you shaking up your Thanksgiving this year?

CLASSIFIED 40

Real Estate Weekly Page 43

CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Amelia Delphos, Carol Diggs, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Lisa Provence, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION ART DIRECTOR Max March (x16) GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Gabby Kirk (x36) classifieds@c-ville.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Chloe Heimer, Lisa C. Hurdle (x30),

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DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman (x39) REAL ESTATE WEEKLY Beth Wood (x56) PRODUCTION COORDINATOR Faith Gibson (x25)

BUSINESS PUBLISHER Anna Harrison (x51)

Inside. Outside. Home. FALL 2021

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CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Debbie Miller (x28) A/R SPECIALIST Nanci Winter (x33) CIRCULATION MANAGER Billy Dempsey (x32)

C-VILLE HOLDINGS, LLC Bill Chapman, Blair Kelly

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C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 20,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle, and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. ©2021 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

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THIS WEEK

My family eats ribs on Thanksgiving. We have turkey too, most of the time, but the main event is the ribs, which everyone likes more than turkey anyway. The tradition began maybe a decade ago, when my aunt, a professional caterer, arrived in town for the holiday and wisely declared that ribs would make the whole endeavor more fun. She was right, and it stuck. Anything can be a tradition if you do it a couple of times in a row. This holiday season will taste even better than usual, I think. Last year, the family I usually see didn’t gather, fearful of the winter surge of the then-9-month-old pandemic. But after widespread vaccination, we’ll all be back together again this time around. Let’s lean in to this season’s trite little exercise: What are you thankful for this year? I’m thankful that I live in a community full of engaged citizens (p. 13) and great food (p. 17). I’m thankful for the safety of my friends and family. And I’m thankful for ribs.—Ben Hitchcock

11.17.21

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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DELTA RAE

WITH WYN STARKS AND CARRIE WELLING

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gold and silver are still up!

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THE MOVEMENT

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SOCCER MOMMY

ROCKY BUYS:

buying gold silver and antiques daily

UNSEQUESTERED TOUR

01-22 | SAVED BY THE 90’S 01-23 | ANDERSON EAST

WITH BENDIGO FLETCHER

02-07 | CORY AND THE WONGNOTES FT. ANTWAUN STANLEY SPECIAL GUEST SIERRA HULL

HOURS: tues - sat 9:30 - 5 • 1-800-296-8676 Antiques open at 9:00

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02-12 | RIPE 02-13 | YOLA WITH SPECIAL GUEST JAC ROSS RENT THE JEFFERSON FOR YOUR EVENT!

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12-02 | 7TH GRADE GIRL FIGHT 12-03 | DARLINGSIDE 12-07 | SIERRA FERRELL LONG TIME COMING TOUR SOLD OUT WITH MELISSA CARPER

12-08 | DAR WILLIAMS 12-09 | JULIAN LAGE 12-10 | BULLY WITH GRAHAM HUNT BAND 12-11 | ZACK MEXICO WITH NEW BOSS AND PIRANHA RAMA

12-17 | DISCO RISQUE + FREE UNION XMAS SPECIAL 01-30 | LOST DOG STREET BAND WITH CASPER ALLEN

02-10 | JOE PURDY 02-11 | WILD RIVERS WITH COREY HARPER 02-12 | SUSTO 02-20 | ANDY SHAUF WITH YVES JARVIS 02-21 | SUN JUNE WITH DAPHNE TUNES 03-04 | SOUTHERN CULTURE ON THE SKIDS 03-31 | LEIF VOLLEBEKK

EAT AT THE SOUTHERN CAFÉ look for our daily specials!

café opens 2 hours prior to performances RENT THE SOUTHERN!

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jewelry repairs done on the premises often while you wait paying $2,000 - $3,000 for ladies Rolex watches and $2,500-$3,500 for men’s two-tone Rolex watches

11-22 | HOUNDMOUTH WITH ONA 11-24 | THANKFUL DEAD: BIGFOOT COUNTRY + SISTERS & BROTHERS 11-26 | THE LEGWARMERS: THE ULTIMATE 80’S TRIBUTE BAND PRESENTED BY GENERATIONS 102.3 12-04 | MIPSO WITH LOWLAND HUM 12-08 | ROBERT EARL KEEN’S CHRISTMAS SHOW 12-11 | DAN TYMINSKI BLUEGRASS BAND 12-15 | THE MOUNTAIN GOATS NEW DATE 12-22 | PUDDLES PITY PARTY

11-26 | KINGS OF THE WILD THINGS/ THE BAND BIG! 11-27 | 14 STORIES

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Rocky pays more for gold, silver and many other items he can resell GOLD, SILVER, PLATINUM JEWELRY (EVEN BROKEN) GOLD, SILVER PLATINUM COINS, BULLION HE PAYS EXTRA FOR GEMSTONES AND DIAMONDS HE CAN RESELL ROCKY WILL PAY UP TO $3000 FOR A GOOD ONE CARAT DIAMOND SOLITAIRE STERLING FLATWARE, HOLLOWWARE ANTIQUE GUNS AND AMMUNITION, SWORDS, CIVIL WAR ITEMS POST CARDS, OLD QUILTS, OLD CLOCKS, ANTIQUE FURNITURE SOME GLASSWARE SOME COSTUME JEWELRY SOME POCKET AND WRIST WATCHES LIKE ROLEX, PATEK PHILIPPE, OMEGA, AND MORE RUNNING OR NOT SHENANDOAH VALLEY POTTERY

THE NUDE PARTY

THE CADILLAC THREE THE STEEL WHEELS

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BENEFITING THE ARC OF THE PIEDMONT PRESENTED BY:

HARPER’S ALLSTATE INSURANCE & ANTHEM HEALTHKEEPERS PLUS

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2021 Ting Pavilion on the Downtown Mall (Course: 1 mile)

B E N E F I T I N G T H E A R C O F T H E REGISTRATION PIEDMONT

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 2019

Adults $25 • Children 3-12 $15 • Under 3 FREE Ask About Our Virtual Option

print Pavilion on the Downtown Pick up yourMall Santa(Course: costume 1ormile) elf ears at the

Arc Of The Piedmont on 1149 Rose Hill Drive or at Registration on Day of Event starting at 9:00am

BE A CLAUS FOR A CAUSE! This is an event you don’t want to miss as the

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community runsand and walks together to raise funds All proceeds support the programs services to support individuals with developmental disabilities. Arc of the Piedmont provides for people in our community Follow us on social media: with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

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November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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The Virginia Glee Club

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81st Annual

Christmas Concerts Frank Albinder, Conductor Daniel Hine, Accompanist

DID YOU K NOW W E A LWA Y S O F F E R 2 0 % O F F H O L I DAY CA R D S A N D I N V I TAT I O N S? S e t up yo u r a ppo i n t m e n t t o day t o l o o k at N EW HOLI DAY CAR D DESI G N S! # S H OPLO CAL

your holiday headquarters . gifts, wrapping, décor & cards 321 east main street . downtown mall . 434.979.6366 . hey@thinkrockpaperscissors.com @rps_cville . www.thinkrockpaperscissors.com

Old Cabell Hall On the Lawn at UVA

Friday, December 3, 2021 8 PM

University Baptist Church 1223 W. Main Street

Saturday, December 11, 2021 8 PM

$20.00

General Admission

$5.00

Students

Tickets at UVA Arts Box Office artsboxoffice.virginia.edu 434.924.3376 VirginiaGleeClub.org The Virginia Glee Club is an affiliated group of the Department of Music at the University of Virginia

Virginia Glee Club Harmony, Love, & Brotherhood since 1871

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10

Protect the ones you love,

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Grand ! Illuminatio N Ting Pavilion

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Charlottesville’s

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“No One wanted to come to work today so we are closed Sorry”

11

—A sign posted on the drive-through kiosk at Charlottesville’s KFC last weekend (courtesy of Reddit user u/vovANUBISvov)

NEWS More early birds than ever

The state’s current congressional map (above) yielded seven Democratic representatives and four Republicans in the 2020 election. After a bipartisan redistricting committee fell apart last month, the creation of a new map will be overseen by the Virginia Supreme Court.

Progressive candidate joins Albemarle prosecutor’s office

Huge gift to LAJC The Legal Aid Justice Center, a criminal justice reform advocacy organization based in Charlottesville, received a whopping, unrestricted gift of $10 million from local mega-donor Sonjia Smith last week. Angela Ciolfi, LAJC’s executive director, says she’s already begun meeting with community organizations from across the commonwealth, and that LAJC plans to expand its operations into new areas of the state.

The gift will allow the LAJC to work more closely with existing networks in Charlottesville, Richmond, Falls Church, and Petersburg, and to expand in Hampton Roads and other parts of Virginia, the organization says. “I trust Angela and her team to be the deeply passionate advocates I’ve known them to be, and I trust them to use this gift to go where communities tell them to go and do what communities tell them they need,” said Smith.

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Former Charlottesville commonwealth’s attorney candidate Ray Szwabowski has joined the Albemarle County CA’s office as a prosecutor. Szwabowski was a public defender before running for the city’s prosecutor job this summer, arguing that Charlottesville punishes those who have committed crimes too harshly. “I’m excited to have this outstanding lawyer join the team and help us move our progressive agenda forward,” says county CA Jim Hingeley.

@cville_weekly

Brian Wheeler’s last day as Charlottesville’s director of communications is November 19.

from each party, and didn’t final map. The initial Dem like what they saw—the list included three political court ordered the Republiscience professors, all from cans to go back to square one, California. and come up with three new Delegate Marcus Simon, one of the Democratic legislators names. Every GOP nominee had worked directly with Rewho served on the now-defunct publicans in redistricting in redistricting commission, sounded off on the developthe past, and the court suggested they wouldn’t be neuments on Twitter. “Glad to see tral enough for the process. the GOPs initial attempt to The court also told the inject hyper-partisan mapmakDemocrats to submit an aders into the process has been Del. Marcus Simon ditional name, as one of the thwarted for the time being,” Simon wrote. “It will take continued vigilance proposed drawers expressed reservations about the process by which two map drawon the part of Democratic lawmakers & aders will be able to collaborate on a single vocates to keep them honest going forward.” SUPPLIED PHOTO

STAFF PHOTO

V

irginia’s redistricting process continues to lurch forward. Last year, voters approved the Democrats’ legislation creating a new, bipartisan committee to draw the districts for state and federal elections. That committee, however, met for two months and then collapsed, unable to overcome its partisan differences. The state’s redistricting process will now be steered by the Virginia Supreme Court. Each party is responsible for submitting a list of three map drawers to the court. The court is supposed to pick one from each list, and the two chosen map drawers will work together to create a viable map. Last Friday, members of the court reviewed the submitted lists of map drawers

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

US GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

UVA saw a 17 percent increase in early decision applications and a seven percent increase in early action applications from 2020 to 2021. The school eliminated its binding early decision option in 2006, in an effort to even the playing field for low-income students, but reinstated the option in 2019. This year, the school received 3,442 early decision applications and 31,152 early action applications. There was an increase in early applicants across all demographics, except for the Native American applicant pool, which had 28 applicants in this year’s and last year’s cycles. First-generation applications increased by 29 percent, and legacy applications went up by 2 percent.

Three things in life are certain: death, taxes, and Charlottesville government officials resigning. The latest city employee to move on to greener pastures is communications director Brian Wheeler, who held the job for three years. Wheeler says he and his family plan to leave the Charlottesville area.

PAGE 13

Virginia Supreme Court rejects GOP mapmaker nominees

IN BRIEF

City spokesman resigns

All over the map


12

NEWS

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everend Seth Wispelwey was not physically injured at the August 12, 2017, Unite the Right rally, but during his testimony in the Sines v. Kessler trial last week, he said he was “wounded badly that summer.” The third week of the trial, in which a group of plaintiffs are seeking to prove the organizers of Unite the Right conspired to commit racially motivated violence, saw further testimony from defendants and expert witnesses. Wispelwey, who grew up in Charlottesville, was an ordained minister with the United Church of Christ. In 2017, he co-founded Congregate, a group of local clergy whose purpose was to “show up in loving support for our community for what we understood would be a violent event,” he testified. On August 11, Congregate held a prayer meeting at St. Paul’s Episcopal. 700 people showed up, but were evacuated when news reached the church that white nationalists were marching at UVA. The next morning, Wispelwey was among counterprotesters in Emancipation Park when Unite the Righters arrived. “I heard yelling and ‘kill the faggot priests,’” said Wispelwey, adding that he was pushed and tripped into the bushes.

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November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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TRIO CELESTE

Later, he was at Escafé on Water Street when he heard a car had hit people. He rushed to Fourth Street. He remembers seeing a young Black woman writhing on the ground, two smashed cars, glass and blood, and bodies on the road. “I didn’t know what had happened,” he said. “It was awful.” Wispelwey said he was diagnosed with PTSD, has night terrors, panic attacks, and has been unable to work full-time or go out socially as he once did. “I used to be an extrovert,” he said. “I don’t even know what I am anymore.” Defendants Richard Spencer and Chris Cantwell, both defending themselves, question Wispelwey about his faith. Said Wispelwey, “I don’t subscribe to the belief that, just because someone calls himself a Christian, that we share the same beliefs.” The next day, the plaintiffs called expert witness Pete Simi to the stand. Simi is a sociology professor at Chapman University who has studied hate crimes, hate groups, and domestic terrorism since 1996.

Defendant Jason Kessler (center) at the August 2017 Unite the Right rally.


NEWS

City Council approves Comprehensive Plan, Future Land Use Map By Ben Hitchcock editor@c-ville.com

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

C

The mustard-colored areas in the Future Land Use Map (above) are designated medium-intensity residential, meaning this is where the city might be able to support increased density. Concern from some citizens and councilors over the inclusion medium-intensity residential wasn’t enough to delay the passage of the Comprehensive Plan.

“Most people who work at Bodo’s commute 45 minutes to an hour to work there. I would like to continue to commute by bicycle, and I think this plan would help.” MIRANDA ELLIOTT RADER, BODO’S EMPLOYEE

to undo the legacies of segregation that are still built in to the city’s streets. Matthew Gillikin, an organizer with prodensity housing group Livable Cville, spoke in favor of the plan. He noted the wide variety of organizations that signed on to a letter of support from Livable Cville, including a dozen religious congregations, Charlottesville DSA, and the UVA Student Council. Miranda Elliot Rader, an employee at Bodo’s, also was in favor of the plan. “Most of my co-workers live outside of Albemarle County. Most people who work at Bodo’s commute 45 minutes to an hour to work there,” she said. “I would like to continue to commute by bicycle, and I think this plan would help.” Carmelita Wood, president of the Fifeville Neighborhood Association, spoke in support of the plan, arguing that it would help fight the long history of segregation in the city. “It addresses so many of the problems we have in the city, past and present,” Wood said. (Some commenters didn’t make pointed remarks either way. One began by saying, “I

am speaking for all species that are sharing Charlottesville, and also cannot find shelter here,” such as “birds, bugs, bees, butterflies,” and more. Another said he “would like to speak on behalf of the humble sidewalk,” and asked for better sidewalks all around.) After three hours of public comment— and after 11pm—City Council members got a chance to talk over what they’d heard. Councilors Heather Hill and Lloyd Snook both expressed reservations about the placement of medium-intensity residential lots, and suggested pulling those sections out of the map, with the intention of adding increased density in certain areas later during the zoning rewrite. Councilor Michael Payne suggested a better course of action would be to move forward with the map as is. “We’re more likely to retain medium-intensity residential in some capacity if we keep it in there, and through the zoning rewrite process chisel it down,” he said. Payne repeatedly pointed out that the zoning rewrite process is going to take more than a year, and will involve more specific market analyses and data. “This is not the final word by any means,” he said. Eventually, the council unanimously voted to approve the Comprehensive Plan. Longtime affordable housing resident Joy Johnson spoke at the very end of the public comment period. “We’ve really been working hard on this since 2017,” she said. “I urge all of the supporters on this call tonight to keep your eyes on it. The real work is in the implementation.”

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ity Council voted unanimously on Monday night to approve a new Comprehensive Plan. The plan, which has been in the works since 2017, will guide Charlottesville’s growth and development in the years to come. The most controversial element of the plan is the Future Land Use Map, which shows the neighborhoods in the city that might be able to support increased development. The map’s path to this point has been long and controversial, with some community members advocating for even greater increased housing density across the city, and others arguing the map’s changes go too far. The last year has seen multiple rounds of amendments to the map, coalitions of residents formed to advocate their positions, letter-writing campaigns and the circulation of petitions, and even a full-page advertisement in The Daily Progress, taken out by a group hoping to delay the process. At Monday night’s public hearing on the Comprehensive Plan, 71 community members addressed council, with 41 speakers expressing their support for the immediate adoption of the plan. The hearing began with a presentation from Jennifer Koch and Ron Sessoms, planners at Rhodeside & Harwell, the consulting firm retained to oversee the process. In his presentation, Sessoms addressed what would become the evening’s central point of contention: The map designates some lots that are currently zoned for only single-family homes as “medium-intensity residential,” allowing up to 12 units to be constructed. Sessoms emphasized the “up to” in the “up to 12 units” designation, saying that those areas “support a variety of housing types and scales.” The adoption of the Land Use Map will give way to a lot-by-lot zoning rewrite, which will set more specific, binding rules for what can be built where. That didn’t stop some public commenters from expressing their concerns with the designation. Early in the evening, caller Tracy Carlson ran through a skit of sorts, in which a theoretical homebuyer and realtor have a conversation about the possibility of a 12-unit building being built on the street. (Later, another commenter called the skit “ludicrous.”) Charlotte Meadows opposed the plan because she felt it was “increasing density just for the sake of increasing density.” David Aller said he was against the plan because the vacant lot next to his house, which he currently uses as a tomato garden, is designated medium-intensity residential, meaning the next owner of the lot might be able to build apartments there. Those who supported the map cited the need to make the city less car dependent and more environmentally friendly, and the need

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For more in-depth coverage of the ongoing trial, go to c-ville.com, where we’re posting longer, daily updates from the courtroom.

Mapping a course

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

After looking at thousands of texts, videos, and emails, and 575,000 posts on Discord with a colleague, he concluded, “The defendants relied on the core characteristics of the white supremacist movement when they organized Unite the Right.” He then listed those characteristics: racist ideologies, the glorification and use of violence, the separation of public and private speech, and strategies to create plausible deniability for their actions. “They believe violence is a necessary course of action, self-defense to prevent extinction,” said Simi. James Fields, who drove his Dodge Challenger into a crowd, tweeted a meme that said, “Love your race, stop white genocide.” The subtext, said Simi, is that “stopping white genocide requires violence.” Cantwell asked Simi if critical race theory influenced his work. “We’re not going down the road of critical race theory,” instructed Judge Norman K. Moon, who expressed his exasperation with the defendants’ courtroom behavior multiple times over the course of the week. On Monday, Jason Kessler took the stand. Kessler, who grew up in Fluvanna and graduated from UVA in 2009, was among the rally’s chief organizers. Attorney Karen Dunn introduced multiple exhibits in which Kessler promoted Unite the Right as a violent event. “I would go to the ends of the earth to secure a future for my people,” he said in a May 20, 2017, Discord post. “This is war.” And he texted Spencer: “We’re raising an army my liege. For free speech and the cracking of skulls if it comes to it.” Kessler took aim at other co-defendants. He called Spencer a “narcissist and sociopath” and said Robert “Azzmador” Ray, who currently is on the lam for blowing off document production and court orders, was a “scumbag” and “a very bad person” that he didn’t want at the event, although video from August 12 showed Kessler and Ray acting very buddy-buddy. After Fields plowed into counterprotesters on August 12, Kessler sent a text to Cantwell inviting him to a meeting that would be limited to “leaders and essential people only” to get their story out. “I remember we were very panicked and shocked by it,” said Kessler. He messaged Elliott Kline three times that they needed to shut down the Discord server, where many attendees made plans to go to the rally. “People were saying highly inappropriate things,” said Kessler. “Specifically, people were mocking Heather Heyer. That was my concern. I didn’t want Discord to be a platform for these trolls.” However, that wasn’t what he said in 2017, when he tweeted on August 18 that Heyer “was a fat disgusting communist,” and on August 24, “I 100 percent believe Heather Heyer was to blame for participating in an armed mob blocking traffic during a state of emergency.” The plaintiffs have presented their last witness, and it’s now the defense’s turn to present its case.

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NEWS

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Firing back By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

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Former Charlottesville police chief RaShall Brackney is threatening a lawsuit against the city.

“My professional reputation has been diminished, harmed, devalued by this city.” FORMER CPD CHIEF RASHALL BRACKNEY

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confront and arrest individuals for blocking streets, shutting down traffic, or other violations of a special events permit.” “My reward for doing what’s right? Slander. My reward? Defamation. My reward? Retaliation, harassment, humiliation. My reward for challenging the system of supremacy? Termination,” said Brackney at the press conference. During a City Council meeting following Brackney’s termination, Boyles, who said he’d held discussions with police officers, city leaders, Wells, and other parties, claimed that key departmental leaders planned to quit their jobs due to their lack of trust in the chief. He pointed to the results of two anonymous surveys of officers—one conducted by the department last year, the other conducted by the Police Benevolent Association in August—which led him to believe the department would only descend into “further chaos” under Brackney’s leadership. Tucker emphasized that the PBA survey was commissioned in July, shortly after Brackney had disbanded the SWAT team and disciplined multiple officers for misconduct. It remains unclear who the survey was sent to. “The timing of it is suspect, where it came from is suspect, the way it was used is very suspect,” he said. Brackney pointed out that Boyles himself admitted he had no faith in the survey, and called it “unscientific.”

In explaining his rationale for the firing, Boyles claimed that he had consulted various department employees and area public safety experts. Brackney’s team submitted Freedom of Information Act requests for records of those meetings, and was told that no records matched the request. “Not one shred of documented evidence exists that these ‘interviews’ were conducted,” she writes. “You slandered me. You libeled me. You literally diminished me. And then now you’ve been torturing me for the past two months,” said Brackney of Boyles. According to Tucker, Brackney still works at the department, and will be on the payroll until the end of the month. However, she has lost access to all CPD spaces and systems, and must make an appointment to enter the department and be escorted around by a subordinate officer. “They have curtailed the information that she’s receiving on a day-to-day basis, and have basically stripped her of her responsibilities for the most part, and have her shadow a captain,” he explained during the press conference. The city has until November 26 to respond to Brackney. If it does not reach a settlement agreement with her, the former chief will take her case to federal court. In her complaint to the NAACP, she also urged the organization to file a class-action suit against the city for its “pattern” of discrimination. After all this, Brackney remains open to staying at CPD, if the city’s new management offers her the job back. “My attorney and I will not take anything off the table,” said Brackney. “The city’s got the next move.”

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

wo months after her controversial firing, former Charlottesville police chief RaShall Brackney has filed formal complaints against the city, and is threatening to bring a lawsuit. In complaints submitted to CPD’s human resources department, the local Office of Human Rights, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and the NAACP, Brackney—the city’s first Black woman police chief—says her firing was direct retaliation against her efforts to dismantle white supremacy within the department. Since Brackney’s firing by then-city manager Chip Boyles (who has since resigned) on September 1, she also claims that city leadership has defamed, harassed, and discriminated against her based on her race and sex. Brackney is demanding $3 million and a public apology. The city is allowed to fire Brackney without cause. However, Brackney claims that after she was dismissed, public comments from the city manager and other leaders insinuated that she was fired with cause. That, her legal team argues, constitutes a wrongful termination. “For the actions I took, for the attempt to dismantle racism, misogyny, nepotism, and police violence, I was deemed, quote, ‘not a good fit’ for this city,” said Brackney at a downtown press conference last week. “My professional reputation has been diminished, harmed, devalued by this city.” City spokesman Brian Wheeler, who also announced his resignation this month, said the city has “no comment at this time” on Brackney’s complaints. During the press conference, attorney Charles Tucker of The Cochran Firm walked through the events leading up to Brackney’s firing, beginning with her receipt of an email and video from a “concerned citizen” on June 6. “What the video uncovered was that several officers using a city phone were engaged in police misconduct,” said Tucker. “[Brackney] put those who were responsible under investigation.” According to a city statement released in August, the investigation revealed that SWAT team officers filmed their children setting off explosives, circulated pornographic videos and racist jokes on department cell phones, threatened to kill department leaders, and fired semi-automatic weapons at unauthorized events. Brackney fired one officer, and dissolved the SWAT team. Two more officers resigned. As early as August 2, Tucker said that Boyles began holding secret meetings with city leaders to discuss terminating the chief. In her complaint to the Office of Human Rights, Brackney accuses Boyles, City At-

torney Lisa Robertson, City Councilors Heather Hill and Lloyd Snook, Vice-Mayor Sena Magill, Police Civilian Review Board Chair Bellamy Brown, Police Benevolent Association President Mike Wells, Major James Mooney (who has also since retired), and Captain Tito Durrette of colluding to get her fired, in response to her disciplining “white male officers for criminal and departmental misconduct.” Tucker claimed he and Brackney have records of emails with evidence of the meetings, but did not plan to release them publicly at this time. Brackney declined an interview with CVILLE for this story, but did provide written responses to our questions. Before her termination, Brackney writes that she had an “open, transparent, and professional relationship” with Boyles, and that he gave her “no indication” he believed the department needed a leadership change. Citing community backlash against Brackney’s termination—along with Mayor Nikuyah Walker’s pushback—Boyles resigned as city manager in October. He has taken a new job as executive director of the George Washington Regional Commission in Fredericksburg. “The city’s response to my actions… [sends] a message that proclaims throughout CPD and City Hall that the good ol’ boys system of patronage and insularity are alive and well in Charlottesville,” said Brackney during the press conference. In addition to disbanding the SWAT team, removing school resource officers from city schools, and ending CPD’s relationship with the Jefferson Area Drug Enforcement Task Force, Brackney said she held officers accountable for severe misconduct, including police brutality, domestic violence, sexual assault, and child abuse. She also claimed the SWAT team has been secretly reassembling since her termination, and will be fully funded in the FY23 CPD budget. The former chief also accused the city of rewarding people who support systemic racism. Brackney said Durrette, a former SWAT team commander, was on a “performance improvement plan” before he was promoted to assistant police chief, following Mooney’s retirement last month. Durrette is leading the department until a new permanent chief is hired. During her three-year tenure as chief, Brackney writes that some officers “openly embraced and supported reform.” But some of her initiatives were met with concerted pushback. In particular, she required officers to participate in implicit and explicit bias training, which was unpopular. She also required them to file Response to Resistance reports for every use-of-force incident in the field. Officers also disagreed with Brackney’s response to last year’s protests against police violence, and believed CPD “should

JACKSON SMITH

Former police chief sues city


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The perfect gift for the UVA student or alum. Available New Dominion Bookshop, at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.


17

Season’s eatings November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com facebook.com/cville.weekly

Loosen your belts, people—Thanksgiving is just around the corner. Before you know it, the decadent aroma of your favorite pie will be wafting out of the kitchen. We hope our annual food and drink issue gives you some inspiration for local eating this holiday season and beyond. Let the gourd times roll.


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Take your pick

Squash sourcing with Whisper Hill Farm’s Holly Hammond By Chris Martin

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SUPPLIED PHOTO

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ith serious supply shortages and shipping delays slowing everything down, holiday cooking staples from bacon to flour to peppercorns and more have suddenly become hard to come by. But fear not—the humble squash is here to save the day. More than just funky fall porch decor, the squash is an often-overlooked veggie with many varieties that can be found locally in abundance in both summer and winter. Scottsville’s Whisper Hill Farm cultivates a wide variety of vegetables, and is a great place to find different types of squash. Co-owner Holly Hammond grew up on an 80-acre “u-pick’’ vegetable farm in Arizona, before working at Waterpenny Farm in Sperryville. She started Whisper Hill in 2010, using USDA organic methods with a focus on sustainable practices. “We grow so much squash in volume, we seek production that complements our crop rotation,” says Hammond. “We grow butternut, delicata, gray kabocha, orange kabocha, and spaghetti squash.” Farmers start their squash seeds at the end of May and transplant them in June. “The insects are the worst,” says Hammond. Squash bugs and cucumber beetles are quick to fly down and multiply, and Hammond suggests would-be squash-growers use row cover, a breathable cloth that creates a greenhouse-like environment, even if it’s not pretty. Whisper Hill covers its squash for about three weeks, and it’s a key to the plants’ ability to thrive. “Keeping the cover on really helps the plants get big, strong, and able to withstand bugs,” says Hammond. “Uncover the squash when it starts blooming because it needs to be pollinated to produce.” The oldest documentation of squash stems can be traced back 10,000 years to Mexico. The word is attributed to the Narragansett Indian tribe, who tell a story about a crow bringing a gift of seeds in its beak. Indigenous Americans taught English settlers about the curing of squash, a longstanding practice that is optional and varies by farm.

Holly Hammond (right) is selling her Whisper Hill Farm squash and other veggies at the IX farmers’ market on Saturdays through the end of November.

“There’s certain squash that don’t need to be cured,” says Hammond, noting that delicata and acorn squash are good examples “because they’re not storage squash.” Curing refers to storing hardy winter vegetables in ideal conditions, resulting in small amounts of dehydration, flavor concentration, and the formation of thicker skin. “We’ll cure our sweet potatoes at 80 degrees and 30 percent humidity,” says Hammond, adding that she prefers them a little less cured. “When you cure them they essentially get sweeter as they age,” she says. “I notice that butternut gets considerably sweeter…for baked goods it’s delicious.” If

you’re going the savory route, look for uncured squash, which has a crisper flavor that will complement saltier foods. With the winter crops, Hammond says the easy part is the harvest. “Unlike summer squash, which you harvest daily, winter squash you harvest all at once.” Whisper Hill Farm spends about a week harvesting over 10,000 pounds of winter squash, a hefty workload that includes cleaning the vegetables off with rags, hauling them from the garden over multiple trips, and putting them into squash or watermelon bins. From there, the veggie is sent to farmers’ markets, restaurants, and grocery stores.

H ARVE ST GE MS

A squash by any other name... Acorn squash Typically green on the outside, there’s also a white variety that can be found in the area. Quarter it and slice it with the skin on into half-inch-thick pieces, start it in a sautée pan with a high-heattolerant oil, and flavor with fresh herbs like thyme or rosemary. Spaghetti squash Large pale yellow squash with yellow flesh that is known for being a substitute for pasta. Cut it in half, remove the seeds, and roast it cut-side

down until you can drag a fork through the squash to shred it. This squash is mild with a slight sweetness that can be accented with salt.

or grayish-blue edible skin, and is tasty in both savory and sweet applications. Use it as a substitute for pumpkin purée in baking.

Delicata squash Typically yellow with green stripes in its indents, it has a chewy peel, which can be eaten or removed. With hints of corn and molasses, it’s a great substitute for pumpkin in savories and roasts well.

Butternut squash Notable for its pale skin and orange flesh, this squash also comes in a smaller version called honeynut squash. It makes an excellent roasted veggie, and is a go-to for soup that can be topped with fried sage leaves, toasted nuts or seeds, or a swirl of creme fraiche.

Kabocha squash This lovely squash has orange


19

Core focus

Local producers are making cider stand out By Paul Ting

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November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

t’s well known that our founding fathers brewed beer, distilled whiskey, and, in the case of Thomas Jefferson, worked diligently to make wine in Virginia. But cider, too has been in production since the Colonial era—both Washington and Jefferson also grew apples and brewed cider. The industrial revolution saw a decline in the cider industry, but these days the beverage is experiencing a resurgence in the state. Traditional cider comes from apples specifically selected for cider making, because they are not necessarily “good eating.” Cider apples can taste sour from high acidity or bitter from high tannin content. Just like in winemaking, these components provide structure, mouthfeel, texture, and complexity of flavor, and make cider a beautiful pairing with food. Patrick Collins of Patois Cider explains that “cider isn’t monolithic,” and therefore there’s “lots of versatility with potential pairings based on varietal, terroir, cellar techniques,” and so on. He says that many ciders are “delicate and nuanced” and may get lost with heavy sauces. He suggests pairing them with “strong singular flavors like soft-ripened cheese.” One example is Arkansas Black from Albemarle CiderWorks. It has delicate flavors of green apples and melons, refreshing acidity, and a bit of tannic structure that brings a slight minerality. In addition to pairing well with a soft triple-cream cheese, it works well with oysters, shellfish, or truffled pasta and dishes with a lighter white sauce. Potter’s Craft Cider’s Pelure goes in a very different direction, intentionally keeping juice in contact with the skins for an extended period of time and aging in oak for 10 months, much like a red wine. The resulting tannic structure is balanced by acidity and a light bubbly effervescence that lifts what otherwise might be a very heavy and structured cider. This cider is not for everyone, it can accurately be described as “funky” or “meaty,” and it can be paired with heavier food. Try it with roast chicken, salami, sausages on the grill, or venison stew. Patois Cider’s Bricolage is a sparkling cider made in the traditional method (the same method as Champagne) and produced entirely from foraged fruit. The bubbles and fruit aromas might give the initial impression of a light and whimsical cider, but you’ll find complex and deep flavors that bring to mind flowers, dried apricot, tart plums, and wet stone. It begs to be paired with food and is versatile enough to drink through your whole meal. A classic cider pairing with roast pork works exceedingly well, but also try it with fried chicken, roasted whole fish, and smoked mushroom tacos.


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Sweet cycle

Beehives in winter are still buzzing with activity By Carrie Meslar

EZE AMOS

A

jar of honey seems like a simple thing. One ingredient, most often drizzled or spooned out in those hazy first hours of the day. Yet, to bring that honey to the table is an involved year-long process that offers little rest for those who decide to take up the challenge. For Ryan Williamson of Sourwood Farm, beekeeping is a family affair. With both his father and father-in-law having raised bees, the hobby, in partnership with his wife, has grown into an all-hands-on-deck business that includes even the youngest members of the Williamson clan. As winter approaches, things slow down for area beekeepers, but they certainly don’t stop. From the outside, an apiary appears quiet, but there is important activity taking place within the hive. It’s a common misconception that bees hibernate, when in fact they cluster together around the queen, shivering and moving their wings to generate heat. Outer bees rotate inwards, so the cluster is in constant motion. This process takes quite a bit of energy, and requires the bees to feed on the stores of honey in their hives. Beekeepers often supplement this honey, or in off years, completely rely on the feeding of sugar to the bees to keep them alive. Williamson notes that it is important that this feeding process ends in late winter, ensuring that when spring comes, and bees venture out to start collecting pollen, the chambers of the hive that will be pulled for honey are free from added sweeteners.

The Williamsons’ wildflower honey can be found at various local retailers, including J.M. Stock Provisions, and on tap at Sourwood Farm by appointment.

EA SY AS L O C AL , F RE SH -B AK E D P I E

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ith the holidays fast approaching, bakeries are sifting through 50-pound bags of flour faster than you can open a can of cranberry sauce, and pie is cooling around every corner. Local pie maker and young entrepreneur Megan Adams is facing down another holiday baking season. Adams sells sumptuous apple hand pies, mini pies, and eight-inch pies through Basan, the Korean food truck. She makes everything from scratch, and even in a locally crowded pie market, Adams’ work stands out. Her arrangement with Basan is new, but she says baking has been part of her life since she was a child, recalling fond memories of baking as a toddler with her mother. It was while working for Camille Phillips at Greenhouse Coffee in Crozet, that Adams’ passion caught fire. “Everything came back to me,” she says. “What I had been wanting to learn more of as a child.” She attended a local culinary program through the Jefferson School and PVCC. “I loved baking, garde manger, soups, stocks, and sauces, things that were culinary focused,” she says. Adams

CHRIS MARTIN

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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By Chris Martin

Megan Adams’ popular hand pies are sold at the Basan food truck (@eatbasan).

honed her skills working brunch shifts at L’etoile, picking up catering gigs, baking at Goodwin Creek Farm & Bakery in Afton, and learning from Angelo Vangelopoulos at The Ivy Inn, all while baking at Greenhouse Coffee. A few months ago, she was baking for fun, and wanted to make pie and pass along the technique to her partner’s daughter. “If you look at her tiny hands and how much intention she put behind it, and what I interpret as love, it brought me back to the love of baking,” says Adams. That led to the Basan gig, where she slings noodles and bakes, reconnecting with what cooking is all about for her. With years of making hand pies under her belt, she sources her apples from Henley’s Orchard in Crozet, and has developed a solid knowledge of the volume needed to fulfill Charlottesville’s pie demands. “I found that if I’m going to bake them, freezing them solid allows the crust on the bottom and top to bake evenly,” Adams says. “I put a little vent in them to let the steam escape.” What’s next on her list? “Bourbon pecan,” she says. “I want to find what’s going to be best, and I definitely want to use a local bourbon.”


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It’s a common misconception that bees hibernate, when in fact they cluster together around the queen, shivering and moving their wings to generate heat.

CHRIS MARTIN

By Will Ham

I

n the depths of the pandemic lockdown, independent and smallscale farmers suffered deeply as outlets for their goods scaled back or shut down entirely. There were reports of thousands of pounds of unsold produce rotting in fields while grocery store shelves remained empty, and tanks of perfectly drinkable milk being dumped down the drain. Amidst the uncertainty, Local Food Hub, a nonprofit dedicated to increasing access to fresh, locally grown food, created a drive-through farmers market to safely reconnect growers to the community. Gathered Thread’s carefully curated poultry marinade will “Hey, wait a minute! We know all pack the perfect flavor into this year’s bird. of these local farms,” says LFH Communications Director Portia Boggs about coming up with the idea. “We know this community. We can connect them.” Since the spring of 2020, Local Food Hub operated the drive-through market on WednesHere is a short list of market highlights that will day and Friday to great success. One of the make your turkey day especially tasty. format’s strengths is its online, pre-ordering system. Shoppers know exactly what they’re Caromont Farm cheese getting and vendors know how much food to The popular goat-cuddle haven is offering a cheeseprepare, which cuts down on waste and allows and-more assortment box with a selection of three people to place their orders while literally lookseasonal cheeses, crackers, and homemade jam or ing in their pantry. honey. “Farmers can guarantee that they will have what Bellair Farm you want in advance,” says Boggs. “Since our marAcorn and spaghetti squashes that can be easket is pre-order only, there is zero waste for them, ily adapted to any recipe or used to create and that is something they really appreciate.” something brand new are at the top of Bellair’s Local Food Hub also covers all costs associfall specialties list. ated with running the market through a combi-

RO O M FO R P IE AND S IDE S

Phantom Hill Farm Phantom Hill returns to the market with its signature microgreen blends, which can add color, flavor, and nutrition to almost any dish. Or, if you prefer to do some growing at home, the farm offers a grow-your-own shiitake mushroom log. Keep it in a damp, shady area of your yard and reap the delicious rewards for four or more years. Gathered Thread The market does not sell turkey, but the poultry marinade packet from Gathered Thread includes basil, garlic scapes, oregano, thyme, summer savory, sage, and rosemary, which make for a fragrant, flavorful bird (or plant-based protein if you wish). Mochiko Cville and The Pie Chest Offload some of the T-day stress by outsourcing your baking this year. Chocolate coconut cream pie from Mochiko Cville is a good way to ease into the after-dinner food coma, or go rogue at The Pie Chest, where the cider-glazed pumpkin cake is a gourd idea.

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nation of grant and individual donations, allowing vendors to take home 100 percent of their sales. “It’s a really big deal for them,” says Boggs. “During COVID, I don’t think it’s an exaggeration to say that most of our vendors were dependent on the drive-through market to just be able to survive as a business. This market is living proof of the power of local food systems.” For the winter season, LFH will be open only one day a week. However, there will be a special one-off Everything But The Bird market on Wednesday, November 24, to give shoppers an opportunity to buy farm-fresh goods for their Thanksgiving dinner. With almost 800 different items from 46 vendors, the food hub is putting everything on the table. For the full shopping experience, go to localfoodhub.org/market Pre-orders can be placed online at localfoodhub.luluslocalfood.com, and pickup is from 4 to 5:30pm at Seminole Square Shopping Center on your selected day. Here is a short list of highlights that will make your turkey day especially tasty.

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

If you want to get your hands on these bad boys, you’ll have to be quick, because pre-orders close on November 20. Adams is pre-selling apple hand pies, mini hand pies (apple, bourbon pecan, pecan, and pumpkin), and eight-inch pies (apple, bourbon pecan, pecan, chicken pot pie, and vegan chicken pot pie). To order, email meganchopsalot@gmail.com.

Local Food Hub celebrates its successful pivot with a Thanksgiving market

JOHN ROBINSON

In central Virginia, beekeepers keep a close eye on the weather, hoping for a winter that isn’t too windy, and a spring that doesn’t come too early or with buckets of rain. The nectar flow begins in late spring, and the production of honey requires bees to have access to forage from plants, beginning with the blooming of various tree blossoms and dandelions, through the arrival of the golden rod in late summer. Most beekeepers can begin to pull honey in late May, and, depending on the conditions and the location of the hives, some are able to pull a fall harvest without compromising the health of the hive. Williamson has advice for those considering the fragile practice of beekeeping: “It’s a huge educational experience, it can be incredibly rewarding but also emotionally devastating,” he says. “Before beekeeping, try to spend time with a beekeeper and connect with members of the beekeeping community.” When the cold sets in and you dip into a jar of perfect honey for your hot tea or cereal, take a moment to consider how this busy process allows us to share a sweet summer day, all year long.

Farm-to-trunk


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HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE The Dogwood Tree is hosting it’s first Holiday Open House! NOVEMBER 27, 2021 • 12:00 - 4:00 PM

Pre-Order your Christmas Arrangements and Holiday Centerpieces! Sign up for upcoming design days! Shop Holiday Garlands, Wreathes, and fresh home accents! Featuring gifts from local partners including: Christine Kennedy Watercolor Artist Chocolatesville Evergreen Enterprises Lilly Bean Pastry Co. Little Paper Crane Old Dominion Candle Co. Saved By Grace Sophia Alexander Candle Co. The Card Bureau

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TWO LATEST BOOKS & MORE

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from local Author William A. James, Sr.

In, A MURDER ON FIFTH AND DICE AND THE RUIN OF FIFEVILLE,

James shows how drug-dealing and gang violence led to the condemnation, demolition, and gentrification of Fifeville. It is a Sequel to his IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, 2007. (He is writing a play based upon this latest Book)

IN THE STREETS OF VINEGAR HILL, James

reveals how fear and misunderstandings caused The Charlottesville City Council to condemn and Demolish a 20 Acre Tract (30 Black businesses and 600 residents) from the Downtown area from 1958-1964.

In, HARD TIMES AND SURVIVAL: THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN AFRICANAMERICAN SON,

James relates His Story and the Reader learns what He means when He Says: “Do not GiveIn to Adversity, but overcome it by Steady and Constant Perserverance.”

Give the gift of a great book! Local Author William A. James, Sr. Call or Write, William A. James, Sr. 434-985-8987 PO Box 6991, Charlottesville, VA 22906 Wjpublications@aol.com

SOLD AT: The University of Virginia Bookstore 400 Emmet Street, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (on UVA Grounds). Patsy Goolsby, Manager, 434-924-1075 | bookshop@virginia.edu 2nd Act Books 214 East Main Street, Charlottesville, VA 22902 Daphne Spain, Owner, 434-202-0754 | daphnespain@gmail.com


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Granular on granola

UVA prof and family geek out and eat out to compile diner data By Shea Gibbs

EZE AMOS

B

Some families debate over home fries or hash browns. Brian Nosek and his daughters combined a love of breakfast and research into a rating system based on taste, presentation, menu, ambiance, and service.

seemed to matter to his intrepid research crew. Presentation and ambiance are modestly correlated with what the Noseks spent, but taste, menu, and service are only slightly related. Donuts, for example, did well because of their affordability. “They’re delicious deathtraps and great value,” Nosek says. Duck Donuts drops in at third behind Thunderbird and Croby’s on the top-10 best value list. Indeed, the research study sample on the whole is relatively low cost, Nosek says. Across all 50 restaurants, the Munchateers spent $9.91 per person on average, and that was for a hungry group trying multiple things. All in the interest of science, of course. “I have a love of science and methodology, and I wanted to share some of that with [my daughters],” Nosek says. “The big debate is how much do we want to add new places to the list versus looking at test-retest reliability. I think we will definitely replicate our breakfast study.”

“We wanted to share our ratings to tell other people about our experiences—give recommendations and inspire people to do fun projects like this on their own.”

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RIP to the breakfast joint that was toprated on taste, Bluegrass Grill & Bakery. Charlie & Litsa’s South Main Street Cafe in Culpepper comes in second on the taste dimension. That’s the measurement where you find some traditionally heralded local breakfast places: Oakhurst Inn Cafe and Espresso Bar ranks fourth; Ace Biscuit & Barbecue, Blue Moon Diner, Bodo’s Bagels, and Fox’s Cafe (also now closed) all tie for the fifth taste spot with an average rating of 9.3. Chains tend not to fare well with the selfstyled “Breakfast Bunch” (or the three “Munchateers,” if that’s your taste). Not a single restaurant with multiple identical locations makes their overall top-10 list. Not even Bodo’s. IHOP rates reasonably well on taste and menu, and Taco Bell scores a surprise eighth in the service dimension. For the eldest Nosek, the most surprising takeaway from the project was how little cost

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

rian Nosek is into numbers. He’s also into breakfast. Nosek, a psychologist at the University of Virginia, is a well-known champion of “open science,” a movement to make academic research and its findings accessible to everyone. “A lot of the public perception of psychology is about treatment and management of wellbeing,” Nosek says. “But a substantial portion of the field, of academic psychology, is about strong methodology.” For his latest data project, Nosek commissioned two research assistants: his daughters, 14-year-old Haven and 12-year-old Joni. “We love breakfast,” Nosek says. “My spouse sleeps in, and we have time in the morning to do stuff on the weekends. So it’s often, ‘Let’s go have breakfast somewhere.’” But how to decide where to dine? Nosek says he and his daughters used Yelp as their go-to info source. But it didn’t tell them everything they wanted to know. Specifically, Nosek says Yelp doesn’t say much about the quality you can expect for your money. The Noseks set out on an egg-zamination of their own. The researchers would eat at 50 places “known for their breakfast.” They would rate every restaurant on taste, presentation, menu, ambiance, and service. They would consider each variable in the context of price. And in the spirit of open science, they would publish their data for all the world to see, explore for themselves, and perform new analyses. “We wanted to share our ratings to tell other people about our experiences—give recommendations and inspire people to do fun projects like this on their own,” Haven Nosek says. No word yet on whether anyone has taken the Noseks up on crunching those numbers. But, from the researchers’ perspective, the conclusions are in. The team’s number one overall breakfast spot in the area? Fill up your gas tank—it’s Thunderbird Cafe in McGaheysville, on Route 33 just outside of Massanutten. “It was really my style and yummy,” Joni Nosek says. Quirk Cafe, Croby’s Urban Vittles, Guajiros Miami Eatery, Fig, and MarieBette Cafe & Bakery round out the top five overall. (Fig and MarieBette tie for fifth.) Quality Pie earns a special honorable mention from the lead researcher; it lands third on taste but suffered overall due to ambiance issues during COVID.


November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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24


THE

WINE

DOWN HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE VINES

53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD 2019 Cabernet Franc and Chardonnay Our Chablis-style Chardonnay and our earthy rich Cabernet Franc are both single varietals grown on our estates. Each of these wines are perfect for the upcoming holidays! Make sure to grab a bottle of Chardonnay to pair with your green bean casserole, salads, or turkey; and the Cabernet Franc works best with sweet potato casserole, cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie. Cheers to a wonderful holiday season! We are open 7 days a week, 11am to 5pm offering our 100% Virginia wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights. Enjoy your visit at our intimate, meadow-like setting in rural Louisa County. we offer well-spaced indoor and outside seating and customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs and blankets. Children and pets are welcome, but pets must always remain outside of buildings and on a leash. Quality wine, friendly staff at a great escape! Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com on our operating procedures. Saturday, November 20th: Wine Club Day- with music by Sue Harlow and Blue Ridge Pizza Co. Thursday, November 25thCLOSED for Thanksgiving Saturday, November 27th: Live music by John Kelly 13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

DUCARD VINEYARDS

WINERY

DUCARD VINEYARD

Guide Map

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MADISON

33 HARRISONBURG

81

15

STANARDSVILLE

KILAURWEN WINERY

340

ORANGE

HORTON VINEYARDS

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REYNARD FLORENCE VINEYARD

GORDONSVILLE

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AFTON

KESWICK VINEYARDS EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS

LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE ZION CROSSROADS

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SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD

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Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and plenty of beautiful views along scenic back roads. The tasting room is near hiking and biking trails along the Shenandoah National Forest and is a perfect respite after your day out! Enjoy some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit

Open daily – Mon-Thurs. 12-5 pm Fri. 12-9 pm Sat/Sun. 12-6 pm Fridays- Friday Night out at DuCard (5:30 - 8:30 pm) come out and kick off the weekend with dinner and live music at DuCard. Saturdays- Music on the Patio (2:30 – 5:30 pm) enjoy a wide variety of artists each Saturday Thursday, November 25thCLOSED for Thanksgiving Friday, November 26thBlack Friday at Ducard; Music by Haze and Dacey (2:305:30pm) and merchandise deals all day! 40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 www.ducardvineyards.com

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY Mulled Wine It’s that time of year again - enjoy a glass of mulled wine at the winery or grab a bottle of our award-winning Merlot with a pack of mulling spices and make your own Eastwood Mulled Wine. Simmered with orange peel, clove, nutmeg, cinnamon, and sugar - it is absolutely delectable in the tasting room and at home. The Eastwood Merlot was awarded a gold medal in the 2021 Mid-Atlantic Southeastern Wine Competition. It is also a 2021 Virginia Governor’s Cup Medalist and a favorite amongst the Eastwood team. Live music every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday in October. We also offer cider (hard & nonalcoholic), s’mores, weekly yoga, events for families and kids, and more. See the upcoming calendar of events for all of the details. Winery Hours: Wednesdays (4-8 PM), Thursdays (4-Sunset), Fridays (4-8 PM), Saturdays (12-8 PM), Sundays (12-5 PM) 2531 Scottsville Rd. (5 mi from Downtown Charlottesville) Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

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33 CROZET

Comprised of 100% of our estate grown Viognier, Veni, Vidi, Vino is loosely translated to “I came, I saw, I drank (DuCard) wine”. It’s a refreshing summer wine expressing tropical and herbal notes on the nose. This wine is vibrant at first, with a wellrounded mid palate leading toward a lingering bright finish. Enjoy with a variety of seafood dishes, roasted pork loin, or a perfectly roasted s’more!

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November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

2020 Veni, Vidi, Vino

on our lawns and sip or pick up a bottle or three of our awardwinning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walk-ups accommodated on a spaceavailable basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website!


SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

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November 20th- Library Live Auction! Join us for special access to our vintaged library wines (check our website for more details). 6399 Spotswood Trail, Gordonsville, Virginia (540) 832-7440 www.hortonwine.com

KESWICK VINEYARDS 2020 LVA Chardonnay Pale yellow in color, our LVA Chardonnay has a fun and bright tone. Citrus, stone fruit, and some floral notes showcase a balanced aroma. Meanwhile, the palate has lots of bright citrus flavors making this a perfect summertime sipper on the porch. Enjoy with a variety of salads, herb roasted chicken, or an afternoon scone while enjoying the last of the summer days.

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Tasting Room Hours

HORTON VINEYARDS 2019 Rkatsiteli Rkatsiteli is an ancient vitis vinifera grape that can be traced back to the country of Georgia, located at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe. This grape is very versatile as it can be used for table wines, liqueurs, fortified wines or sparkling. After extreme cold temperatures killed off some of Horton Vineyard’s vines in 1996. Founder Dennis Horton sourced some cold hearty Rkatsiteli given their late bud break gives it the ability to make it through freezing winters.

While we have a wide variety of wines to pick from, we offer different themed flights each month to highlight our wine throughout the year! Wine flights, glasses and bottles are available. To ensure time for a tasting please arrive at least 15 minutes prior to closing. Open Daily from 10 am – 5 pm Wednesdays- Wine Wednesday (7-7:30 pm) Join Horton Vineyards live on Facebook every Wednesday at 7pm to learn about a different wine each week!

We look forward to continuing to serve all of our wonderful guests this summer during our daily hours of 10am-5pm. We offer first come, first served seating at our outdoor courtyard tables or open seating for those who wish to bring their own blankets and chairs to spread out in our designated lawn area. Wine is available by the flight, glass and bottle, and only our outdoor areas can be accessed at this time. A selection of pre-packaged meats, cheeses, crackers, and spreads are available for purchase. Saturday, November 20thLive music by Matt Johnson Tuesday, November 23rdTasting Tuesdays featuring 2021 Viognier Thursday, November 25thCLOSED for Thanksgiving Saturday, November 27thLive Music by Paulo Franco

Tuesday, November 30th— Tasting Tuesdays featuring 2021 White Blends 1575 Keswick Winery Drive Keswick, VA 22947 keswickvineyards.com • (434) 244-3341

KILAURWEN WINERY Kilaurwen White A non-vintaged wine comprised of Vidal and Rkatsitelli, Kilaurwen White is crisp and well balanced with a beautiful pale straw color. Tangy and packed with citrus, this wine offers just the right amount of acidity to satisfy the palate and pairs exceptionally well with fowl or seafood dishes. Happy Holiday Greetings! We send Happy Holiday Greetings to all our friends and family members and hope to see you one more time at Kilaurwen during this festive season! Thanks for your visits and loyal support throughout the challenging 2021 year. The tasting room will close for the 2021 season at the end of November. Weekend hours are Saturdays and Sundays from 12 noon - 6 pm (closed for the season at the end of November) First come, first serve seating is available at outdoor umbrella tables in our Boxwood Garden, on our covered patio, or limited seating at socially distanced tables inside our tasting room. Masks are required only inside the tasting room. Enjoy the mountain views while sipping your favorite Kilaurwen wines which are available by the bottle, the glass and DIY tasting flights. You are welcome to bring your own picnic and enjoy it with a bottle of your favorite Kilaurwen wine while


SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

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you take in the mountain views and enjoy sitting around our fire pit. Well-mannered pets on leashes are welcome. Art Exhibit A unique style and vibrant colors characterize the works by Sarah Gondwe which continue on display in the vineyard Tasting Room until the end of November. Gondwe is self taught and works with a new technique which involves scraping bits of crayon onto canvas, wood, glass or metal, then using a hot iron to melt and shape the crayon into freeform design. She is a member of the Art Guild of Greene and her art pieces are available for viewing and/or purchase. 1543 Evergreen Church Rd Stanardsville, VA 22973 (434) 985-2535 www.kilaurwenwinery.com

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS Our 2020 Cabernet Franc has rich aromatics of pomegranate and raspberries, but a bright palate full of pepper and cherry. Medium in body with plenty of tannic structure, this is a great wine to age, or drink with your holiday meals! Perfect for sweet potato casserole, pies, or next to a roaring fire pit, the Cabernet Franc will not disappoint.

Hours: Tuesday – Thursday: 11 am – 5 pm; Friday – Sunday: 11am to 4:30pm

5022 Plank Rd., North Garden, VA 22959 (434).202.8063 www.pippinhillfarm.com

REYNARD FLORENCE VINEYARD Ti Rey Rosé 2018 & 2020 Named in honor of our winery dog Ti Rey, this wine is dry, rich, and robust. It features bright and lively notes of dried strawberries and cherries. It is crisp, clean, and refreshing and will please your palate with a taste of our Barboursville terroir. Ti Rey Rosé

Ti Rey is our beloved nine-year-old male Corgi and when you visit us here at Reynard Florence, he is sure to be part of your experience. He may greet you as you drive in (slowly!) and lead you up to the tasting room. We also have an adorable female Corgi puppy named Brixie. She is full of energy and is responsible for keeping Ti Rey trim and fit. Someday she may have a wine named for her! Most days you can find Ti-Rey and Brixie greeting customers in our tasting room, making new friends on the deck, or playing in the yard. Visiting Reynard Florence We look forward to welcoming you to our small, cozy, and intimate winery. As you drive down our

driveway, you will be greeted by our stunning mountain view. We are truly a hidden gem. Our service is warm, friendly, and you will likely have an opportunity to meet the owners and their two corgies Ti Rey and Brixie. Reservations are not required, and seating inside the tasting room is first-come-firstserve. We have lots of outdoor seating and space available on our front patio, back deck, and pergola. Umbrellas and canopies provide shelter from the sun and rain. Picnics are welcome outside! Enjoy live jazz every Sunday on the back deck from 2-5 pm. Hours: Thrus/Fri 12-5pm; Sat/Sun 11am – 5pm Open Holiday Mondays, as well as by appointment or chance! Don’t hesitate to give us a call! 16109 Burnley Rd. Barboursville, VA 22923 540.832.3895 / 434.962.1849

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Plan to visit: Pippin Hill is a culinary vineyard in the heart of Virginia’s wine country. There are two types of standard reservations available: Indoor Table or Covered Veranda for table service. Walkins are welcome for lawn seating. Reservations via Resy are recommended for Indoor and Veranda seating.

Nov 17th- Cooking class with Pippin hill- Columnbiana! Purchase tickets in advance.

is the perfect pairing for all your festive holiday meals whether toasting friends and family while enjoying hors d’oeuvres or delving into a delicious ham or turkey at the table.

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

2020 Cabernet Franc

Sundays- Live music on the hill! Each Sunday from 1-4 PM, Pippin Hill welcomes local musicians to perform on our Veranda. Check our website for varying artists.


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Giving Thanks

NOVEMBER 17TH – 30TH PRODUCE Organic Celery $2.49 Each Organic Yellow Onions $1.49/lb.

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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Organic Red, Yukon Gold, & Russet Potatoes $1.49/lb. Organic Sweet Potatoes $2.49/lb. Organic Cranberries 8 oz. $3.49/each

BULK Organic Regular Rolled Oats $1.49/lb. (SRP $1.99) Organic Whole Cashews $8.99/lb. (SRP $14.99) Bulk Pecan Halves $11.99/lb. (SRP $14.99) Organic Walnuts $11.99/lb. (SRP $14.99)

Organic Brussels Sprouts $4.99/lb.

923 PRESTON AVE. 293-4111 WWW.IYFOODS.COM


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s Sale GROCERY Farmer’s Market Pumpkin Pie Mix $3.39 (SRP $3.99) Imagine Organic Vegetable Broth 32 oz. $5.99 (SRP $6.39) Wholly Wholesome Pie Shells 2 pk. $6.99 (SRP $7.99)

Bob’s Red Mill All Purpose Flour 5 lbs. $10.99 (SRP $12.99)

OUR STANDARDS ALL OF OUR PRODUCE IS NON-GMO NO HYDROGENATED OILS ALL OUR CHEESE IS ANIMAL RENNET FREE NO PRESERVATIVES OR ARTIFICIAL COLORING NONE OF OUR PRODUCTS CONTAIN HIGH FRUCTOSE CORN SYRUP

MON-FRI 8AM-8PM, SAT 9AM-6PM, SUNDAY 10AM-6PM

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Wholly Wholesome Vegan Pumpkin Pies $14.99 (SRP $16.99)

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Wholesome Organic Sucanat Sugar 2 lbs. $9.69 ($11.39)

Curbside phone orders available from open until 5 PM daily!


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CHARLOTTESVILLE

SYMPHONY

AT T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F V I R G I N I A

BENJAMIN ROUS, MUSIC DIRECTOR

FAMILY

Holiday Concerts Michael Slon, Conductor

Jeannette Jang and David Sariti,Violinists

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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Jolly, Joyous and Not-to -be -Missed ! THE BLACKBURN

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4 | 8:00PM SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5 | 3:30PM OLD CABELL HALL Masks Required for All Ages

Black Friday @ The Blackburn featuring

The Judy Chops FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26

artsboxoffice.virginia.edu 434.924.3376 Free parking at Central Grounds Garage

Home for the Holidays with

Robin and Linda Williams FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10

Doors open at 6 pm. Music starts 7 pm. Concerts take place in The Blackburn Inn’s new Conference and Wellness Center in Staunton, Virginia. Tickets and information at Blackburn-Inn.com

The 2021-22 season is generously supported by


CULTURE

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THROUGH 11/20

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Andrew Bovell’s When the Rain Stops Falling is an intimate play with a vast setting. It’s 2039, and a catastrophic flood is coming that will end all life on Earth. Interweaving stories from four generations across two continents, the play showcases the lasting impacts of climate change and the damaging legacy left behind by patterns of abandonment and betrayal. UVA Drama’s rendition, directed by Marianne Kubik, features large-scale digital projections that both complement and disrupt the structure of the plot. $8-14, 8pm. Culbreth Theatre, 109 Culbreth Rd., UVA. drama.virginia.edu.

THURSDAY 11/18

TALES OF THE CITY

TOGETHER IN SONG Drawing on the rich and diverse Southern musical traditions, North Carolina string band Chatham Rabbits constructs its modern folk with clawhammer banjo, effortless harmonies, and a deep appreciation for the past. The husband-and-wife duo’s name pays homage to a string band from over 100 years ago, and the couple’s guitar and Gibson banjo are more than 80 years old—but they don’t let that stop them from telling stories of their own. The pair is currently filming a TV show for PBS that documents married life in the music industry. $15-18, 8pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. frontporchcville.org.

OUR GUIDE TO YOUR WEEK

@cville_culture facebook.com/cville.weekly

SUPPLIED PHOTO

SATURDAY 11/20

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Social commentator and cultural satirist Fran Lebowitz has an impressive resume of books, essays, and films. Her New Yorker flair won her a spot on Vanity Fair’s Best Dressed Hall of Fame list, and she’s the subject of Martin Scorsese’s recent Emmynominated, limited documentary series “Pretend It’s a City.” Lebowitz appears solo to share her views on current events, pet peeves, and whatever else is on her mind. $24.75-44.75, 7:30pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net.

SUPPLIED PHOTO

CLIMATE STAGE


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THE BELOVED HOLIDAY TRADITION RETURNS

LIVE ON STAGE!

A CHRISTMAS CAROL DECEMBER 10–30 BLACKFRIARS PLAYHOUSE, STAUNTON, VA Actress Natasia Reinhardt (photo by Amy Wolf)

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

@cville_culture

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TICKETS ON SALE NOW! AmericanShakespeareCenter.com • 540.851.1733 or 1.877.MUCH.ADO

When the Rain Stops Falling

by Andrew Bovell

Directed by Marianne Kubik November 18-20 at 8pm December 3, 4 at 8pm December 5 at 2pm Culbreth Theatre The year is 2039. It’s been raining for days when a sudden omen forecasts a great flood to end all life on earth. Climate change becomes the companion to a family tree whose branches span four generations and two continents in this intricate story that considers how patterns of abandonment and betrayal shape a damaging legacy that may test the resilience of its inheritors. For mature audiences. Please be advised that this play contains potentially distressing topics. For detailed information please read the content warning at drama.virginia.edu/content-warnings.

www.drama.virginia.edu 434-924-3376


CULTURE SCREENS

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Playing for keeps Jim Cummings has another brilliant outing in The Beta Test By Deirdre Crimmins arts@c-ville.com

T

Alamo Drafthouse Cinema Jim Cummings is the writer, director, producer, and star of The Beta Test, co-starring Virginia Newcomb, a dark comedy about a Hollywood agent ensnared in a web of lies when he falls prey to a sinister sex cult.

preoccupation highlights the existing cracks in his artificially perfect life. Cummings is incredible as the obsessed, focused-yet-bumbling Jordan. He often lets awkward moments hang a beat longer than expected, to the point of ridiculousness. Jordan is never framed as a good, selfless guy, but he thinks the world sees him this way. He lies poorly, but thinks he is the smartest guy in the room and cannot

fathom anything less. Watching his ego and his life get chipped away by his own doing is tasty and satisfying. Where The Beta Test falls short is with its social agenda. It teases Jordan as the kind of guy who thinks the #MeToo movement is going to come after him, but never fully incorporates that into his fears and paranoia. Granted, there are plenty of other issues in Jordan’s life that distract from his grasp of cancel culture, but the hint of this threat makes it feel like an underdeveloped idea. Also, as The Beta Test gets closer to the truth, it begins to flirt with the ramifications of certain digital security issues, but in a manner that is rushed and merely tacked on.

Still, The Beta Test is an entertaining exercise in watching a self-involved Hollywood player slowly come to the realization that he is neither all-powerful nor all-knowing.

The Beta Test NR, 93 minutes Watching his assumed powers slip between his fingers while he flails is a mean-spirited way for Cummings to take a swing at his fellow celluloid elites. No doubt he has met these kinds of egomaniacs, and his taking them down a peg in a fictional manner is a pleasure to watch.

OPEN POSITIONS

@cville_culture

PVCC IS HIRING!

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

here is a certain charm to an actor who doesn’t shy away from playing the fool, especially when that actor is also the writer, director, and producer of the film. Jim Cummings is one of the newest multihyphenates in Hollywood, and he is not afraid to be a dunce. Cummings has been directing and writing for over a decade, but he made his first major splash in 2018 with Thunder Road. Based on his own short film, Thunder Road stars Cummings as an awkward police officer who is losing his struggle with grief. Rather than playing as a tragedy, the film is an intersection of serious and silly, and Cummings makes it brilliant. In The Beta Test, Cummings repeats the formula, mixing humor with morbidity at his character’s expense. He stars as a cutthroat Hollywood agent named Jordan, who seemingly has it all—a good job, a flashy car, a beautiful fiancée, and a shallowly perfect life. Jordan’s trajectory is interrupted when he receives a hand-lettered purple envelope, which leads to an anonymous sexual encounter at a fancy hotel. This launches him on an obsessive search to find the source of the letter. The film offers glimpses into the lives of other people whose relationships were walloped after receiving the same purple envelope, and it adds gravity to Jordan’s pursuit of the truth. Oddly, Jordan’s obsession with the source of these invitations is not driven by his need to protect his relationship or a lust to find the sexy stranger. Instead, he needs to get to the bottom of this dark web because he cannot handle the lack of control. The cryptic investigation coincides with a crumbling business deal and rising tension with his fiancée (Virginia Newcomb) just weeks ahead of their wedding. His

Piedmont Virginia Community College invites applications for the following positions: • • • • •

Full-Time Faculty – Nursing Library Specialist – Part-Time Transfer Advisor – Part-Time Workforce Services Operations Supervisor Workforce Services Program Manager – Healthcare

Detailed job descriptions and application procedures are available at: https://jobs.vccs.edu/postings/search | Questions? Email jwills-payne@pvcc.edu. Piedmont Virginia Community College is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer and actively seeks applications from women and minority candidates.

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• Accounting Tutor – Part-Time • Administrative Assistant • Full-Time Faculty – Computer Science/ Information Systems Technology • Full-Time Faculty – Culinary Arts • Full-Time Faculty – Mathematics


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CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

#2

#4

#5

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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#1

#1 solution

#2 solution

#3 solution

#4 solution


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CROSSWORD

Wow BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK 57. Words from the speechless ... or a description of this puzzle’s theme 1. Roman ____ (novel 59. Site of the Munch genre) Museum 6. Denver omelet ingredient 60. Spend time in a cellar, 9. Video call annoyance perhaps 13. “Would you like me to?” 61. Bit of truth 15. Ben Jonson wrote one 62. Ostracize to himself 63. Leb. neighbor 16. Laundry unit 64. Actress Spacek 17. Result of a home run in the bottom of the ninth, perhaps DOWN 19. 100% 1. Life ____ know it 20. Org. that awards the Safer Choice label 2. Fellow at Oxford? 21. Up 3. “____ Land” (2016 Best Picture nominee) 22. Eldest Stark daughter on “Game of Thrones” 4. Cousin of a caribou 23. Dated 5. Broccoli bit 25. Southpaw’s opposite 6. “In what way?” 28. 90° on a compass 7. Bye at the French Open? 29. Evil hypnotist’s directive 8. “____ Explain Things to Me” (2014 Rebecca 30. Wide divide Solnit book) 33. Squirrel’s favorite tree, 9. Spanish newspaper maybe whose name means 36. Has a drink “The Country” 40. “____ & Oh’s” 10. Direction at the start of a (Elle King hit) game of hide-and-seek 41. Units measured by 11. Like a zero-star review multimeters 12. Classic concert halls 42. Learner’s permit 14. “... assuming there’s holder, often even one” 43. “Well, ____ was 18. In shape awkward ...” 22. Hindu teacher 45.q“Much obliged!” 23. Reasons 47.q1937 Rodgers and Hart tune 24. “NBA on NBC” theme composer 51. Itty-bitty 25. Investment firm T. ____ 52. Cuts with a beam Price 53. “Well, what have 26. Animal also called a we here?!” steinbock 56. “____ Hit Talk Show” 27. Contracts a winter (2004 show hosted by malady an ‘80s TV character)

ACROSS

#3

2

3

4

5

13

6 14

17

7

9

I S H I O R T O N A G V R S I P O R A N N O I T

T E A L E O N I

C A V E

A T O N C M E A O L R O V I O I I C O I S H N I Y O

M E C C A N

L E T S

11

12

36

37

40

41

32

33

34

35

38

53

54

55

39 42

44

45 48

51

49

46

50

52

56

57

59

60

62

63

58 61 64

A S S T

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10

19

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E D S E L S

E T U E X X

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47 © 2021 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

T A R T L Y

R B O E T A V M A D H A I N M E A S H I A V O W

16

27

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A M I N O R

S O U P L E T U R T M O L A A S I N K T E A Y R D A G I N E E D O S E S T S

24

30

#6

M O O G

22

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#6 solution

S A V A N T

8

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#5 solution

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ANSWERS 11/10/21

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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30. Animator’s sheet 31. V-J Day pres. 32. Reactions to puppy videos 34. Supermodel Wek 35. Some Mattel toys 37. Egg producer 38. “See me after class,” for one 39. “South Park” boy 44. “Hidden Figures” star Taraji P. ____ 45. Brexit exiter 46. Some bygone service stations 47. Origin of the word “flannel” 48. Suffix meaning “science” 49. Less cooked 50. NYT rival 51. Resort town in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains 53. Dominates, in slang 54. Earth-turning tools 55. Big-eyed 57. Used to be 58. Swim-bike-run race, for short


36

IMAGINE IMAGINE A A DAY DAY WITHOUT WITHOUT WATER WATER ART ART CONTEST CONTEST Help Select a Fan Favorite! Voting Open: November 15th - 24th

Go to our website to cast your vote for your favorite Imagine a Day without Water art contest submission from the top entries!

Which entry best conveys love for our water?

www.charlottesville.gov/artcontest

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

37

Scorpio

By Rob Brezsny

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Storyteller and mythologist Michael Meade believes that each of us has an inner indigenous person—a part of our psyche that can love and learn from nature, that’s inclined to revere and commune with the ancestors, that seeks holiness in the familiar delights of the earth. The coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to cultivate your relationship with your inner indigenous person. What other experiences might be available to you as you align your personal rhythms with the rhythms of the earth? What joys might emerge as you strive to connect on deeper levels with animals and plants and natural forces?

Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn novelist Haruki Murakami writes, “I was always hungry for love. Just once, I wanted to know what it was like to get my fill of it—to be fed so much love I couldn’t take any more. Just once.” Most of us feel that longing, although few of us admit it. But I will urge you to place this desire in the front of your awareness during the next two weeks. I’ll encourage you to treat your yearning for maximum love as a sacred strength, a virtue to nurture and be proud of. I’ll even suggest you let people know that’s what you want. Doing so may not result in a total satisfaction of the longing, but who knows? Maybe it will. If there will ever be a time when such fulfillment could occur, it will be soon.

Aquarius

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): Since 1996, Ira Glass has produced the renowned radio series “This American Life.” In 2013, as a reward for his excellence, he was offered a raise in his annual salary from $170,000 to $278,000. He accepted it for one year, but then asked that it be lowered to $146,000. He described the large increase in pay as “unseemly.” What?! I appreciate his modesty, but I disapprove. I’m always rooting for Pisceans like Ira Glass to embrace the fullness of their worth and to be aggressive about gathering all the rewards they’re offered. So I’m inclined, especially right now, to urge you NOT to be like Glass. Please swoop up all the kudos, benefits, and blessings you deserve.

Aries (March 21-April 19): Aries poet and philosopher Friedrich Hölderlin had many ups and downs. He was one of Germany’s greatest poets and philosophers, but he also endured more emotional distress than most people. His biographer wrote, “Sometimes this genius goes dark and sinks down into the bitter well of his heart, but mostly his apocalyptic star glitters wondrously.” You may have been flirting with a milder version of a “bitter well of the heart,” Aries. But I foresee that you will soon return to a phase when your star glitters wondrously—and without the “apocalyptic” tinge that Hölderlin harbored.

In the coming weeks, I believe you will experience much less of this sad problem than usual. I’m guessing you’ll be especially skilled at articulating your lush truth and will have an extra receptive audience for it.

Gemini (May 21-June 20): “I never resist temptation,” declared playwright George Bernard Shaw. Why did he dare to utter such an outlandish statement? “Because I have found that things that are bad for me do not tempt me,” he said. I propose that you aspire to embody his attitude during the next eight weeks, Gemini. Make it your aspiration to cultivate a state of mind wherein you will only be tempted to engage with influences that are healthy and educational and inspiring. You can do it! I know you can!

Cancer

Taurus

(June 21-July 22): While still a teenager, Cancerian cowboy Slim Pickens competed in the rodeo, a sporting event in which brave athletes tangle with aggressive broncos and bulls. When America entered World War II, Pickens went to a recruiting office to sign up for the military. When asked about his profession, Pickens said “rodeo.” The clerk misheard and instead wrote “radio.” Pickens was assigned to work at an armed forces radio station in the American Midwest, where he spent the entire war. It was a safe and secure place for him to be. I foresee a lucky mistake like that in your near future, Cancerian. Maybe more than one lucky mistake. Be alert.

(April 20-May 20): Author David Foster Wallace felt sad about how little of our mind’s intense activity can be shared with others. So much of what goes on inside us seems impossible to express. Or if it is possible to express, few of our listeners are receptive to it or able to fully understand it. That’s the bad news, Taurus. But here’s the good news:

(July 23-Aug. 22): To create your horoscope, I’ve borrowed ideas from four famous Leos. They all address your current astrological needs. First, here’s Leo author P. L. Travers: “More and more I’ve become convinced that the great treasure to possess is the un-

Leo

known.” Second, here’s Leo author Sue Monk Kidd: “There is no place so awake and alive as the edge of becoming.” Third, Leo poet Philip Larkin: “Originality is being different from oneself, not others.” Finally, Leo author Susan Cheever: “There is no such thing as expecting too much.”

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I encourage you to adopt the perspective expressed by spiritual author Ann Voskamp. She wrote, “I want to see beauty. In the ugly, in the sink, in the suffering, in the daily, the moments before I sleep.” I understand that taking this assignment seriously could be a challenging exercise. Most of us are quick to spot flaws and awfulness, but few have been trained to be alert for elegance and splendor and wondrousness. Are you willing to try out this approach? Experiment with it. Treat it as an opportunity to reprogram your perceptual faculties. Three weeks from now, your eyes and ears could be attuned to marvels they had previously missed.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran educator and anthropologist Johnnetta Cole wrote, “The first sign of an educated person is that she asks more questions than she delivers answers.” I agree and would also say this: A prime attribute of an intelligent, eager-to-learn person is that she asks more questions than she delivers answers. I encourage you to be like that during the coming weeks, Libra. According to my astrological estimation, you are scheduled to boost your intelligence and raise your curiosity. An excellent way to meet your appointments with destiny will be to have fun dreaming up interesting questions. Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, (877) 873-4888

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November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): An article published in the journal Scientific American declared, “Most people don’t know when to stop talking.” Conversations between strangers and between friends typically go on too long. A mere two percent of all dialogs finish when both parties want them to. That’s the bad news, Aquarius. The good news is that in the coming weeks, your sensitivity about this issue will be more acute than usual. As a result, your talk will be extra concise and effective—more persuasive, more interesting, and more influential. Take advantage of this subtle superpower!

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Some people become so expert at reading between the lines they don’t read the lines,” wrote author Margaret Millar. That’s not a common problem for you Scorpios. You are an expert at reading between the lines, but that doesn’t cause you to miss the simple facts. Better than any other sign of the zodiac, you are skilled at seeing both secret and obvious things. Given the astrological omens that will be active for you during the rest of 2021, I suspect this skill of yours will be a virtual superpower. And even more than usual, the people in your life will benefit from your skill at naming the truth.


November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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38

434.995.8095 301 E. Main Street www.skoomaboutiquedispensary.com


Q&A How are you shaking up your Thanksgiving traditions this year? We pre-ordered a turkey and chicken from @alcarbonchicken and can’t wait! @THEPETERDAVIS/INSTAGRAM

I’m outsourcing all the cooking! We rented a house in the Blue Ridge in NC & are bringing a premade dinner with us.

Say “mmm.”

39

@BRMOUNTAINMAMA/INSTAGRAM

Getting a quality bird from @stockrva and smoking it on our new @traegergrills!

Signed up for my first 5K with my mom and brother this year!

@CAMEOKATH/INSTAGRAM

@MURY_G/INSTAGRAM

This Thanksgiving we’re avoiding the unfinished, incomplete, gray concrete monument Dewberry Living (? many names & years) because rooms are too cold. Happy turkey time!! @LUFFAKLEIN/TWITTER

I’m not. If I deviate from my traditional Thanksgiving menu, there will be anarchy! @SLOVIE64/INSTAGRAM

I’m shaking it up by merely being in the moment! @MELISSASHIRLEYMILLER/ INSTAGRAM

WINTER 2021

Taste is everything.

VERY FINE WINES What to drink, where to drink it, and who to know in the world of Virginia vino

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know. Meet

CHRISTINA MARTIN,

the baker with no bakery

SUSHI! Thai meets Japanese at the hands of the Tauchis PIZZA! A Lampo alum takes his slice of the local pie game BURRITOS! Lucky Blue’s Bar serves up something for everyone

This is our town.

ON STANDS SPRING, SUMMER, FALL, WINTER

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When it comes to area eats, we let our cravings guide us. And in this quarterly magazine, you’ll find everything from a stack of pancakes to a plate of filet mignon. Each issue of Knife & Fork introduces readers to chefs, food trends, recipes, and, most importantly, the best meals around.

November 17 – 23, 2021 c-ville.com

Next week’s question: If you had a warning label, what would it say?

CAN’T-MISS SIPS: We’re starting with Lightwell Survey’s Strange Hybrid Moments. PAGE 17


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VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE COUNTY OF ALBEMARLE RE: ESTATE OF VERNELL MARIE SHIFLETT, DECEASED

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November 17 - 23, 2021 c-ville.com

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Need to apply for an ABC License? Need to run a legal? Contact Chloe for more information : Chloe@c-ville.com **Notarized Affidavit Included in Price

SHOW CAUSE AGAINST DISTRIBUTION ORDER It is ORDERED that the creditors of, and all others interested in, the above estate show cause, if they can, on November 29, 2021, at 9 a.m. before this Court at its courtroom, against the payment and delivery of the estate to the legatees, without refunding bonds It appearing to the Court that the report of the account of PATSY C. CROSBY, the Executor of the above-referenced estate, and of the debts and demands against the estate, have been filed in the Clerk’s Office and that six months have elapsed since the qualification, and upon motion of the Administrator, it is ORDERED that the first paragraph of this Order be published once a week for two successive weeks in C-VILLE Weekly, a newspaper with general circulation ENTERED this 27th day of October, 2021 Cheryl V. Higgins Judge I ASK FOR THIS: H. Kay Cross, Esquire VSB # 39098 106 W. South Street, #209 Charlottesville, VA 22902 434-205-4130 kay@hk:aycross.com Counsel for Patsy of C. Crosby, Executor of the Estate of Vernell Marie Shiflett


EMPLOYMENT

41

Winter Wander TRAIL OF LIGHTS

We’re very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet & C’ville! Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population.

We're Hiring!

bout Us

Want to apply your skills to ensure the greatest quality of life possible for our fellow community members in need? If so, The Arc has these opportunities to offer.

ur mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental sabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the ading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we ge you to consider the following career opportunities:

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $15-$17/hr) rect Support Professionals- Charlottesville Day Support ($13-$15/hr) ct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professional- Floater (overnights, $16/hr)

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $15-$17/hr) Directinterested Support ProfessionalsCharlottesville We're very eager to hear from candidates in working in Crozet and C’ville! Day Support ($13-$15/hr) To see additional details and a full listing of all our positions or to apply, please visit our web site at http://arcpva.org/employment Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $13-$15/hr) Direct Support Professional- Floater ($16/hr)

Earn some extra money for the holidays.

Boar’s Head Resort is hiring for their Winter Wander Trail of Lights illuminated lakeside stroll taking place from November 26 through January 30.

addition to offering a challenging and rewarding experience, The Arc also offers competitive ompensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive benefits package including paid ave, health, dental and vision insurance, as well as life and long-term disability insurance. The Arc the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Full-Time, Part-Time and Seasonal Positions are also Available:

For more details and positions, and to apply, please visit Apply now!

http://arcpva.org/employment

The Arc of the Piedmont is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

434-977-4002x124 arcpva.org • @arcpiedmont.va

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arcpva.org 434-977-4002 x124 @arcpiedmont.va Offering competitive compensation, paid training, and - for full time staff - an attractive benefits package including paid leave, health, dental & vision insurance, as well as life & long-term disability insurance.


42

COMMUNITY AND MISCELLANEOUS ANNOUNCEMENTS

Looking for a part time sales job or side hustle? Now hiring part time sales reps. to build and manage new business. Commission based, flexible job in a fun work environment that includes great perks. Perfect for an outgoing and energetic person who enjoys building relationships with local businesses.

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Must be 21+ and have both reliable transportation and a home office (computer and internet access). A good fit for a grad student, someone who works restaurant shifts in the evening or a stay at home Mom looking to ease back into the workforce. Sales experience is a plus (and yes, bartending and waiting tables counts!). Could potentially become a full time position for the right candidate.

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WWW.CAAR.COM 43

VOL. 30 NO. 46 n NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021

FREE

A PUBLICATION OF THE CHARLOTTESVILLE AREA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® Charlottesville Albemarle, Fluvanna, Greene, Louisa, Madison, Nelson, Orange, Augusta

Delivers a Sunny Outlook BY CARLA HUCKABEE

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Commercial Real Estate Expansion

NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

A P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E A R E A A S S O C I AT I O N O F R E A LT O R S ®


NOW IS THE TIME TO SELL!

NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

44

SOLD!

UNDER

350 CLAIBOURNE ROAD

CONTRA

CT

TED JUST LIS

1460 CANFIELD LANE

Like new construction without the wait! This beauEscape to a cottage in the woods while only tiful home is less than two years old & filled with minutes from Downtown! This beautiful home ofupgrades. Walk into your foyer to find tall ceilfers first floor living with a two bedrooms on the ings& wonderful luxury vinyl plank flooring that main floor including the big master bedroom. flow through the main level. Turn the corner to see The full bath is completely updated and feels an open floor plan with your gourmet kitchen & like it was built for a spa. The kitchen overover sized island overlooking your light filled livlooks the dining area and living room to give a ing room. Perfect for entertaining! Off the living feeling of openness. Upstairs you will find two room is your deck with plenty of room to lounge additional spacious bedrooms and a full bath. or grill out. Walk into your large 1st floor master Off your kitchen there is a lovely screen porch suite complete with en suite bath, tiled shower & to sit or go onto the large deck to enjoy the feeldual vanities. The main level is completed by a ing of nature. The fire pit adds another potential visit to your laundry room. Great main floor living! space to sit and relax. Walk just through the Head upstairs to find two more bedrooms plus trees to an open lawn area perfect for playtime. a big loft area perfect for a family or recreation All of this is just 15 minutes from Downtown or room. As a bonus there is a combination room UVA Hospital and 11 minutes to Wegmans!! to be used for an office, hobby. MLS# 622259 $490,000 MLS# 622295 1544 Sawgrass Ct $365,000 2142 Avinity

Price Drop!

2095 AVINITY LOOP

Gorgeous describes this Craig Builders home. Grand foyer leads to chef’s dream kitchen full of upgraded cabinets, stainless appliances & granitecounter tops. Hardwood floors lead to a dining area & wonderful living room with fireplace. Living room opens up to large balcony with a captivating view of CarterMountain. Natural light flows into every room! Upstairs has dual master bedrooms. The master suite sports a large walkin closet & upgraded bathroom with doublesinks along with a claw foot tub. Bottom level includes a 3rd bedroom, full bath, and home office perfect for working from home. Attic has flooring to give Sunday 1-3 pm extra storage.Walk out to your patio with access to large grass common area.Magnolia Warranty on all Dr the 2808 Loop appliances to than the 15 new owner. Peace &transfers tranquility less minutes from Beautifully upgraded 4 BR townhousekitchen w/mountain Avinity is minutes away from UVA, MLS#house 624092 Downtown! Enjoy this wonderful on over an views! Open floorplan, perfect for entertaining $440,000 acre with beautiful mature trees. $469,900 with private patio. $365,000

Open House

! Under Contract

Complete 1st floor living, lg MBR & BA w/laundry. Hardwoods on main floor. Gourmet kitchen & loft open to LR. Outside patio. $410,000

434.305.0361 paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/575169 pdmcartor@gmail.com

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/575473

paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/577468

! N e w L is ti n g

Buyers BUYERS & Sellers!

pdmcartor@gmail.com HONORABLE MENTION

Best of Cville Real Estate Agents in 2016 & 2017, and a Finalist in 2018

GE T YO UR HO M E SO LD HE RE !

Best of Cville Real Estate Agents in 2016 & 2017!

Contact me today to find out about our New Listing Program. Let’s get your home

LISTED, UNDER CONTRACT & SOLD! paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com

Plan now to sell in Spring 2022! Special incentives offered now for Spring 2022 listings and it’s not too late to sell in 2021. Call now for details to create your 2357and Middle River Rdplan!

Come enjoy the peace and tranquility of your own lake front retreat! Single floor living home includes both MB & laundry on the main floor. $240,000 paulmcartor.montaguemiller.com/576182

Price Drop! RUNNER UP

Call Me Today!

434.305.0361 FINALIST

& SELLERS CALL ME TODAY!

PUT YOUR in 6 days! HOUSE Under Contract HERE:

900 GARDENS BLVD #100 CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22901 WWW.AVENUEREALTYGROUP.COM

4161 Presidents Rd

63 Soapstone Ln

Country living 15 minutes of Downtown & within Albemarle County. This single floor home has beautifully updated kitchen & bathrooms. $260,000

Here’s your chance to live in a 1906 farmhouse with all the style and character while enjoying the conveniences of a modern home. $130,000

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Semi-Custom Detached Villa Homes Surrounding ainBelvedere Pocket Park! From $549,900 Tour our Newest Model Homes and Old Trail Village Tour Tour our our Newest Newest Model Model Homes Homes inin Belvedere Belvedere and and Old Old Trail Trail Village Village

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Be One of the First to Pick Your Homesite!

Sales Center Now Open on-site off Rt 29 North! Currituck Model in Belvedere | 905 Belvedere Blvd, Charlottesville, 22901 Currituck Currituck Model Model in Belvedere in Belvedere | 905 |Belvedere 905 Belvedere Blvd, Blvd, Charlottesville, Charlottesville, VAVA 22901 VA 22901 OPEN DAILY 12-5 Villa Model in |Old Trail Village | 406 Astel Crozet, 22932 Villa Model Villa Model in Old in434-987-6522 Trail Old Village Trail Village | 406 |Astel 406 Astel St, St, Crozet, St, Crozet, VAVA 22932 VA 22932 NorthPointe@craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com/northpointe MODEL HOMES OPEN DAILY | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com MODEL MODEL HOMES HOMES OPEN OPEN DAILY DAILY 12-512-5 | 12-5 434-973-3362 | 434-973-3362 | craigbuilders.com | craigbuilders.com

Conceptual images shown. Pricing and design subject to change


45

Thinking of selling your house this year, call me.

OLD TRAIL DRIVE

BURNLEY STATION ROAD

Highly desirable end unit townhouse in Old Trail. Immaculate condition. 3 bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths and a large 2 car garage. Beautiful upgrades in the kitchen. Morning sun and mountain views from the back deck. $440,000

French Country home, set on a knoll in Northern Albemarle. A serene setting with peace and quiet. One floor living with a split bedroom plan. Large master bedroom with 2 full baths. Beautiful rear terrace with large boxwoods. Detached garage with room for storage as well as a large attic. New roof and many other upgrades! Only 10 minutes to Hollymead Town Center. $575,000

PENNY LANE

CLUB DRIVE

503 Faulconer Drive Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903 p: 434.295.1131 f: 434293.7377 e: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

French Normandy style home set on a 2.7 acre corner, wooded lot in Keswick Estate. Elegant, custom designed residence built by Baird Snyder.Composite slate roofing, turrets and copper finials.Cast stone work on the exterior and solid mahogany arched front doors. 20’ sweeping entry with curved staircase. Amazing master suite, chef ’s kitchen and a wine cellar with tasting room. Arched windows and doors, carved white statuary marble fireplace. Extensive gardens and terraces. $3,000,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Fabulous cottage tucked away on 12.5 acres with 1 division right. Top quality craftsmanship features; a copper roof and downspouts, vaulted ceilings, dramatic windows and artistic stonework.The first floor bath features a stone fireplace. Mature landscaping, wrap around porch, spring, stream and a detached studio all work to make this a compelling property. The studio has a fireplace with a beautiful walnut mantle. There are 2 sheds (a potting shed and another set up for miniature goats) $850,000

NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


Delivery and Supply Chains

46 NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

How often have you heard “Our response times are slower due to COVID.”? What seems like a worn-out excuse has become our reality. So much that even the penultimate consumer experience, holiday gift-giving, is threatened. Filling the gap, Amazon is opening two “last-mile” delivery facilities near Interstate 64, one in Waynesboro, the other in the Ferncliff Business Park in Louisa County. Each site will employ about 100 drivers and freight handlers in time to help deliver holiday gifts. Whether or not Christmas gifts arrive on time, supply chain delays have already delayed delivery of bigger prizes to local economies.

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

Too Much of a Great Thing?

Commercial Real Estate Expansion Delivers a Sunny Outlook

W

e are just a few months shy of two years into the pandemic that wreaked havoc on our main streets and many of our side streets. While some businesses and operations adjusted and remained viable, others did not survive.

BY CARLA HUCKABEE

Still others stepped into the void after the worst of the shutdowns were over with a business strategy customized to deal with COVID limitations. As infection rates declined, CEOs breathed a sigh of relief and made plans to return to something closer to their nearly carefree in-person, on-site, on-time pre-COVID existence.

Until the Delta variant caused everyone to pause. So here we are in November 2021, still wondering when and how much of a recovery to that idyllic pre-COVID experience we can expect. Against a backdrop of supply chain delays, staffing shortages, and remote work becoming entrenched, the outlook is surprisingly sunny.

In an 18-month period, even with delays, nearly a half million square feet of Class A office space is being delivered to Charlottesville. Dairy Central and 3TWENTY3 opened in 2020. The CODE Building opened this month, and Apex Plaza will open over the winter. Is that too much of a great thing? According to Chris Engle, Charlottesville’s Director of Economic Development, vacancy rates of only 1.5 percent and no new Class A office space downtown in over a decade, make Charlottesville ripe for this scope of new construction. Even after the CODE building and Apex Plaza are added to the mix, vacancy rates will be close to a healthy five percent. The long-awaited CODE Building— Center of Developing Entrepreneurs—officially opened November 1. Its presence (and impact) on the Downtown Mall has been highly anticipated since demolition of the old ice-skating rink. The nine-story building towers over the west end of the Mall. Yet its stepped scale and configuration with enticing courtyards and water features improve pedestrian and open-air flow between Market, Main, and Water Streets. Developer Andrew Boninti, CHS Development, expects the CODE Building to catalize renewed vitality on the Downtown Mall. “We hope to see the rebirth of the Mall coming out of the pandemic.” Ground floor retail, below grade parking, office and shared workspaces on upper floors with terraced green roofs should attract more customers, diners, and office workers downtown. The building is 70 percent leased up and tenants will spend the next couple of months moving in and customizing their space. The real impact of the LEED Gold CODE Building on downtown businesses will be realized in 2022 and beyond. Following closely after the CODE Building’s opening, will be the eight story, 300,000-square-foot Apex Plaza. Serving as headquarters for Apex Clean Energy, there will be a similar timeline of tenants gaining access and completing buildout over winter months, with the real impact on downtown retail and restaurants coming later. Known for its mass timber construction, its 875 solar panels are expected to have Apex operating at net-positive energy.


47

Last 39 Months • $117 Million Leased • 142 Deals

,

Commercial and Investment Properties For Sale & Lease FEATURED PROPERTIES Last 39 Months • $117 Million Leased • 142 Deals

For Sale

Available

NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

Commercial and Investment Properties For Sale & Lease

Available

,

Augusta County Net Income Property Established Veterinarian tenant For Lease

Harrisonburg Former Walgreens 11,214 square feet For Sale

Harrisonburg at Traffic Light Across from Panera Prime End cap Space up to 5,200 SF

Charlottesville Rt. 29 5.7 Acres For Sale

Harrisonburg 7.32 acre Mixed Use Parcel by JMU

Staunton 18,000+ SF Building Downtown by Parking Garage

Sold

Leased

Industrial Complex Over 110,000 SF on 10 Acres

Sold

2,500 SF New Starbucks Woodstock

New Chipotle Drive Thru

Sold

1,700 SF Shell Gas C-Store

Sold

Leased

Pending

Former School on 10 Acres

Portfolio of 4 Car Washes

Sold

Sold

Sold

6,200 SF UVA Medical Building

Sold

30,000 SF Warehouse-Distribution Property

Sold

Property Types Include: Shopping Centers, Office Buildings, Gas Stations, Apartments, Mini-Storage, Industrial Buildings, Hotels Serving Local, Regional, National Clients • PO Box 5017 Charlottesville, Industrial Land - 255 Acres VA 22905 69 Bank Branches in VA & NC

Over $384 Million Sold/Leased in Last 18 Years Property Types Include: Shopping Centers, Office Buildings, Gas Stations, Apartments, Mini-Storage, Industrial Buildings, Hotels Serving Local, Regional, National Clients 2903 N. Augusta Street Staunton, VA 24401 • PO Box 5017 Charlottesville, VA 22905

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Over $384 Million Sold/Leased in Last 18 Years Approved 44 Acre Subdivision 6,100 SF Carilion Medical Clinic 2903 N. Augusta Street Staunton, 85 Lots Net Income VA 24401

FEATURE

Sample of Recent Sold/Leased Properties


CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

FEATURE

NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

48

These four cutting edge office buildings coming online in such a narrow timeframe point to optimism in Charlottesville’s general economy and its ability to attract and retain innovative companies.

Still Working from Home The COVID pandemic began after this quartet of notable Class A office buildings was already in the construction pipeline. No doubt, COVID created some uncertainty about office use and the impact of working from home on occupancy. Most companies with an office-based workforce expected to have employees back in their cubicles by Labor Day. Once the Delta variant became prominent, many halted their plans for a full return. Some still offer a fully remote option to employees. Other employees became permanent remote workers, such as those at the former State Farm campus in Pantops. Contrast that approach with Commonwealth Computer Research Inc., located near Hydraulic Road. After becoming part of General Atomics operation earlier this year, the company recently signed a lease for nearly 50,000-square-feet in the 3TWENTY3 building. LEED Gold, net-positive energy, green roofs, enhanced air quality, stunning views and downtown locations all combine to attract businesses into these superior spaces and give their employees a great reason to come back to the office.

Sweet Manufacturing The office environment isn’t the only commercial real estate sector showing promise. New or expanding manufacturing operations in Central Virginia help boost the economy with a decided slant toward sweets and eats. The Hershey Company has increased its presence on both sides of the Blue Ridge. Hershey recently mailed flyers to area homes on both sides of the mountain, inviting people to apply for open positions at their newly expanded plant

in Stuart’s Draft, which added 90,000 square feet and 100 new positions. And that empty State Farm campus in Pantops? Say hello to Bonumose. The former “Project Packet” company will partner with Hershey to research and develop reduced or zero sugar chocolate products. A nearly $28 million expansion will allow Bonumose to move into 36,000 square feet of the former State Farm building. Bonumose will expand its production capabilities and relocate its existing research and development

lab from North Fork, creating 64 new jobs. How sweet it will be if their first product, tagatose, lives up to its promise as a healthy low-calorie sugar. The fast-casual Mediterranean restaurant chain CAVA just announced they will invest more than $30 million to build a new processing and packaging operation in Augusta County’s Mill Place Commerce Park. CAVA has 130 locations and several new restaurants in Central Virginia. The 57,000-square-foot facility will create 52 new jobs.


49 NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

When looking to buy, sell, or lease locally, Use local expertise from experienced Commercial REALTORS Serving the Greater Charlottesville Area for over 40 years Give us a call for all of your Commercial Real Estate needs!

SOLD

FOR SALE/ LEASE

48 Zion Station Road

943 Glenwood Sta 301

2003 Avon Court

1434 Rolkin Road

FOR SALE

FOR LEASE

FOR LEASE

FOR LEASE

485 Hillsdale Drive

3450 Berkmar Drive

4000 Olympia Circle

FOR LEASE

FOR SALE

SOLD

2987 Lake Monticello

889B Rio E

4570 Monacan Trail

SOLD

FOR LEASE

LEASED FEATURE

3Twenty3

1725 Broadway Street

LEASED FOR SALE 30 Thomas Jefferson Parkway

1410 Incarnation 202B

Robin Amato

FOR LEASE 1412 E High Street

Butch Wilberger

Caroline Satira

1200 Five Springs Road

Rob Archer

www.RE3CP.com | 1116 E High St, Charlottesville, VA 22902 | 434-817-1240 Office | 434-817-1245 Fax

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Bill Howard

FOR LEASE


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FEATURE

NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

50

OPPORTUNITY AWAITS WITH ALL 3 OF THESE UNIQUE PROPERTIES: Income Producing Short Stay Or Primary Residence

In Orange County, Worthington Architectural Millwork is expanding its manufacturing operation of high-end custom cabinetry and millwork, adding 26 new jobs. Its sister company, Seabury Moore, LLC., specializes in custom home building and will construct a 20,000-square-foot building in the Thomas E. Lee Industrial Park.

The 65-acre Villages at Terrace Greene will have 282 townhouses between Preddy Creek Road and 29North. Thirty of those will be true live-work units with a ground floor office or retail space and a two-story townhome above. On buildout, this gives entrepreneurs the opportunity to enjoy unique, convenient, but separate livework spaces.

Employees and Roofs

Retail and Restaurants Still Deliver

As this sampling of new and expandNORTHFIELD MANOR ing businesses in Central Virginia shows, companies continue to invest in this area, building facilities and creating new jobs. Continued economic growth, however, requires job growth and investment to move in tandem. The Virginia REALTORS® association reported that there are still about 175,000 fewer jobs in Virginia than before the pandemic. The Charlottesville metro area experienced a steeper decline in employment during that period than elsewhere in Virginia, losing more than eight percent of jobs compared to less than five percent for the entire state. Located in Northfields subdivision this is an Entertainers Dream! The main home We still haven’t recovered. But, as these features 10 Bedrooms and 9 Full Baths; The Carriage House over garage features announcements of office and manufac3 Bedrooms and 2.5 Baths; 2 Large Vehicle Bays & Private Gym. Includes a secturing expansions demonstrate, the ecoond buildable Lot in rear w/access from Old Brook Rd. Build a pool house, guest nomic outlook is good. The strength and house; or divide the parcel. LESS Than 5 miles to: UVA Hospital; Downtown Cville; JPJ Arena. CHO Airport 6 miles. DC 2 hours & Richmond 1 hour. MLS# 621112, speed of the recovery has been tempered $2,800,000 by the Delta variant, but economists with Virginia REALTORS® predict continued expansion for the last quarter of 2021 and 971 FLATTOP MOUNTAIN RD accelerated growth next year. And to house the people to fill these jobs, several new large-scale rental developments are in the works with many more proposed. Stony Point Development’s 180 new apartments at 10th & Dairy are set to open in January 2022. Built as one component of the Dairy Central mixed-use development, it is an amenity rich community with easy access to all the new Class A office space gracing the skyline. Live year round comfortably in this retreat style custom home. Hi speed century The 261 apartments at Berkmar Landlink internet, double lot & never ending spring. w 3 beds 2.5 baths & wrap around deck. MLS#623715, offered at $700k ing, near Earlysville, are expected to be occupied by the summer of 2022. Onebedroom units start at $1,465 per month. 500 DAVID ROAD Two- and three-bedroom units are also available. The complex is close to Hollymead Town Center and the many restaurants and retail establishments along 29North, the Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport, and UVA Research Park. A little farther up 29North, a unique mixed-use development was approved by the Greene County Board of Supervisors. Alan Yost, Director of the Greene County Economic Development and Tourism Marshall Manor. This property features main house as well as a detached cottage. Department, expects groundbreaking Tucked away main home boasts 5 bedrooms 3 full baths & updated kitchen & sunthis spring for Phase I of the Villages at room. The rentable cottage features 2 bedrooms 1.5 baths & Mountain View’s. The Terrace Greene. He describes it as a truly private 4.7 acres along with immense historic landmarks, adjoins UVA Foundation walkable live-shop-work community. preservation. MLS# 623721 First time offered after almost 2 decades at $765k. “Most of these mixed-use developments include a huge retail component Candice Van der Linde with residential in the back,” said Yost. Buy and Sell Cville Team “Often the people that live there, drive Call: 434-8730 to the shops. Our goal is to have a much Connect: BuyandSellCville.com more walkable, pedestrian-friendly comCome visit: RE/MAX Realty Specialist munity with no big divide between retail and residential. And we are targeting significant employment centers as our commercial anchors. We’d like to atBuy and Sell Cville Team tract light industrial or research and Nominees: Candice & Bert Passionate about Helping companies compatible with development People SELL & BUY Residential residential space.” Real Estate in the

NOMINATE ME NOMINATE ME

NOMINATE ME

Candice Van der Linde @Candice_Realtor Buy and Sell Cville Team

Candice van der Linde, Realtor

Call: 434-981-8730 • Connect: BuyandSellCville.com

Charlottesville Area. We can’t wait to connect with you & Share Some of our Best Adventures!

943 Glenwood Station Ln #203

Despite online shopping trends, customers still shop in stores, and retail still delivers. Many stores kept the doors open with enhanced delivery, or, for restaurants, drive through and curb-side pickups. Some restaurants have closed their dining room doors simply because they don’t have enough staff to operate drive-through and dine-in. A surge in small businesses is one of many bright spots in the area, according to Rose Deal, Orange County Director of Economic Development. Innovation Orange, LLC, is relocating to the HUBZone in Orange. The IT company helps businesses and citizens manage their business tech securely and efficiently. New restaurants Spoon and Spindle, and Cooper’s Cookin’ and Catering, creative arts shop Paint It Orange, join other small businesses livening up the town of Orange. Peter Wray, Broker with Triangle Realtors, is still enthusiastic about the commercial real estate market. “Sites are filling up and vacancies are low.” He rattles off shopping areas from Pantops to Staunton that are expanding or at full capacity. “We have a new six-acre site on 29North to ground lease or build to suit. Before we even brought it to market, we had strong interest from multiple users. Demand is not slowing down. “As some sectors contract, that real estate is being repurposed. In the past two years I have done 70 bank branch conversions. With the rise in online banking, it didn’t make sense to have so many banks. But other businesses were ready to reuse those buildings.” “Churn can be good. Look at what’s happening with the Staunton Mall. It’s being redeveloped into a mix of retail and multifamily units. Retail operations shift with changes in costumer needs, or they get left behind for other businesses to move in. “There are some warning indicators that could stall or reverse our growth. If inflation and interest rates rise quickly and if the supply chain issues worsen, that will slow us down. Construction is taking almost twice as long as it should because of supply and delivery problems. Otherwise, I feel good about our economic prospects, at least through the first quarter of 2022.” As the COVID trends of remote work and enhanced delivery become more entrenched or subside, businesses will respond and adapt, and the commercial real estate market will follow suit. Going into the winter and 2022, most pros have a sunny outlook. Carla Huckabee writes about high performing real estate. Buy and Sell Cville Team Nominees: Candice & Bert


51

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

PORTERS ROAD

Charming bungalow in Southern Albemarle. Home offers 2 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, covered front porch and a detached garage. Over an acre of beautiful, flat land with a winding path through the woods. $195,000

NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

Annie Gould Gallery

REDBUD LANE

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville.

Unique, contemporary tri-level home. Set on 2 acres with beautiful trees and mature landscaping. Home features; 3 bedrooms, 2 full bathrooms, dining room, 3 Trex decks, paved driveway and a 500 sq. ft. carport. No HOA! $350,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200

109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

12 Zephyr Road

Text 12Zephyr to 424-337-3216 Find Homes REALTORS® are licensed to sell real estate in the Commonwealth of VA. Find Homes Realty Brokerage Lic # 0226033659. 145 Ednam Dr # 311, Boar’s Head Professional Ctr, Charlottesville VA 22903. 434-218-0221. Fair Housing Compliant. Locally owned and operated. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this isn’t a solicitation.

Julie Weaver REALTOR

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

3BR • 2BA 1,914 SqFt MLS # 624155 $287,000


NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

52

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers ROBINSON WOODS

GALLISON HALL

Set on 43 park-like acres, this Farmington gem features a 1931-33 Georgian house, indoor pool and tennis facilities, spectacular Blue Ridge views, total privacy, and an exceptional close-to-town location. On historic registers. MLS#617686 $8,450,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

WOODFIELD

Rare opportunity to purchase an architecturallydesigned, gracious 3,530 square foot residence with 4 bedrooms and 3 baths on a secluded 4.59 acres in the heart of Garth and Owensville Road yet close to all Charlottesville/UVA amenities. MLS#623814 $949,000 Robert Mellen, 434.996.7386

MOORELAND

Classic Virginia brick home, circa 1855, on 22 acres, just seven miles south of Charlottesville. Property includes a cottage, outbuildings, shared ownership in a beautiful pond. Lovely mature landscaping and mountain views. $1,100,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

Bright, comfortable house that has just undergone a complete renovation. The flexible floorplan includes living room with gas fireplace, spacious kitchen, family room, dining room, 4 BR & 3.5 BA. Upscale features include wood floors, new stainless appliances & cabinets, granite countertops, glass tile and marble in baths. In immaculate condition. Neighborhood common area is a bit of country in the city! Conveniently located in a small City residential neighborhood centrally located & just minutes from Downtown and UVA. MLS#620141 $670,000 C. Dammann, 434.981.1250

GREY OAKS

In the heart of this exceptional country estate is an immaculate 6-BR, 6.5-BA home offering outstanding views overlooking a 2-acre lake to the Blue Ridge Mountains.Total tranquility, 53+ rolling acres, wonderful outdoor spaces, and a 1,800 sf barn. MLS#617485 $4,165,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MADISON

Over 560 acres of wooded land on Thoroughfare Mountain in Madison County. Three contiguous parcels, completely private, with endless possibilities. Hunt, ride ATVs, camp, build a weekend retreat or a permanent residence in total serenity. MLS#621697 $2,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

THE GLEASON

Open, extremely spacious floor plan with 4 bedrooms and 4.5 baths. Enjoy expansive mountain and city views from inside or from one of 2 balconies. Secure garage parking. Ting Available. Walk to dining, shopping, and entertainment! MLS#621646 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434. 981.1863

WOODLANDS

Beautifully restored 1780s Colonial on 293 acres in Northampton County. This historic home has 4 BR, 3 full & 2 half BA. Property has access to the Machipongo River which flows into the Atlantic. Rare offering. MLS#614051 $1,495,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 www.WoodlandsFarmVa.com

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

BEECH HILL

Spectacular & spacious contemporary residence on 14.3 acres. Situated between Ivy and Crozet. The interior features an open floor plan with quality details throughout, including Marvin windows, extensive custom millwork, 20 ft. high stone fireplace, superb kitchen/breakfast room, spacious master suite with dramatic spa bathroom. TOTAL: 4-5 BR, 4 full BA, 1 half BA. Exterior special features: copper roof, extensive Ipe deck, whole house generator, and heated pool. One huge feature: high speed fiber optic internet!!! MLS#623368 $2,375,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

SUNNYSIDE

Remarkably large parcel located convenient to Charlottesville and UVA. Exceptional Blue Ridge views, charming farm house (in need of restoration). Under VOF easement but with divisions into already predetermined parcels. MLS#585228 $4,400,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


53

RAGGED MOUNTAIN

4.32 acres, half open, with gently rolling, cleared homesite on a high plateau with lovely pastoral and mountain views. Situated in Ivy Valley, just off I-64 west of Charlottesville, less than 10 miles to the University of Virginia. MLS#622663 $465,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

FRAY’S GRANT

3 fabulous home sites mostly in beautiful hardwoods, gently rolling and priced below tax assessments! Each lot is 2+ acres on private setting. Only ten minutes to airport, excellent shopping, including Harris Teeter, Target, Kohls, Bonefish Grill, and Starbucks. Jim Faulconer 434,981.0076

SIMMONS GAP ROAD

5-acre lot with mature hardwoods. Great opportunity to build with no HOA. Private building site amongst beautiful woods. Located between Free Union and Earlysville but so convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. MLS#621177 $140,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

WESLEY CHAPEL ROAD

Nice, mostly wooded residential building lot in Meriwether Lewis School District! Great privacy, 1.72± acres, beautiful rural setting in an area of large farm and estate properties. Located approximately 15 miles NW of Charlottesville. MLS#613685 $125,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

BLANDEMAR FARM ESTATES

25.4 acres with varying topography and amazing rock outcroppings. Unique design opportunities to create a stunning residence with magnificent views. Convenient to Charlottesville and the University of Virginia. Fiber optic available. MLS#593358 $554,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

MISSION HOME ROAD

146.88 ac. in Albemarle & Greene County. Privacy & protection adjacent to the Shenandoah National Park! Full division rights & multiple home sites. Extraordinary timberland. Views of the mountains, along with easy access to trails & Skyline Drive. MLS#620276 $1,200,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SIMMONS GAP/ ESTES RIDGE

10 acres of mature woods. Property has long road frontage and consists of two parcels being combined and sold as one. No homeowners association! Design and build your dream residence on this very wellpriced parcel. MLS#621178 $189,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

RAGGED MOUNTAIN FARM

Two wonderful estate parcels comprised of 185.01± acres, in coveted Ragged Mountain Farm. Excellent elevated building site, complete privacy, and beautiful views. Murray/Henley/Western school district. MLS#621083 $1,895,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EMERALD RIDGE

Spectacular 22-acre lot in Western Albemarle! Wooded, wonderfully private and offers the ideal location for an elevated building site with the potential for big year-round views. Western schools! MLS#621504 $295,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

KESWICK

Wonderful wooded, 10.56-acre lot in Keswick. Great location, convenient to Pantops, 10 minutes east of Charlottesville with exceptional privacy and frontage on Mechunk Creek. MLS#619380 $149,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MEADOWBROOK HILLS

Lovely 3-bedrooms, 3-baths, circa 1958 brick home located in one of the City’s most desirable neighborhoods- convenient to all that Charlottesville has to offer! Walkable to Barracks Road & UVA, and just a short drive from Downtown. MLS#622783 $695,000 Will Faulconer 434.987.9455

NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

54

HOME SALES STATS

ENDING THE WEEK OF NOVEMBER 14, 2021

Be the First to Live in this Spacious Well Appointed Custom Built Home!

oad 3199 Cold Spring R

THERE WERE 92 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 22 were in Albemarle with an average price of $421,862 n 12 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $466,951 n 6 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $356,859 n 8 were in Greene with an average price of $347,247 n 11 were in Louisa with an average price of $645,236 n 1 was in Madison with a price of $395,000 n 10 were in Nelson with an average price of $333,890 n 17 were in Orange with an average price of $322,521 n 2 were in Staunton with an average price of $198,550 n 3 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $271,067

Langdon Woods Dr Lot 11 with home To-Be-Built. Build your quality 2,830 sq ft custom home, by European Homes, on a beautiful parcel of land in Langdon Woods~ a nature preservation established community, west of Earlysville. Imagine tranquil livingVIEWS nestled in aTHE beautiful estate community devoted UNIVERSITY VILLAGE country - STUNNING FROM 5TH FLOOR This unique Condo is a realtogem at University VillageEnjoy because it captures both beautiful Ridgeprivate and Southrural preservation. a sense of personal spaceBlue on your 3.42 ColdinSpring Hollow, west Mountains and isand located one ofGet Charlottesville's premier independent acres with trees open land. back Charlottesville to nature while using the retirement runningGracious living intrails aThe Western Albemarle county neighborhood off and Bloomfield Rd.floor lessamenities. than 15 minutes from city. Thefloor owner custom communities. discerning buyer will find thisother 5th home with antheopen plan walking and community lake designed this estate home with inspiration from a beloved SC farmhouse to seamlessly merge traditional southern style with contemporary that includes a separate dining room, living room, eat in kitchen and 2 bedrooms and 2 spaces for the modern lifestyle. Formal entertaining spaces meet an open family kitchen, secluded office and playrooms, and ample Enjoy theexcellent convenience of convenient being onlyparking, minutes to baths a rare find. There is also storage, exceptional amenistorage. The home was imagined with its surroundings in mind- enjoy the mountain, wooded and pastoral views of its 21 acres with Hollymeade Townfitness Center and w/75' the Blue Ridge Mountains! ties andwindows services including dining, center heated pool, & a chauffeur. plentiful and skylights throughout and a partially screened mahogany wraparound porch. Yard islibrary, partially fenced, surrounding acreage with creeks and hiking woods. Attention to details make for a high end quality. MLS# 557041 $1,390,000 MLS#570017, $375,000

AnitaDunbar-Realtor.com/617300

$875,000

For more information and photos, visit www.anitadunbar-realtor.com Call or email for a private showing.

HOMES SOLD

CRS, SFR,SRES, Associate Broker

434.981.1421 434.951.7135 Anitadunbar1@gmail.com anitadunbar1@gmail.com CRS, SFR, SRES, Associate Broker

500 Westfield Rd, Charlottesville, VA 22901

THE 547 STAGECOACH ROAD MOORE’S CREEK

318 RIVERSIDE AVENUE FRYS SPRING

77 JEFFERSON DRIVE LAKE MONTICELLO

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • editor@caarrew.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@caarrew.com • 434.817.9330

152 SPRING OAKS LANE RUCKERSVILLE

LOCAL GOVERNMENT CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com • 434.817.2749 xt. 25

955 HICKORY CREEK RD 2013 STONE RIDGE WOODS LOUISA WINTERGREEN

(Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

DESIGNER

CAAR

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

The REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is published weekly by the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. Copyright All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc., assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY.

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

Any reference made to the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®, Inc. is not to be construed as making any representation, warranty, or guarantee by the corporations concerning the information on properties advertised in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The content of all ads contained herein are solely the responsibility of the advertiser. The opinions and statements contained in advertising or elsewhere in this publication are those of the authors of such opinions and are not necessarily those of the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc., or the Charlottesville Area Association of RealtoRs®.

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

the CAAR Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered.

www.charlottesville.org Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 www.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

www.co.fluvanna.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.925 per $100

www.gcva.us Real estate tax rate: $.775 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

MADISON COUNTY

www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.68 per $100

NELSON COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

ORANGE COUNTY

www.nelsoncounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.61 per $100

Information on advertising placement may be obtained by calling 434-817-9330. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. CAAR Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel.: 434-817-9330 • e-mail: ads@caar.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


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NOVEMBER 17 - 23, 2021 ISSUE 3046

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PLAY HARD WORK HARDER

Let us help you find new staff members with a display help wanted ad in C-VILLE!

NOW HIRING! FULL TIME & SEASONAL POSITIONS WORK OUTDOORS, TRAVEL, HAVE FUN! HARD WORK

PLAY HARDER PLAY HARDNOWWORK HARDER HIRING! FULL TIME & SEASONAL POSITIONS NOW HIRING! FULL TIME & SEASONAL POSITIONS

CURRENTLY

HIRING FOR: PLAY HARD WORK HARDER NOW HIRING! FULL TIME & SEASONAL POSITIONS SALES: Event Sales Consultant

TENT

TENT

OPERATIONS: Crew Leaders & Entry Level Field Crew

C O M PA N Y

C O M PA N Y

Skyline

Local and travel positions available.

Skyline

APPLY TO JOIN OUR TEAM:

APPLY APPLY TO JOIN OUR TEAM:ONLINE today at skylinetentcompany.com/careers/

434-484-0143

WWW.SKYLINETENTCOMPANY.COM/CAREERS CALLS TO OFFICE PHONE STRONGLY DISCOURAGED. 434.484.0143 WWW.SKYLINETENTCOMPANY.COM/CAREERS 434.484.0143 C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E , VA & C H A R L E S T O N , S C

TENT

APPLY TO JOIN OUR TEAM:

C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E , VA & C H ARL T O NOR , OLDER S C TO APPLY * MUST BEE18SYEARS

PANERA IS HIRING!

SALES/OPS: Project Manager

SkylineSkyline

Want discounted food all the time?

-

C O M PA N Y

WWW.SKYLINETENTCOMPANY.COM/CAREERS B OA R’ S HEA D RES O RT TENT

* MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER TO APPLY

Career Mixer 434.484.0143

C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E , VA & C H A R L E S T O N , S C * MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER TO APPLY

APPLY TO 13, JOIN OUR Monday, September 12-9 p.m. Tuesday, September 14, 7 a.m. - 2 p.m.

TEAM:

GREAT BENEFITS

Discount on Food Hourly pay plus tips Raises for certifications Flexible schedule

C O M PA N Y

APPLY ONLINE AT CAREERS.PANERABREAD.COM OR TAKE A PICTURE OF THE QR CODE BELOW!

WWW.SKYLINETENTCOMPANY.COM/CAREERS 434.484.0143 Do you want to work at a place that strikes the balance between fun, family and work? Charlottesville’s only true resort is the place to be! Come join us for a one-of-a-kind hiring event where you will see what it means to be a part of a company that strives to deliver a family environment and memorable guest and member experiences. Interview, socialize, enjoy great food and beverage and have FUN!

FREE Food* • Music • Hotel Stays and Gift Certificates Door Prizes and Giveaways • Cornhole

Complimentary Fitness Membership

* MUST BE 18 YEARS OR OLDER TO APPLY

SCHOOL

N O W

H I R I N G

BUS

Resort Discounts

DRIVERS STARTING AT $16.97 PER HOUR

Employee Golf Outing

$

REQUIREMENTS + DESCRIPTION

Employee Social Gatherings

$500-$1,000 Sign-On Bonuses for All Positions**

RETIREMENT

GREAT PAY

HEALTHCARE

TUITION ASSISTANCE

TRAINING

Interview for a Job, Get Hired for a Career, Become Part of a Family Join our team in a variety of positons and departments from entry level to management. All skill sets needed. Most positions pay above $15/ hour and commensurate with experience.

HOLIDAYS

Full-Time, Part-Time and Seasonal Positions Available:

Hotel Operations:

Food & Beverage:

Spa:

Golf and Sports:

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

• • • •

• • • • • •

Housekeeping Engineer Groundskeeper Front Desk Agent PBX Operator Reservation Agent HR Administrative Assistant

Restaurant General Manager Cooks Bartenders Dishwashers Host/Hostess Supervisor and Servers Food Runner/Busser

Esthetician Licensed Massage Therapist Nail Technician Spa Receptionist/Attendants

2,400

Assistant Golf Pro Childcare Provider Golf Course Maintenance Outside Greeters and Starters Pro Shop Manager Fitness Floor Attendant

APPLY NOW OR CALL

Benefits Include: Discounted Childcare, Health, Dental, Vision, 401k, Fitness Memberships, Resort Discounts, Travel Discount to Other Hotels *Upon completion of interviews, you will be given food and beverage tickets for redemption. **Sign-on bonuses vary by position and will be paid out with rules, starting with $250 on your first paycheck.

Education and/or experience equal to a high school diploma Must have clean driving record (No CDL required) For those without a CDL, free training will be provided All school bus drivers are Part-Time employees with healthcare benefits equal to a 40-hour employee

(434) 970-3532

www.tinyurl.com/schoolbustransit

1505 Avon Street Ext, Charlottesville, VA 22902

CAAR REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.CAAR.COM

Email classyexec@c-ville.com for more details about our DISCOUNTED full page and half page employment ad packages!

C H A R L O T T E S V I L L E , VA & C H A R L E S T O N , S C


BEER THAT DOESN’T CARE WHAT LIST YOU’RE ON.

CELEBRATE RESPONSIBLY®

©2021 MILLER BREWING CO., MILWAUKEE, WI • BEER


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