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FEBRUARY 14 – 20, 2018 CHARLOTTESVILLE’S NEWS AND ARTS WEEKLY C-VILLE.COM FREE

FOR THE LOVE OF... From moving 1,000 miles to picnicking in a sewer (to each their own), love has made you do some crazy things

Bad break for

WEST2ND PAGE 10

CAPTURING

Last call for

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light and dark

ESCAFÉ


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GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT IN IN CHARLOTTESVILLE CHARLOTTESVILLE NN TTIIOO TTAA

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OUR OUR GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT TODAY TODAY

OUR OUR GOVERNMENT GOVERNMENT TOMORROW? TOMORROW?

EDUCATIONAL SERIES SPONSORED BY

THE LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS CHARLOTTESVILLE TOMORROW JEFFERSON SCHOOL AFRICAN AMERICAN HERITAGE CENTER SESSION February 11, 2018 SESSION II Sunday Sunday February 11, 2018

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

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Government Government in in Charlottesville Charlottesville Today Today

Panelists will discuss the current Panelists willofdiscuss the current organization Charlottesville City Council organization of Charlottesville elections, rotating mayorships City and Council the elections, rotating mayorships and the City Manager form of government. City Manager form of government.

FACILITATORS: FACILITATORS: · Andrea Douglas, Executive Director, ·

· ·

Andrea Douglas, Executive Director, Jefferson School African American

Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Heritage Center Brian Wheeler, Executive Director, Brian Wheeler, Executive Director, Charlottesville Tomorrow Charlottesville Tomorrow

PANELISTS: PANELISTS: · Bitsy Waters, Charlottesville Mayor, 1988-90 ·· Bitsy Waters, Charlottesville Mayor, 1988-90 Charles Barbour, Charlottesville’s first · Charles Barbour, Charlottesville’s first African-American Mayor, 1974-76 Mayor, · African-American Rich Schragger, UVA Law1974-76 School professor ·· Rich Schragger, UVA School professor Tom Walls, Executive Law Director, · Tom Walls, Executive Director, Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership

SESSION February 25, 2018 SESSION II II Sunday Sunday February 25, 2018

Options Options for for Governance Governance in in the the Future Future This session will focus on alternative forms of city This sessioninwill focus on alternative forms city government Virginia, elected Mayors, wardofversus government in Virginia, elected Mayors, ward versus at-large council elections, procedures and at-large counciltoelections, and models,etc. requirements enact newprocedures city governance requirements to enact new city governance models,etc.

FACILITATORS: FACILITATORS:

· ·

· ·

Andrea Douglas, Executive Director, Andrea Douglas, Executive Director, Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Jefferson School African American Heritage Center Bob Gibson, Senior Researcher, Bob Gibson, Senior Researcher, Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service

PANELISTS: PANELISTS: · Bill Pantele, Richmond City Council, 2001-09 ·· Bill Pantele, Richmond City Council, 2001-09 George Gilliam, Charlottesville City Council, · George Gilliam, Charlottesville City Council, 1972-76 · 1972-76 Rich Schragger, UVA Law School professor ·· Rich Law member, School professor Joan Schragger, MacCallum,UVA former · Joan MacCallum, former member, Lynchburg City Council Lynchburg City Council

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THIS WEEK NEWS 9 Ah, the crazy things we do for love. My college boyfriend had moved 10 West2nd decision’s effect to New York City from Missouri to take a summer internship, and my on other downtown developers. parents forbade me from visiting him (something about wanting me to 11 Crozet road connectors save money). So, I did what any good only child would do: I put the would lessen traffic snarls. 12 Group says it’s okay to plane tickets on my roommate’s credit card and we flew to NYC for a restrict private militia. long weekend. Our first stop was a store we didn’t have in our small 13 Should city release car attack videotapes? college town, and we spent hours browsing. As I stood in line to pay for my large haul, I spotted two familiar faces in front of me: my parents’ FEATURE 17 next-door neighbors. Somehow, we were standing a few feet apart in the exact same store at the exact same time, 850 miles from my tiny hometown in Kentucky. So, I did what any person in love would do: I put down my loot, scrambled underneath the security ropes and ran out of the store to make sure my parents never knew my whereabouts. C-VILLE readers responses to the phrase “Love made me...” Well, my secret’s out now (sorry Mom and Dad!), along with more than 50 reader responses to our request for the craziest things (the ARTS 23 good, the bad and the ugly) they’ve done for love (p. 17).—Jessica Luck 25 Calendar Listings

From the heart

The top Facebook post last week was “Four more down: Kessler-related hearings reach a verdict,” which received 72 reactions, 48 comments and 7 shares.

26 Feedback: Free Idea’s music goes where it wants to. 27 The Works: Victory Hall’s Marginalia is one for the books.

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28 Review: Getting real with Fax Ayres’ “Still.” 29 Preview: Keller Williams brings good times to the Jeff. 31 Screens: S&M trilogy comes to painful end with Fifty Shades Freed.

THE BIG PICTURE

LIVING 33 33 A fond farewell to Escafé. 33 To Do: Events 35 Small Bites: Farm Bell Kitchen’s new Southern cuisine. 37 Sudoku 39 Crossword 41 Free Will Astrology

CLASSIFIEDS 42 Q&A

Volume 30, Number 7

Suiting himself Richard Dizon, a fourth-year University of Virginia engineering student, was among those who participated in College Suit Up on Sunday, February 11, at JCPenney in the Fashion Square Mall. UVA faculty, staff and alumni, as well as JCPenney team members, offered students heading into the workforce advice on how to dress for success, including the proper fit of a suit, how to tie a tie and current career fashion trends. A 40 percent store discount and free mini-makeovers were also part of the evening.

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EDITORIAL EDITOR Jessica Luck (x20) editor@c-ville.com NEWS EDITOR Lisa Provence (x14) lisa@c-ville.com STAFF REPORTER Samantha Baars (x40) news@c-ville.com ARTS EDITOR Tami Keaveny (x18) tami@c-ville.com SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS EDITOR Caitlin White (x45) caite@c-ville.com ARTS & LIVING REPORTER Erin O’Hare arts@c-ville.com COPY EDITOR Susan Sorensen EDITORIAL INTERNS Sam Padgett, Jake Pierce CONTRIBUTORS Rob Brezsny, C. Simon Davidson, Elizabeth Derby, Mike Fietz, Erika Howsare, Kristofer Jenson, Raennah Lorne, Nick Rubin, Jen Sorensen, David Levinson Wilk

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Everything

MARCH 3 – Sugar Hollow Bridges Run 10 – The Haven 8K 17 – Fix a Leak Family 5K

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THE BASICS C-VILLE is published Wednesdays. 23,000 free copies are distributed all over Charlottesville, Albemarle and the surrounding counties. One copy per person. Additional copies may be purchased for $1.99 per copy. CONTRIBUTIONS Unsolicited news articles, essays, and photography are carefully considered. Local emphasis is preferred. Although care will be taken, we assume no responsibility for submissions. SUBSCRIPTIONS First-class mail subscriptions are available for $140 annually. THE LAW ©2018 C-VILLE Weekly. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. ME MBE R

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02-17 | The Legwarmers- The Ultimate 80’s Tribute Band presented by Generations 102.3 Presents 02-21 | Rhett Miller of Old 97’s and Evan Felker of Turnpike Troubadours 02-23 | J Roddy Walston & The Business with Futurebirds 03-09 | Tim O’Brien Band (ft. Noam Pikelny, Mike Bub, Shad Cobb and Jan Fabricius) with Amanda Anne Platt 03-11 | AHS Jazz Band 1st Annual ‘Swing into Spring’ Benefit Concert 03-14 | Matisyahu 03-16 | Rockn’ to Lockn’ 03-22 | Wild Child with special guests The Wild Reeds 03-24 | Matt & Kim with CRUISR and TWINKIDS 03-26 | Drive-By Truckers with Erika Wennerstrom of Heartless Bastards 03-29 | Delta Rae 03-30 | Dark Star Orchestra 03-31 | Cigarettes After Sex 04-07 | Cry, Cry, Cry 04-08 | An Evening with Yo La Tengo 04-20 | Dr. Dog with Kyle Craft 04-24 | Anderson East

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February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

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Don’t miss our 5th annual bow-WOW-walk and festival supporting the animals and lifesaving programs at the Charlottesville-Albemarle SPCA! This K.9 2.5K features human and doggie entertainment, canine competition, treats for pups and a pack of animal-friendly sponsors! Walk Pre-Registration January 1-April 6 Walk Registration April 7 from 8:30AM-9:45AM Walk Kick-Off 10AM Post-Walk Party in the Park 11AM-12:30PM

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Learn more & register your team at caspca.org! $35 REGISTRATION FEE includes a shirt, bag & doggie bandana!

This year’s walk will be hosted by HOT 101.9 DJs, PJ Styles and Kevin Graham!


I don’t think you can understand the country today if you don’t understand the legacies of slavery and how they have shaped our understanding of rights, freedoms and opportunities.

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—Montpelier President & CEO Kat Imhoff

NEWS

Connect four PAGE 11

IN BRIEF Clean Virginia

Dominion Energy is coming under fire with legislation and a new PAC that donates to legislators who forego contributions from the electric monopoly. Clean Virginia Project, chaired by local investor Michael Bills, will contribute to delegates and senators in the General Assembly who eschew Dominion donations. Former congressman Tom Perriello has joined the effort.

Tinsley takes a break Dave Matthews Band violinist Boyd Tinsley announced he would not be joining the band on its 2018 tour, tweeting that he was “worn out” and needed to spend more time with his family.

RYAN JONES

Why did the salamander cross the road? Ah, this one’s easy: To get to the other side. It takes a warm, wet winter night for more than 1,000 spotted salamanders to start their 100-yard migration, crossing Rio Mills and Polo Grounds roads from their forested homes to their vernal pool breeding grounds. Because navigating across the busy roads often ends badly for the local yellow polka-dotted amphibians, they no longer have to do it alone. Each year, a team of dozens of community members are on standby, waiting for Devin Floyd, founder of the Center for Urban Habitats and Blue Ridge Discovery Center in Charlottesville, to send out an alert that the critters are on their way. This year’s migration started the night of February 10, and regular salamander rescuer and Albemarle County Board of Supervisors Chair Ann Mallek was there to help by picking up 10 of 46 amphibians on the side of Rio Mills and hand-delivering them across February 10 salamander stats: Polo Grounds Road. “They were cold and slow until they rested on our hands, then quickly warmed 46 salamanders up for their last sprint to the vernal pools,” she says. 3 critter casualties But they’re not done yet—Mallek urges drivers to keep an eye out for any salaman33 human volunteers der stragglers when passing through the area until migration stops around mid-March.

Real estate rising

More charges

Residential

A judge certified eight additional charges against Mark Hormuz Dean, an Albemarle Pain Management Associates physician, who was arrested January 5 on two counts of rape, two counts of object sexual penetration and one count of forcible sodomy for allegedly assaulting patients between 2011 and 2015.

Local assessments have been mailed and residential and commercial real estate is still going up. The increases, however, are a far cry from last year’s city commercial assessments, which saw an average 29 percent increase but soared to 50 percent or more in some cases.

Commercial

6.7% Residential increase in Charlottesville

2.6% City commercial increase

2.5% Residential increase in Albemarle’s urban ring

1.4% County commercial increase

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Despite Saturday’s overtime loss at JPJ to Virginia Tech, the University of Virginia men’s basketball team was ranked No. 1 in Monday’s Associated Press Top 25 for the first time in more than 35 years. The Hoos (23-2) also became the first ACC team to make it to No. 1 after starting the season unranked (not to mention having been predicted to finish sixth in the ACC).

@cvillenews_desk

We’re No. 1

Cross watch

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

UVA alum/CNET founder Halsey Minor, the man who left downtown Charlottesville with the Landmark eyesore, is now casting his magic in Puerto Rico, where he’s part of a migration of blockchain and bitcoin entrepreneurs flocking to the hurricane-ravaged island to avoid taxes and create a society based on cryptocurrency, the New York Times reports.

DEVIN FLOYD

Halsey’s crypto utopia


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West2nd smackdown Council rejects permit despite meeting city requirements By Lisa Provence lisa@c-ville.com

W

hen Mayor Nikuyah Walker chaired her first City Council meeting February 5, citizens got to see how previously out-of-control meetings would be run under a new regime—and learned that the heckling continues both for councilors and for the West2nd developer seeking a special use permit that was rejected for reasons that had little to do with city code. When Keith Woodard won a bid in 2014 to build a mixed-use building on a city-owned Water Street parking lot that would house the City Market, parking, retail and residential, he had the blessings of City Council for his innovative design. Four years later, costs soared and he retooled the project, adding 28 luxury units and another floor, which required the special use permit. He also offered to build affordable housing units on Harris Street. Of all developers in town, Woodard has the best track record on affordable housing. When he bought Dogwood Housing in 2007 from local mixed-income housing icon Eugene Williams, he promised to maintain the affordability of most of the units—and has done so. So it was odd that Woodard would be the one asked to jump through higher hoops by Councilor Wes Bellamy and receive jeers from the Greek chorus in attendance as he sought approval to increase

density for West2nd. That Woodard offered to build affordable units on Harris Street instead of contributing to the Affordable Housing Fund, as most developers do, is unusual. And he said he’d exceed the city’s requirement of 16 units kept below market rate for 4.7 years. When councilors said they wanted a longer term, he said he’d make eight units affordable for 10 years. Bellamy badgered him to up the number of affordable units. “Why couldn’t all 16 units be affordable for 20 years?” asked Bellamy. “The project still has to be financially feasible,” explained Woodard, eliciting a big sigh from Bellamy. Woodard pointed out that he could have put the amount required—$316,000—into the Affordable Housing Fund, “which maybe we should have stuck with that,” and that keeping eight units affordable for 10 years was already challenging at an estimated cost of $474,000. Bellamy said he was perplexed that Woodard said it wouldn’t be financially feasible “when some would say you’ve made a lot of money in this city and because you’ve already made so much money maybe you can give some back.” That was greeted by whoops from some attendees. And when Bellamy asked Woodard how much money he was going to make from West2nd, Deputy City Attorney Lisa Robertson advised councilors to “focus on the land use issues” for a zoning application. “That was a silly question,” says Eugene Williams. “[Bellamy] doesn’t have the facts

KEITH WOODARD

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

@cvillenews_desk

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434-981-4968

NEWS

The reconfigured West2nd has 97 luxury condos ranging from $359,000 to $1.4 million, wider City Market stalls and aisles, and 102 public parking spaces.


NEWS

Growing pains Crozet roads can’t keep up with new developments By Mary Jane Gore reporter@c-ville.com

A

ON THE ROAD TO COMPLETION Kevin McDermott, transportation planner for Albemarle County, says two more road projects are pending from funds the county gave community councils at the end of 2017. Crozet earmarked its share for: • Sidewalks, curbs, gutters and regrading and repaving the Crozet Square area. New parking will be angled. • Safety improvements, including a sidewalk in front of the Starr Hill Brewery.

Barnes Lumber site. His business has put up about $1.9 million so the county could file for matching VDOT funds for an east-west connector road. Funds may be awarded by late spring. If a go, Phase 1 road funds would become available in July, Stoner says. Design would start immediately, followed by construction in one to one and a half years, according to McDermott. The roads would extend from Library Avenue to High Street and then back to Crozet Square, Stoner says. Later the connector might extend as a new Crozet “main street” that would go east to Parkside Village and possibly beyond, he says. Mallek says that because Crozet Square is an important town entrance with historic shopping, “everybody has a great stake in making sure that traffic moves successfully and that we get the rest of the connector finished. Then traffic could move west seamlessly, and we can take out the backup that happens sometimes under the [Crozet Avenue] trestle.” Emilia Puie in Parkside Village says that she is hoping the east-west connector to downtown will happen soon. Her family moved from nearby Myrtle Avenue to get more sidewalks. “We love walking and we love Crozet’s downtown,” she says. “When the children are older they could go there by themselves.”

240 Four-way stop

Proposed connector

Proposed connector

An east-west connector road in Crozet will extend from Library Avenue to Western Ridge subdivision, while Eastern Avenue would run north-south and connect Route 240 to Route 250.

“I think we’re one disaster away from being a critical need even more than it is now.” JIM DUNCAN

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250

@cvillenews_desk

fire along Old Three Notch’d Road caused a rush hour roadblock February 1 on one of Crozet’s main thoroughfares: Three Notch’d Road, aka Route 240. Instead of being able to drive to downtown Crozet, drivers had to make a U-turn, return to U.S. 250 and make a right, then another right onto Crozet Avenue/ Route 240, only to be part of a massive backup at the light and four-way stop near the railway trestle at Crozet Square. High-density growth area Crozet surely has the homes, but roadways have lagged behind. Will 2018 be the year several road projects begin in earnest? “I think we’re one disaster away from being a critical need even more than it is now,” says realtor and Crozet resident Jim Duncan. Some neighborhoods, like Parkside Village, Brookwood and Westhall, can only get in through Tabor Street, and that’s a concern for residents who “are afraid they can’t get out,” says Duncan. “We’ve worked hard for the past 10 years, so it would be great to finally take some steps,” says Ann Mallek, chair of the Albemarle Board of Supervisors and representative of the White Hall District, which includes Crozet, where two connector road projects are in the works. One would connect Route 240 to Route 250 through Park Ridge Drive and the Cory Farm subdivision. The proposed Eastern Avenue Connector, which runs north-south, still has two major portions that need to be constructed, says Kevin McDermott, transportation planner for Albemarle County. The northern piece may break ground soon. “The private developers of the Foothills-Daly development are responsible for making a connection onto Park Ridge Drive and onto Route 240,” McDermott says, and they have submitted all of the required applications. To the south, a bridge that is needed to cross Lickinghole Creek to complete the connector road “is the sticking point and has been for many years,” says David Stoner, a member of the Crozet Community Advisory Committee. “It’s such an expensive proposition that it hasn’t risen to the top of the county’s list of projects to be funded.” The southern-portion work is No. 12 on the county’s priority list of road projects, McDermott explains. “Because other priorities are already under way, No. 12 will be a priority in the next year,” he says. Once the county identifies funds to place into the capital improvement plan, design

work will begin, maybe within a year, he says. The county would likely apply for a revenue-sharing grant with the state to get the southern piece of the connector started. “You’re probably looking at two to three years out for construction if everything works well,” says McDermott. Just ahead of the Eastern Avenue connector is the Library Avenue extension at No. 11. Developer Frank Stoner (no relation to David Stoner) owns Crozet New Town Associates and its construction arm, Milestone Partners, which will develop the former

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

and he doesn’t know how much [Woodard] had to spend.” When councilors voted 3-2 to deny the permit, the hecklers applauded. “Those young people know nothing about investing,” says Williams. “That just bothers me to know we had three councilors who wanted to accommodate the audience more than actually trying to make this feasible for both sides.” Bellamy, Walker and Heather Hill voted against the special use permit. ”It’s not all right to vote against it without explaining specifically what the developer needs to do,” says Williams. He opines that it would have been wiser to say what they wanted and table the vote. Williams also criticizes Kathy Galvin and Mike Signer’s yes votes and says they seemed more concerned about downtown businesses than low-income residents. Others have concerns about the Monday night performance, and the word “extortion” has been bandied about. “If I’m a developer and read those [news] accounts, a red flare has gone up,” says attorney Fred Payne, who is a plaintiff in the lawsuit against City Council for its vote to remove Confederate statues. “Why would I want to invest in this town?” With the vote to deny the permit, “You can see the degree to which City Council is out of control,” says Payne. “I have a feeling if this were litigated, the city would probably lose.” He adds, “I don’t think this City Council understands there are limits on what they can do.” Part of the problem Woodard faces is that four councilors were not around when the city bid out the project in 2014. Galvin was, and at the meeting she said, “The demand was that the City Market be downtown on that city parking lot. It was not affordable housing.” The project has moved along “based on criteria the city gave this developer.” Galvin also said the special use permit meets the comprehensive plan and zoning ordinance, and the project would add 80 people living on the mall and 100 jobs in the face of increasing competition to downtown businesses, as well as increase city revenue from the parking lot from $6,500 a year to $945,000 a year. “That’s huge,” she said. For Bellamy, the message to developers is, “This council will prioritize affordable housing.” He says he appreciates Woodard’s efforts and understands that he met city requirements. “We still have discretion,” says Bellamy. “I hope we can still work together.” Hill was more concerned about the City Market. “I’m not convinced the market will thrive there,” she said. She says she’s not “anti development,” but suggests “we ultimately may not be able to accommodate the market on this specific site.” Woodard says he doesn’t think City Council’s vote to deny the permit was about increased density. “We’re looking at alternate paths to go forward,” he says. Litigation is not an option at this point, but he says he does need a decision soon because people have reserved condos in West2nd. And he’s put $2 million into underground utilities, as well as four years of effort. “We’re trying to work things out,” he says. “I’m trying to be positive.”

11


NEWS

12

TheatreCHS presents

South Pacific

Keeping out the militia Law group says legal remedies exist to prevent another August 12 By Samantha Baars news@c-ville.com

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LEGAL REMEDIES Paramilitary activity prohibitions: 25 states (including Virginia, where it’s a Class 5 felony) criminalize assembling a group to train or practice with firearms or techniques that could hurt or kill someone, and intending to use those practices in a civil disorder. False assumption statutes: 12 states (including Virginia) bar acting like a cop or the unauthorized wearing of military-like uniforms. —University of Georgetown Law School’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection

EZE AMOS

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

@cvillenews_desk

facebook.com/cville.weekly

theaterchsboxoffice@gmail.com

N

ew research shows that all 50 states can legally restrict private militia and paramilitary activity at events such as the summer’s deadly Unite the Right rally, according to the University of Georgetown Law School’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection. The legal organization, which filed a lawsuit on behalf of the city last October against 25 groups and individuals that allegedly engaged in unlawful militia-like activity on August 12, claims the independent militiamen and women, many with AR-15s slung over their shoulders, made tensions boil at the rally. In its litigation, ICAP aims to prohibit the defendants from returning to Virginia to engage in the type of behavior seen over the summer, and during a February 8 press conference, senior litigator Mary McCord announced a set of new tools every state can use. “Violent conduct is not protected by the First Amendment,” she said. Aside from independent groups such as the Pennsylvania and New York light foot militias present at Unite the Right, McCord says several of the white supremacist groups also fall into that category because of their “militaristic battle behavior,” combat-type helmets and reliance on bats, batons, clubs, sticks and reinforced flag poles for protection. But perhaps this could have been prevented due to already existing clauses, statutes and prohibitions, which could be used proactively to impose restrictions during an event’s permitting process to reduce the possibility of violence while protecting the right to free speech and peaceable assembly.

“All in all, what this research found is that all 50 states have one of these,” McCord said. On October 28, the League of the South —a white nationalist group named in ICAP’s lawsuit—planned two White Lives Matter rallies in Shelbyville and Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Adam Tucker, an assistant city attorney for Murfreesboro, said the folks at ICAP immediately reached out with suggestions for restrictions the locality could impose to prohibit violent paramilitary activity like that seen in Charlottesville. Tucker said city officials were able to write a prohibition of paramilitary activity into the rally’s permit, and on the day of the planned rallies, though members of the league showed up at their first planned rally in Shelbyville, they canceled the second one, calling it a “lawsuit trap” on Twitter.

Georgetown Law School’s Institute for Constitutional Advocacy and Protection says all states have the power to prevent militia-like activity.


NEWS

Spring Watercolor Session

13

with Lee Alter @McGuffey

EZE AMOS

Children:

Fourth Street on August 12

Conspiracy theory? Petitioner wants videos of fatal crash released By Samantha Baars news@c-ville.com

I

Adults:

Wednesdays: 10:00 am - 1:00 pm March 14 - May 16 Fridays: 10:00 am - 1:00 pm March 16 - May 18

Children’s Art Show @ Hot Cakes til March 3rd please stop by ages 4-12

Call 434-760-9658 www.leealterartist.com

and on Facebook as lee alter art and lee alter

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com @cvillenews_desk facebook.com/cville.weekly

n a widely viewed YouTube video, a Fairfax man says he’s able to disprove information disseminated by the Charlottesville Police Department about the fatal car attack on August 12. Now William Evans is on a mission to find two videos shown publicly in a December 14 court hearing that could help him understand what happened that day, and he claims the city has unlawfully refused to show them to him. James Alex Fields is charged with driving a silver Dodge Challenger into a crowd of counterprotesters at the Unite the Right rally, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring more than a dozen others. His car rear-ended a second sedan, which then smashed into a minivan, according to a press release published by the city and on the CPD’s Facebook page on August 13. “The minivan had slowed for a crowd of people crossing through the intersection,” the press release says. But Evans says otherwise. And he has made several YouTube videos about the events that transpired that day. In one called “NEW VIDEO from Charlottesville: the Grassy Knoll Film,” a nod to the conspiracy-theory-prone assassination of John F. Kennedy, Evans shows video evidence from an undisclosed source that the maroon van was stopped at the scene of the crash about five minutes before the fatal attack. “You tell me whether that van slowed for a crowd of pedestrians or whether that van parked there deliberately,” he says in the video, while positioned in front of two bookcases overflowing with literature and wearing a light blue polo shirt. “The answer is obvious. The Charlottesville Police Department has an obligation to clarify this mistake and to investigate that maroon

van, to investigate why it was parked there and to investigate the people in it.” But Evans never explicitly states his own theory. For this and other questions he’s raised on his YouTube channel, SonofNewo, Evans has filed a motion seeking a court order under the Freedom of Information Act that the city of Charlottesville and Commonwealth’s Attorney Joe Platania unseal the videos shown in an open courtroom at Fields’ December 14 preliminary hearing, and make them available to the public. “The precedent is pretty clear across the entire country, both in the Supreme Court and in federal courts and in the state courts that statutes like this, when you show something like this to a portion of the public in a public setting, at that point you don’t have the right as a government entity to withhold it from anybody else who asks for it,” says Evans. However, Alan Gernhardt at the Virginia Freedom of Information Advisory Council says the videos could fall under FOIA’s criminal investigative files exemption, especially if they were shown at a preliminary hearing. “They’re not actually introduced into the court file,” he says. “It’s a discretionary release showing it for the preliminary hearing but not actually releasing it to the public.” Evans says the accounts of the videos that he’s read from Unite the Right organizer Jason Kessler and reporters from the New York Times and the Washington Post, who were present at the December hearing, are contradictory. Platania declined to comment on the record about why he and Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Nina Antony motioned to withdraw the two videos from Fields’ case file. “I have been served with the petitions and expect the Charlottesville Circuit Court to set the matter for a hearing that I plan to be present for,” he says.

Tuesdays: 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm March 13 - May 15 Thursdays: 3:30 pm - 5:30 pm March 15 - May 17 Saturdays: 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm March 17 - May 19


14

You Are Invited to an Open House! Please join The Center for Plastic Surgery and Sentara Martha Jefferson Vascular and Vein Center for an Open House at their new location.

The Center for Plastic Surgery at Sentara Martha Jefferson

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Join us for: tours of the new offices live demonstrations

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

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Light Refreshments will be served. Dr. John Ligush

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Dr. Lewis Owens


15

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February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com @cvillenews_desk

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February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

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16

Introducing C-BIZ, C-VILLE’s quarterly business magazine for working folk—from the ground floor to the corner office. Each issue, we’ll take national conversations and zoom in to see how they’re playing out locally. You’ll meet the city’s movers and shakers and hear what they have to say about running a business in Charlottesville, Albemarle and, in some cases, beyond. No one is off limits. It’s all of our business.


Love made me watch ‘‘Game of Thrones.’’ MICAELA CAMERON

Sell a house I’d bought only the year before, get married a second time and move to C’ville without a job...and not regret any of it! BRENDA BROWNING/FACEBOOK

Learn to be flexible and less rigid. @LLSPOT/INSTAGRAM

17

HEART We’ve all been there: the good, bad and crazy things we do for love

Love is patient, love is kind...or is it: Love tried my patience, love made me kind of wish I’d never swiped right on Tinder? In honor of the day when Cupid is known to strike (with some direct hits and some tragic misses), we conducted an unscientific reader survey in which we asked you to complete the phrase “Love made me...” From romances that made you travel the distance—thousands of miles in some cases— to those that made you thankful that you’re single, the main theme in everyone’s answers: Love makes us who we are. We’ll drink to that.

Love made me learn how to downhill ski. JOEL LEHMAN

@SHORTCE/INSTAGRAM

Love made me...move cross-country to C’ville. @PETESRAVEN/INSTAGRAM

RICHARD ELWELL

Love made me decide to be polyamorous.

DAVID REID

GRETCHEN BURGESS/FACEBOOK

Steal a bunch of flowers from my school’s garden to give to my crush in elementary school. CARL CARPENTER/TWITTER

A better person. LARRY SAUNDERS/FACEBOOK

Broke and crazy. MATTHEW PAUL SISSONS/FACEBOOK

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Love made me very different than I’d thought I’d be.

BETTY DAVIS SHIFLETT/FACEBOOK

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

Love made me have a picnic in a sewer.

Move to Charlottesville while my fiancé is at Darden!

Move to another city. Then when my fatherin-law passed away it made me move back so my husband could take care of his mother. What a wild ride!


18

Jobs are out. Journeys are in. Dreammakers wanted! Ever wondered if travel can change people’s lives? You bet it does! We’re WorldStrides and we take students around the globe, to connect with new worlds and bring home big new ideas. You might even call us the dreammakers. Relevant and rewarding work? Check. Relaxed yet ambitious company culture? Absolutely.

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Want to be a dreammaker yourself? Let’s talk: worldstrides.com/careers


LOVE MADE ME... Love made me spend part of my winter in Detroit. That was a few years ago. Now I’m older, wiser and warmer. MICHELLE LYNNE/FACEBOOK

Smoke pot. JAMES SPENCER/FACEBOOK

So happy ^_^ And over 15 years later, even happier! LISA SWEET/FACEBOOK

Who I am today. GAYLE MILLNER/FACEBOOK

Love made me love someone who didn’t love me back...

19

Blind love made me elope in Lake Tahoe, sell my great house, buy a catamaran, break through an icy river in November and sail off to the Bahamas with a charming but completely selfcentered rogue. It was right after September 11 and all I can say is I guess my guard was down and my heart was broken. The eight-month voyage was full of misadventures and fun and beauty and tears and grandeur and pain. As soon as we landed at Gangplank Marina in Washington, D.C., I kicked him off the boat, went to the magistrate and got a divorce ($84! Best expenditure of the year!). Then I proceeded to live happily on my boat there for three years. Was it worth it? Yes! CHARLOTTE DRUMMOND/FACEBOOK

Happy...for a while... <3 LAURA FRANCES CONRADI/FACEBOOK

Love made me move across the ocean with a 6-week-old to keep our family together. (It was either love or hormones...) ;-)

Love made me cook plenty of meals.

RACHEL HARRIS/FACEBOOK

JENNA DELGADO

Go on a bicycle tour. MELISSA WENDER/FACEBOOK

Move 5.5 hours from home.

Sleep like a baby... Priceless moment.

AMANDA TESVICH BROWN/FACEBOOK

DEBORAH CHRISTY/FACEBOOK

AVI ALVARADO/FACEBOOK

CAITLIN WORRELL/FACEBOOK

Love made me. CAITLIN PETERSON

Single and happy to be so!

MINERVIA BERRY/FACEBOOK

RONDA CHOLLOCK/FACEBOOK

BRENDA NECKERMAN/FACEBOOK

Spend 19 months dealing with USCIS [U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services].

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Leave a city I was comfortable in and move back to my hometown. A place where I really didn’t have a good start. It was the love of/for my daughter that prompted me to move her closer to her maternal family, and it made me rethink my relationship with my family. In the end, love won, and we all are happily together these days!

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

Move to C’ville!

Love made me find a new life in Charlottesville <3

JUSTINA HARRIS/FACEBOOK


February 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 20, 2018 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

20


LOVE MADE ME... Love made me want to buy a boombox to hold outside someone’s window. I forgot that it is the 21st century and I couldn’t find one cheap enough. PAUL SANDERS

Love made [my husband] read Jane Austen! And love made him quit smoking! RAENNAH LORNE/FACEBOOK

Itchy. Love made me buy a bunch of nice gifts and plan a trip to the Bahamas.

DAVID JOHNSON

TERRENCE SMITH

BRIAN MOYNIHAN

Love made me get married, have children and trust God. BECKY MCALLISTER

TERRY DAVENPORT/FACEBOOK

CINDI SCOTT/FACEBOOK

Love made me drive thousands of miles. NICHOLAS LEDUC

Love made me realize that true peace and happiness comes from within, and not from the affirmation and affection of others. SARAH WHITNEY/FACEBOOK

LAURA BRINKERHOFF YOUNG/FACEBOOK

JOHN WEBB/FACEBOOK

CAROLINE MANKINS/FACEBOOK

Love made me able to Love made me end a have an excuse to see relationship to get the Alvin Ailey dance involved in a better one. company. MAX BACALL

CHRIS STAPLES

Love made me learn how to let go of my fears. JULIE DESPERES

Stay in Harrisonburg another two years, adopt cats, change my whole world and write a thesis.

Love made me move 1,100 miles to be with a man I’ve been married to for 12 years now. Love made me find my life’s path and a home in Charlottesville.

EMILY ELIZABETH/FACEBOOK

@KIJILINN/INSTAGRAM

facebook.com/cville.weekly

Marry a man I met at the mall!

Crazy!

Almost move away from Charlottesville?!?!! Wha???

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

Forget who I am.

Adopt A LOT of dogs!

LOU LOMBARDI/FACEBOOK

Love made me ask my doctor about Cialis. Love made me put my spouse ahead of myself every day.

21


22

JUST ANNOUNCED AT

THE PARAMOUNT

SPONSORED BY: ELIZABETH and JOE LEVACA

W E D N E SDA Y, J UN E 20 • 8:00PM

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

facebook.com/cville.weekly

T HI S W EEK ’ S ON SA L E SC HED UL E: WEDNESDAY • STAR CIRCLE MEMBERS | THURSDAY • PARAMOUNT MEMBERS | FRIDAY • GENERAL PUBLIC

STARR HILL PRESENTS: SCOTT BRADLEE’S POSTMODERN JUKEBOX FEBRUARY 17 PARAMOUNT PRESENTS: GO, DOG. GO! FEBRUARY 21 PARAMOUNT PRESENTS: MET LIVE IN HD - LA BOHÈME FEBRUARY 24 PARAMOUNT AT THE MOVIES PRESENTS: THE BIG LEBOWSKI [R] FEBRUARY 24 PARAMOUNT PRESENTS: NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE IN HD - CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF FEBRUARY 25 PARAMOUNT PRESENTS: ACC MEN’S BASKETBALL ON THE BIG SCREEN UVA VS. LOUISVILLE MARCH 1 PARAMOUNT AT THE MOVIES PRESENTS: THE WIZARD OF OZ MARCH 4 STARR HILL PRESENTS: AN INTIMATE EVENING OF SONGS AND STORIES WITH GRAHAM NASH MARCH 9 PARAMOUNT PRESENTS: MET LIVE IN HD - SEMIRAMIDE MARCH 10 PARAMOUNT AT THE MOVIES PRESENTS: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND [PG] MARCH 18

Stay connected.

TH E PARAMO UNT TH E ATE R l 215 East Main Street, Charlottesville, VA l 434.979.1333 l www.theparamount.net SPONSORED BY:

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23

Trick of the eye PAGE 28

SATURDAY 2/17

BREAK IT DOWN African-American culture in 1920s NewYork City is discerned through the poetry of Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen and Claude McKay, seen through the eyes of painter and muralist Aaron Douglas, and told through the voice of art historian David Driskell in Of Ebony Embers:Vignettes of the Harlem Renaissance. These iconic figures form an ensemble that reprises the role of a Harlem jazz band while playing full-out tributes to Duke Ellington, Jelly Roll Morton, Billy Strayhorn, Thelonius Monk and Charles Mingus. $12-15, 7:30pm.V. Earl Dickinson Building at PVCC, 501 College Dr. 961-5376.

THURSDAY 2/15

PLAYING LIMBO

PUBLICITY PHOTO

SATURDAY 2/17

BLAST FROM THE PAST

SEE FRIDAY STAGE

Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox can be summed up in three words: musical time travel. The group, founded by pianist and arranger Bradlee in 2009, takes listeners on a journey across decades, playing songs from the modern era—everything from the party pop of Miley Cyrus and Lady Gaga to the minimalist rock of Radiohead—and rearranging them, while keeping the familiar lyrics, and adding a vintage twist. Imagine Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass” played on...an upright bass, or Lorde’s “Royals” as a ballad sung by a sad clown. $40-160, 8pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 979-1333.

TUESDAY 2/20

CUTTING SHORTS

PUBLICITY PHOTO

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A variety of techniques, budgets and effects come together at the 19th annual Animations Show of Shows. The festival traverses themes of societal trends and modern anxieties with 16 screenings including The Burden, a quirky stop-motion short about how being trapped in a routine life makes the apocalypse seem liberating, and Everything, “a simulation of reality where you can see the world from everything’s point of view,” narrated by Alan Watts. $9, 7:30pm. Violet Crown Cinema, 200 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 529-3000.

@artscville

PUBLICITY PHOTO

Le Noises in the library

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

Asher McGlothlin perfectly captures the spirit of his childhood in the Appalachian Mountains, as well as the leap from teenager to adulthood, on his January 2018 debut EP Bardo, which takes its name from the Buddhist term describing the halfway place between death and rebirth. Able to be both chaotic and delightful, McGlothlin takes on this beautiful unbalance in the diversity of his six songs, touching on happy and sad, upbeat and downtrodden, accompanied by rich vocals and soulful instrumentation. $7, 6pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. 977-5590.


February 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 20, 2018 c-ville.com

@artscville

facebook.com/cville.weekly 24


ARTS THIS WEEK

music Jim Waive’s Valentine’s Day. Cowboy hatclad troubadour intent on revisiting a time gone by with honky tonk songs from the heart. $5 suggested donation, 5pm. The Space Lab, 705 W. Main St. 228-1120. Matty Metcalfe. Accomplished pianist takes to the keys for a relaxing evening. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Of Good Nature. Indie rock and reggae fivepiece with a unique progressive instrumental sound. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526. Red & The Romantics. Band plays imaginative tunes for Valentine’s Day. Free, 7:30pm. Durty Nelly’s, 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. The Lil Smokies. Traditional bluegrass quintet plays romantic melodies for you and yours. With Gallatin Canyon. $12-14, 6pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. 977-5590.

dance Bachata Fusion. Edwin Roa teaches an introductory bachata lesson before DJ Butchata spins an eclectic Latin mix for a social dance. $5-8, 8pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561.

stage Marie Antoinette. Mary Baldwin University’s production of David Adjmi’s political and social satire. $7-12, 7:30pm. Fletcher Collins Theatre, Deming Fine Arts Center, 301 Deming Dr., Staunton. (540) 887-7189. Top Girls. Caryl Churchill’s groundbreaking theatrical exploration of the challenges women face in defining their own lives, strength and resilience. This is a pay what you can performance, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177.

words

Thursday 2/15 music Asher McGlothlin. Singer-songwriter captures the essence of what it’s like to come of age in the Appalachian Mountains. With Boomer and Moose. $7, 6pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. 977-5590. Irish Songbirds. Kevin Donleavy leads a group of musicians in authentic Irish tunes. Free, 8pm. Tin Whistle Irish Pub, 609 E. Market St. 202-8387.

Skip Haga and Company. A skilled keyboardist and some friends liven up the evening. Free, 7pm. Durty Nelly’s, 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278.

The Michael Elswick Gathering. Epic jazz ensemble with influences ranging from hard bop to New Orleans-style jazz. Free, 7pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Zoso. The ultimate Led Zeppelin experience that authentically captures this golden age of music. With Breakers. $15-17, 7pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall.245-4948.

Marie Antoinette. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $7-12, 7:30pm. Fletcher Collins Theatre, 301 Deming Drive, Deming Fine Arts Center, Staunton. (540) 887-7189.

Top Girls. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $20-25, 7:30pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177.

Third Fridays Improv Workshop. Learn to think fast, improve focus and listening skills and tap into creativity to build on the many possibilities that emerge in theatrical improvisation. Free, 6pm. V. Earl Dickinson Building at PVCC, 501 College Dr. 961-5376.

words Bobby Elliott and Juan Suarez. University of Virginia MFA candidates read from their work. Free, 8pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-2552.

Top Girls. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $20-25, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177. Welcome to the Music Library: An Evening of Short Plays. Students in Doug Grissom’s playwriting class drew inspiration for a class project from the Music Library. Part of the Making Noise series. Free, 6pm. Music Library, Old Cabell Hall. 243-8433.

Friday 2/16 music Barbara Martin. Guitarist, vocalist and songwriter mixes original songs with blues and jazz from the ‘20s and ‘30s. $7-9, 7:30pm. Rockfish Valley Community Center Lounge, 190 Rockfish School Ln., Afton. 361-0100.

words Guion Pratt and Lina M. Ferreira C.-V. Reading. Guion Pratt, a poet, songwriter and composer, and writer Lina M. Ferreira C.-V. read from their work. Part of the Charlottesville Reading Series. Free, 7pm. New Dominion Bookshop, 404 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 295-2552.

Bob Bennetta. Local jazz pianist creates a chill atmosphere. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. BRIMS Traditional Ensemble. Authentic Irish music from local musicians. Free, 8:30pm. Tin Whistle Irish Pub, 609 E. Market St. 202-8387.

etc. Coco. Following his dreams of becoming an accomplished musician, young Miguel finds himself in the stunning and colorful Land of the Dead, where his adventures begin. Free, 7:30pm. V. Earl Dickinson Building at PVCC, 501 College Dr. 961-5376.

Brittney Wagner. Guitarist and singer playing honest music ranging from blues to bluegrass. Suggested donation $5, 7pm. The Space Lab, 705 W. Main St. 228-1120. Crewe d’Bayou. Be prepared to get funky and groove to a fun N’awlins vibe. Free, 5:30pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. 975-0094.

Saturday 2/17 music Charlottesville Symphony: Brahms’ Second. Local musicians play the most overtly optimistic of Brahms’ symphonies. $10-45, 8pm. Old Cabell Hall, UVA. 924-3376. Curtis Prince and Clairvoyants. Get the night started right with some tunes from local acts. Free, 8pm. Durty Nelly’s, 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. David Tewksbury Band. Inspired by art rock, jazz fusion and R&B. With Matthew McAllister Band. $7, 6pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561. Eli Cook. Celebrated local blues guitarist and songwriter plays a set. $10, 8pm. Rapunzel’s Coffee and Books, 924 Front St., Lovingston. 263-6660. Evan Mook. Jazz virtuoso slides onto the piano bench for the evening. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Gallatin Canyon. Virginia-based bluegrass band specializes in its own refreshing brand of bluegrass-roots music. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. 297-2326. Gunners N’ Roses. Six UVA Law students in touch with their inner rock stars perform the music of Guns N’ Roses. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526. Lord Nelson. Rural rock ‘n’ roll from a Virginia five-piece. Free, 6:30pm. The Batesville Market, 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

DJ Frank Rivera. Spinning a mixture of club and EDM music as well as Top 40 hits. 21plus. $5, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526. Groove Fetish. Five-piece band with driving rhythms, seductive melodies and incredible solos. With Galaxy Dynamite and Strange Machines. $7-10, 8pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561. Keller Williams. Singer-songwriter blends elements of bluegrass folk, alt-rock and jazz into a varied and unique sound. $25-28, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 245-4948. Marie Anderson. Singer-songwriter plays a little bit of everything. 21-plus. Free, 7pm. Wild Wolf Brewery, 2461 Rockfish Valley Hwy., Nellysford. 361-0088. Mojo Pie. Original acoustic tunes ranging from folk to blues to rock. Free, 8pm. Durty Nelly’s, 2200 Jefferson Park Ave. 295-1278. Pickin’ and Grinnin’. Instrumental and vocal jam open to the public. Free, 7pm. James River Brewery, 561 Valley St., Scottsville. 286-7837. Pierce Edens. Songwriter blends Appalachian roots with grungy rock ‘n’ roll. 21-plus. Free, 10:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549. Rock and Worship Roadshow. The Roadshow returns with amazing acts including For King & Country, Matthew West, Natalie Grant, Bethel Music and Zach Williams. $10, 7pm. John Paul Jones Arena, 295 Massie Rd. 243-4960. The Hard Modes. Jazz sextet combines original arrangements with the varied sounds of game music. Free, 10pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

dance Contra Dance. Enjoy traditional, easy dances for all ages and experience levels. Free$10, 7:30pm. The Front Porch, 221 E. Water St. 242-7012.

GET LISTED The C-VILLE Weekly arts calendar submission process allows arts community partners to enter events directly into the calendar via computer log-in. Please contact us by e-mail at arts@c-ville.com to request account information. DEADLINE INFO: Events must be entered into the online calendar system by 5pm on Tuesday, one week prior to publication. We list events that are art-related or have entertainment value and are open to the public. We do not guarantee event listings in print and we typically don’t include faith-based, environmental, medical or instructional events that are outside the realm of art.

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The Currys. Acoustic trio with tight vocal harmonies and elements of country, bluegrass, blues and rock in its folk-driven set. Free, 6:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549.

Marie Antoinette. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $7-12, 7:30pm. Fletcher Collins Theatre, Deming Fine Arts Center, 301 Deming Dr., Staunton. (540) 887-7189.

@artscville

Nick and Steve Pollock. Father-son duo plays acoustic tunes, classic and contemporary. Free, 10pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

stage

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

John Edgar Wideman Reading. Award-winning fiction writer currently in residency at UVA reads from his work. Free, 5pm. Auditorium of the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, UVA. 924-3025.

stage

©2018 Jen Sorensen www.jensorensen.com Twitter: @JenSorensen

Wednesday 2/14

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ARTS FEEDBACK CONTINUED FROM PAGE 25

Saturday 2/17 Maria DeHart. Dreamy, acoustic folk. Suggested donation $5, 7pm. The Space Lab, 705 W. Main St. 228-1120. Of Ebony Embers: Vignettes of the Harlem Renaissance. This homage to Harlem jazz includes music by jazz greats Duke Ellington, Jelly Roll Morton, Billy Strayhorn, Thelonius Monk and Charles Mingus. $15, 7:30pm. V. Earl Dickinson Building at PVCC, 501 College Dr. 961-5376. Porch Dogs. Rock, pop, county, Americana —everything but disco. Free, 7pm. Wild Wolf Brewery, 2461 Rockfish Valley Hwy., Nellysford. 361-0088. Ragged Mountain String Band. Traditional old-time music from Appalachia, suitable for dancing or just listening. Free, 7pm. Starr Hill Brewery Tap Room, 5391 Three Notch’d Rd., Crozet. 823-5671.

TOM DALY

Free Idea plays Magnolia House on February 15. The group also records all of its practices and performances and posts many of them to the band’s SoundCloud page.

Mind’s eye

Free Idea trades the rules for psychedelic nirvana By Erin O’Hare arts@c-ville.com

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

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blank canvas. That’s what Marie Landragin sees in her mind’s eye when she’s about to play guitar with Free Idea. Just before the first note rings out, she sees a frame, some material, potential for the space to become anything. When the music starts, she says, it begins painting forms, “and there’s color, and very often, I see it as a landscape” that develops as she and her bandmates build out a patiently meandering psychedelic rock set. Usually that landscape has a lot of water, perhaps a lake, and as Landragin listens and plays, she sees stones tossed into the lake, ripples appearing and expanding across the surface. Sometimes there’s a storm coming. Other times, she sees a cave, with crystals dripping from the ceiling. Every time Free Idea plays, Landragin sees a different landscape, because not one guitar lick, chord progression, bass line or drum fill is composed ahead of time. Everything is spontaneous. It’s the kind of music that Landragin yearned to play after years of playing psychpop-rock songs with Borrowed Beams of Light, and very intricate, highly composed songs with heavy rock/metal band Corsair. She wanted to play music that had no rules...but that was also palatable and interesting. So Landragin asked musicians she knew to be both experienced and adventurous to give the no-rules music thing a go. Guitarist Brian Knox and bassist Will Evans were up for the challenge, as was drummer Greg Sloan. “When you don’t say ‘yes,’ you miss out on a lot,” says Sloan, who wasn’t about

to miss out on this seemingly unusual combination of musicians. Landragin’s a metalhead, while Knox (of Naked Gods) has an electrified Americanafolk bent; Evans is a jazz-bred art rock guy (Voterfrog, Whatever Brains), while Sloan has played in a slew of garage-rock-leaning bands (Big Air, Dwight Howard Johnson, The Ha-RANG!, DEN and currently, Sweet Tooth). “It doesn’t even seem like it should work,” Sloan says. But it does. The result is pretty psychedelic, combining familiar sounds from the whole rock spectrum, plus folk, jazz, blues, electronic and pop, all in a constant state of flux. The sound is free to go where it will—because the music doesn’t adhere to the typical rock song structure. There are no melodies, no choruses, no verses; there’s no song at all. But don’t mistake Free Idea, a band that jams, for a jam band. Bands like Phish and the Grateful Dead compose verses, choruses and bridges that they expand on the fly in anticipated spots. Free Idea is entirely improvised,...but it’s not like jazz where musicians riff on a melody or root structure that they move away from and return to. “That’s the beauty of Free Idea: It’s all new simultaneously,” says Landragin. The music is created in the moment. Ask them to recreate something they played 20 minutes ago, or even 30 seconds ago, and it’s a no-go. “We couldn’t even if we tried,” says Evans. There are a few parameters, though: The band plays straight through whatever set length a venue gives it (17 minutes, 35 minutes), usually with a Knox-created visual abstraction projected on a screen behind the group and timed to the set length. When it ends, it’s time to wrap up and say goodbye.

A lot of cool things happen in this vulnerable artistic space where musicians cast off insecurity and hesitation in service of moving music forward in time and space via the act of listening closely to one another, says Landragin, adding that “if you play with someone long enough, you start to read each other, feel each other.” Guitarists Knox and Landragin sometimes arrive at the same note at the same time, from two seemingly different sonic places. Other times, Knox will play a note that really sticks out, a note Landragin wouldn’t have dared to play. But when Knox plays it, she considers what he’s hearing and why; usually, Landragin will begin to hear Knox’s angle and comes around to it herself, maybe for 30 seconds, maybe for two minutes, before they float off on separate trajectories once again. And, yes, certain things have happened more than once: Sloan has ad-libbed some of the same lyrics in two performances, and Evans has a “Wooly Bully”/”Louie Louie”-esque bass progression he defaults to on the rare occasion when it seems like the band is out of ideas. If you think that Free Idea plays cacophonous weirdo music that’s hard to listen to if you’re not dropping acid or tripping on shrooms, you’re wrong. The music manages to sound composed (and approachable and interesting) without being composed at all—that’s difficult to achieve and it doesn’t work with every combination of musicians, says Landragin. But when it works, it’s sublime, and “kind of addictive in a way,” says Landragin of how Free Idea fills the blank canvases of her mind’s eye. “It’s a really beautiful state to be in.”

Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox. Imagine wandering into a nightclub somewhere on the outskirts of time, a classic jukebox in the corner playing timeless music with oddly familiar modern lyrics, from Miley Cyrus to Radiohead. $40-160, 8pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 979-1333. Serene Green. Rockabilly band nods to Johnny Cash while staying true to its downhome roots. 21-plus. Free, 10:30pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549. Stan Hamrick. Acoustic guitar at its finest. Free, 9pm. Tin Whistle Irish Pub, 609 E. Market St. 202-8387. The Bonnie and Clyde Affair. Costume party featuring music from DJ Chuck 804, Mz Kitti, Kasara & Dea and Eric Jones. 21plus. $15-25, 10pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561. The Legwarmers. Don’t just remember the ‘80s. Relive them with a tribute to the world’s most hedonistic decade. $16-18, 8pm. The Jefferson Theater, 110 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 245-4948.

stage Marie Antoinette. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $7-12, 7:30pm. Fletcher Collins Theatre, Deming Fine Arts Center, 301 Deming Dr., Staunton. (540) 887-7189. Top Girls. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $20-25, 8pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177.

Sunday 2/18 music Bayou Faux Pas. Cajun music to get you moving. Free, noon. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Bob Williamson. Local piano man plays dinner music for your listening pleasure. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279. Charlie Hunter Trio with Silvana Estrada. Melodic leads and swinging rhythms joined with stunning guitar riffs. With Silvana Estrada. $20-23, 8pm. The Southern Café and Music Hall, 103 S. First St. 977-5590. Charlottesville Symphony: Brahms’ Second. See listing for Saturday, February 17. $20-45, 3:30pm. Monticello High School, 1400 Independence Way. 244-3100. Irish Matthew Sing-along. Versatile Downtown Mall denizen plays many instruments for sing-along-ready shanties. Free, 5:30pm. Tin Whistle Irish Pub, 609 E. Market St. 202-8387. John Howard. With guitar or mandolin in hand and the sustain of harmonica, songwriter brings life to lyrics that tend to tell the story of a once drifter. Free, 7pm. Wild Wolf Brewery, 2461 Rockfish Valley Hwy., Nellysford. 361-0088.


ARTS THE WORKS

Michael Clem and Thomas Gunn. Guitarand bass-swapping duo explores Americana through covers and gut-wrenching originals that pull at the heartstrings whilst tickling the funny bone. Free, 2pm. Glass House Winery, 5898 Free Union Rd., Free Union. 975-0094. Morgan Maddox. Local singer-songwriter and master of both the six- and 12-string guitar plays country and Southern rock. Free, 2pm. Wild Wolf Brewery, 2461 Rockfish Valley Hwy., Nellysford. 361-0088. Salsa Sunday. Edwin Roa teaches an introductory salsa lesson before DJ Butchata spins an eclectic Latin mix for a social dance. $5-8, 8pm. The Ante Room, 219 Water St. 284-8561. Tara Mills and Jimmy Stelling. Original mountain Americana. Free, 2:30pm. Albemarle CiderWorks, 2545 Rural Ridge Ln., North Garden. 297-2326. The Sound Machine Band. Playing Motown, modern, funk and jazz. Free, 1pm. The Batesville Market, 6624 Plank Rd., Batesville. 823-2001. Travis Elliott. Local singer and guitarist takes on songwriting subjects from love to spaceships, both badly in need of repair. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526.

stage Marginalia. Matt Boehler’s staged song cycle for three voices, clarinet, cello and percussion as performed by Victory Hall Opera. $30, 8pm. McGregor Room, Alderman Library, UVA. 227-9978. Marie Antoinette. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $7-12, 2pm. Fletcher Collins Theatre, Deming Fine Arts Center, 301 Deming Dr., Staunton. (540) 887-7189. Top Girls. See listing for Wednesday, February 14. $20-25, 2pm. Live Arts, 123 E. Water St. 977-4177.

music ATM Unit featuring Jonah Kane-West. An organ wizard and a bass warrior meet for an epic adventure. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526. Red & The Romantics. A blend of vintage folk and Americana music. Free, 7pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549.

Tuesday 2/20 music Karaoke Night. Bust out your best vocal performance. 21-plus. Free, 10pm. Rapture, 303 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. 293-9526.

Travis Elliott. See listing for Sunday, February 18. Free, 10:30pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

etc. Animation Show of Shows. Sixteen exceptional and inspiring animated shorts from around the world. Part of The Virginia Film Festival’s Virginia Film Festival at Violet Crown series. $9, 7:30pm. Violet Crown Charlottesville, 200 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. (512) 495-9600.

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magine the thousands of hands that have held the spine of a library book, the fingers that have turned the pages. Imagine the moments in history that have intersected with the text through the lives of its readers. Beginning in 2015 and ending in June of 2017, a project called Book Traces @ UVA sought to catalog minutia in 19th- and 20th-century library books that may have been overlooked—notes that readers wrote in the margins, and objects, such as pressed flowers, they left tucked between the leaves. Now, composer Matt Boehler has sifted through their findings and written a song cycle about them called Marginalia, to be performed by Victory Hall Opera. If you’re not familiar with song cycles, Boehler describes them as “a collection of songs that are linked thematically,” and adds, “The concept album is the modern version.” Running about 50 minutes long and scored for three vocalists and three instrumentalists, Marginalia is a dialogue among readers throughout the shelf lives of various books. In one such dialogue, Boehler draws on marginalia documented from two separate books. In Poems and Ballads by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, a reader named Jane Chapman Slaughter wrote to a lost former lover, “Our readings together were in this book.” And in a Dutch translation of Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s Enoch Arden, an inscription by one James R. reminds the recipient, Thomas Randolph Price, they “read it together” in the original English. Boehler was amazed by the parallel. “It’s something that is really beautiful and coincidental,” he says. Kristin Jensen, project manager at the UVA Library, writes in an email, “In a way, Book Traces is a reaction to the mass digitization of print materials, which is one of the most important developments in the library world in recent years. Digital collections are great for sharing and searching texts, but

Composer Matt Boehler combed through the notes from UVA’s Book Traces project to create Marginalia for Victory Hall Opera. The song cycle will be performed in the McGregor Room of Alderman Library on February 18.

ginalia Jensen and co-principal investigator Andrew Stouffer found, Boehler likens to “tiny shards and scraps. It’s like this landscape covered in glass and it’s my job to make a narrative mosaic out of it,” he says. One of the challenges was finding material that could stand on its own, without the context of the book in which it was written. “I wanted things that leapt off the page of their own accord and didn’t “Part of the legacy of the University need something outside to reference them,” he says. of Virginia and its library are the books that make up collections of wealthy white slave- theThe Book Traces project genowners. To not acknowledge that erally date from 1820-1923. at this point in time would be at best They aren’t rare enough to be physically protected coptone-deaf.” MATT BOEHLER ies and aren’t new enough Book Traces is all about taking a deep dive to be part of the general collection. Due to into physical books and bringing out these this designation, many of the books in Book hidden histories of how people in the past Traces happen to overlap with the Civil War. interacted with their reading material.” “Especially where we are now in our hisBook Traces has, in turn, been digitized, tory at this very moment, looking at this and this digital collection gave Boehler, who marginalia is an interesting experience,” does not live in Charlottesville, access to the Boehler says. “You feel almost like you’re in material. “It was a long process of sifting an in-between space, seeing something at through information and deciding what once nostalgic and horrifying. Part of the needed to be said,” he says. Most of the marlegacy of the University of Virginia and its

library are the collections of wealthy white slave-owners. To not acknowledge that at this point in time would be at best tonedeaf,” says Boehler. In line with all VHO performances, the song cycle will be performed in an unconventional space. In this case, the elegant McGregor Room at the Alderman Library provides the perfect backdrop. “It is my hope that people will experience this piece as if voices are coming out of the stacks and out of the books, that it is immersive in that way,” says Boehler. “I hope it gives the audience the feeling of being between the past and the present.” Boehler credits the work of the Book Traces team in documenting and preserving the marginalia that inspired his composition. “The Book Traces project finds that the book is more than just its text,” he says. “It also gains meaning from the hands that held it. And metaphorically that extends to the lives of individuals. Our lives are enriched with meaning through the presence of those around us.” He hopes that this is something the audience will garner from the performance: “to have enough presence to listen and to bear witness.”

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Ragged Mountain String Band. See listing for Saturday, February 17. Free, 7pm. The Whiskey Jar, 227 W. Main St., Downtown Mall. 202-1549.

By Raennah Lorne

@artscville

Bob Huntington. Hear everything from Gordon Lightfoot to The Beatles. Free, 6pm. Fellini’s, 200 Market St. 979-4279.

Victory Hall Opera’s Marginalia reads between the lines

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

Monday 2/19

An open book

T+T FOTOGRAFIE

Jon Spear Band. Some of central Virginia’s finest blues musicians collaborate for a set. Free, 3:30pm. Starr Hill Brewery Tap Room, 5391 Three Notch’d Rd. Crozet. 823-5671.

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ARTS REVIEW

28

BE NJAM IN ROUS, M USIC DIRECTOR

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17 8:00pm | Old Cabell Hall

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 18

3:30pm | Monticello High School (Note: venue change for this date only)

SHIELDS | Ricercar HAYDN | Trumpet Concerto

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

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with Rachel Duncan, Trumpet

BRAHMS | Symphony No. 2 Sponsored by Rachel Duncan’s appearance is underwritten by a gift from the Angus Macaulay Visiting Artist Fund. The 2017-18 season is made possible by a major gift from

artsboxoffice.virginia.edu 434.924.3376

Fax Ayres’ contemporary, playful and sometimes unsettling photography is captured in “Still” at Chroma Projects through February 28. COURTESY OF THE ARTIST

Perfectly ‘Still’ The light and dark interplay of Fax Ayres’ imagery By CM Gorey arts@c-ville.com

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o we continue to have time to admire the still life? In a world where disposable and looping ultra-high resolution video pops from the phones in our pockets, the composed scenes of the genre require more from our attention. The art form that originated with painting centuries ago has been criticized for nearly as long for lacking meaning. That issue doesn’t weigh heavily on the striking and irreal photographs of Fax Ayres in his exhibition “Still” at Chroma Projects. Ayres says that his works aim to suggest “something enigmatic—larger and sometimes darker, than the things themselves.” But whatever connotations the artist intends, they take a back seat to his studied creation process and his methodical craftsmanship. Taking the works at face value, it’s difficult to discern if they are paintings, photos or a mixed media that lands somewhere in between. That’s their charm. Ayres states that it’s his intention to “merge the aesthetics of photography and painting,” and by that measure he succeeds greatly. Light and dark interplay with the pooled and smeared profundity of oil paint, while uneven surfaces of tree bark and stone are rendered in what could be hyperrealistic brushwork or the result of a smartly angled lens. His still lifes are the result of moving from a rather straightforward and even illumination of his subjects to a darkened studio where he reshoots portions of the same scene in separate and experimental captures. Reassembling the pictures in Photoshop, he creates an altogether novel view. “When I’m doing these individual component shots, it often feels like I am applying the light to the object the way you might apply paint to a canvas,” Ayres says.

No one can question the painterly quality of the works. They look like rich photographs that originate from a more luxurious place than the latest photo filtering app. But here comes that age-old consideration: What does it all mean? The still lifes are culled from Ayres’ children’s rooms, his wife’s stuff and his own found objects. Amidst rudimentary machines and stone slabs, gourds and action figures stand in forced interaction on the stages of Ayres’ interior universe. Flirting with surrealist touchstones like clock faces and eggs found in Salvador Dalí’s most famous pieces, the photos tinker with weight and hints of narrative. “Gourd #1” floats miraculously above a scale, while the plants of “Gourd #2” are engaged in a desirous or antagonistic choreography. The next installment appears more decorative, like a minimalist Thanksgiving display in a house high on upcycled wood. “The Parlous Egg” and “The Egg Laboratory” reveal a dry comic sensibility, while other photos draw on the interplay of familiar figures like Marge Simpson, Batman, and Winnie the Pooh embroiled in contentious or hazardous situations from a child’s playtime. The exterior night photographs “Birch Grove, Onteora” and “Old Pool Gate, Onteora” make use of the painterly composite technique to spectacular results; freed from the studio trappings and any expectation of narrative, the quiet of nature presents a sublime and unsettling beauty that is truly still. Perhaps the trompe l’oeil in Ayers’ work is not that his images trick the viewer into thinking that the objects are actually occupying space within the confines of the print, but that the subjects could have been real when he snapped the picture, despite the wealth of evidence to the contrary.


Continuous loop

events

ARTS PREVIEW

with guest artist Rachel Duncan Saturday, February 17, 8pm, Old Cabell Hall Sunday, February 18, 3:30pm, Monticello High School

Sasha Leitman - Artist Talk*

part of TechnoSonics XVIII and the Making Noise Series Thursday, February 22, 5pm, UVA Music Library

Laetita Sonami Colloquium CCT*

Friday, February 23, 3:30pm, 107 Old Cabell Hall

Technosonics XVIII: DIY*

Friday, February 23, 8pm, Old Cabell Hall Saturday, February 24, 5pm, The Southern

Wesley Diener, Voice*

Keller Williams keeps stacking up the sets arts@c-ville.com

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UVA Chamber Music Series - Albemarle Ensemble Sunday, March 18, 3:30pm, Old Cabell Hall

Josephine Miller, Voice*

Distinguished Major Recital Saturday, March 24, 3:30pm, Old Cabell Hall

Telemetry at the Bridge*

featuring Anne La Berge, Matthew Burtner, Catherine Monnes Saturday, March 24, 8pm, The Bridge PAI

Charlottesville Symphony - Masterworks 4

Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini Saturday, March 24, 8pm, Old Cabell Hall Sunday, March 25, 3:30pm, MLK Performing Arts Center

UNIVERSITY of VIRGINIA facebook.com/uvamusic | twitter.com/uvamusic

* denotes free events

music

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C. TAYLOR CROTHERS

Saturday, March 17, 8pm, Old Cabell Hall

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Keller Williams performs solo at the Jefferson on Friday.

New Chicago Brass: Recital for UVA Brass Fest 2018*

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

here are certain musicians whose style is so unique that any snippet of their music is immediately identifiable. Multi-instrumentalist Keller Williams is one of those artists. A staple on the jam scene and the festival circuit for nearly 25 years, Williams has created a singular sound, which he dubs “acoustic dance music.” Although he wields an acoustic guitar, Williams packs a punch, laying down a beat and building layer after layer with a looping pedal, vocals and a setup that’s included everything from a bass guitar on a stand to a drum machine. His DIY ethic is bound together by one guiding principle: have fun. “I take having fun very seriously and if I can’t enjoy myself, I can’t really expect myself to entertain anybody, so I think it starts with me having fun,” says Williams. Lighthearted and playful, he’s music’s Peter Pan, accenting his songs with whistling in the same way that Pan wields the flute. But amidst all the whimsy, Williams’ backbone is his masterful playing. He’s taken part in countless collaborations with the likes of Larry and Jenny Keel, The Travelin’

McCourys, The String Cheese Incident and a co-headlining tour with fingerpicking master Leo Kottke. Williams described his first show with Kottke as a test run, which took place at the Paramount Theater in Charlottesville in 2016. From there, they embarked on a 25date run. “The first couple of weekends, he had his own car and we had our own car, but then the last several weekends we were actually in the van together,” says Williams. “Just being around him is surreal in the sense that he’s one of my idols.” Around that time, Williams began to resuscitate an old project that he had started in 2011 but never finished—an album without looping. “Out of all the records I have, there’s nothing that’s just one guitar, one microphone. ...I wanted to have something that was representative of what I was doing on that Leo Kottke tour,” says Williams. The album—titled RAW—came out in January 2017 and includes a track titled “Thanks, Leo,” dedicated to Kottke. But Williams didn’t stop there. He released an additional album with a full band on the same day. Titled SYNC, it’s another offering with his KWahtro lineup. “I would record my guitar and vocal track to a clip track...and then I would send that to Rodney Holmes, the drummer,” explains Williams. “And then he would send it off to Danton [Boller] the bass player... and Danton would lay his duty upon it and we’d figure out a time for Gibb Droll [guitar] to come to the studio with us to put on his part.” Although the group recorded piecemeal, the result “kind of sounded like four guys playing in the same room at the same time and it sounded like it was in sync, so hence the name,” says Williams. When Williams brings his solo act to the Jefferson Theater on Friday, he says the audience can expect a mixture of RAW material and looping. Looking ahead, he’ll return this summer to play FloydFest with a new Hillbenders project: PettyGrass—a bluegrass tribute to Tom Petty whose songs Williams calls “powerful, yet so simple and so easy to connect with and sing along to.” But Williams is not done yet. He promises another milestone is on the horizon: his first instrumental record. And he won’t take all the credit for his abundant output. It’s the fans, he says, that keep this machine turning. “I have the projects because I’m allowed to have them,” Williams says. “It’s because people are coming to see them and ask for them back that they remain. And if they didn’t, those projects wouldn’t be around.”

Distinguished Major Recital Saturday, February 24, 3:30pm, Old Cabell Hall

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Charlottesville Symphony - Masterworks 3


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Flailing around Fifty Shades Freed pales as softcore porn

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UNIVERSAL PICTURES

Happy returns

Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan return as the newly married Greys in the less kinky, more frivolous Fifty Shades Freed.

By Kristofer Jenson arts@c-ville.com

other a Lifetime movie, picked up the jumbled pages and proceeded with production without sorting. Fifty Shades of Grey was adapted only because the book sold preposterously well, and then the sequels were made because everyone signed paperwork saying they would be. There isn’t an ounce of life or believable human interaction to be found, a necessary component for good screen ro-

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mance. Taylor-Johnson did a miraculous job making as much of the first installment as good as it was, though her more intelligent and playful tone supposedly led to conflicts with author E.L. James. Now we have James Foley slumming it, putting things in the movie because they were in the book whether they make any sense, his Glengarry Glen Ross days a distant memory. This Valentine’s Day, see or do absolutely anything else. Go for a drive and read street signs aloud. Sit motionless in a dark room. Read nutritional facts to your partner. You’ll have a more romantic time than at Fifty Shades Freed.

February 14 – 20, 2018 c-ville.com

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his whole thing started as porn, right? Like, I’m not making that up, am I? I don’t say that to ridicule anyone’s idea of what’s sexy—you do you and have fun doing it, don’t apologize if no one’s getting hurt—it’s just puzzling to sit through a silly, directionless adoption/kidnapping intrigue with a vague notion that this is the hottest, kinkiest thing to ever reach mainstream audiences. At some point, this series went from Anastasia Steele’s (Dakota Johnson) exploration of the forbidden side of romance with a mysterious, handsome billionaire as her guide to a half-baked TV-grade family drama/ thriller that frontloads the sex scenes and flails around for the remainder. Let’s put aside that Christian Grey (Jamie Dornan) is less of a master of kinky sex and more of an emotionally distant control freak who describes his turn-ons so dryly with such gratuitous jargon that it sounds like he’s trying to recite a Wikipedia entry from memory. Who wanted this? Who likes this? There is nothing notable about this story or these characters outside of their sex lives, which have turned into an afterthought. There wasn’t much to the sex when

it was there, at least not since the first half of the first movie, when director Sam Taylor-Johnson and star Johnson seemed to enjoy squeezing whatever quality and fun they could from the source material. Not Dornan, though. Everything about him and his performance has been wrong since the beginning, from his apparent confusion about the character’s relationship to sex to the strange way he moves his mouth to conceal his accent. Maybe he can be good, but while Johnson turned the empty vessel of Steele from the books into a curious adventure seeker who knows this is silly but does it anyway, Dornan does the opposite by finding ways to make Grey even emptier. What is this whole thing about, anyway, other than two and a half movies too long? Fifty Shades Freed begins where Darker, the previous installment, left off. Ana and Christian have gotten married, but Ana’s old boss who assaulted her is after them. Ana gets pregnant, someone gets kidnapped but then it’s okay in the end. Who exactly is being freed and from what remains unclear, unless the title refers to the literal freeing of the kidnapping victim, which would be weird since that’s only about 10 minutes out of the whole movie. It’s like someone dropped two scripts at the same time, one an erotic adventure and the

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LIVING

Q&A: In honor of

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Valentine’s Day, finish the phrase: Life is like a box of chocolates, __________. PAGE 46

ALL YOU CAN EAT

No place like home Escafé has served as a gathering spot for many different groups By Erin O’Hare living@c-ville.com

Escafé’s Water Street location has been a popular nightlife spot for everyone from the LGBTQ community to bachelorette parties.

license for what had become known as a gay bar was a challenge in the 1990s, particularly because then-governor George Allen was a vocal opponent of gay rights (a Washington Post article from 2015 says that Allen’s views have since evolved). Eastern Standard was all about “the philosophy of the people involved. It wasn’t a scene thing, it was just how we felt; we parlayed ourselves into good service and other people embraced it,” Concannon says. Zellmer, who moved to Charlottesville from Rochester, New York, in the mid-1980s, says he and Sibbald went to dinner often at the gay-friendly Eastern Standard, where they met other regulars who quickly became

friends. Remembering those Friday nights brings a smile to Zellmer’s face. “It was something we looked forward to every week,” he says. It seems to Zellmer that the necessity for a gay bar in Charlottesville has faded over time, as prejudice against LGBTQ folks “has lessened.” But it’s still an important spot for people in that community, he says. Sonja Weber Gilkey, an artist and white tantric kundalini yoga counselor who met Zellmer and Sibbald at the restaurant “at least 15 years ago,” says Escafé has long been a place where a “very bohemian” crowd gathered to discuss everything from politics CONTINUED ON PAGE 36

LIVING TO DO NONPROFIT

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Family Art Jams

Piedmont Landscape Association seminar

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Thursday, February 15

Saturday, February 17

The Piedmont Landscape Association’s annual seminar brings together gardening enthusiasts and landscape professionals to discuss topics such as pests, urban ecosystems and more. $50-75, 8am-5pm. The Paramount Theater, 215 E. Main St., Downtown Mall. theparamount.net

J. Robin Albertsson-Wren leads an evening of stress reduction and shares information on managing stress for you and your family. $10 suggested donation, 10:30am-noon. Charlottesville T’ai Chi Center, 206 Water St. E. RSVP to (877) 880-2479.

EZE AMOS

Saturday, February 17 The Fralin Museum of Art at UVA leads children on age-appropriate tours and hosts hands-on art activities, this session centered on “marvelous monotypes.” Parents and adult family members are encouraged to serve as assistants. Free, 10am-noon (ages 5-12) and 1-3pm (ages 8-12). The Fralin, 155 Rugby Rd. 243-2050.

Saturday, February 17, and Sunday, February 18 Get ready to pig out at this porktastic event full of food, live music, face painting and more. $10-20, noon-8pm. The BBQ Exchange, 102 Martinsburg Ave., Gordonsville. bbqex.com

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bator from Taliaferro Junction will be built in its place. The Eastern Standard/Escafé story begins on the Downtown Mall, at 227 W. Main St., where The Whiskey Jar is today. Concannon and Smith took over Eastern Standard in June 1992, and after renovations, reopened it in December 1992. The restaurant had the reputation of switching from bistro to gay bar at 10pm, Concannon says, and it suited his and Smith’s vision for the place—they wanted to welcome all people. Talking by phone from Maine, Concannon says that although they opened Eastern Standard to everyone, not everyone was open to Eastern Standard. Getting a liquor

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MELODY ROBBINS

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n the evening of Friday, February 5, artist Bob Anderson stands in the middle of Escafé, identifying the many people in the Escafé Opera murals that his wife, Dominique, painted for the restaurant in 1997 and added to in 2015. There’s the Andersons’ daughter, Adriana, a former server at the restaurant, and the Andersons’ two sons. Also included are artist and socialite Beatrix Ost, pianist Bob Bennetta, photographer Brian Schornberg, the forearm of Doug Smith, or maybe Sean Concannon, the restaurant owners who’d commissioned the paintings but were hesitant to be represented themselves. Playing the lute in one scene is a man named Ned, whose granddaughter had come into the restaurant a few years after his death wanting to see her grandfather immortalized in paint. Warm, dim light bounces off the restaurant’s orange walls, and Bob turns around and gestures to a man behind him. “Do you recognize him?” he asks, pointing to Stuart “Stu” Zellmer, who’s sitting near the back of the restaurant, sipping a drink with friends. Zellmer is in the mural panel over the kitchen, painted next to his partner of 36 years, Gary Sibbald, who died from emphysema a few years ago, Anderson explains. People push tables together to talk closely about their memories of Escafé and its predecessor, Eastern Standard. Spirits are high, but there’s a trace of melancholy in the air. Escafé, a longtime hub of Charlottesville’s LGBTQ community and a popular nightlife spot, will close its doors after service on Saturday, February 17. The building, along with the Main Street Arena that houses the ice rink and The Ante Room music venue, will be demolished later this year; an office building/tech incu-


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Southern kitchen Restaurant honors its historic roots By Sam Padgett and Erin O’Hare eatdrink@c-ville.com

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he weathered farm bell stationed outside the restaurant is a bellwether for what you’ll find inside: farm-to-table Southern cuisine. Ryan Hubbard, co-owner of Red Food Hub Co. and the Dinsmore Boutique Inn, has combined his love of preserving the past with his passion for new Southern cuisine into Farm Bell Kitchen. The restaurant is located in the brick building (constructed by Thomas Jefferson’s master carpenter, James Dinsmore) across from UVA Children’s Hospital on West Main Street. According to Hubbard, the very same bricks that were used in the Rotunda form the walls of Farm Bell Kitchen (Dinsmore also helped build several buildings at UVA and James Madison’s Montpelier). Beyond maintaining its historical legacy, Farm Bell Kitchen is dedicated to serving Southern cuisine with ingredients from local producers. The name came to Hubbard from the farm bell now outside the restaurant that he found in a Southwest Virginia salvage yard. “It’s emblematic of our new Southern cuisine and our farm-to-table approach,” he says. Farm Bell Kitchen will be open for lunch and breakfast daily, and periodically serve supper (note: not dinner), and brunch on the weekends. If you find yourself in the area, remember for whom the bell tolls: it tolls for those who are hungry.

roasted coffees, the organic Limu Dabsessa ($24 for 12 ounces of beans). The beans, which are roasted in the Charlottesville area, come from Yidnekachew Dabessa’s eponymous coffee plantation in the Oromia region of Ethiopia, where Dabessa, an experienced coffee farmer and entrepreneur, has expanded his small coffee farm into a large-scale operation over the course of a decade. According to the Good Food Award’s website, “to qualify for entry, roasters and coffee farmers must emphasize fairness and transparency from seed to cup. Acknowledging the difficulties of verifying farm-level sustainability efforts across continents, the Good Food Foundation again turns to thirdparty certification bodies for assistance in identifying beans eligible for consideration.” Mudhouse is one of 15 roasteries to receive an award in the coffee category. Last year, Mudhouse was named Micro Roaster of the Year in Roast magazine’s 14th annual Roaster of the Year competition, and possible additional accolades are on the horizon: After making it through the qualifying round earlier this month, Mudhouse will compete in the Specialty Coffee Association U.S. Coffee Championship in Seattle later this year.


LIVING ALL YOU CAN EAT

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EZE AMOS

Todd Howard, who has owned Escafé since 2008, is proud that the bar/restaurant has served as a safe space for a variety of people, including the LGBTQ community, the under-21 crowd and the clergy during the Unite the Right rally.

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to moonstones to tarot cards. “I’ve loved it. And I’m really sad that it’s over. On Friday, you could really look forward to being there,” she says. Concannon and Smith left Charlottesville for Portland, Oregon (where they owned a spot called West Café for 11 years), in 2005 and sold the Eastern Standard space to Mark Brown and Todd Howard. Howard took over as sole owner of Escafé (i.e., Eastern Standard Café) in October 2008, intending to keep the inclusive environment, but on a slightly different tangent. One of Howard’s more controversial choices was to open the place to the under-21 crowd, with the intention to “mother hen” them and ensure they had a safe place to discover themselves, Howard says. Escafé moved from the Downtown Mall to 215 Water St. in January 2012, and the demographic has changed a bit over time. Visit on a weekend and you’d be hardpressed not to find a bachelorette party or a group of sorority girls on the dance floor. Howard is particularly proud of how the place has served not just the LGBTQ community, but the Charlottesville nonprofit community and, most recently, the clergy, who used Escafé as a safe space during the Unite the Right white supremacist rally on August 12. “It’s not just a rainbow flag in front,” says Charles Casavant, a longtime patron and investor who first visited Escafé in the 1990s after reading about it in the Damron (a gay- and lesbian-friendly travel resource) when he moved to town. He once asked Howard: “Are you running a business or a mission?” Howard replied, “both.” Howard invited songwriter Brady Earnhart to host Uncovered, a monthly songwriters showcase and open mic, at Escafé starting in 2015. Earnhart says that Howard “has always looked for ways to bring top-notch Charlottesville music and audiences together,” and when the series relocates to Tin Whistle Irish Pub come April, it won’t be the same. “The obvious thing Escafé added to Charlottesville was an openly gay bar, though that liberality spread to include a

range of people who felt more at home there than anywhere else,” Earnhart says. “It was striking to sit on the patio on a Friday night and hear one group of people speaking Arabic, another Spanish, another talking about what it was like to come out of the closet, another about politics, another just about who’s wearing what…it was a broadly and effortlessly diverse crowd. “I can’t imagine downtown without Escafé,” he says. “Unfortunately, I won’t have to for long.” Nobody in the room on this Friday night can give a single favorite memory of Escafé; ask them for one, and three or four stories tumble out. Schornberg, the young photographer in the Escafé Opera 2015 mural, has many fond memories, from visiting the bar with four of his five sisters (the youngest isn’t yet 21 and will miss out on what’s become a Schornberg sibling 21st birthday tradition) to buying rounds of drinks for friends, having “some of the strangest nights of [his] life” and running, along with his fiancée, from their Belmont home to Escafé on New Year’s Eve because it’s where Schornberg “has always been” at the stroke of midnight on a new year. “This place is so much more than a bar,” says Schornberg. “It’s friendship. I’m just one of hundreds of people” that Escafé has been a home for, he says. Casavant agrees. “Home is the best word [for the place],” he says, his voice catching before he adds, “I will miss it a great deal.” Howard says when he first heard of the impending demolition, he hoped to move Escafé to a new location, root it, then pass it on to someone who could nurture it for another 10 years. But he couldn’t find the right spot; he believes it’s “the universe’s way of telling me to move on.” As the evening winds down, Casavant, sitting at a two-top table, twists the stem of his martini glass between his thumb and forefinger. “There’s something about a bar that’s awfully close to an altar,” he says. “It may be blessed or not, but it still has that feeling of, ‘I met you here, and I appreciate that. You blessed my life because you were here, if only for a moment.’”


LIVING SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

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ACROSS 1. Deutsche Bank rival 5. Italian apology 10. Vivaldi’s “____ Dominus” 14. “Here comes trouble!” 15. Babe and Baby 16. “I get it” cries 17. A 1950-’60s titular sitcom character seen on a present-day TV screen? 19. Equal 20. Do a shepherd’s task 21. Late, as a library book 23. Typewriter feature 27. Daly of “Cagney & Lacey” 28. When many celebs tweet baby pictures of themselves, for short 31. Asian capital’s ladies’ man? 34. “Whose woods these ____ think ...”: Frost 36. “To Kill a Mockingbird” author 37. Fortify with vitamins, e.g. 38. Retiring group? 40. Leading 41. One nodding his head 42. Midpoint: Abbr. 43. NBA star Anthony, to fans 44. Pretty obvious direction on a bottle of Prell? 47. From ____ Z 48. “____ she blows!” 49. Watched a season of “Stranger Things” in one sitting, say 51. Look through blinds, say

53. Prove suitable for 57. “The Neverending Story” author Michael 58. Evidenced by its name, what a national toy retailer offers customers a chance to do ... or what you do in 17-, 31and 44-Across 62. Run smoothly 63. Spanish 101 verb 64. Nevada’s so-called “Biggest Little City in the World” 65. Restful resorts 66. Harvests 67. LPGA part: Abbr.

DOWN 1. Confused responses 2. ____ Tzu (toy dog) 3. Portend 4. Have an affair 5. Above capacity, for short 6. Slangy response to “Why?” 7. Big name in chips and pretzels 8. UPS label phrase 9. On the briny 10. Hurtful email, e.g. 11. “That’s news to me!” 12. The U.S. Army bought 1,000 of his revolvers during the MexicanAmerican War 13. “That makes sense” 18. ____ party 22. Children’s writer R. L. ____ 24. “10” music 25. Distort

26. CBS logo 28. ____ bar 29. “Don’t look so glum!” 30. Pyramids with four equal sides 32. He’s second to Jeter among the New York Yankees’ all-time hit leaders 33. Granny’s “Darn it!” 35. Source of some cubes 39. Not an original 40. ____ impasse 42. Home of the Cubs, for short 45. Slow to catch on 46. Country’s McEntire 50. Winger of “Urban Cowboy” 51. Fires (up) 52. Lyft competitor 54. Bank charges 55. McEwan and McKellen 56. Jeff Bridges sci-fi classic 59. “Give ____ whirl!” 60. Pass on a track 61. OBs, e.g.

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Pets don’t keep normal hours. Neither should your vet.

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LIVING FREE WILL ASTROLOGY LIVING FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

By Rob Brezsny

Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20): Now that you have finally paid off one of your debts to the past, you can start window-shopping for the future’s best offers. The coming days will be a transition time as you vacate the power spot you’ve outgrown and ramble out to reconnoiter potential new power spots. So bid your crisp farewells to waning traditions, lost causes, ghostly temptations and the dead weight of people’s expectations. Then start preparing a vigorous first impression to present to promising allies out there in the frontier.

Aries (March 21-April 19): At 12,388 feet, Mount Fuji is Japan’s highest peak. If you’re in good shape, you can reach the top in seven hours. The return trip can be done in half the time—if you’re cautious. The loose rocks on the steep trail are more likely to knock you off your feet on the way down than on the way up. I suspect this is an apt metaphor for you in the coming weeks, Aries. Your necessary descent may be deceptively challenging. So make haste slowly! Your power animals are the rabbit and the snail.

Taurus (April 20-May 20): In 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright made a few short jaunts through the air in a flying machine they called the Wright Flyer. It was a germinal step in a process that ultimately led to your ability to travel 600mph while sitting in a chair 30,000 feet above the earth. Less than 66 years after the Wright Brothers’ breakthrough, American astronauts landed a space capsule on the moon. They had with them a patch of fabric from the left wing of the Flyer. I expect that during the coming weeks you will be climaxing a long-running process that deserves a comparable ritual. Revisit the early stages of the work that enabled you to be where you are now.

Gemini

Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The posh magazine Tatler came up with a list of fashionable new names for parents who want to ensure their babies get a swanky start in life. Since you Aquarians are in a phase when you can generate good fortune by rebranding yourself or remaking your image, I figure you might be interested in using one of these monikers as a nickname or alias. At the very least, hearing them could whet your imagination to come up with your own ideas. Here are Tatler’s chic avant-garde names for girls: Czar-Czar, Debonaire, Estonia, Figgy, Gethsemane, Power and Queenie. Here are some boys’ names: Barclay, Euripides, Gustav, Innsbruck, Ra, Uxorious, Wigbert and Zebedee. crux of the issue is this: How shall we define the nature of a planet? But for the people of New Mexico, the question has been resolved. State legislators there formally voted to regard Pluto as a planet. They didn’t accept the demotion. I encourage you to be inspired by their example, Gemini. Whenever there are good arguments from opposing sides about important matters, trust your gut feelings. Stand up for your preferred version of the story.

Cancer (June 21-July 22): Ray Bradbury’s dystopian bestseller Fahrenheit 451 was among the most successful of the 27 novels he wrote. It won numerous awards and has been adapted into films, plays and graphic novels. Bradbury wrote the original version of the story in nine days, using a typewriter he rented for 20 cents per hour. When his publisher urged him to double the manuscript’s length, he spent another nine days doing so. According to my reading of the planetary configurations, you Cancerians now have a similar potential to be surprisingly efficient and economical as you work on an interesting creation or breakthrough—especially if you mix a lot of play and delight into your labors.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22): Poet Louise Glück has characterized herself as “afflicted with longing yet incapable of forming durable attachments.” If there is anything in you that even partially fits that description, I have good news: In the coming weeks, you’re likely to feel blessed by longing rather than afflicted by it. The foreseeable future will also be prime time for you to increase your motivation and capacity to form durable attachments. Take full advantage of this fertile grace period!

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 2004, a man named Jerry Lynn tied a battery-operated alarm clock to a string and dangled it down a vent in his house. He was hoping that when the alarm sounded, he would get a sense of the best place to drill a hole in his wall to run a wire for his TV. But the knot he’d made wasn’t perfect, and the clock slipped off and plunged into an inaccessible spot behind the wall. Then, every night for 13 years, the alarm rang for a minute. The battery was unusually strong! A few months ago, Lynn decided to end the mild but constant irritation. Calling on the help of duct specialists, he retrieved the persistent clock. With this story as your inspiration, and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you Virgos to finally put an end to your equivalent of the maddening alarm clock.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Was Napoléon Bonaparte an oppressor or liberator? The answer is both. His work in the world hurt a lot of people and helped a lot of people. One of his more magnanimous escapades transpired in June 1798, when he and his naval forces invaded the island of Malta. During his six-day stay, he released political prisoners, abolished slavery, granted religious freedom to Jews, opened 15 schools, established the right to free speech and shut down the Inquisition. What do his heroics have to do with you? I don’t want to exaggerate, but I expect that you, too, now have the power to unleash a blizzard of benevolence in your sphere. Do it in your own style, of course, not Napoléon’s.

for now, Scorpio. You have pursued a gradual, steady approach to ripening, and soon it will pay off in the form of big bright blooms. Congratulations on having the faith to keep plugging away in the dark! I applaud your determination to be dogged and persistent about following your intuition even though few people have appreciated what you were doing.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The growth you can and should foster in the coming weeks will be stimulated by quirky and unexpected prods. To get you started, here are a few such prods. 1. What’s your hidden or dormant talent, and what could you do to awaken and mobilize it? 2. What’s something you’re afraid of but might be able to turn into a resource? 3. If you were a different gender for a week, what would you do and what would your life be like? 4. Visualize a dream you’d like to have while you’re asleep tonight. 5. If you could transform anything about yourself, what would it be? 6. Imagine you’ve won a free vacation to anywhere you want. Where would you go?

Capricorn

Scorpio

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You may think you have uncovered the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth. But according to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’re just a bit more than halfway there. In order to get the rest of the goods, you’ll have to ignore your itch to be done with the search. You’ll have to be unattached to being right and smart and authoritative. So please cultivate patience. Be expansive and magnanimous as you dig deeper. For best results, align yourself with poet Richard Siken’s definition: “The truth is complicated. It’s two-toned, multi-vocal, bittersweet.”

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Trees that are slow to grow bear the best fruit,” said French playwright Molière. I’m going to make that your motto

Expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes: Real Astrology.com, 1-877-873-4888.

The Salvation Army Family Store Discount Days Thursday thru Monday: Select clothing items 4/$1.00

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(May 21-June 20): In 2006, 5 percent of the world’s astronomers gathered at an international conference and voted to demote Pluto from a planet to a “dwarf planet.” Much of the world agreed to honor their declaration. Since then, though, there has arisen a campaign by equally authoritative astronomers to restore Pluto to full planet status. The

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EMPLOYMENT GENERAL Maintenance Mechanic 2018 has arrived bringing with it many new opportunities! As we start our 55th year, Team CBS (Complete Building Services) is looking for a few good people in the Charlottesville area to become a part of our growing operation.Complete Building Services, a building operations and facilities maintenance company, is in search of a Maintenance Mechanic with a minimum of 1-2 yearsí experience. CBS is a division of The Donohoe Companies, Inc. - Washington’s oldest real estate company.The Maintenance Mechanic†will perform operations, repairs and maintenance of HVAC, electrical, and plumbing to†equipment within†the facility, while acquiring the skills and knowledge and completing the training required to obtain licenses. The hours for this position are 2:30 PM to 11:00 PM - must be able to work weekends.Qualifications:Universal CFC preferredBasic building operations knowledgeMust be able to work all shiftsMust be available to be on call 24/7Prior hotel experience a plusMust have reliable transportationAble to lift sixty (60) poundsCap-

able of ascending ladders up to a height of thirty (30) feetMust possess interactive personal skillsTo apply call: 202-333-4977

HELP WANTED Experienced Ecological Designers and Landscapers Wanted The Natural Garden, a local habit-restoration, native plant nursery, and ecological landscaping company, is hiring for a variety of positions from experienced landscape architect to field crew members. We offer competitive pay rates, a family-like company culture, and opportunities for career advancement. For more information visit our website at www.thenaturalgarden. net/job-openings.html. PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www. AdvancedMailing.net (AAN CAN)

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casino games: Blackjack, Craps, Roulette, Texas Hold `em. (434) 8253283 Info@Casino2U.biz Denied Credit?? Work to Repair Your Credit Report With The Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-6209426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN) Dish Network-Satellite Television Services. Now Over 190 channels for ONLY $49.99/mo! HBO-FREE for one year, FREE Installation, FREE Streaming, FREE HD. Add Internet for $14.95 a month. 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN) Home Improvements Gravel Driveway Repair Private, commercial,

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Charlottesville Parks and Recreation Compensation for a completed egg donation cycle is $4,500.

Anonymous Egg Donors Needed The Reproductive Medicine & Surgery Center of Virginia is looking for young women interested in helping couples who are unable to conceive using their own eggs. To be an anonymous egg donor, we need applicants who are:

February 14-20, 2018, c-ville.com

• Between 21 years - 31 years old • In good general health • Within normal weight range • Non-smoker For more information and an application, please con-tact Stephanie Barrix, R.N., IVF/Egg Donor Coordinator @ stephanie.barrix@rmscva.com or call 434.654.8537.Also, visit our website www.rmscva.com

Accepting applications for seasonal and temporary positions Featured Parks and Recreation Opportunities: Aquatics Coach I Aquatic Instructors Camp Leader Camp Leader - Adaptive Recreation Camp Leader - Inclusion Program Camp Leader (Robin and Mani’s All Buddy Camp) Instructor I - Adaptive Camp Director Instructor I - Adaptive Inclusion Coordinator Instructor II Lifeguard Rec. Leader - Camp Assistant Director Rec. Specialist - Camp Director Seasonal Maintenance Worker II - Parks Closing dates and additional openings are listed on our website. To view current job openings and to apply, please visit

www.Charlottesville.org/Jobs HR Office: 434-970-3490

Equal Opportunity Employer

Reasonable accommodations will be made for persons with disabilities. The City conducts preemployment drug testing for all positions. Final applicants required to register with Selective Service must show proof of registration. You will be asked to provide personal identity and eligibility for work in the U.S. in accordance with the Immigration Reform and Control Act.


CLASSIFIEDS RICHMOND'S TURNTABLE EXPERTS SINCE 1978 WE ARE LOOKING FOR VINTAGE

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Member Services Coordinator WNRN Charlottesville is looking for a full-time Member Services Coordinator for its growing network of stations. This position reports to the Membership Director with duties that encompass all areas of membership at WNRN including planning and execution of on-air fund drives and all aspects of member support before, during and after each drive. A bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience is required, an understanding of Salesforce, Constant Contact and their use is also required. Interested applicants should submit a cover letter and resume to jobs@wnrn.org. Deadline for materials is February 21st.

Producer of Digital and Audio content WNRN is looking for a full-time Producer of Digital and Audio content for its growing network of stations. This position contributes content through production of original audio for the award-winning public service feature Hear Together. The position is also the primary contributor and organizer of the station’s digital content and platforms. A bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience is required, an understanding of Wordpress, Adobe Audition and digital audio remote systems is also required. Interested applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, writing sample and produced audio piece to jobs@wnrn.org. Deadline for materials is February 21st. Visit www.wnrn.org for more information about WNRN.

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TRADING AS MARU 412 E. Main St., Charlottesville, VA 22902-5236 The above establishment is applying to the VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE CONTROL (ABC) for a Wine and Beer On Premises and Mixed Beverage license to sell or manufacture alcoholic beverages. Kay Choi, Managing Member Note: Objections of the issuance of this license must be submitted To ABC no later than 30 days from the publishing date of the first Two required newspaper legal notices. Objections should be registered at www.abc.virginia.gov or 800-552- 3200.

regionten

innovative services for mental health, developmental disabilities and substance use disorders

a better life, a better community Region Ten Community Services Board Case Manager / Louisa Full Time

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Visit our jobs section at www.regionten.org

or contact Susan Good at 434-972-1898 for details. EOE

direct support services.

This position requires a Bachelor’s degree in the field of communications, This is non-profit a full-time, salaried, and/or exemptbusiness; level position requires considermarketing, management at least which two years of leadership experience of in developmental non-profit marketing or public relations, development, able knowledge disability service delivery systems. Also donor relations and/or fundraising using diversified fund development, required are strong oral/written skills, the ability to exercise leadership and as well as documented success in securing gifts fromeffectively donors, foundations supervise the work of others, to interact and to establish and andmaintain government sources. This is a full-time, exempt position to A Bachelor’s favorable relations with our clients and reporting the public. the degree ExecutiveinDirector. Compensation to be negotiated, a human services related field and commensurate two years of with directly related qualifications and experience.

experience is required.

To learn more about our agency and mission please visit us at http:// To learn more about our agency and mission please visit us at thearcofthepiedmont.org/. Qualified candidates are encouraged to submit https://arcpva.org/ Qualified arePark encouraged to submit a a cover letter and resume to The Arc of thecandidates Piedmont 509 Street cover letterVA. and resume to: Themay Arcalso of the Piedmont 509 Park Street CharCharlottesville, 22902. Materials be faxed to 434-977-7864. VA. 22902. Materials may also be e-mailed to evanderloo@ Thelottesville, Arc is a EEO/D/V employer.

arcpva.org or faxed to 434-977-7864. The Arc is a EEO/D/V employer.

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Join an organized and thoughtful team of mental health professional providing support services to individuals recovering from serious mental illness. Looking for someone who believes in recovery from mental illness, who is professional, dependable, flexible, patient and dedicated. Be part of a team assisting individuals with apartment and community living skills. The CSA III provider offers instruction in daily living skills provides assistance obtaining community resources, monitoring of psychiatric and behavioral status and crafts individual service plans. Bachelor’s degree in human services field and one years’ related work experience required. Must meet Qualified Mental Health Professional criteria. Hours are Sun – Thur afternoon/ evenings. $36,396.70 annually.

(Charlottesville Adult Activity Center)

Are you passionate about applying your skills to ensure the greatest quality Arepossible you passionate about applying your skills to ensure of life for your fellow community members in need? If so Thethe Arcgreatest quality of life possible for your fellow community members in need? If so The is hiring for a Director of Development & Community Relations. This person Arc is hiring for a Dayimplementing Support Program Manager. This position oversees is responsible for designing, and leading a comprehensive the operation ofrelations, our Charlottesville Adult Activity Center, which serves and mission-based public fundraising and membership campaign. Responsibilities includewith identifying, cultivating and stewardingResponsibilities contributory supports adults developmental disabilities. include relationships with individuals, foundations, corporations and government facilitating and implementing day-to-day services, community integration sources. Will also work closely with, and provide leadership thepeople we support. initiatives, activities and individualized programs forto,the Development Community Committee to secure funding, conductconsistent Provides and supervision toRelations Direct Support Professionals to ensure major gift campaigns, public awareness of The Arc, andperson-centered implement maintenance andfurther implementation of each person’s Indispecial projects. Serves as primary media contact for the organization and vidualized Service Plan. Also responsible for staff and budgetary oversight, works strategically to devise and implement proactive media outreach efforts team meetings, medical administration and licensure compliance. Will also and marketing strategies to increase awareness of the agency. Responsibilities provide on-call assistance to assure appropriate handling of emergency also include oversight of our web site as well as the leveraging of social situations and will also be required to assist team, as-needed, in providing media.

February 14-20, 2018, c-ville.com

This position provides case management services to individuals of all ages with opportunity to work primarily with consumers with intellectual disability and help them achieve full potential. The incumbent will provide assessment of service needs, coordination of services among providers, development of service plans, as well as monitoring of needs and advocacy, consultation and education for consumers, families and the community. Valid VA driver’s license and good DMV driving record required. Applicants must possess Bachelor’s degree in a human services field. Must meet Qualified Mental Health Professional criteria. Work schedule is 40 hours weekly. Benefits, including mileage reimbursement, provided. $40,036.37 annually.

DAY SUPPORT PROGRAM MANAGER Director of Development & Community Relations


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CLASSIFIEDS

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE 8.01-316

Albemarle County

General District Court Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re

D.B. a male child (d.o.b. July 18, 2007)

The Object of this suit is to: approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residual parental rights of Johnnie L. Bottenfield in the child born to him and Jennifer A. Fitzgerald on July 18, 2007, in Charlottesville, Virginia. It is ORDERED that the defendant Johnnie L. Bottenfield appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interest on or before March 27, 2018 at 9:00 a.m. 1/9/18

David M. Barredo

DATE

JUDGE

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

c-ville.com

Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE 8.01-316

Albemarle County

facebook.com/cville.weekly February 14-20, 2018, c-ville.com

Commonwealth of Virginia VA. CODE 8.01-316

General District Court Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re

ORDER OF PUBLICATION

H.B. a male child (d.o.b. February 6, 2009)

The Object of this suit is to: approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residual parental rights of Johnnie L. Bottenfield in the child born to him and Jennifer A. Fitzgerald on February 6, 2009, in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Albemarle County

General District Court Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court

Commonwealth of Virginia, in re

T.B. a male child (d.o.b. May 3, 2004)

The Object of this suit is to: approve the foster care plan of Albemarle County Department of Social Services with the goal of adoption and the petition to terminate the residual parental rights of Johnnie L. Bottenfield in the child born to him and Jennifer A. Fitzgerald on May 3, 2004, in Charlottesville, Virginia.

It is ORDERED that the defendant Johnnie L. Bottenfield appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interest on or before March 27, 2018 at 9:00 a.m.

It is ORDERED that the defendant Johnnie L. Bottenfield appear at the above-named Court and protect his or her interest on or before March 27, 2018 at 9:00 a.m.

1/9/18

1/9/18

DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE

DATE

David M. Barredo JUDGE


CLASSIFIEDS

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Q&A Finish the phrase: Life is like a box of chocolates, _______.

You can never get enough. PETE SANTEN

Life is like a box of chocolates, someone will eventually take it from you...piece by piece.

Sometimes you get brown gooey stuff on your hands.

The one you pick may have unintended consequences.

@RTRJNH/TWITTER

@TONYTOWNSEND/TWITTER

MARVIS FERRELL/EMAIL

Full of surprises. Enjoy! LINDA GILMER/FACEBOOK

Sometimes you get Jason Kessler, sometimes Sara Tansey—the difference is just a matter of taste.

@WORTHYSTYLE/TWITTER

@EKKNAPPENBERGER/TWITTER

It’s ALWAYS worth it to splurge on the good stuff! KATHRYN COLLIER/EMAIL

It gets better with all the new things you try. SOPHIE KIERNAN

JEREMY KIERNAN

...because it’s YOUR box, take a nibble out of each piece.

Don’t just stick your thumb in different ideas, savor them all and you might learn something new.

CAROLYN VOLDRICH/FACEBOOK

DEBBIE CASH/EMAIL

@SMALLTOWNRAMBLR/TWITTER

...you never know what you’re going to get.

Some of it’s sweet but some is full of nuts. AMY ARCHIE/FACEBOOK

Next week’s question: What’s something you’ve learned from a teen recently? (See your answers in next week’s Youth Issue!) Send your answers to question@c-ville.com, or respond via Twitter @cvillenews_desk (#cvillequestion), Instagram @cvilleweekly or on our Facebook page facebook.com/cville.weekly. The best responses will run in next week’s paper. Have a question of your own you’d like to ask? Let us know.

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