C-VILLE Weekly | May 25 - 31, 2022

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WWW.C-VILL E.COM MAY 25 - 31, 2022 VOL. 31 NO. 21 n

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YEARS OF REAL ESTATE

FLUVANNA, GREENE, CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE, ORANGE, AUGUSTA MADISON, NELSON,

LOUISA,

EZE AMOS

Why has the city's implementation of a Marcus Alert system stalled? PAGE 12

IX kicks off the first Charlottesville Arts Festival this weekend PAGE 21

Farmers : Marketts People Great Goods, Grea BY KEN WILSON

INSIDE

GEN ! N OW ide to

ly gu A month cefully in a aging gr esville Charlott

Pouring it on Wine scientist Joy Ting is in the business of making your vino taste better

JOHN ROBINSON

MAY 25 – 31, 2022 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

PAGE 25

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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V.34, No. 21

Charlottesville’s News & Arts Weekly CIRCULATION: 20,000 WEEKLY

P.O. Box 119 308 E. Main St. Charlottesville, Virginia 22902 www.c-ville.com Facebook: facebook.com/cville.weekly Twitter: @cville_weekly, @cville_culture Instagram: @cvilleweekly

FEATURE 16

EDITORIAL

JOHN ROBINSON

Down to a science How Joy Ting is making Virginia wine better. NEWS

9

11 City and county are working to cut carbon emissions. 12 Why no progress with a local Marcus Alert system?

23 Small Bites: Food drops, deer tats, good news, and more. 29 Sudoku 29 Crossword

NEWS REPORTER Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com CULTURE EDITOR Tami Keaveny tami@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Maeve Hayden INTERN Maryann Xue CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, Deirdre Crimmins, Amelia Delphos, Carol Diggs, Jenny Gardiner, Shea Gibbs, Mary Jane Gore, Erika Howsare, Desiré Moses, Kristin O’Donoghue, Lisa Provence, Sarah Sargent, Jen Sorensen, Courteney Stuart, Paul Ting, Sean Tubbs, David Levinson Wilk

13 The B.U.C.K. Squad continues to seek funding for its work.

31 Free Will Astrology

Q&A

DESIGN AND PRODUCTION

CULTURE

33 What’s your favorite local spot for a glass of wine?

ART DIRECTOR Max March max@c-ville.com

19

20 The Working Pour: Albemarle CiderWorks’ Hewes Crab is golden. 21 Feedback: C’ville Arts Festival has something for everyone.

CLASSIFIED 35

Real Estate Weekly Page 39

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com

ADVERTISING advertising@c-ville.com ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Gabby Kirk (434) 373-2136 gabby@c-ville.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Annick Canevet annick@c-ville.com, Lisa C. Hurdle classyexec@c-ville.com, Brittany Keller brittany@c-ville.com DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & MARKETING Stephanie Vogtman

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7

ON THE DOWNTOWN MALL

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“We’re not too young because as you can see, young Black people have already been getting killed and are still being killed. So, it needs to start early.”

9

­— Teen activist Nya Bryant, speaking at a youth-led protest for racial justice on the Downtown Mall on Saturday

NEWS IN BRIEF

Free formula

Slash and burn PAGE 11

CHS music legend retires

In response to the national baby formula shortage, Pediatric Associates of Charlottesville is giving out free formula samples and collecting unopened formula donations. The Voices of Liberation Free Store has also created a nobarrier formula support grant—caregivers in need can call or text (434) 218-3229, or email visionsofliberation365@gmail.com.

COVID cases are on the rise again in the Blue Ridge Health District—as of May 24, the district averaged 122 new cases over a seven-day period, compared to 46 cases on April 24. The UVA Medical Center has also seen an uptick in COVID patients over the past month. Despite this spike, the health district took down its local COVID data portal last week—area case counts, vaccination rates, and other data are now only available on the Virginia Department of Health and Centers for Disease Control websites.

Bob Good

Monticello High School seniors Carlos Armengol and Caroline Devine have started a change.org petition calling on Virginia to remain a member of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, a cap-and-trade program that aims to reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuel power plants in 11 states. Though Virginia just joined RGGI last year, Governor Glenn Youngkin and state Republicans are working to withdraw the state from it.

T

he woman who built Charlottesville High School’s orchestra into an award-winning juggernaut is retiring after 40 years. “Laura Mulligan Thomas has influenced generations of students in Charlottesville with a music education that is second to none,” said Charlottesville Superintendent Royal A. Gurley, Jr. in a release announcing her retirement. “She leaves a legacy in our schools.” Thomas accepted the job as CHS orchestra director right out of college at age 22. In 1989,

she took the then-40-member orchestra to a competition in New York City and won a gold medal. Recognitions for her program kept adding up as Thomas led the orchestra to competitions across the United States and abroad. Among many personal honors, Thomas was named Charlottesville Rotary Club’s Citizen of the Year, the Virginia Women’s Forum Charlottesville Woman of the Year, and Outstanding Educator in Central Virginia by Phi Delta Kappa. She was also the recipient of the Golden Apple and Piedmont Council of the Arts awards.

The city schools’ orchestra program begins at Walker Upper Elementary, and at CHS Thomas has additionally mentored string ensembles that perform at events around the Charlottesville area. Her former students range in age from late teens to late 50s, and many have gone on to careers in music performance and education. Among those former students is Thomas’ daughter, Emily Waters, who will step into her mother’s shoes. Waters has degrees in music and music education from VCU and JMU. She is currently the orchestra director at Walker.

Crozet mom claims anti-racism changed son Crozet mother Melissa Riley has accused Albemarle County Public Schools’ anti-racism curriculum of completely warping her 13-yearold biracial son’s perspective on race and identity. Riley, who is white, claims that her son, an eighth grader at Henley Middle School, now identifies as a Black man, and has “racial issues.” “He’s seeing things that don’t go his way as racism. And he is finding safety in numbers now,” Riley said in an interview on Fox News last week. “I asked him to clean the house, [he said] ‘racism.’” The single mother also claims her son—who “looks Hawaiian”— never saw himself as different from his white classmates or experienced racism until the school district launched an anti-racism

pilot program at Henley, a predominantly white school, last spring. She believes the program—which educates students on white privilege, systemic racism, and other racial issues—indoctrinates students to view and treat each other differently based on skin color, and ultimately promotes discrimination against white people. Riley and other disgruntled parents are plaintiffs in a lawsuit filed against the county school board by the Alliance Defending Freedom, a conservative nonprofit, in December, claiming that the district’s anti-racism curriculum violates the Virginia Constitution and parental rights. A circuit court judge dismissed the lawsuit last month, finding no evidence that the curriculum is racist or divisive. ADF plans to appeal the ruling.

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Speaking up

Laura Mulligan Thomas retired after conducting Charlottesville High School's award-winning orchestra for 40 years.

@cville_weekly

SUPPLIED PHOTO

Virginia 5th Congressional District Representative Republican Bob Good defeated challenger Dan Moy in a GOP nominating convention in Farmville on Saturday. Good received 1,488 votes, while Moy received only 271. The incumbent will face off against Democratic nominee Josh Throneburg in November.

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

Good wins

SUPPLIED PHOTO

On the rise


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NEWS

11

Riding green City, county discuss increasing environmentally-friendly transit Music. Food. Friends. It’s summer the way it was meant to be! Kick back on the lawn of the Blackburn Inn and Conference Center, in Staunton, for live music every Friday night now through Labor Day.

FRIDAY, MAY 27

FILE PHOTO

SUMMERSTAGE #1:

Within the next three to five years, Charlottesville’s climate action team hopes to create neighborhoods that are bikeable, walkable, and served by public transportation.

By Maryann Xue news@c-ville.com

I

Grounds open at 6 PM. Music at 7 PM. Rain or Shine. Tickets and Information at SummerStageVa.com

Heifetz Kickoff Hootenanny FRIDAY, JUNE 3 SUMMERSTAGE #1:

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Founding member of Nitty Gritty Dirt Band

10 concerts between Memorial Day and Labor Day The Blackburn Inn and Conference Center Staunton, VA Opening Musical Act @ 7 PM Headliner @ 8 PM Tickets starting at $15 INFORMATION & TICKETS: SummerStageVA.EventBrite.com

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Grounds, Bar & Grill Open @ 6 PM

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COMING SOON: Everyday Everybody

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

n a virtual meeting last week, the Metropolitan Planning Organization’s Citizens Transportation Advisory Committee discussed how Charlottesville and Albemarle County are working to drastically slash their carbon emissions, particularly in the context of transportation. Susan Elliott, Charlottesville’s climate protection program manager, explained that 95 percent of the city’s emissions come from the community. Residential, commercial, and transportation each make up 30 percent, while 5 percent stems from waste. The remaining 5 percent comes from municipal operations. The city has already begun to see progress in its fight against climate change—its emissions in 2019 were 30 percent less than 2011 levels. Still, within the next three to five years, the city’s climate action team plans to implement key mitigation strategies, including creating neighborhoods that are walkable, bikeable, and served by public transit. The team also wants to increase the use of green transportation—including e-bikes, scooters, and electric vehicles— among residents, and develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations across the community, among other big goals. Elliott urged the city’s urban designers to prioritize travel conservation, and design more spaces that allow people to travel to important destinations within a five-minute walk radius. Gabe Dayley, Albemarle’s climate protection program manager, provided a similar overview of the county’s status on climate action. In a 2018 report, the county’s emissions were about 10 percent less than its 2008 levels. Thirty-nine percent of the county’s emissions come from buildings,

while 52 percent stem from transportation—a much larger share than the city due to the county’s larger size. According to a 2015 to 2019 report on work commutes, only around 16 percent of county residents take a bus, carpool, walk, bike, or use another environmentally-friendly form of transportation—the majority drive alone to get to work. The county is considering reducing the amount of space allocated to on-street parking, and shifting it over to accommodate public transit, walking, and biking. However, “with a large rural area, it’s unlikely that we would ever have a transit service that could serve all areas of the county, so we may need to rely more on the transition to personal electric vehicles than the city might have to,” Dayley said. Over the past few years, there has been a growth in the usage of electric vehicle charging infrastructure across the county. Though Albemarle does not have its own transit service, both city and county leadership want Charlottesville Area Transit to work toward electrifying its fleet—the University of Virginia, which has its own lofty climate goals, has already purchased four electric buses. The county is also looking into transitioning to electric school buses. Following the presentations, members of the committee raised questions regarding the feasibility of increasing public transit, walkability, and bikeability in areas where driving seems to be the most accessible option. Dayley and Elliott explained that the city and county’s focus is on maximizing greener transportation options— but one trip does not have to be limited to a single mode of transportation. “It’s not just the walkability, it’s not just the bikeability, it’s not just the transit access,” said Elliott. “It’s how those pieces intersect together.”


NEWS

12

In crisis When will Charlottesville implement the Marcus Alert system? SKYLINE CHIMNEY SERVICE

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n the wake of 2020’s Black Lives Matter protests, the Virginia General Assembly passed the Marcus-David Peters Act. Named in honor of a 24-year-old Black high school biology teacher killed by a Richmond police officer during a severe mental health crisis in 2018, the 2020 law required localities to create a 9-8-8 number for mental health crises, and to develop protocols by July 2022 for when behavioral health experts, instead of law enforcement, will respond to crises related to mental health, substance use, and developmental disabilities. Last year, the City of Charlottesville’s Marcus Alert work group began exploring how to develop the new mental health response system—but since then, little progress has been made on actually implementing it. Earlier this month, The People’s Coalition and Brave Souls On Fire held a rally in front of City Hall, calling on City Council to immediately establish a community-based response to mental health crises, completely separate from the Charlottesville Police Department, as well as create a 24/7 crisis center and new municipal department addressing community mental health needs, among other demands. “What we don’t want is a situation where a person is in crisis, and it ends up being some type of preventable fatality,” said Myra Anderson, director of Brave Souls On Fire and co-chair of the Marcus Alert group, during the rally. “When you are in the depths of depression or despair, or having suicidal thoughts, and you reach out for help, we need to make sure as a community that that help is the right help you need.”

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But with fluctuating deadlines and constantly evolving requirements, it currently remains unclear when the Marcus Alert system will be up and running in the Charlottesville area. In March, the Republicanmajority General Assembly passed a bill allowing localities with populations of less than 40,000 to opt out of the system. Those with more than 40,000 residents are now required to implement the system by July 1, 2028—two years past the original deadline. Laws surrounding the Marcus Alert are expected to be reexamined during next year’s legislative session. According to Sonny Saxton, executive director of the Charlottesville-UVA-Albemarle County Emergency Communications Center, the center has yet to hear back from the state’s Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Services regarding the timeline and requirements for Charlottesville—which has around 46,600 residents— to implement the Marcus Alert. The system is currently available in only five localities across the state, including Prince William County, Richmond, and Virginia Beach. “It will take time and substantial effort to ensure all these resource needs are met,” says Saxton. “Fortunately, we’ve also seen how there’s no lack of people who are eager to jump in and be intentional about this work. The need is clear, and now it is largely a question of staffing, resourcing, and coordinating logistics between all parties involved.” The local emergency communications center sees the limits of its current system on a daily basis, explains Saxton. In instances where an individual needs to be placed in emergency custody, it is difficult to predict wait times for a staffed bed, or when and where medical attention will be available.

Myra Anderson says it’s important that we, as a community, make sure everyone gets the kind of help they need.


NEWS

MYRA ANDERSON, DIRECTOR OF BRAVE SOULS ON FIRE AND CO-CHIAR OF THE MARCUS ALERT GROUP

By Brielle Entzminger reporter@c-ville.com

F

The nonprofit B.U.C.K. Squad is currently working to secure several grants in order to place 10 to 15 more violence interrupters in each of the city’s predominantly Black neighborhoods this summer.

“Some of the folks that were against us are family members of drug dealers,” claims Dickerson. “They don’t want us around because they’re benefiting from what these folks are doing.” Under Dickerson’s leadership, the squad has continued to connect conflicting parties with the community resources they need, like mental health care and job opportunities, and continually follow up with them to make sure they do not turn back to violence. “When you get to know them, they don’t really want to shoot these guns anyway,” says Dickerson. “Most of them are just trying to drive attention to themselves,” especially those whose fathers are incarcerated. “They just don’t have no understanding of what life is really about, and how you can sustain your life,” he adds. In addition to gun violence, the squad receives calls on its 24-hour hotline (365-4187) related to domestic violence, substance abuse, missing children, and other emergencies. But the squad has not had the capacity to intervene in and prevent every shooting in the city. In fact, last year, amid a nationwide upswing in gun violence, CPD responded to over 250 reported shots-fired incidents. This year, there have already been several shootings, including at Fry’s Spring Beach Club in March. Two men sustained non-life threatening injuries, and police collected more than 100 cartridge casings at the scene. (Two men have since been arrested in association with the crime.) “This is not just isolated to First Street or West Haven,” says Dickerson. “Anybody can get killed.” In Charlottesville and across the country, gun violence is only expected to rise over the summer.

“There’s longer days. People are drinking more, smoking marijuana more, using drugs more,” says Dickerson. “That’s the catalyst for gun violence.” The nonprofit is currently working to secure several grants in order to hire 10 to 15 more violence interrupters, so it can place a team in each of the city’s predominantly Black neighborhoods this summer. To tackle the root causes of gun violence, the squad also aims to expand its community programming. It plans to continue hosting youth events this summer, and will also work to prevent recidivism. In collaboration with Piedmont Virginia Community College, member Bryan Page recently developed a 12week re-entry program that connects formerly incarcerated people with job training and mentorship. Around 4,500 people are scheduled to be released from Virginia prisons this summer. According to Virginia Department of Corrections’ figures, about 3,200 of those releases are due to a new state law expanding the earned sentence credit program—Dickerson expects over 100 to be returning home to Charlottesville. “The first 72 hours are the most important hours of a person getting out of jail. That’s when he’s going to choose what direction he’s going to go in,” says Dickerson. “A lot of these guys are going to be re-incarcerated… if they don’t have certain avenues they can travel to get their life together.” With additional funding, the organization plans to offer mental health services, career development, financial planning, grief counseling, vocational training, and other critical programs, as well as establish a permanent physical headquarters—including mediation centers and wraparound services—in the near future. To learn more about or donate to the B.U.C.K. Squad, visit bucksquad911.org.

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ollowing the arrival of the coronavirus pandemic, gun violence spiked across Charlottesville, particularly in the city’s predominantly Black neighborhoods. There were four gun homicides in 2020—a notable uptick from the two homicides in 2019 and one in 2018. By the end of the year, the Charlottesville Police Department had responded to 122 shots-fired incidents. This rise in gun violence continued into 2021, with multiple shootings taking place in or near public housing communities. However, the year ended with zero homicides. The city has the B.U.C.K.—Brothers United to Cease the Killing—Squad to thank for this drop in gun-related deaths, says its Executive Director Herb Dickerson. Since last January, the nonprofit squad has intervened in conflicts, attempting to talk down clashing groups before they start shooting. In 2021, Dickerson says the squad intervened in about 79 incidents. So far this year, that number has been 46. “The whole thing is developing relationships within these communities, and letting folks know what you’re attempting to do to help [the] guys with these guns and selling drugs. There is another way,” says Dickerson. “Our personal experience and reputation proves that you can do different.” In October, City Council donated $50,000 to the squad, which helped compensate its dozen members, as well as increase its patrols in predominantly Black neighborhoods. However, the $50,000 has now run dry, forcing the group to rely on private donations to stay afloat. “The $50,000 [was] a good start. We got the message out about what we’re doing, and people started supporting us,” says Dickerson. “You can’t get a person to go out in the streets at 2 o’clock in the morning for free—it just wouldn’t make sense to put their lives on the line.” Councilor Michael Payne and then-mayor Nikuyah Walker voted against the $50,000 donation. Payne specifically cited concerns councilors had heard from the Public Housing Association of Residents and the Charlottesville Redevelopment and Housing Authority. B.U.C.K. Squad founder Pertelle Gilmore severed all ties with the squad last June. “The draw with the squad is that a lot of them are from the streets… Some of them deal with a lot of trauma, and just have personal issues,” squad board chair Kimberly Hayes told C-VILLE in October. “[Gilmore] and the squad came to an agreement that they thought it would be best that he deal with his issues.” In response to these concerns, the squad created an accountability and grievance policy last year. It has also developed an “open relationship” with CRHA Director John Sales, says Dickerson.

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Marcus Alert system is developed and implemented,” says Payne. “We need to be unified in laying the groundwork, making investments in our budget, conducting trainings… to allow us to hit the ground running.” Payne emphasizes the importance of pursuing other avenues of non-police mental health responses as well. The Albemarle County Police Department recently opened a Crisis Intervention Team Assessment Center through a partnership with Region Ten, creating an environment for individuals experiencing mental health crises to receive proper care and assessment outside of the criminal justice system. “When we conduct our search for the next chief of police, explicitly prioritizing implementation of these programs will be critical,” adds Payne. “There is a clear need in the community—we cannot just accept the bare minimum in terms of timelines and program scopes to improve our response to mental health needs.”

B.U.C.K. Squad tackles gun violence in city

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

“What we don’t want is a situation where a person is in crisis, and it ends up being some type of preventable fatality.”

Making a difference

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For Region Ten, which serves six localities including Charlottesville and Albemarle County, the current expectation is for the entire area to implement the Marcus Alert system, but it also remains unclear when that will happen, says Joanna Jennings, Region Ten community relations spokesperson. This year, state lawmakers also extended the original July 1, 2021, deadline for localities to establish voluntary databases containing relevant mental health and emergency contact information to 2023— although in Charlottesville and Albemarle County, anyone who wishes to provide this information can already do so by calling Region Ten or the ECC’s non-emergency number (977-9041). In the case of a related 911 call, this information will be made available to the emergency responders dispatched to the scene. However, nationwide changes to mental health crisis response are arriving soon. By July 16, anyone in the U.S. experiencing a mental health crisis will be able to call or text 988, and be connected right away with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, in accordance with a new Federal Communications Commission mandate. Charlottesville, says City Councilor Michael Payne, cannot wait until 2028 to change its local response to mental health crises. This budget cycle, City Council allocated $100,000 toward the Marcus Alert system—an investment that Payne says needs to be connected to a coordinated plan. “It is vital that the Emergency Communications Center, Charlottesville Police Department, and Charlottesville city government coordinate their efforts to position Charlottesville to be the next area where a

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WINE

DOWN WHAT’S DELISH AT LOCAL WINERIES?

CHISWELL FARM WINERY 2020 Chardonnay The 2020 Chardonnay is crisp and easy drinking as we head into warmer weather! You’ll find notes of honeysuckle and yellow apples on the nose, with zippy pink grapefruit and lemongrass on the palate. Enjoy our Chardonnay with home made chicken salad, grilled shrimp, or strawberries and cream! With a glass in hand, enjoy the beautiful scenery from our lawn, or a cozy chair inside, where you’ll discover a variety of inviting spaces. While indoor seating is limited, there are many options for outdoor seating, including rocking chairs on the covered porch and dining tables on the lawn for small groups. You’re also welcome to bring your own folding chairs and blankets to sit further out on the hill. All seating is first-come, first-served. Ages 21+, no dogs or other pets permitted on the property. For a family-friendly experience, visit our wine shops at Chiles Peach Orchard or Carter Mountain Orchard.

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Wine is currently available by the glass, flight, or bottle. We also offer a curated selection of snacks that pair well with any of our wines (outside food is not permitted). Wine sales stop 30 minutes prior to closing. May 21st- Paint and Sip (advanced ticket purchase required) see our website for more details! Hours: Wednesday–Sunday, 12 PM–5:30 PM (hours change seasonally) 430 Greenwood Rd, Greenwood, VA 22943 434.252.2947 • www.chilesfamilyorchards.com/chiswell

WINERY

DUCARD VINEYARD

Guide Map

REVALATION VINEYARDS MADISON

33 HARRISONBURG

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ORANGE

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HARK VINEYARD

HORTON VINEYARDS

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REYNARD FLORENCE VINEYARD

GORDONSVILLE

33 CROZET AFTON

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LOUISA

CHARLOTTESVILLE

CHISWELL FARM WINERY

EASTWOOD FARM & WINERY

ZION CROSSROADS

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POTTER’S CRAFT CIDER PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS

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SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

CUNNINGHAM CREEK

53RD WINERY & VINEYARD

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53RD WINERY AND VINEYARD 2021 Albariño Just in time for the spring: our 2021 Albariño! Pale gold in color with a nose of tropical fruit, this light and lively wine is easy drinking. With flavors of candied citrus peel, ripe pear, and thyme, this estate grown Albariño is one to look out for. Enjoy with firm cheeses, shrimp scampi, or a nice picnic on a warm fall afternoon We are open 7 days a week, 11am to 5pm offering our 100% Virginia wine by the bottle, glass and tasting flights. Enjoy your visit at our intimate, meadow-like setting in rural Louisa County. we offer wellspaced indoor and outside seating and customers are welcome to bring their own picnic baskets, chairs and blankets. Children and pets are welcome, but pets must always remain outside of buildings and on a leash. Quality wine, friendly staff at a great escape! Visit our website, www.53rdwinery.com. June 4th- Louisa Humane Society 5K and food provided by Birmie’s Fixins Food cart Open 7 days a week, 11 am – 5 pm 13372 Shannon Hill Rd • Louisa, VA 23093 (540) 894-5474 • 53rdwinery.com.

CUNNINGHAM CREEK WINERY Menage-A-Paw Made in Virginia with the juice of Argentinian Malbec and Carmenere, Menage A Paw is a light & bright, the perfect red for every palette–even in the heat of the summer! Dive into the lush ripe cherry, plum, and licorice on the nose followed by light tannins, green apple, and hints of lavender on the palette. Menage a Paw is ever great for sharing amongst white wine lovers and red wine enthusiasts! Enjoy chilled or at room temperature, with a backyard cookout or on the water. In honor of our rescue dogs, CCW donates $1 for each bottle sold to Green Dogs Unleashed, a non-profit animal rescue in Troy, Virginia. Come visit us Thursday & Friday 1-8, Saturday 1-9, Sunday 1-6. No reservations, ample indoor and outdoor seating. Corky and Crush, our resident Aussies, welcome friendly leashed dogs (be sure to visit the fenced unleashed dog park). Thursdays & Saturdays- Yogacheck our website for more details. Saturdays- Live music and Food Trucks! Check our website for a list of bands each week. May 28th- Memorial Day All You Can Eat Oysters with Salty Bottom Blue Oysters- all you can eat grilled and on the ½ shell for $40 June 11th- 5K Fun Run/Walk benefiting Green Dogs Unleashed

June 12th- Wine Pairing Dinner with Chef Andy (advanced ticket purchase required) Winery Hours: Thurs/Fri 1-8 pm; Sat 1-9 pm; Sun. 1-6 pm 3304 Ruritan Lake Road Palmyra, VA 22963 434-207-3907 www.cunninghamcreek.wine

DUCARD VINEYARDS 2021 Shenandoah White and Black Bear Red Long time DuCard fans will recognize these two wines - our Shenandoah White Wine and our Black Bear Red. We release them every year in very small quantities, and a portion of the sales are donated towards the Shenandoah National Park Trust. Since the beautiful Shenandoah National Park borders our winery property, it is very special to us. The trust helps ensure that SNP remains a crown jewel of the National Park Service, and we are proud to support it in any way we can! Our uncrowded rural Madison County area has mountains, streams and plenty of beautiful views along scenic back roads. The tasting room is near hiking and biking trails along the Shenandoah National Forest and is a perfect respite after your day out! Enjoy some peace and quiet relaxation in this challenging environment. Sit on our lawns and sip or pick up a bottle or three of our award-winning wines to take home. Reservations available and recommended (especially for Saturdays). No reservation fee or minimum purchase. Walkups accommodated on a spaceavailable basis. To order wine for local delivery or UPS shipping, visit our website! Open daily – Mon-Thurs. 12-5 pm Fri. 12-9 pm, Sat/Sun. 12-6 pm Saturdays- Music on the Patio (2:30 – 5:30 pm) enjoy a wide variety of artists each Saturday May 29-30th – Memorial Day Music on the Patio! Check our website for artists! 40 Gibson Hollow Ln • Etlan, VA 22719 (540) 923-4206 www.ducardvineyards.com

EASTWOOD FARM AND WINERY Gold Medal Virginia Wines The Eastwood Merlot, Cabernet Franc, Meritage Reserve, and Blanc de Blancs were awarded gold medals in the 2022 Virginia Governor’s Cup. Enjoy these gold medal wines in our tasting rooms this month. We are currently featuring a Gold Medal Tasting Flight. We also are offering a Gold Medal Bundle for pickup or shipping - available in the tasting room and on our website, which includes a bottle of each of our gold medal


winners to enjoy at home. As of April 1, all of our spaces are open five days a week. We look forward to welcoming guests back to the Tent and Terrace Bar, the Mountaintop, as well as to the Barn and Veranda. We also are delighted to announce that we opened a food truck for guests to enjoy onsite. It will most often be parked at the Terraces and offers a delicious menu featuring a Grilled Chicken & Pimento Cheese Sandwich, Chicken Skewers, Peel & Eat Shrimp, Chilled Rice Noodles, a Chickpea Salad, among other items. Join us for award-winning wines, great ciders, delicious food along with live music, yoga, paint & sip classes, events for families and kids, and more this month. We look forward to seeing you. Winery Hours: Wednesdays-Saturdays (12-8 PM), Sundays (12-6 PM) 2531 Scottsville Rd. (5 mi from Downtown Charlottesville) Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 264-6727 www.eastwoodfarmandwinery.com

HARK VINEYARDS

May 28th- Sue Harlow Music + Sweet Jane’s Kitchen Food Truck June 4th- Faraway Music + Two Brothers Southwestern Grill

HORTON VINEYARDS 2018 Albariño *Part of our first International Tasting Series (see below for details) This semi-dry white wine has lime and apple aromas a light body and a clean, crisp finish. Albariño’s resistance to heat and humidity make it an excellent pairing for the Virginia climate. This wine is created in steel allowing the natural flavors to come forward and should be enjoyed within six months to a year of purchase. Pairing Suggestions: clams, oysters, steamed mussels, cream pasta dishes, grilled fish. We are excited to announce that we will be starting an international tasting series to include multiple Virginia Wineries. This is the ticketed-only International Tasting series you won’t want to miss! Horton Vineyards is hosting a four part event series this year to showcase the versatility of Virginia terroir and diversity of winemaking. The series will start with an Albariño tasting in May, Nebbiolo tasting in June, Pinotage tasting on International Pinotage Day in October, and will finish the series with a Touriga Nacional and Port wine tasting in December. The tastings will start at 11:30am. Guest speakers will guide you through your tastings and discuss the history of the grape. Charcuterie boards will be available for guests to purchase to go along with their tastings. This event will be limited to 30 guests. Tickets are available for purchase in the tasting room and online. Ticket Pricing: 1 person for one International Tasting Day- $35.00 2 people for one International Tasting Day- $65.00 1 person for all four International Tasting Days- $125.00 2 people for all four International Tasting Day- $240.00 Due to the nature of this event, we are unable to accommodate dietary restrictions. Tickets are nonrefundable. Open Daily from 10 am – 5 pm Wednesdays- Wine Wednesday (77:30 pm) Join Horton Vineyards live on Facebook every Wednesday at 7pm to learn about a different wine each week! May 28th- International Tasting of Albariño including Chrysalis & Ingleside Vineyards! 6399 Spotswood Trail, Gordonsville, Virginia (540) 832-7440 www.hortonwine.com

POTTER’S CRAFT CIDER Cider Nouveau A rosé-style cider fermented on Petit Verdot and Merlot grape skins from King Family Vineyards, aged in French

About Us: You can’t make good cider without good apples. Our process starts with locally grown cider apples from orchards and farms around the Shenandoah Valley. We know exactly where our fruit comes from and which varietals will yield the best flavors, aromas, and tannins in our Virginia climate. Beyond just apples, we find inspiration through local collaboration. We’ll always partner with neighboring wineries, breweries, distilleries, and farms to expand and enhance our cidermaking possibilities. The Potter’s Craft Cider tasting room is just 10 minutes south of Charlottesville; featuring craft cider, charcuterie, live music, and local food trucks every weekend. Potter’s also offers a selection of fortified and aromatized wines, cider cocktails, nitro cold brew coffee, local kombucha, juice and seltzer. Given its dreamy ambience, stunning architecture, expansive grounds, and convenient location, Potter’s is an accessible place for everyone to enjoy. Fridays & Saturdays- Live music each week at 5:30! Checkout our website for who’s coming up. April 28th- Bingo Night 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. Charlottesville, VA 22903 434-244-2767 www.potterscraftcider.com

PIPPIN HILL FARM & VINEYARDS 2021 Sauvignon Blanc Made from grapes grown at the best vineyard sites in the area our Sauvignon Blanc is a beautiful expression of what local terroir can produce. Our lovely climate means acidity remains high on these grapes, making it one of our best food wines, pairing particularly well with herb-driven sauces served over chicken, tofu, or fish dishes. With its distinctive, vivid aromas of chamomile and kiwi and bright hints of citrus and gooseberry on the tongue, it has a balanced, clean finish and a zesty acidity that makes this Sauvignon Blanc vintage one of our best. **Sip, Stroll, Sample, Savor**: Join us on the Hill for our newest Estate tour and wine tasting experience! Join us for a unique, in-depth exploration of our wines, vines, and land. The experience starts with a glass of award-winning bubbly and a guided tour of our Estate vines. The tour is followed by an intimate tasting featuring a selection of six exclusive Reserve and Library wines and concludes with our culinary favorites such as our cheese & charcuterie board and seasonal burrata. Make your reservation on our Website! Plan to visit: Pippin Hill is a culinary

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Hours: Tuesday – Thursday: 11 am – 5 pm; Friday – Sunday: 11am to 4:30pm Sundays- Live music on the hill! Each Sunday from 1-4 PM, Pippin Hill welcomes local musicians to perform on our Veranda. Check our website for varying artists. 5022 Plank Rd., North Garden, VA 22959 (434).202.8063 www.pippinhillfarm.com

REVALATION VINEYARDS 2019 Tannat The 2019 Tannat has mature and elegant tannins…this wine will age well. Complex and bold, the nose has notes of cherry, raspberry, anise, cigar, licorice, vanilla bean, almond, and ripe-tomato juice. The cherry and raspberry flavors come through in the front of the palate with flavors of anise and vanilla in the mid-palate. Revalation Vineyards is a familyowned vineyard that offers exquisite wines in an exceptional setting. Situated in Madison’s Hebron Valley, the property offers stunning views of the Blue Ridge mountains. Relax on the porch of the 1830’s log cabin tasting room while you enjoy one of our wine flights served in fine antique glasses. Inside tables can be reserved through our website. Reservations are requested for both indoor and outdoor areas and walk-ins are welcome whenever space is available. On chilly days with low winds, we are happy to light the firepits, free of charge. Well-behaved, leashed dogs are welcome on the porch, patio and surrounding outdoor areas. Our vineyard is a 21+ property and no smoking or vaping is permitted. Hours: Nov. 1 - April 30, Friday 12pm - sunset and Saturday/Sunday 12pm - 5pm. Mondays- 10% off bottle purchases for seniors 65+ with a valid I.D. Fridays- Take in a spectacular sunset over the Blue Ridge Mountains with a glass of wine. Saturdays + Sundays- Pop-ups by local artisans and food vendors. Visit our website for the monthly schedule. June 3rd- Book World Meets Wine World Fundraising Event with Author Andi Cumbo-Floyd Author Andi Cumbo-Floyd will be reading from her latest book. Ten percent of all wine and food sales from the entire day will be donated to the Literacy Council of Madison County. 2710 Hebron Valley Road, Madison, VA 22727 540-407-1236 • www.revalationvineyards.com SPECIAL ADVERTORIAL SECTION

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Upcoming events:

434-964-9463 (WINE) 1465 Davis Shop Rd, Earlysville, VA 22936 www.harkvineyards.com

vineyard in the heart of Virginia’s wine country. There are two types of standard reservations available: Indoor Table or Covered Veranda for table service. Walk-ins are welcome for lawn seating. Reservations via Resy are recommended for Indoor and Veranda seating.

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Visiting Hark: Hark Vineyards is a family-owned winery focused on the belief that beautiful views and delicious wine can bring people together. We offer two tasting menus, poured as flights for you to take back to your picnic area. Each feature five wines, and provides experience with both the Hark and Jake Busching Wines brands. Our wines are also available by the bottle or glass. We welcome — and encourage — you to bring a picnic and enjoy the experience our estate offers. Some picnic foods such as cheese, charcuterie, jams, crackers, and chocolate are available for purchase in our tasting room.

Hours: 12pm-6pm on Friday/ Sunday and 12pm-8pm Saturdays

oak barrels. The grapes bring beautiful color, complex tannins and a light fruitiness to the dry, crisp cider. The oak aging allows the separate components to meld together harmoniously, allowing the different elements to perfectly complement one another.

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

2020 Virginia Verde Zippy and refreshing, our Virginia Verde pays homage to classic Vino Verde wines! With notes of lime zest, ripe melons, and bright acidity, this wine is perfect for enjoying on the porch or pairing with a variety of foods. Make sure to snag a bottle before it’s sold out!

June 11th- Live Music all day by John Kelly and Bofa and the Band + Popitos Pizza


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Wine wonder Joy Ting’s quest to elevate Virginia wine is founded in scientific curiosity BY MATT DHILLON

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

JOHN ROBINSON

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here might be notes of butterscotch and baked goods, a bite of sour green apple, even a touch of goat cheese, or something earthier with floral aromas and a chocolaty finish. There is the terroir to consider, the climate, the living yeast, sugar content, temperature, phenolic compounds, tannins, malic acid, lactic acid, and more, but what makes good wine good wine? In her lab at the Winemakers Research Exchange, Joy Ting searches for answers to this question. Entering her fourth year as research enologist for the organization, Ting gets to peek into the winemaking process of almost every vineyard in the state and help them improve their wine. The WRE, a nonprofit research cooperative founded by winemakers and funded by the Virginia Wine Board, is dedicated to the improvement of Virginia wine. Ting’s job is to design and facilitate experiments on different winemaking practices and to help winemakers incorporate the results. “Whenever we do an experiment, the first thing I do is ask the winemaker, ‘What was your winemaking goal in doing this experiment?’” says Ting, who’s married to C-VILLE contributor Paul Ting. “We want to keep that winemaking goal in view. And a lot of times it’s things like, ‘I wanted to improve the mouth feel of my wine,’ or, ‘I felt like I wanted more structure in this wine.’” As she has discovered, good winemaking is as much about responding to the grapes as it is about creating wine. One of the first things Ting learned in the industry was how to adapt to the circumstances for each vintage. “At its heart, this is an agricultural industry and we’re governed by what the weather and the climate give us,” Ting says. “There’s a balance between the need to have a good plan and the need to be flexible and have open hands to what the vintage is going to bring in and work with it, not against it.” What Ting likes about working with wine is that it’s alive. A marine biologist by training with a Ph.D. in applied biology from Georgia Tech, Ting came to wine from a scientific angle. Leaving her job as a high school biology teacher in Charlottesville, she started as a lab tech at Wineworks for the harvest of 2013 after a fateful conversation with the owner, Michael Shaps. “I had gotten very interested in wine itself, but specifically in the production side, the side that sort of seems a little more scientific,” Ting says. Winemaking engaged her inherent wonder at finding out how things work and her fascination with making things. She learned an appreciation for craft from her mother, who was a seamstress. “She just had this way of looking at fabric and knowing what to do and making it more beautiful than it was on its own,” Ting says. From that early example, Ting has always been interested in the process of taking raw materials and developing what is best in them. In her own winemaking process, she keeps

that in mind. Good wine depends on what “So much of winemaking is showing up If it’s Virginia wine, the grapes are doing, and her role is to help every day and paying attention to the smaller Joy Ting has probably analyzed it. Ting matched details, just to sort of help to keep things on them express that. By 2014, Ting was making small batches her biology Ph.D. with an track” she says. “It’s not very glamorous at all. interest in wine to become of her own brew. She experimented under But Ting never lost her enthusiasm for exa research enologist at Joy Ting Wines, her label, while learning the perimentation or her aptitude for teaching. In Winemakers Research Exchange, where she intricacies of winemaking at Wineworks, a 2018, when the position of research enologist large operation, where she could sometimes works to improve Virginia’s was incorporated into the WRE, it seemed like winemaking processes. a perfect fit. The position would need someone put in 12-hour days during the fermentation process. If the yeast were ready to be fed, it who could design experiments, analyze data, could turn into a 14-hour day. publish studies, and disseminate information in practical “You have to sort of watch that every day to make sure ways to local vineyards and winemakers. that you get it in there at the right time,” Ting says. “If you Virginia is a unique growing region with unique chaldon’t feed the yeast on time, there’s a point at which it lenges. Some of the wines people are most familiar with doesn’t matter if you feed them, they can’t eat it anyways don’t grow well here. The growing season is shorter than because their cell membranes won’t take food in anymore.” some grapes need to ripen, and the environment is humid If you don’t feed them on time, the yeast get stressed, and and wet enough to make mold an issue. stressed yeast make bad flavors: vinegar, sulfur, rotten eggs. Winemakers look for grapes that fit the land. While Ting did simple lab work well within her wheelhouse, chardonnay is the most planted grape in Virginia, making but the numbers needed to be accurate enough to make up about 13-14 percent of the annual yield, it is a struggle to grow. However, a lesser-known white wine grape that very expensive decisions.


Literacy Volunteers of Charlottesville/Albemarle

Help change a life.

Tutor an adult in reading, writing, and/or speaking English.

New Tutor Training June 4, 2022 10:30 am— 4:30 pm Northside Library Register by June 1

by visiting www.literacyforall.org Our students come from a variety of backgrounds, and are all hoping to acquire the language skills they need to independently pursue their life goals, support their families, and flourish.

www.literacyforall.org • 434-977-3838

Join our Lunch Club! May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

Akira Ramen & Sushi BJ's Brewhouse Burger Bach Burton's Grill Champion Grill Matchbox Mezeh Mission BBQ Noodles & Company Qdoba Mexican Eats Torchy's Tacos

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does great is petit manseng. This grape, with its small berries, thick skin, and loose clusters, has better airflow and is more disease resistant than most varieties. “It was introduced into Virginia by our cooperative extension agent [Tony Wolf], who tried a bunch of different varieties to find out what actually grows here,” Ting says. Now Virginia has the second largest planting of petit manseng in the world, next to its home region in France. Its high sugar and acid content deliver an interesting, sharp character to the wine. But it is still relatively obscure, making up about 2 percent of the annual yield. Cabernet franc contends closely with chardonnay for most-planted grapes every year and averages about 12 percent of the annual yield. This red grape is typically used in blends because its floral, fruity, and mellow characteristics are often attached to vegetable or green pepper flavors. However, its resilience, adaptability, and earlier ripening cycle have prompted Virginia winemakers to embrace it in its own right and cultivate its potential. In 2004, Virginia had 1,900 acres of fruiting vineyards, ranking it 10th overall in the country, according to data collected by the Virginia Wine Board. By 2008, that number climbed to 2,500 acres. In 2010, it spread to 2,633. In 2015, the growth peaked at 3,172 acres bearing fruit. In 2019, the number was climbing again at 2,969 acres and the state ranked eighth in overall wine production. But Virginia wine remains an emerging industry and one that is continually working on establishing itself. It is still a world of experimentation and development. “We’re not as well known around the world as many are,” says Ting. “I think one of the things we get from that is it’s still very intertwined, so a lot of people know each other and it’s still very collaborative and it’s very cooperative.” Ting’s work at the research exchange is a testament to that collaboration. Vineyards can use this common resource to learn about the effects of leaf removal on the ripeness of their grape, how to integrate the skins during fermentation, or how sulfur dioxide could help with the storage of their wine. “There are so many things, I think, that are improving the quality of Virginia wine, and I am very grateful that we get to be one part of helping to lift that tide,” Ting says. Beyond her research, Ting contributes her expertise by collaborating as a winemaker on a variety of releases. This spring she led a tasting of her work with The Wool Factory’s new label that showcased a 2020 petit manseng, a 2019 cabernet franc, and Bitte vermouth. Her own rubric for what makes good wine is related to what makes people gather around a table, to sit together, and share an evening. Some of the exquisite fine wines we are accustomed to reserving for special occasions, but Ting favors a wine that you could drink any day, or every day. Wine is an ingredient in that everyday bond of coming together. The dinner table, she says, is not just about putting food in our bodies, it’s part of a bigger picture of community, communication, and connection. “When I was growing up, my family would sit at the dinner table, we would eat our meal in the dining room, and then we would sit around and talk for three hours,” Ting says. “And so, I feel like one of the things I’m trying to do is I’m trying to make wines that go with you through the meal and help you want to linger longer at the table, talking to your family, talking to your friends, talking to whoever you’re having dinner with.”

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Open for Breads, Pastries, Cof fee, and Takeout Breakfast, Lunch & Br unch. MarieBette Café & Bakery · 700 Rose Hill Drive, Charlottesville · 434.529.6118 Petite MarieBette · 105 E Water Street, Charlottesville · 434.284.8903 mariebette.com


CULTURE

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SATURDAY 5/28

Adam Granduciel is known for doing things on his own. Typically a loner in the studio, the frontman for American rock band War on Drugs assembles most of the group’s records by overdubbing pre-recorded tracks. It worked well for years, but in 2018 Granduciel was ready for something new— community. The band’s fifth studio album, I Don’t Live Here Anymore, evolved from hours of in-person jamming and brotherhood between every member of the band. “It just reminded me of all the things I love about making music,” says Granduciel. “Collaborating with my friends, and letting everybody shine.” $45-50, 7pm. Ting Pavilion, 700 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. tingpavilion.com

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JOIN TOGETHER

THROUGH 5/31

SHINING EXAMPLE SUPPLIED PHOTO

FRIDAY 5/27

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So, you think you can dance? Even if you can’t, all you need is a phone to participate in Fralin After Five’s Social Dance, “a site-specific immersive performance.” The dance, a combined interaction between public space and social media, features 11 performers and 11 audience members who must move together by communicating through their phones—no speaking, talking, or touching allowed. Choreographer Shandoah Goldman is known for immersive performances that fuse film, location, sound, theater, and more. A reception at the museum follows the performance. Free, 6pm. Mad Bowl Field, 155 Rugby Rd., UVA Grounds. uvafralinartmuseum.virginia.edu

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Friends of UVA Children’s Hospital, local businesses, and nonprofits are supporting children and teens during Mental Health Awareness Month with The Shine Guide, a curated collection of events in nature, art, music, yoga, and more. This week, youngsters can tour McCormick Observatory, take a yoga class for relaxation and stress reduction, pick up a mindfulness kit, join a book club, and volunteer at Ivy Creek, among other activities. Free, times vary. Online and various locations around Charlottesville. Search Shine Guide or contact friendsofuvachildrens@gmail.com

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

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CULTURE THE WORKING POUR

Best pressed

Wednesday 5/25 music

A rise in popularity finds Virginia cider going for the gold By Paul Ting living@c-ville.com

Irish Wednesday. Music from King Golden Banshee. Free, 5:30pm. The Pub at Lake Monticello, 51 Bunker Blvd., Palmyra. lake monticellogolf.org Mike Rosensky and Jeff Decker Quartet. Late-night live music. Free, 8pm. Miller’s Downtown, 109 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. millersdowntown.com

Glassware: Although you may not drink cider from wine glasses normally, using a wine glass helps distinguish flavors because of its wide bowl and ability to concentrate aromas for evaluation. A larger, thinner bowl will help you swirl cider to bring out subtle aromas.

dance

Taste in order: Taste dryer, lighter ciders first and then move on to sweeter, heavier ciders. Appearance: Look closely at color and clarity. Do you see bubbles? Is the cider watery and thin or full-bodied and syrupy? Smell: Put your nose in the glass and evaluate the aroma. Can you smell anything, or is the impression intense and pungent? Does it smell like apples, pears, other fruits, flowers, herbs, vanilla, honey, spice? Is it musty? Taste: Allow the cider to touch all parts of your tongue. Do the flavors match the aromas that you identified? Is the cider sweet, acidic, bitter? If there is sweetness or acidity, is it in balance, or does the cider seem flat or sour? Mouthfeel: Is it light, like water, or does it feel heavier, like syrup? Does it dry out your mouth or is it creamy?

Albemarle CiderWorks 2019 Hewes Crab is one of the gold medal winners in this year’s Governor’s Cup competition.

Berto and Matt. Brazilian and Latin guitar night. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com

The process of tasting cider is similar to tasting wine, but the underlying flavors vary between the source fruit of apples and grapes. Like wine, specific training exists for those who taste cider professionally. These tips let you be the judge.

Comfort: Take your time. Taste in a well-lit, odor-free environment. Stay hydrated as you taste.

Length and finish: How do the flavors change and finish? How long does it last? Overall impression: What is your final evaluation of the cider? Is it pleasant? Is it complex? Is it balanced? STAFF PHOTO

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

How ‘bout them apples?

Temperature: Most people drink cider chilled at colder temperatures, but tasting at slightly warmer temperatures, 55 degrees is suggested, helps bring out flavors and textural components.

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B

eginning in 2021, the annual Virginia Governor’s Cup competition, which traditionally recognizes the best wines in the state, included a separate category for cider. In 2022, the competition awarded 10 gold medals to ciders and Albemarle CiderWorks’ 2019 Hewes Crab won Best in Show. Opened by the Shelton family in 2009, Albemarle CiderWorks is Virginia’s oldest operating cidery. Production has expanded from three types of cider to the current count of 15 different varieties. The growth of Albemarle CiderWorks parallels the renaissance of cider in Virginia, and its resurgence in the United States. Cider is considered one of the country’s original beverages, brought here from England by the first settlers and produced by several of the founding fathers. While consumption waned as beer and wine became popular, consumer interest has reignited in recent years, resulting in more cideries, more variety, and an increase in the volume of production. In Virginia, cider falls under the same category as wine for tax purposes, and some of these tax dollars are controlled by the Virginia Wine Board, which uses the money for marketing, research, and other initiatives. As the cider market has grown, Virginia has ramped up promotion of the beverage. These efforts extend to the inclusion of cider in the Governor’s Cup, increased marketing, and the recent

expansion of the state-funded Winemakers Research Exchange (see page 16) to include cider in its research and education efforts. With cider’s inclusion in the Governor’s Cup, the VWB recognized the wine/cider apples and oranges (well, grapes) situation by forming a separate category for cider, and assuring that the cider judges are distinct from the wine judges. This year’s judges panel featured cider enthusiasts, cider makers, cidery owners, and even a certified pommelier. Similar to the better-known sommelier designation for wine, the establishment in 2019 of the pommelier designation is more evidence of cider’s growing importance in the United States. While a historic beverage rooted in history, cider is still new to many and presents an opportunity to taste, explore, and keep drinking local.

Amanda Anne Platt & The Honey Cutters. Lyrically driven, country roots music. $20-25, 6pm. Potters Craft Cider, 1350 Arrowhead Valley Rd. potterscraftcider.com

Pairing: Try pairing your favorites with food and see how your impressions change.

The Wavelength. Joined by special guest David Drubin on drums. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskeyjarcville.com Vincent Zorn. Performing live on the patio. Free, 6:30pm. Red Pump Kitchen, 401 E Main St., Downtown Mall. redpumpkitchen.com

Latin Night with Bachata Social. Dance the evening away with bachata, salsa, merengue, cha cha, cumbia, reggaeton tunes, and more. Free, 6:30pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarm andwinery.com

stage Accidental Death of an Anarchist. A self-proclaimed “maniac” infiltrates central police headquarters and, using an increasingly absurd set of disguises, manipulates his bumbling interrogators into telling the truth. $20-25, 7:30pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org

classes The Shine Guide: Flower Arranging. Teens and preteens learn the art of flower arranging from experts at the Charlottesville Garden Club. Free, 4pm. JMRL: Gordon Avenue Library, 1500 Gordon Ave. events.c-ville.com

etc. Make Your Own Impact Meet Up. Tackle climate change by learning how to reduce your carbon footprint. Free, 5pm. Kardinal Hall, 722 Preston Ave. theclimate collaborative.org

Thursday 5/26 music Berto and Vincent. A night of wild gypsy rumba and Latin guitar. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com The Wavelength. Vintage rock, jazz, and blues. Free, 6pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. prnbrewery.com

stage Accidental Death of an Anarchist. See listing for Wednesday, May 25. $20-25, 7:30pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org

classes The Shine Guide: Relaxing Yoga. Teens and preteens join Dr. Ina Stephens, UVA professor of pediatrics and medical yoga and integrative health specialist, for a yoga class focused on relaxation and stress reduction.


CULTURE FEEDBACK

etc. Arts From Underground. Artmaking, drinks, and karaoke inside The Looking Glass. Free, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

We can artwork it out IX gears up for the first Charlottesville Arts Festival

Friday 5/27

By Shea Gibbs

music

arts@c-ville.com

Fridays After Five: The Chicken Heads with Runawayz. Live music outdoors. Free, 5:30pm. Ting Pavilion, 700 E. Main St. tingpavilion.com Mid Life Crisis. Performing oldies, folk, originals, and country. $5, 6pm. The Pub at Lake Monticello, 51 Bunker Blvd., Palmyra. lake monticellogolf.org Sarah Shook & The Disarmers with Shagwuf. Americana. $15-18, 8pm. The Southern Café & Music Hall, 103 S. First St. thesoutherncville.com Sisters & Brothers. A blend of R&B, Motown, reggae, soul, funk and rock with psychedelic touches. Free, 7pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. prnbrewery.com The Michael Elswick Gathering. Jazz, blues, ballads, and Latin tunes. Free, 6pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com The Wavelength. Friday night tunes. Free, 5pm. Hardware Hills Vineyard, 5199 W. River Rd., Scottsville. hardwarehills.com

dance Social Dance. A site-specific immersive performance from 11 performers and 11 audience members. Free, 6pm. Madison Bowl, UVA Grounds. uvafralinartmuseum.virginia.edu

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words Wendy Zomparelli: A Life of Her Own. Zomparelli reads from her new novel. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. ndbookshop.com

etc. Charlottesville Arts Festival. Immerse yourself in art at this three-day celebration of creativity, diversity and community featuring art of all genres. $10-25, 6pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

Saturday 5/28 music Berto & Vincent. Brunch with wild gypsy rumba and Latin guitar. Free, 11am. Tavern & Grocery, 333 W. Main St. tavernand grocery.com C O N T I N U ED ON PAGE 2 3

festival-style events typically pay only for themselves, with revenues going into the pockets of vendors and other staff. IX hosts only four to five gated events per year, and the foundation’s board hopes even those someday could be made free of charge. Going forward, the organization hopes to support its 24-hour mural and sculpture art park and community-driven events with

Charlottesville Arts Festival Ix Art Park May 27-29

small grassroots donations. Bryant says The Looking Glass will remain a critical revenue stream, drawing tourist dollars from outside C’ville to fuel the local art community. Sponsors are also crucial for events like IX’s summer film series. “We are trying to do as few ticketed events as we can,” Bryant says. “We are growing and giving back to the community. We want to open the doors and be a public art park, 365.”

“It’s everything you would expect from an art festival…and it’s also a mural launch. It compounds itself, and everything coalesces in a great way.” ALEX BRYANT

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SummerStage No.1 Heifetz Kickoff Hootenanny. Live music, food, and drinks. Free, 6pm. The Blackburn Inn and Conference Center, 301 Greenville Ave., Staunton. black burn-inn.com

result of the panel’s selection process is an eclectic collection of fresh artists, Harr says. “The thing about IX Art Park is it allows for us to have a wide variety of art—from more traditional printing and photography to funky mixed media—that you wouldn’t see any other place,” Harr says. “We have a lot of artists participating that people have not seen.” Most of the vendors will display their wares in traditional festival-style tents, according to Bryant, but the Charlottesville Arts Festival will also feature installations in the field stretching across the park, performances, and an outdoor art room for demonstrations and workshops. The goal is to use as much of the available space as possible and make the event “experiential and immersive,” Bryant says. Among the vendors will be artists Sean McClain, Charlene Cross, Erin Harrigan, Jamie Agins, Jessie Rublee, Michelle Freeman, Rebecca Razul, Sarah Tremaine, Sam Ashkani, Nicole Pisaniello, and Tom Toscano. Food and craft beer will be available throughout the weekend. Still, Bryant says tickets aren’t what drives the nonprofit IX Art Park Foundation, as

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Fralin After Five. Public reception for the opening of The Little Museum of Art’s “May Flowers” and an immersive performance, “Social Dance” by Shandoah Goldman’s Under Story. Free, 5pm. The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA, 155 Rugby Rd. uvafralinartmuseum.virginia.edu

Charlottesville Arts Festival launches with three days of art, artists (painting by Sean McClain, above), and public participation with music, food, and live demos. IX Art Park organizers hope to make it an annual event.

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

Accidental Death of an Anarchist. See listing for Wednesday, May 25. $20-25, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org

I

X Art Park attracted about 356,000 visitors in 2021. But only 16,000 of them bought tickets to an event or The Looking Glass, the park’s immersive art experience. Now, with free events stacked nearly backto-back throughout the summer, IX will host its biggest ticketed happening of the year. The first Charlottesville Arts Festival, which administrators hope will build on last year’s inaugural Metamorphix Art Festival, kicks off on Friday, May 27, and runs through the weekend. “We were thinking about it, and Metamorphix is kind of an IXian brand,” says Alex Bryant, the park’s executive director. “This festival is for Charlottesville and about Charlottesville. It’s a bigger thing—and more sustainable.” Bryant and IX events planner Ewa Harr hope the more expansive festival, which will host nearly 60 artists from central Virginia and beyond, becomes a yearly signature for the park. They’re billing CAF as “a three-day celebration of creativity, diversity, and community providing locals and visitors a chance to immerse themselves in arts of all genres.” That means in addition to the five dozen art vendors featuring paintings, drawings, photography, sculptures, ceramics, jewelry, glass, fiber arts, and tattoo designs, the festival also invites attendees to experience and make art in unique ways. Charlottesville Arts Festival opens with fire dancing and the unveiling of its portion of the Mural Mosaic Global Roots project. The America Connects National Mural features contributions by more than 1,500 artists across the country. Mural Mosaic, which has been creating public murals since 2003, launched the collaborative project in April 2021 to reconnect folks in the post-pandemic world. “We’re just really excited about three days of art and activation,” Bryant says. “It’s everything you would expect from an art festival…and it’s also a mural launch. It compounds itself, and everything coalesces in a great way.” To select the expansive list of artists at the festival, Harr, Bryant and others from the IX Art Park Foundation board formed a panel to sift through applications. The “judging process was terribly challenging due to the high caliber of work from all of our applicants,” Bryant says, and the panel was unable to allow everyone who applied to exhibit. Harr, who also coordinates the Crozet Arts and Crafts Festival, was central to the selection effort, Bryant says, as she’s personally connected to many of the region’s artists. The

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Free, 4pm. JMRL: Central Library, 201 E. Market St. events.c-ville.com

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grow. learn. connect. Coming soon @ your library

Summer reading chaLLenge

JUNE 1 - AUGUST 31

KICKOFF PARTy! Celebrate the start of JMRL's Summer Reading Challenge with festivities at your local library branch. Check the JMRL calendar of events for details. Greene County Library, June 6, 6 pm

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

Louisa County Library, June 7, 2 pm Crozet Library Teens, June 7, 6:30 pm Scottsville Library, June 9, 4 pm Crozet Library, June 10, 2 pm Central Library Teens, June 10, 5:30 pm

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MAY 27–JULY 3 “Heartwrenching and hilarious! An ode to life’s joys” (The Guardian, UK). This "poignant, uplifting" play (DCMetroTheaterArts.com) explores the lengths we will go to for those we love. The story of a 7-year-old child coping as his family encounters struggles engages the audience, inviting you to the list of every brilliant thing that makes life worth living.

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CULTURE SMALL BITES

Saturday 5/28 Fish Pond Spring Jam. Featuring entirely Virginia-based artists: Lord Nelson, Orion and The Melted Crayons, Sisters & Brothers, Ragged Mountain String Band, The Positive Collective, Orme Storm, and The Bhakti Boyz. $45, noon. Fish Pond Collective, 1472 Fish Pond Rd., Howardsville. events.c-ville.com Mama Tried. The local five-piece band features Susan Munson, Charlie Pastorfield, Stuart Holme, Kent Raine, and Sam Johnston. Free, 7pm. Pro Re Nata, 6135 Rockfish Gap Tpke., Crozet. prnbrewery.com Paulien Quartet. Live music in the orchard. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com The War On Drugs. Music firmly embedded in the classic rock lineage. $45-50, 7pm. Ting Pavilion, 700 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. tingpavilion.com Tim Ryalls and Barry Collins Acoustic Duo. Classic rock, blues, and country tunes. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com

dance Kizomba in the Orchard. A beginner-friendly dance lesson, social dance, food from local eateries, and, of course, cider. $10-15, 6pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com May Ballroom Dance. USA Dance Charlottes­ville presents an evening of dancing and a special performance by ballroom champions Mike and Rose-Ann Lynch. Free, 7pm. Unity Church, 2825 Hydraulic Rd. usa dancecville.org

stage

outside IX Farmer’s Market. Over 60 local vendors with fresh produce, prepared foods, artisan goods, and more. Free, 9am. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org Ramblin Rabbit Run. Benefiting local organization All Blessings Flow, which provides medical equipment free of charge to those in need in Charlottesville, Albemarle and surrounding counties. $50, 7am. Piedmont Virginia Community College, 501 College Dr. rotaryrabbitrun.com

etc. Met Live in HD: Turandot. Marco Armiliato conducts Puccini’s stirring opera, which takes the stage in the company’s ever-popular production by Franco Zeffirelli. $18-25, 12:45pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

Sunday 5/29 music Calie Garrett and Gary Green. Soulful piano and harmonica. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. glasshousewinery.com Cville Jazz Congregation. Grab a glass and crunch on an apple while enjoying diverse

dance Salsa Class. Learn to salsa and strut your stuff. $6-8, 7pm. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

stage Accidental Death of an Anarchist. See listing for Wednesday, May 25. $20-25, 2pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org

etc. Charlottesville Arts Festival. See listing for Friday, May 17. $10-25, 10am. Ix Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org Late Night Comedy in the Orchard. Gather the squad for a night of laughs. Free, 6:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarlecider works.com Musical Bingo. Listen to your favorite music, match the songs to the titles on your music bingo cards, and win prizes. Free, 3pm. Eastwood Farm and Winery, 2531 Scottsville Rd. eastwoodfarmandwinery.com Sundays on the Yard. A community cookout with food from Pearl Island Catering, music from Hurt City’s DJs, dancing, and fellowship. Free, 1pm. The Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, 233 Fourth St. NW. jeffschoolheritagecenter.org

Monday 5/30 music Baby Jo’s. Tunes from the seven-piece New Orleans-inspired boogie and blues band. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thewhiskeyjarcville.com Berto & Vincent. Dinner with live tunes. Free, 7pm. South and Central Latin Grill, Dairy Market. southandcentralgrill.com Gin & Jazz. Brian Caputo Trio performs in the hotel lobby bar. Free, 5:30pm. Oakhurst Hall, 122 Oakhurst Cir. oakhurstinn.com

etc. Dark Star. A proto-alien cosmic trip. $10, 7:30pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station. drafthouse.com Memorial Day Celebration. Live music, local eats, and a surprise food truck. Free, 11am. Bryant’s Cider, 3224 E. Branch Loop, Roseland. bryantscider.com Sedona Taphouse Dine Out For Charity. One dollar for every flat-iron steak and salmon sold goes to SARA. Price varies, all day. Sedona Taphouse, 1035 Millmont St. sara cville.org

Tuesday 5/31 music Josh Mayo and The House Sauce. Featuring different acts every other Tuesday. Free, 9pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. rapturerestaurant.com Vincent Zorn. Solo wild gypsy rumba. Free, 7pm. The Bebedero, 225 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. thebebedero.com

etc. Geeks Who Drink Trivia Night. Compete for prizes and bragging rights. Free, 8pm. Firefly, 1304 E. Market St. fireflycville.com

Let’s all Thai together We’d be hard-pressed to find anyone who’s been as innovative as Chimm Thai Restaurant co-owner Jay Pun in finding ways to serve people during the ongoing pandemic. While Chimm St. at Dairy Market remains open, Chimm’s 5th Street Station location is still closed for indoor dining, relying on takeout, delivery, patio seating, and catering to keep customers happy. Now, Pun says, his team has added a fooddrop program, as well as a stand at IX Art Park’s Thursday night farmers’ market. “It’s basically me and my dad doing neighborhood food drops and catering, since staffing is so hard for everyone these days,” says Pun. The Chimm drop offers a variety of options from easy-to-reheat dishes to pre-portioned meal kits. Want to learn the basics of Thai street food? Chimm will deconstruct everything from drunken noodles to pho, and deliver it with instructions included. The owners of Chimm also support Asian communities through their business. Inspired by NYC’s Heart of Dinner organization, which seeks to fight food insecurity in Asian communities, and in remembrance of last year’s horrific Atlanta spa shootings, Chimm offers the chance to donate meals to local Asian families. Meal donations include free delivery, a complimentary dessert, and a personalized card. To participate in the food-drop or meal donation programs, visit chimmtaste.com to place an order, or email chimmtaste@gmail.com

Deer goggles In March, Devils Backbone Brewing Company released Buck Tradition, its newest IPA lineup. As part of the celebration, DB partnered with tattoo artist and TikTok star Jake Karamol to create a series of designs, and threw out a challenge to customers that asks: Are you committed enough to permanently rep the buck? Any brave soul who gets a tattoo of one of the designs will receive a year’s supply of free beer, along with a sick tat. Find out more on Instagram at #bucktraditiontattoochallenge

Tabled for now In March of 2020, the Local Food Hub saw that farmers were having trouble connecting with their customers due to pandemic supply chain disruptions. In addition, Charlottesville residents had reservations about going into grocery stores. So as part of its mission to increase equitable access to fresh food from independent farmers, LFH began hosting a contactless Drive-Through Market, and the temporary solution grew into a years-long project with over 150 successful events. Now that pandemic restrictions have waned and traditional farmers’ markets have reopened, Local Food Hub has suspended

Devils Backbone Brewing Company will give a year’s supply of beer to anyone who’ll sport a Buck Tradition IPA tattoo designed by Jake Karamol.

the drive-through market, and intends to reopen it in the fall, when many farmers’ markets close for the seaso

Up next If you are reading this in Charlottesville, welcome to the next great food city! Food & Wine magazine included C’ville on a list of 11 American cities with up-and-coming food and drink scenes, along with Cincinnati, Ohio, and Boise, Idaho, among others. “Charlottesville has emerged as a vibrant dining destination,” writes Katie Chang, calling out Dairy Market (and Angelic’s Kitchen and South and Central), saying the food hall brings “together some of the area’s brightest talent.” The article also gives a shout-out to The Wool Factory, In Vino Veritas, MarieBette, Conmole, and Luce.

Keep ’em full We’re not just about fancy dining either. The Blue Ridge Area Food Bank reported that its March collections added up to the most donations in its 11-year history. The BRAFB School Food Drive brought in 11,000 pounds of food from 22 schools, over 18 days. “The opportunity for the schools, family, students, parents to come together has really been spectacular,” says Albemarle High School senior Kat Ravichandran, who helped lead the effort. The extra food has been sorely needed: According to BRAFB CEO Michael McKee, the number of food insecure families in the Blue Ridge area has increased more than 50 percent since 2000, and the food bank is now serving about 110,000 people every month. Learn how you can help fight hunger at brafb.org —Will Ham

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Porco Rosso. Presented with subtitles. $10, 12:30pm. Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 5th Street Station, Dairy Market. drafthouse.com

Vincent Zorn. Brunch with live music. Free, 11am. South and Central Latin Grill, Dairy Market. southandcentralgrill.com

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Charlottesville Arts Festival. See listing for Friday, May 17. $10-25, 8am. IX Art Park, 522 Second St. SE. ixartpark.org

Sunday music. Bluesy jazzy vibrations. Free, 1pm. The Grill at Meadowcreek, 1400 Pen Park Rd. meadowcreekgolf.org

FEELIN’ DEER FOR BEER, NOODLE DROPS, AND HELPING HANDS THAT KEEP PLATES FULL

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

Accidental Death of an Anarchist. See listing for Wednesday, May 25. $20-25, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. livearts.org

jazzy rhythms. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. albemarleciderworks.com

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One of the most popular videos produced by AARP is called “What is Old?” A group of millennials are asked to say what age they consider to be “old” and to show what “old” looks like to them. Most say 40s, 50s, and 60s and then pretended to hobble across the street using a cane and write a text message on their phones using one finger while squinting at the screen. Then each millennial is paired with an older person and something changes. A 55-year-old does a perfect yoga balance on a small block, something one millennial can’t do. A 70-year-old does karate moves with his younger partner. They teach each other dance moves, balancing exercises. The result? The millennials quickly change their minds about what they thought “old” was. “Old, now, to me is, like, 100,” says one millennial. What’s striking about the video is how intimate the connection becomes between the two generations. Most are holding hands, embracing, or smiling brightly as they describe their experience. The experiment reveals how energized both the millennials and older people were by the experience. It’s a fun video. However, the experiment also reveals how strong the false perceptions and societal walls are between generations, something that can damage the fabric of society. As the American cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead said, “Connections between generations are essential for the mental health and stability of a nation.” Indeed, during a pandemic in which younger and older people had to isolate from each other for health reasons, addressing this disconnectedness is more important than ever. While we know that loneliness and isolation are health risks for older people, a situation that has been exacerbated by the pandemic, younger generations are suffering from loneliness and isolation as well. While Gen Z and Millennials are more “plugged on” than ever in this age of social media, research shows they are also two of the most lonely generations. “While the digital world is seen as a social space, you usually don’t get the deeper connections that humans need (and get) from real life,” psychologist Nancy Sokarno told Refinery29. “Ironically, these platforms that are designed to bring people closer together, can in turn, contribute to and heighten feelings of loneliness and fear of personal failure — all of which im-

pact negatively on our mental health.” “We seem to understand the value of having diverse relationships and connections with people of different socioeconomic, faith, racial or other backgrounds. The same is true for engaging with a wide variety of ages,” said Peter Thompson, executive director of The Senior Center. “A community is made up of all ages, and the strength of the community depends on all generations,” said Marta Keane, CEO of the Jefferson Area Board for Aging (JABA). While the causes of loneliness and isolation can be complex, and are different for everyone, societal perceptions that isolate generations from each other, especially during this time, need to change. Now more than ever young people and older people need each other’s support. So what can you do? Much can be done simply by making micro-gestures in our daily lives as we emerge from the pandemic. Why not think about striking up a conversation with a person of a different generation who you see in the grocery store, at a coffee shop, at a Little League game, or walking in your neighborhood? Make the connection. You never know what kind of cool stuff you might learn. Volunteering is also one of the greatest ways to engage across the generations. Visual and performing arts groups also have roles to play in bringing generations together. Game groups, like chess clubs, and some recreation groups, like golf, bowling, or walking and hiking, are available for all ages. “Generations have so much to learn from one another,” says Keane. “The seniors have wisdom and experience to share. They can provide guidance and encouragement, and demonstrate the joy of life. Younger generations have ideas without assumptions/biases and can be open to new ideas. They might stretch what is in one’s comfort zone.”


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R O S E W O OD VILLAGE

On this Memorial Day, we would like to honor many of our residents and all others who have served.

7 Time GOLD Winner Assisted Living | 4 Time Gold Winner Memory Care

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Charlottesville, VA| www.RoseWoodVillage.com | HOLLYMEAD 2029 Lockwood Dr. | GREENBRIER 500 Greenbrier Dr.

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Call Today To Learn More & Schedule Your Visit

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SENTARA STARR HILL HEALTH CENTER PRESENTS

COMMUNITY LEARNING CIRCLE FIRST TUESDAY EDUCATION SERIES Join Us Virtually Every First Tuesday of the Month Scan QR Code:

June 7, 2022 The Challenges of Mental Health in Black Men 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

or Join with Link Below: https://tinyurl.com/sentara-starr-hill-learning

Learn tips on how to manage and prevent chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease and obesity.

Nicholas Wright, LPC, LSATP • 10 years’ experience as a Virginia Licensed Professional Counselor • Licensed Substance Abuse Treatment Practitioner in Charlottesville • In private practice treating anxiety and depression • Culturally responsive to mental health services with the Central Virginia Clinicians of Color Network

For more information, contact Setour Dillard, RN, Integrated Care Manager at 434-984-4640 or sadillar@sentara.com.

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CULTURE PUZZLES SUDOKU

CROSSWORD

50% off

Complete the grid so that every row, column, and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK 69. ____ Jim 70. Baking supplies

ACROSS 1. Blows one’s top 7. Evidence of a recent scrape 11. One standing in an alley 14. Shrink back 15. “Anything ____?” 16. “____ you decent?” 17. Cover, as a car 18. Readied, as leftovers 20. Many promotions made by Starbucks? 22. Lacto-____-vegetarian 23. W-2 collector 26. Ruffle the feathers of a Migos member? 32. “The Time Machine” race 34. Great Plains tribe 35. Fashion designer Anna whose last name becomes a fashion item when a “t” is added to its end 37. Great deal ... or an apt description of 20-, 26-, 45- or 52-Across 42. Down 43. Navy VIPs 44. ____ Romeo 45. Setting of a 2000s Ponzi scheme? 50. HBO competitor 51. Get an ____ (ace) 52. “SNL” castmember Alex pooh-poohs an idea for a sketch? 61. Three-fingered saluter 64. Without assistance 65. Citrus drink suffix 66. Orange-roofed chain, familiarly 67. Parallel-park, e.g. 68. See the humor in

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DOWN 1. “Spamalot” writer Idle 2. Where Johnny Cash shot a man, in song 3. Bay Area campus, in brief 4. Hair style for Marie Antoinette 5. Become bored by 6. Record holder 7. Medieval laborer 8. Treble ____ 9. First recipient of the ATP Player of the Year award 10. “Cold one” 11. Rocker Benatar 12. Fury 13. ____ Stark, patriarch on “Game of Thrones” 19. In its current condition 21. Ending for ball or buff 24. Fix a flat? 25. Things 26. Benny Carter song that sounds like an expression of dismay used in the Upper Midwest 27. In shape 28. Back: Prefix 29. Needing no Rx 30. The Red Baron, to Snoopy 31. Boggy lowland 32. Right side of a cliff? 33. Actors Hemsworth and Neeson 36. “____ tree falls ... “ 38. Ming in the Basketball Hall of Fame 6

7 15

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39. Downloadable form, often 40. Band with the 1991 #1 hit “Unbelievable” 41. Tic-____-toe 46. Titles for Benedictine monks 47. What Jack Sprat couldn’t eat, in a nursery rhyme 48. “Gorillas in the Mist” author Dian 49. Like secret messages 53. “Draft Dodger Rag” singer Phil 54. April 1 target 55. Mountain overlooking Tokyo 56. Quark’s place 57. Olympic gold-medal gymnast Korbut 58. Lawyer’s charges 59. Dart about 60. Thesaurus contents: Abbr. 61. Duffel or satchel 62. Glowing lines 63. Even so

ANSWERS 5/18/22

Walkie talkie S T U B S

C H L O E

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I Q U O T E S I E T E

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D A L I

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A B S

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I S I N T O

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A V I S T O N E O W O N E I B M L K I E O N O W U E M E W E D E M O G S P P I E L I V E O N E R Y E R S

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© 2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

J A R O M I R

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#2 solution

E L M I R A

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O N I M H A R E N I R H I C R A B T P A R A M O M A R E

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O R T O N

May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

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May 25 – 31, 2022 c-ville.com

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By Rob Brezsny

Cancer (June 21-July 22): Wilma Mankiller was the first female principal chief of the Cherokee Nation. She said, “The cow runs away from the storm, while the buffalo charges directly toward it—and gets through it quicker.” Political strategist Donna Brazile expounded on Mankiller’s strategy: “Whenever I’m confronted with a tough challenge, I do not prolong the torment. I become the buffalo.” I recommend Mankiller’s and Brazile’s approach for you and me in the coming days, my fellow Cancerian. Now please excuse me as I race in the direction of the squall I see brewing in the distance.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): The New Yorker is an influential Pulitzer Prize-winning magazine that features witty writing and impeccable fact-checking. In 2017, its stories exposed the extensive sexual misconduct committed by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein—and helped lead to his prosecution. How did the magazine get its start? It was co-founded in 1925 by Harold Ross, who had dropped out of school at age 13. He edited every issue for the next 26 years. I’m sensing the possibility of a comparable development in your life, Leo. In the coming months, you may get involved in a project that seems to be beyond the reach of your official capacities or formal credentials. I urge you to proceed as if you can and will succeed.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo-born Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer and author. In his book Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual, he lays down his manifesto: “Become the discipline—embrace its cold and relentless power. And it will make you better and stronger and smarter and faster and healthier than anything else. And most important: It will make you free.” While I don’t expect you to embrace Willink’s rigorous ethic with the same fanatical grip, I think you will benefit from doing the best you can. The cosmic rhythms will support you if you make a fun and earnest effort to cultivate liberation through discipline.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

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Gemini (May 21-June 20): “Reality is not simply there; it does not simply exist,” claimed author Paul Celan. “It must be sought out and won.” I think that is excellent advice for you right now. But what does it mean in practical terms? How can you seek out and win reality? My first suggestion is to put your personal stamp on every situation you encounter. Do something subtle or strong to make each event serve your specific interests and goals. My second suggestion is to discern the illusions that other people are projecting and avoid buying into those misunderstandings. My third suggestion is to act as if it’s always possible to make life richer, more vivid, and more meaningful. And then figure out how to do that.

lighthouse than the sea in the coming days. Lately, you have thoroughly embodied the sea, and that has prepared you well to provide illumination. You have learned new secrets about the tides and the waves. You are attuned to the rhythms of the undercurrents. So I hope you will now embrace your role as a beacon, Libra. I expect that people will look to your radiance to guide and inspire them.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Movie people are possessed by demons, but a very low form of demons,” observes author Edna O’Brien. She should know. She has hung out with many big film stars. Since you’re probably not in the movie business yourself, your demons may be much higher quality than those of celebrity actors and directors. And I’m guessing that in the coming weeks, your demons will become even finer and more interesting than ever before—even to the point that they could become helpers and advisors. For the best results, treat them with respect and be willing to listen to their ideas.

Sagittarius

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Some nights you are the lighthouse, some nights the sea,” writes Libran author Ocean Vuong. According to my astrological analysis, you are better suited to be the

(Dec. 22-Jan.19): According to author Caroline Myss, “You should see everything about

Capricorn

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): An Aquarian poet was disturbed when a suitor told her, “I’m really very fond of you.” She responded, “I don’t like fond. It sounds like something you would tell a dog. Give me love, or nothing. Throw your fond in a pond.” I don’t advise you to adopt a similar attitude anytime soon, Aquarius. In my oracular opinion, you should wholeheartedly welcome fondness. You should honor it and celebrate it. In itself, it is a rich, complex attitude. And it may also lead, if you welcome it, to even more complex and profound interweavings.

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): “I need a playlist of all the songs I used to love but forgot about,” wrote Tumblr blogger Yuyuuyuyuu. I think you could use such a playlist, too, Pisces. In fact, I would love to see you receive a host of memos that remind you of all the things you love and need and are interested in—but have

forgotten about or neglected. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to recover what has been lost. I hope you will re-establish connections and restore past glories that deserve to accompany you into the future.

Aries (March 21-April 19): “The only way to the truth is through blasphemy,” declared Aries author Flannery O’Connor. I appreciate the cheeky sentiment, but I don’t believe that all truth requires blasphemy. In many cases, rebellion, irreverence, and skepticism may be enough to pry loose hidden and buried information. Outright blasphemy isn’t necessary. What does this have to do with you? Well, I’m hoping you will be feisty and audacious in your quest for interesting truths. As you dig, I invite you to be less than perfectly polite. Don’t be rude or unkind, of course. Just be charmingly bold.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): I like Joan Didion’s definitions of self-respect. As you enter a favorable phase for deepening and enhancing your self-respect, they may be helpful. Didion said self-respect is a “sense of one’s intrinsic worth.” She added, “People who respect themselves are willing to accept the risk that the venture will go bankrupt, that the liaison may not turn out to be one in which every day is a holiday. They are willing to invest something of themselves.” And maybe the most essential thing about self-respect, according to Didion, is that it is “a discipline, a habit of mind that can never be faked but can be developed, trained, coaxed forth.” Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: RealAstrology.com, (877) 873-4888

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Libra

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’m all in favor of you getting what you yearn for. I have no inhibitions or caveats as I urge you to unleash all your ingenuity and hard work in quest of your beautiful goals. And in the hope of inspiring you to upgrade your ability to fulfill these sacred prospects, I offer you a tip from Sagittarian author Martha Beck. She wrote, “To attract something that you want, become as joyful as you think that thing would make you.”

your life as a lesson.” Whoa! Really? Each trip to the grocery store should be a learning opportunity? Myss says yes! For example, let’s say you’re in the snack foods aisle and you’re tempted to put Doritos Nacho Cheese Tortilla Chips and Lay’s Barbecue Potato Chips in your cart. But your gut is screaming at you, “That stuff isn’t healthy for you!” And yet you decide to ignore your gut’s advice. You buy and eat both bags. Myss would say you have squandered a learning opportunity: “You’ve harmed yourself by blocking your intuitive voice,” she writes. Now, in accordance with astrological omens, Capricorn, here’s your homework assignment: Regard every upcoming event as a chance to learn how to trust your intuition better.


May 18 – 24, 2022 c-ville.com

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SUNSET THURSDAYS

JOIN US FOR GREAT WINES, FOOD TRUCK & LIVE MUSIC WEDNESDAY - SATURDAY 12-8PM, SUNDAY 12-6PM OPEN UNTIL SUNSET EVERY THURSDAY

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Q&A

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What’s your favorite local spot for a glass of wine? My local spot is at home with my own wine made at home. Not to mention my own beer and mead. ARTHUR DENT/FACEBOOK

I like rustic settings. Olive Garden. @__CHASE_W__/INSTAGRAM

Depends. Want a simple glass, a fresh appetizer, and a great vibe? Gotta go to Tilman’s. Want something truly exquisite, a raconteur to tell you about it, and a bottle to take home? It’s gotta be Tastings (and the incomparable Bill Curtis). @MSMESSAGE/TWITTER

Costco. CHERRY STEWART/FACEBOOK

Crush Pad.

Mad Dog, paper bag, 14th Street Bridge. Watch the magic happen. SEAN MILLER/FACEBOOK

MARIJEAN OLDHAM/FACEBOOK

City Council. Bring your own cheese. BRIAN LAMBERT/FACEBOOK

Tavola. CHRISTINA CELLINI/FACEBOOK

King Family. I can watch polo while enjoying their Crosé. @DULCIMERT/INSTAGRAM

Tilman’s wine bar is great! ANGELA GREEN/FACEBOOK

Well Hung in Gordonsville! CHARLOTTE BAIRD CRANDALL/ FACEBOOK

My screened porch. @JENB_VIRGINIA/TWITTER

Glass House winery in Earlysville—Meglio del Sesso, and bananas and tropical flowers in bloom. I’ve spent many birthdays there & love the whimsical, far away feel of this place. @MAGGIORE0519/INSTAGRAM

Choosing one is hard!! But I have to shout out Tavola for their great wine list and super knowledgeable staff, who can always guide you to an amazing pairing! @YARNASANA/INSTAGRAM

Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cville_weekly (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

Thursdays 5-9 pm at the Downtown Vitae Distillery tasting room! *Fabulous* specialty cocktails, as well as offer the $5 Raffle every 3rd Thursday of the month, with local goodies, and a Rockin Playlist!

Wearing rainbow and/or any outfit that makes you feel especially yourself will always be highly encouraged!

$1 from each cocktail sold will continue to help @cvillepride, along with the proceeds from our 3rd Thursday Raffles!

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NIGHT

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Next week’s question: What are you most excited about this summer?


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The Center for Research in Reproduction at UVA is looking to hire an experienced laboratory specialist: full-time, M-F days, Charlottesville location.

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Servers, Bartenders, Cooks Servers, Bartenders, Cooks We are a brewery, vineyard, We a brewery, vineyard, and are restaurant in southern and restaurant in southern Charlottesville. Charlottesville. Offering competitive wages. Offering competitive wages. 434-424-0888 434-424-0888 info@mountidareserve.com info@mountidareserve.com

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Our mission is to ensure full community inclusion and participation of people with developmental disabilities through the provision of high-quality services and advocacy. Our vision is to remain the leading provider of services and advocacy for this deserving population. If you share these values we urge you to consider the following career opportunities:

Senior Direct Support Professionals (2 openings, $17-$19/hr) Direct Support Professionals - Residential Services (FT and PT, $15-$17/hr) Direct Support Professional- Floaters ($18-$19/hr)

Residential Manager Charlottesville (FT $45k-$52k DOE)

We're very eager to hear from candidates interested in working in Crozet and C’ville! For a full listing of all our positions or to apply, please visit our web site at http://arcpva.org/employment

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LEGALS

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FORECLOSURE SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE AT PUBLIC AUCTION 30.72 Acres with Wine Tasting Room and Offices, and an Unimproved 2.31 Acre Lot 4574 Belle Vista Drive, Barboursville VA Albemarle County Tax Map Nos. 03500-00-00-017A4 and 03500-00-00-017A5 SALE: THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 2022 AT 12:00 P.M. AT THE ALBEMARLE COUNTY CIRCUIT COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 501 E. JEFFERSON STREET, CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA 22902 In execution of a Credit Line Deed of Trust, being dated March 31, 2015 and recorded on March 31, 2015, in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court in Albemarle County, Virginia (the “Clerk’s Office”), in Deed Book 4601, page 202, and corrected by the re-recording of the Credit Line Deed of Trust to correct name in the legal description and recorded on August 6, 2015 in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 4659, page 91 (together, the “Deed of Trust”), the undersigned as Trustee under said Deed of Trust, will offer for sale at public auction the parcel listed below: All those three certain tracts or parcels of land situated in the Rivanna Magisterial District of Albemarle County, Virginia on the east side of State Route 20, north of Stony Point, shown as revised Lot 1, containing 21.00, more less; Revised Lot 4, containing 16.31 acres, more or less, and Lot 5 containing 2.31 acres, more or less, on a plat by Roger W. Ray Assoc., Inc., dated March 21, 2014, and recorded in the Clerk’s Office of the Circuit Court of Albemarle County, Virginia, in Deed Book 4545, page 233; TMP 03500-00-00- 017A1 Revised Lot 1, containing 21.00 acres more less; Being the same property conveyed to Oderon, LLC, a Virginia limited liability company by Deed from Darren J. Kady and Darren J. Kady, Trustee under the Southwind Declaration of Trust, and Deborah Kady and Deborah A. Kady, Trustee under the Southwind Declaration of Trust, dated March 15, 2005 and recorded April 8, 2005 in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 295, page 45-50 (“Lot 1”). TMP 03500-00-00-017A4 Revised Lot 4, containing 16.31 acres, more or less; Being the same property conveyed to Oderon, LLC, a Virginia limited liability company by Deed from Darren J. Kady and Darren J. Kady, Trustee under the Southwind Declaration of Trust, and Deborah Kady and Deborah A. Kady, Trustee under the Southwind Declaration of Trust, dated March 15, 2005 and recorded February 2, 2006 in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 3153, page 199. LESS AND EXCEPT 6.59 acres reflected as Parcel X on the Plat by Roger W. Ray & Assoc. Inc. dated October 17, 2017, and revised on October 24, 2017, which is recorded with the Deed recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 05013, Page 0543 (“Lot 4”). TMP 03500-00-00-017A5 Revised Lot 5, containing 2.31 acres, more or less; Being the same property conveyed to Oderon, LLC, a Virginia limited liability company by Deed from Paul M. Neal and Rebecca M Neal, husband and wife, dated October 21, 2009 and recorded November 16, 2009 in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 3819, page 255. (the “Property”) TERMS OF SALE: A bidder’s deposit of the greater of $75,000 or 10% of the winning bid, shall be paid at the sale by cashier’s check made payable to Bidder (to be assigned to Trustee if Bidder is successful), with the balance upon delivery of a trustee’s deed within 30 days of sale. If the initial deposit is less than 10% of the winning bid, then the successful bidder’s deposit MUST be increased to 10% of the winning bid by cashier’s check or wired funds within three (3) business days. Settlement shall be held within 30 days after the date of sale unless otherwise postponed at the sole discretion of the Trustee. Sale is subject to the covenants, conditions, restrictions, rights of way, and easements, if any, contained in the deeds and other documents forming the chain of title to the property. Property is sold “AS IS, WHERE IS,” “WITH ALL FAULTS” and “WITH ABSOLUTELY NO WARRANTIES.” TIME SHALL BE OF THE ESSENCE WITH RESPECT TO SETTLEMENT. The deposit shall be applied to the credit of successful bidder at settlement; or, in the event of failure to complete settlement within the time set forth after the date of sale, in accordance with the terms of sale, the deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the costs of sale, including Trustee’s fee, and the Property shall be resold at the cost and expense of the defaulting Purchaser. Risk of loss or damage to the Property shall be borne by successful bidder from the time of auctioneer’s strikedown at the sale. Purchaser shall pay all settlement fees, title examination charges, title insurance premiums, and recording costs. Current real estate property taxes will be prorated at closing as of date of sale. Rollback taxes, if any, will be the responsibility of the Purchaser. THE TRUSTEE RESERVES THE RIGHT: (i) to waive the deposit requirements; (ii) to extend the period of time within which the Purchaser is to make full settlement; (iii) to withdraw the Property from sale at any time prior to the termination of the bidding; (iv) to keep the bidding open for any length of time; (v) to reject all bids; and (vi) to postpone or continue this sale from time to time, such notices of postponement or setting over shall be in a manner deemed reasonable by the Trustee. Announcements made on day of sale take precedence over all other advertised terms and conditions.

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Employees, directors and officers of Farm Credit of the Virginias, ACA, and their immediate family and companies in which they have an interest are not eligible under federal regulations to purchase this property at foreclosure. FOR INFORMATION SEE: www.fplegal.com/foreclosures Flora Pettit PC, Trustee Nancy R. Schlichting 530 E. Main Street P. O. Box 2057 Charlottesville, VA 22902 (434) 220-6113 LMG@fplegal.com


SOUTHERN STONES, LLC Chickadee

313 2nd Street SE, Ste 105, Charlottesville, VA 22902 The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) AUTHORITY Mixed Beverage Restaurant License to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. David Stone, Owner

SERVICES

37

NOTE: Objections to the issuance of this license must be Submitted to ABC no later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first of two required newspaper legal notices.

ORDER OF PUBLICATION Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE § 8.01-316 Albemarle County Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Fitzgerald • Services •

• Gravel Driveway Repair • Grading & Reshaping • Drainage Corrections • Ditching & Gravel Installation • General Driveway Repair

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re: J.T. The object of this suit is to: Approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the parental rights of Jerome Turner or Unknown Father in the child born to Amber Spears on December 3, 2020 in Charlottesville, Virginia

Call Mitch Fitzgerald

434-960-8994

& MISC.

Notices

**Notarized Affidavit Included in Price

AUCTION

EcoVillage, 188 EcoVillage Trl, Floyd, VA

Wed, May 12, 12:30pm at the Train Station, 414 Washington St, Altavista, VA

Twin Fir Estates

228 Acres

1,019 Acres

One Of A Kind!

7 Tracts

offered in on Leesville Lake Timber • Sweeping Views • Road Frontage • Private & Accessible

Off US-221 in Willis, this gorgeous property features an expansive timber valley rimmed by 2.5mi of incredibly scenic open ridgeline! Bid live or online. Details at TRFAuctions.com | 434.847.7741 | VAAF501

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Contact Annick for more information: Annick@c-ville.com

ABSOLUTE LAND Wed, Jun.22, 12:30pm at the Floyd

May 25 - 31, 2022 c-ville.com

David M. Barredo JUDGE

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It is ORDERED that the X defendant Jerome Turner or Unknown Father, appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interests on or before July 8th, 2022 at 9:00 a.m. 4/20/2022 DATE

GOT MAD SKILLS?


38

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WWW.C-VILLE.COM

VOL. 31 NO. 21 n MAY 25 - 31, 2022

CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE, FLUVANNA, GREENE, LOUISA, MADISON, NELSON, ORANGE, AUGUSTA

Great Goods, Great People BY KEN WILSON

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

Farmers Markets:

MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

30

YEARS OF REAL ESTATE

39


MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

40

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers MOUNT PARAN CHURCH

STUART HOUSE

1791 Virginia Historic Landmark. Double portico, elaborate carvings, entrance hall, fireplaces, elevenfoot ceilings, city & mountain views. Eat-in kitchen, dining room, screened porch, bedroom suite. Fiber internet. MLS#630080 $1,645,000 Court Nexsen 646.660.0700 / Steve McLean 434.981.1863

PRIVATE & PROTECTED

IVY FARMS

2.33 private acres, situated in Meriwether Lewis Elementary School district and Western Albemarle. This home offers mostly one level living with master BR and BA, spacious FR w/FP. Upstairs are 2 BR and BA. 2-bay paneled garage with storage. MLS#630240 $795,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

GREEN ACRES

Pastoral views from this 3 BR brick home on 159+ acres in Southern Albemarle. Ideal for farming with fenced pastures, ample water sources, equipment shed & barn. Detached 2-bay garage with space above. Property is not under easement & has 4 division rights. MLS#630428 $1,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

U

N D

ER

C O

N

T

R AC

T

2-story custom home, 4 BR, 5.5 BA, 7 FP, spacious rooms, and numerous windows providing an abundance of light and airy feeling. Idyllic wooded setting overlooking pond with enormous privacy on 76 acres. Under conservation easement with the VOF. MLS#628772 $2,950,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

Extraordinary church residence! Circa 1854 and redesigned by architect Bruce Wardell, as his own home. There is simply nothing like it. Step through the double doors into the vestibule and then into the soaring 16 ft. tall former sanctuary complete with a loft and side row of tall windows. Pressed tin ceiling and rich oak floors compliment the clean lines of the open interior floor plan. A separate “Sunday School” addition has 3 or 4 bedrooms and 3 full baths. Bucolic views complete the perfect setting. MLS#630270 $810,000 Tim Michel,434.960.1124

GREY OAKS

Spectacular 53-acre country estate with incredible custom-designed home, wonderful outdoor spaces, multi-functional 1,800 sf barn, 2-acre lake, Blue Ridge views, and a private, serene setting—all within 15 miles of Charlottesville. MLS#617485 $3,965,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863 greyoaksfarmva.com

WILLOWFIELDS FARM

This magazine worthy farmhouse is sited on over 156 protected acres overlooking a pond & the rolling hills of Southern Albemarle. 4 BR, 4 full & 2 half BA. Less than 10 miles south of Charlottesville. Tranquil setting near Pippin Hill & other vineyards! MLS#629743 $6,385,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

THE ALDERMAN HOUSE

Circa 1930, this fine Georgian was designed by Marshall S. Wells for Mrs. Edwin Anderson Alderman, widow of the first President of UVA. 4-5 BR, classic 18th century detailing on 0.62-acre lot. Located less than a mile from the Rotunda. MLS#630408 $1,885,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

WOLFCREEK FARM

Situated near the Blue Ridge Mtns. in western Madison County Virginia, contains 333 acres of rolling to hilly pastures and grazing land, wooded mountain land, 2 homes and a complement of necessary farm buildings to sustain many agricultural endeavors. Currently runs as a grazing farm for beef cattle. There is a quality 3 BR brick home, c. 1995, offering 1-level living, a modern kitchen, baths and large windows bringing in lots of light. Outside is a lovely terrace and in-ground gunite pool. NOT IN CONSERVATION EASEMENT! MLS#630435 $3,200,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

WOOD’S END

Striking residence on 5+ acres in the heart of Keswick. Architecturally-designed with numerous high-end custom features. Gracious one level living with 3,471 fin. sq. ft. Minutes from the world class Keswick Hall, Charlottesville, UVA, and Pantops. MLS#626196 $1,195,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM


41

RAGGED MOUNTAIN

Two wonderful estate parcels comprised of 185.01± acres in coveted Ragged Mountain Farm. Excellent elevated building site, complete privacy, and beautiful views. Murray/Henley/Western school district. MLS#621083 $1,895,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SIMMONS GAP ROAD

5-acre lot with mature hardwoods. Great opportunity to build with no HOA. Private building site amongst beautiful woods. Located between Free Union and Earlysville but so convenient to Charlottesville & UVA. MLS#621177 $140,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

SOUTHERN ALBEMARLE

87+ acre pine forest property is a good investment tract, or use as a hunting and recreational tract, or with multiple division rights, a place to build a home or more than one home. Potential mountain views, and private settings. MLS#629213 $499,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076

ESTATE PARCEL IN AFTON

Stunning, mountain views available on this attractive 14± acre property, possessing lovely streams and woods. This charming parcel is tucked in a bucolic area, yet only 1.5 miles from Route 151 Brew Trail, with easy access to Wintergreen, Charlottesville & UVA. Robert Mellen, 434.996.7386/Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

COMMONWEALTH DRIVE

1-story, 2,147 sf. commercial office building at the corner of Westfield Road just off Rt. 29S. Zoned Commercial Office (CO) use includes administrative and business offices, medical, dental and more. $749,000 Mark Mascotte, 434. 825.8610

EDNAM FOREST

Wonderfully large 1.5+ acre building lot in Ednam Forest. Build your dream home on this elevated, wooded lot located in a single family community, minutes from UVA and within walking distance to Boar’s Head Resort. MLS#598537 $289,500 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

MADISON

Over 560 acres of wooded land on Thoroughfare Mountain in Madison County. Three contiguous parcels, completely private, with endless possibilities. Hunt, ride ATVs, camp, build a weekend retreat or a permanent residence in total serenity. MLS#621697 $2,685,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

LAMBS ROAD

Private, 6+ acre wooded lot, that’s conveniently close to Charlottesville, but still in Albemarle County. The property contains large, mature trees and a small stream that winds through the middle. Three potential division rights. MLS#626128 $259,000 Jeremy Fields, 434.270.1220

MISSION HOME ROAD

146.88 ac. in Albemarle & Greene County. Privacy & protection adjacent to the Shenandoah National Park! Full division rights & multiple home sites. Extraordinary timberland. Views of the mountains, along with easy access to trails & Skyline Drive. MLS#620276 $1,200,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

SIMMONS GAP/ ESTES RIDGE

10 acres of mature woods. Property has long road frontage and consists of two parcels being combined and sold as one. No HOA! Design and build your dream residence on this very well-priced parcel. MLS#621178 $189,000 Charlotte Dammann, 434.981.1250

503 Faulconer Drive| Charlottesville | VA 22903 | office: 434.295.1131 | email: homes@mcleanfaulconer.com

WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

GARTH ROAD

11.73-acre, buildable lot in Western Albemarle! One of a kind location and a rare opportunity to purchase a large lot in an estate neighborhood 10 minutes to town. 2 division rights and is gently rolling with a small stream bisecting the property. MLS#628219 $795,000 Steve McLean, 434.981.1863

RIVANDALE FARM

An oasis of tranquility and fine country living appr. 20 minutes to Charlottesville and CHO airport. 177 private acres with circa 1901 classic Virginia farm house, 3 ponds, completely remodeled and updated. MLS#626933 $3,475,000 Jim Faulconer, 434.981.0076 www.RivandaleVa.com

MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers


42 MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

A DREAM HOME IS GREAT, BUT THE RIGHT ONE IS BETTER. Let an agent who knows guide you.

LOUISA COUNTY

$359,900

$749,000

1648 SALEM CHURCH RD

FLUVANNA CO

$349,900

CONTRACT PENDING

Bev Nash 434-981-5560 • Starting in early May • 1,512 sf, 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home on 5 acres • Similar to photo, covered porch, rear deck • Walk out, roughed in, basement • Granite countertops, stainless steel appliances • Real fireplace in the family room

Ruth Guss

CHARLOTTESVILLE

Albemarle, Fluvanna, Louisa County

Dan Corbin

434-531-6155

• HOMES, LAND, FARMS • New Construction Available Now • READY TO SELL? • Now Accepting Real Estate Listings • CALL FOR DETAILS Fluvanna Co

$369,900

434-960-0414

• 5 Bedroom, 5 Full Baths, 5,351 Fin Sq Ft • Terrace Level In-Law Apartment w/Kitchen • Separate Heated & Cooled Pub or Home Office • New 32’ x 14’ Wolf Serenity Decking w/Vinyl Rails • Paved Driveway, Fenced Rear Yard, Mature Landscape • 2 Car Attached Garage Plus a 2 Car Detached Garage

$411,000

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • • • • • • • • • •

R 2 ZONING! OR- move right in! Locust Grove Home w/ Mtn Views Tremendous expansion potential! Unbelievably awesome Kitchen Finished Bonus Attic Space Unfinished Walk OutBasement New HVAC ‘21; Stainless Appl. Pkg Soapstone Counters; Custom Maple Cabinets Hand-Made Stained Glass Kitchen Window Covered Rear Porch

$340,030

Bev Nash 434-981-5560 • 3 or 4 bedroom, 2 bath home • Cedar siding and recent new roof • Around 1,900 finished sf • Set back off the road on 2 shady acres • A 1,600 sf workshop, 14x10 shed • Large elevated rear deck, chicken coop!

$69,900

Pat Burns

434-465-4444

• Sitting amidst estates and horse properties this beautiful 5 acre lot in Keswick area for sale to build your dream home. Convenient to Charlottesville, Gordonsville. $69,900.

14 ELM CT/TROY

ROCKBROOK MANOR

$1,650,000

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

NEW CONSTRUCTION

Dan Corbin 434-531-6155 • Available Soon, June 2022 • One Level Living, 3 Bd, 2 Ba • Upgrade Finishes, Molding, Built ins • 1565 Sq Ft, 2 Car Gar, Near Schools • Beautiful Pond and Panoramic Views • No HOA, Well & Septic = No Water Bills • Welcome to West River Meadows - MLS 629888

434.985.0021 410 West Main Street Charlottesville, VA 22902 Downtown

Lori Click

434-326-7593

• To Be Built! The Brookwood, Similar to Photo! • 4 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Attached Garage, 1.66 Acres • Upgraded Siding Accent, Wide Window Trim, 10’x16’ Rear Deck • Master Suite with Garden Tub, Double Bowl Vanity • Kitchen with Granite Countertops, Stainless Appliances • Luxury Vinyl Plank Floors, Forest View s/d offer DSL, Fiber Optic

Candice van der Linde 434-981-8730 • • • • • • • • • •

Investment & Conference Destination Minutes to UVA, Large Group Accomod. Gourmet Kitchen open to 2 story great room Full wall of windows & custom stone FP. Guests can gather inside & out Large 16 seat sunroom dining area Basement features the 2nd kitchen; Guest suite as well as the game room; full size conference room w/wet bar 1 BR 1 BA Apt with private entry

434.974.1500 943 Glenwood Station Ln Suite 203 Charlottesville VA 22901


43

EAN FAULCONER INC. MCLFarm, Estate and Residential Brokers Farm, Estate and Residential Brokers 503 Faulconer Drive ∙ Charlottesville ∙ VA ∙ 22903

CLUB DRIVE

French Normandy style home set on a 2.7 acre corner, wooded lot in Keswick Estate. Elegant and gracious custom designed residence, built by Baird Snyder. Light filled, comfortable rooms thoughtfully planned. Interior archways, arched windows and doors. A 20’ high sweeping entry with curved staircase sets the tone for this exciting home created for entertaining and daily living. Custom door design and carved white statuary marble fireplace mantel. Cast stone work on the exterior and solid mahogany arched leaded beveled glass front doors lead to the limestone foyer. Extensive gardens and terraces. Enjoy Resort style living in Keswick Estate with newly remodeled Keswick Hall and Country Club. $2,950,000

MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

Annie Gould Gallery

KESWICK LANE

A unique art gallery located in the heart of historic Gordonsville. 109 S. Main Street, Gordonsville, VA • (540) 832-6352 anniegouldgallery

Dramatic, open floor plan custom built by Shelter Associates, in Keswick Estate. Thoughtfully designed large comfortable living areas, and a stunning formal dining room.The wide cased openings allow for graceful flow throughout the first floor. Gorgeous marble countertops in the kitchen with fabulous custom cabinets and lighting. The extended exterior living space sets this home apart with a screened porch and terraces. The open turned staircase leads to a full, partially finished terrace level. Set on over 3 acres, this elevated, private parcel backs up to an adjacent horse farm. Many beautiful features including: custom moldings, sunken English gardens, geothermal heating and 2 master suites on the main level. $2,350,000

CALL SHARON

Over 25 years of Real Estate experience. email: callsharon.today@yahoo.com cell: 434.981.7200 WWW.MCLEANFAULCONER.COM

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE

It's our way to say Thank You. TEXT "Heroes" to 434-337-3216 Find Homes REALTORS® are licensed to sell real estate in the Commonwealth of VA. Locally owned and operated. Find Homes Realty Brokerage License # 0226033659. 145 Ednam Dr # 311, Boar’s Head Professional Ctr, Charlottesville VA 22903. 434-218-0221. Fair Housing Compliant. If you have a relationship with another Realtor, this isn’t a solicitation. Information deemed reliable but not guaranteed.

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

Serving Local Heroes and Saving Them Money on a Home.


Charlottesville City Market

44

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

FEATURE

MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

Let’s look first at the Big Momma of farmers markets around here, Charlottesville’s oldest open air market, the one voted #1 Farmers Market in Virginia by American Farmland Trust’s Farmers Market Celebration and Virginia Living. Saturday mornings from April through November the Charlottesville City Market, at the corner of Water Street and 2nd Street SE, is the de facto town square, where you’ll meet anybody or everybody—usually with coffee, street food, or stroller in hand—socializing, perusing,

Farmers Markets: Great Goods, Great People BY KEN WILSON

“F

eel good about what you buy! Feel good while you feast!” The folks at Market Central in Charlottesville are on a mission to support local farms, farmers markets, and entrepreneurs and connect them to the local community. And if feeling good and tasting great aren’t incen-

tive enough, let them be more specific. Our local markets, they’ll tell you— and we have a bunch—don’t just offer fresh and locally grown food. They also support farmers who engage in environmentally responsible practices, sustaining their land for future generations and staving off rural development. They help drive the economy, incubat-

ing new businesses—food trucks!—and creating jobs. They provide venues for local artisans to sell their creative wares. And last (but hardly least) they are intergenerational gathering places where we can enjoy the cultural diversity with which Charlottesville and Albemarle County are blessed.

inspecting, and deliberating between, say, Albemarle, Nelson, or Fluvanna County salad greens. It’s a combo of fruits of the earth/creative labors of the hand scene, with crafts like soap and jewelry for sale alongside fruit and produce, herbs and plants, meat and cheese, and prepared foods. Breakfast browsers can enjoy fresh artisan breads, apple cider doughnuts, organic bagels, and other culturally diverse treats that are made on location and line the Water Street side. Lesly Gourdet began selling his LG’s Elixir here in May of 2018. It’s “a concoction—aka a tonic,” he is proud to say, that he has worked on “closing in on three decades.” Gourdet’s dedication is impressive—and he comes by it naturally. Born and raised in Haiti, he learned from his adored great-grandmother, who could make a medicine cabinet from the world of nature outside her door. “When any of the children’s health was compromised,” he remembers, “she would treat them with her special homemade potion of carefully picked herbs, spices and a host of various leaves.” Crafted with ten organic or naturally grown ingredients (turmeric, garlic, ginger, onion, lemon, lime, black pepper, habanero, apple cider vinegar, agave), Gourdet’s own “One Shot at a Time Makes One Feel Sublime” elixir is cold-pressed with no added water or preservatives. That makes it, he avers, “quite powerful and potent. Hence one to two ounces is the daily recommended dosage.” While the eight-ounce bottle is the most popular with first time buyers, lately many of his customers have stepped up to the 32-ounce size. But Gourdet doesn’t just come to sell. “I have been patronizing farmers markets for a bit over thirty years in Charlottesville,” he says, “and literally and traditionally my entire life! I do about 90 percent of my shopping from farmers markets.” The depth and variety of talent of the artisans he finds there (as well as at our


In nearby Forest Lakes South in Charlottesville, local farmers, artisans, and prepared food vendors set up shop every Tuesday from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m., late April through October, in the community pool parking lot at 1650 Ashwood Boulevard. Besides fresh produce, baked goods, plants, and crafts, shoppers can feast their eyes and tease their tastebuds while choosing from three different food trucks. One week there may be Mexican tacos, Filipino chicken and pork belly barbeque and cheesy raclette to bring home for dinner; the next there might be fajitas, made from scratch buttermilk biscuits, and handcrafted chocolates. Forest Lakes Farmers Market is pet friendly, and will be open this year through October 11.

Earlysville Farmers Market

resource in today’s emerging and rapidly expanding cannabis industry. “We have been vending at IX Park since late 2019. It was one of the first places to offer local support. We deeply value our partnership with IX and Market Central and their ever-supportive and innovative staff, with its openness to grow and support the community in a variety of ways. IX truly strives to bring a comprehensive, locally supported and curated market for our community, in our humble opinion.” Among the organic Virginia grown hemp articles, her company offers sublingual tinctures, bath oils, supportive pet care items, and edible cannabis treats like gummies and honey. “We often develop new products in partnership with other farm to table small businesses such as Philosopher’s Tea (local lavender) and Hungry Hill (local honey),” Kuhn says. Her customers range in age from 20 to 80-somethings. So what do Kuhn and her husband Joe like to bring home from other vendors? “What don’t we enjoy purchasing?” she laughs. “We are weak in the knees for everything from fresh salmon, locally made jewelry, gluten free (and regular) breads, pastries, orchids, woven bags, produce, freshly made foods, locally blown glass, farm raised duck, beef, local eggs, cut flowers, elixirs and tonics, coffee, sake, pies [and] locally made Bloody Mary mix.” While she sells her own products at IX, Leigh and Joe also patronize other local markets including Charlottesville City Market and those in Crozet, Greene and Nelson counties. “We feel that to be a true community business, reciprocity and collaboration are a vital fabric that lift our local commerce,” she says. And

she means it. “We also want to encourage room for other fellow CBD vendors to sell there as well, and continue to build the collaborative spirit we value.” The Farmers Market at Ix Art Park is open from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon at 522 2nd St. SE. A weekday edition launched on Thursday, May 5 and will run throughout the summer. Sponsored by Market Central and IX Art Park, the Sunset Market At Ix Art Park runs Thursday evenings from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m., with farm produce, prepared food, and artisanal crafts, all by local small businesses. A list of participating vendors is posted weekly on the Market Central website and Facebook page.

Farmers in the Park Every vendor is a local at Farmers in the Park, held Wednesdays from 3:00 to 7:00 p.m. on the corner of Chesapeake and Meade Avenue. Smaller in size (but not charm) than its bustling Saturday counterparts, Farmers in the Park offers a wide selection of farm fresh vegetables, fruit, baked goods, plants, and a whole lot more. It’s open annually from May to September.

Albemarle Farmers Market From farm to market, from dirt to gravel—Albemarle Farmers Market takes place each Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in a gravel lot across from Starbucks in the Hollymead Town Center Shopping Center. Local vendors have everything from produce, eggs, meats, and seafood, to honey, jams, pickles, and salsa. Others offer garden plants, fresh cut flowers, soaps, lotions, other personal and home products, plus a large variety

Area farmers and artisans get together once a week in the parking lot at Buck Mountain Episcopal Church for the Earlysville Farmers Market. Meat, eggs and cheese, bread and baked goods, and fruits and vegetables are for sale, along with much more to whet the appetite and liven up the table—spices, jellies, pickles, relish, and the like, as well as soap and local craft items. The Earlysville Farmers Market is currently open each Thursday from 4:00 to 7:00 p.m.

Crozet Farmers Market The Crozet Farmers Market is open every Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon, May through mid-October. Head for the grassy field behind the Blue Goose Building on the corner of Jarmans Gap Rd. and Crozet Avenue for vegetables and vegetable starts, baked goods, honey, and maple syrup, plus bedding plants, cut flowers, jewelry, lotion, woodcrafts and pottery. Vendors here returned $1,000 to the community in 2021 with a donation to the Crozet United Methodist Church (CUMC) Food Pantry. One popular feature at the Crozet Market is the Horticulture Help Desk, staffed every second and fourth Saturday by volunteer Piedmont Master Gardeners who answer questions about plants, plant disease, pest control, and safe and environmentally responsible horticultural practices. Visitors can bring samples of pests or problem plants. For help answering questions, HHD volunteers access Virginia Cooperative Extension.

It’s Market Time The crops are in the ground, the weather is fine, the pantry wants filling, and a lot of folks are going to market. Let’s give one of our local creators the last word on just how fortunate we are around here. “We deeply value the kinship and camaraderie that exist amongst fellow vendors,” says Leigh Anne Kuhn “There is a respect and community that one could never put a price on, nor truly articulate the value of. The market community, atmosphere, and connections are part of the ties that keep us bound with the Charlottesville love we hold so dear.”

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

Many Saturday morning shoppers (and vendors including LG’S Elixir) like to hit both City Market and (just a few blocks away) the Farmers Market at IX Art Park. As a site celebrated for its come what may, let it all hang out creativity, IX is about where you’d expect to find a booth belonging to a cutting-edge outfit like Albemarle Cannabis Company. In the words of owner and COO Leigh Anne Kuhn, ACC is a “woman-owned, family-operated business trying to grow, and provide a local, trusted cannabis

Forest Lakes Farmers Market

FEATURE

The Farmers Market at IX Art Park

of craft and jewelry items. A food truck 45 is on site, leashed pets are welcome, and parking spots are plentiful.

MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

arts, crafts, and music festivals) are “truly extraordinary,” Gourdet says. “So that translates to shopping for gifts for family and friends. C’est la Vie!” Jeweler Robin Braun has been selling at Charlottesville City Market since 2008, and she could hardly be more enthusiastic. It’s a market, she says, with a group of vendors “who care very much about every detail of what they are doing and selling. “Because we are a producer-only market, the person selling the item is often the person who made it, so they are the most knowledgeable about the item being sold. This is critical to the market functioning properly.” And her customers? “My customers could not be nicer,” Braun answers. “Over and over, I am struck by that fact.” Another market pleasure Braun looks forward to is the food, like tofu dumplings from Got Dumplings, and “the very thoughtfully produced and delicious products”—cookies and shortbread—for example, from Althea Bread. “I purchase all of my gifts at the Market, as well as most of my produce, some readymade food, and kombucha from Mountain Culture Kombucha.” “The vendors are so grateful to the community for supporting us! I am so lucky to earn my living this way, and I could not do it without the excellent— and I do mean excellent—folks who run the market, as well as our wonderful customers.” All in all over 100 vendors come together for Charlottesville City Market, nine months of the year: 8:00 a.m. till 12 noon from April through September, and 8:00 a.m. till 1:00 p.m. from October through December. Like all our local markets, Charlottesville City Market is family friendly. Young kids, and dogs on leashes, are welcome—cats too if they can stand it!


MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

46

HOME SALES STATS ENDING THE WEEK OF MAY 22, 2022

THERE WERE 148 SALES IN THE 11 COUNTY AND CITY AREAS n 62 were in Albemarle with an average price of $562,650 n 14 were in Charlottesville with an average price of $715,293 n 13 were in Fluvanna with an average price of $395,707 n 9 were in Greene with an average price of $438,886 n 11 were in Louisa with an average price of $448,907 n 4 were in Madison with an average price of $427,000 n 2 were in Nelson with an average price of $579,500 n 17 were in Orange with an average price of $336,365 n 8 were in Staunton with an average price of $302,750 n 8 were in Waynesboro with an average price of $334,228

FLUVANNA COUNTY 1304 HIDDEN VALLEYS ROAD

This unique, custom built home is tucked away on 10 private acres in Hidden Valleys. Veranda style porch, two-story foyer w/turned stair case. Two master bedrooms with attached master baths, Kitchen with large island, two sinks, all appliances, and breakfast nook. Formal living room and dining room with double-sided fireplace. Sunroom with lots of natural light. Screened porch off kitchen and a laundry / mud room with a large closet. MLS# 618411 Asking price - $649,000 Debbie Cash Cell (434) 960-5501 dkcash55@gmail.com www.RealEstateiii.com

3450 Berkmar Drive, Suite A 111 Charlottesville, VA 22901

WWW.C-VILLE.COM

VOL. 31 NO. 20 n MAY 18 - 24, 2022

30

YEARS OF REAL ESTATE

CHARLOTTESVILLE ALBEMARLE, FLUVANNA, GREENE, LOUISA, MADISON, NELSON, ORANGE, AUGUSTA

$$$

COVERED! 24 HOURS • 52 WEEKS 3 6 5 D AY S P E R Y E A R ONLINE & IN PRINT

Rising Rates & Higher Costs

HOMES SOLD

Real Estate Weekly

What’s a Buyer to Do? BY CARLA HUCKABEE

THE 709 EXTON COURT RIVER RUN

1516 RUTLEDGE AVENUE RUGBY

We’ve Got Central Virginia

42 NAHOR DRIVE LAKE MONTICELLO

Staff:

EDITORIAL COORDINATOR

Celeste Smucker • REWeditor@c-ville.com

MARKETING SERVICES Beth Wood beth@c-ville.com • 434.996.4019

2606 DUNDEE ROAD STANARDSVILLE

313 MINERAL AVENUE MINERAL

17096 TIN CAN ALY GORDONSVILLE

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

LOCAL GOVERNMENT (Note: Real estate tax information gathered from local government Web sites and is believed but not guaranteed to be accurate as of publication date. Towns may assess real estate taxes in addition to those charged by each county.)

CITY OF CHARLOTTESVILLE

GREENE COUNTY

CITY OF STAUNTON

LOUISA COUNTY

CITY OF WAYNESBORO

MADISON COUNTY

ALBEMARLE COUNTY

NELSON COUNTY

www.charlottesville.gov Real estate tax rate: $.95 per $100 ci.staunton.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.92 per $100 www.waynesboro.va.us Real estate tax rate: $.90 per $100 www.albemarle.org Real estate tax rate: $.854 per $100

FLUVANNA COUNTY

fluvannacounty.org Real estate tax rate: $.884 per $100

greenecountyva.gov Real estate tax rate: $.82 per $100 www.louisacounty.com Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100 www.madisonco.virginia.gov Real estate tax rate: $.71 per $100 nelsoncounty-va.gov Real estate tax rate: $.72 per $100

Faith Gibson ads@c-ville.com

DESIGNER

Tracy Federico designer@c-ville.com All advertising published in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY is believed to be truthful and accurate. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for, the accuracy or truthfulness of the advertising placed within this publication. Neither the Real Estate Weekly, Inc., nor its corporate parent, the C-VILLE Weekly, assume any responsibility and shall have no liability whatsoever for errors, including without limitation, typographical errors or omissions in the REAL ESTATE WEEKLY. The Real Estate Weekly, Inc. reserves the right to edit or refuse any advertising it deems inappropriate or misleading. No advertising will be published in the Real Estate Weekly if it is known to be inaccurate or untruthful. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy, but this publication does not warrant, nor is it liable for the advertising placed within this publication. This publication will not accept advertising that refers to or attempts to establish fees or rates of commissions charged for services rendered. All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation, or discrimination because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or intention to make any such preference, limitation, or discrimination.” Virginia Fair Housing Law also makes it illegal to discriminate because of elderliness (age 55 and over). We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis.

The Real Estate Weekly Is printed on 100% recycled paper

ORANGE COUNTY

orangecountyva.gov Real estate tax rate: $.804 per $100

308 E. East Main Street • Charlottesville, VA 22902 • e-mail: ads@c-ville.com Send your news and/or press releases to editorREW@gmail.com


47

12570 Chicken Mountain Rd Orange , VA Home built in 2000 from reclaimed materials - 100 acres is enhanced by being in the middle of a couple of thousand acres

Jane Porter Fogleman (434) 242-8355

511 Shelton Mill Rd 6057 Gordonsville Rd Charlottesville , VA Keswick , VA Fox Haven offers private retreat & Brook Hollow - Comfortable and convenient location. Minutes to shopping & manageable Keswick estate of 38 acres. amenities including Harris Teeter Grocery, Spectacular setting, opposite Castle Hill and ROY WHEELER REALTY UVA Healthcare. adjoining Keswick Vineyards. Duke & SharonREAL Merrick ESTATE SERVICES Steve White (434) 989-4415 (434) 242-8355

12570 Chicken Mountain Rd Orange , VA Home built in 2000 from reclaimed materials - 100 acres is enhanced by being in the middle of a couple of thousand acres

Jane Porter Fogleman (434) 242-8355

MAY 25 - 31, 2022 ISSUE 3121

OPEN 11/3 | 12-3pm

PRICE REDUCED 12570 Chicken Mountain Rd UVA Orange , VACAPE 12570 Chicken Mountain Rd COD!

Home built in 2000 fromBroad reclaimed 1527 Ave Orange , VA materials - 100 acres is reclaimed enhanced by Home built in 2000 from 4 BR, 2 BA, 2043 SQ FT being -in100 theacres middle of a coupleby of materials is enhanced $374,500 mls 630150 being in thethousand middle ofacres a couple of Steve White Jane Porteracres Fogleman thousand

(434) 242-8355 434-242-8355 Jane Porter Fogleman (434) 242-8355

511 Shelton Mill Rd

6057 Gordonsville Rd

6057 Gordonsville Rd

READY END UNIT THE 12570 HILL Chicken Keswick , VA Rd KeswickMountain , VA 511 Charlottesville Shelton MillMOVE-IN Rd, VA 6057 Gordonsville Rd FoxCharlottesville Haven offers private retreat Lockwood & Brook Hollow - Comfortable and Brook Hollow - Comfortable and , VA 2174 Drive 23 Briarwood Rd Keswick , VA Orange , VA convenient location. Minutes to shopping & Keswick estate of 38and acres. manageable Keswick of 38 acres. Fox Haven offers private retreat - Comfortable Home built in 2000 from reclaimed 3 BR,&Grocery, 2.5 BA, 1622 manageable SQBrook FT Hollow 3 BR, 2.5 BA, 1719 SQ FTestate amenities including HarristoTeeter Spectacular setting, opposite and Spectacular setting, opposite Castle Hill convenient location. Minutes shopping & manageable Keswick estateCastle of 38 Hill acres. materials - 100 acres is enhanced byand $369,000 mls 629999adjoining Keswick Vineyards. $296,525 mls 629976 UVA Healthcare. adjoining Vineyards. amenities including Harris Teeter Grocery, Spectacular setting, opposite Castle Hill and being in theKeswick middle of a couple of Duke & Sharon MerrickDan Conquest Susan Stewartthousand Steve White Steve White UVA Healthcare. adjoining Keswick Vineyards. acres (434) 989-4415 (434) 989-4415 242-8355 Duke &(434) Sharon Merrick 434-242-8573 434-242-3550 Steve White (434) 242-8355

(434) 989-4415

Jane Porter Fogleman (434) 242-8355

OPEN 11/3 | 12-3pm 12570 Chicken Mountain Rd THE CHESAPEAKE 12570 Chicken Rd OrangeMountain , VA 64 Bridlewood Dr Orange Home built in 2000, VA from reclaimed

511 Shelton Mill Rd THE MONTPELIER 6057 Gordonsville Rd 12570 Chicken Mountain Rd THE EVERETTE 511 Shelton Mill,Rd Charlottesville VA 6057Keswick Gordonsville Rd 12570 Chicken Mountain Rd , VA Orange 850 Jefferson Drive 620 W. Old Mountain Rd , VA Charlottesville , VA Fox Haven offers private retreat & Keswick , VA Orange Brook Hollow - Comfortable and Home built in 2000, VA from reclaimed BR,from 2.5 BA, 1440 SQ FT convenient 4 shopping BR,&2.5&BA, 1719 SQ FT Hollow 3 BR, 2.5 BA, 1608 SQ FTfrom Fox Haven offersMinutes private retreat location. to Home built- 100 in3 2000 reclaimed Brook - Comfortable and Home built- 100 in 2000 reclaimedby materials acres is enhanced by manageable Keswick estate of 38 acres. materials acres is enhanced location. Minutes to shopping & amenities including Harris Teeter Grocery, $298,765 mls $357,225 mls 629975 $319,350materials mls materials 100middle acres isofenhanced by 629974 convenient manageable Keswick estate of 38 acres. 100middle acres isofenhanced by being in- the a couple of Spectacular setting, opposite Castle Hill and being629984 in- the a couple of amenities including Harris Teeter Grocery, UVA Healthcare. being in the middle of a coupleStewart of Spectacular setting, opposite Castle Hill and in the middle of a couple of thousand acres adjoining Keswick Vineyards. thousand acres Susan Susan Stewart Susan being Stewart UVA Healthcare. Duke & Sharon Merrick thousand acres adjoiningSteve Keswick Vineyards. thousand acres White

Jane Porter Fogleman 434-242-3550 Jane(434) Porter Fogleman 242-8355 (434) 242-8355

Duke(434) & Sharon Merrick 242-8355 (434) 242-8355

434-242-3550

Steve989-4415 White (434) (434) 989-4415

Jane Porter Fogleman 434-242-3550 Jane(434) Porter Fogleman 242-8355 (434) 242-8355

UNDER CONTRACT

511 Shelton Mill Rd WILLOW LAKE TOWNHOUSE COLONIAL HOME BRIGHT 6057 Gordonsville Rd 12570IMPRESSIVE Chicken Mountain Rd 511 Shelton Mill Charlottesville , VARd Gordonsville 12570 Chicken Rd Keswick , VA Rd Orange , VA 76Mountain Hillsborough Lane 1247 Maple View Drive 6057 Charlottesville VA Fox Haven offers private,retreat & Keswick VA reclaimed , VA and Home builtOrange in 2000 ,from Brook Hollow - Comfortable

Jane Porter Fogleman (434) 242-8355 (434) 242-8355

Duke & Sharon Merrick (434) 242-8355 (434) 242-8355

WWW.HOWARDHANNA.COM CHARLOTTESVILLE 434.955.5155 WESTERN ALBEMARLE 434.205.4355 ZION CROSSROADS 434.589.2611 GREENE COUNTY 434.985.2348 12570 Chicken Mountain Rd Orange , VA Home built in 2000 from reclaimed materials - 100 acres is enhanced by being in the middle of a couple of thousand acres

511 Shelton Mill Rd Charlottesville , VA Fox Haven offers private retreat & convenient location. Minutes to shopping & amenities including Harris Teeter Grocery, UVA Healthcare.

Steve White (434) 989-4415 (434) 989-4415

Duke & Sharon Merrick (434) 242-8355 (434) 242-8355

What's your home really worth? Scan to get THREE estimates instantly 6057 Gordonsville Rd Keswick , VA

12570 Chicken Mountain Rd Orange , VA

Brook Hollow - Comfortable and manageable Keswick estate of 38 acres. Spectacular setting, opposite Castle Hill and adjoining Keswick Vineyards.

Home built in 2000 from reclaimed materials - 100 acres is enhanced by being in the middle of a couple of thousand acres

THE REAL ESTATE WEEKLY WWW.C-VILLE.COM

UPDATED RANCH HOME 12570 Chicken Mountain Rd 511Orange Shelton, Mill VA Rd 2058 Union Mills Road Charlottesville Home built inSQ 2000 from, VA reclaimed 5 BR, 2.5 BA, 2864 SQ FTconvenient 2 private BR, to 2retreat FULL, 2 HALF BA, 1778 SQ FT 3 BR, 2.5 BA, FT Fox Haven offers & & Fox2288 Haven offers private retreat by & location. Minutes shopping Home built in 2000 reclaimed Brook Hollow - Comfortable and materials - 100 acresfrom is enhanced by manageable Keswick estate of 38 acres. materials - 100 acres is enhanced $599,000 mls 630390 $317,000 mls 630075 $359,000 mls 630308 convenient location. Minutes to shopping convenient location. Minutes to shopping & including Harris Teeter Grocery, & amenities materials - 100 acresof is aenhanced manageable Keswick estate of 38Hill acres. being in the Spectacular setting, opposite Castle and being in the middle of a couple of middle couple ofby amenities including Harris Teeter Grocery, amenities including Harris Teeter Grocery, UVA Healthcare. Susan Katelyn Mancini Maury Atkins being in the middleacres of a coupleStewart of Spectacular setting, opposite Castle Hill and adjoining Keswick Vineyards. thousand acres thousand UVA Healthcare. UVA Healthcare. Duke & Sharon Merrick 703-203-3388 acres adjoining Keswick Steve WhiteVineyards. Janethousand Porter Fogleman Jane Porter Fogleman 434-242-3550 540-223-2719


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