Design Meets You Magazine by Cushing Terrell • 2023

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INAUGURAL ISSUE

Music in Motion FL ATHEAD VAL LEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

WAC H H O L Z CO LLE GE C E N TE R

D E C E M BER 2 0 2 3



IN TH I S I SS UE 01

Letter from the CEO

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Behind the Design

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Sustainability Spotlight

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Feature Story

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Cultural Icon

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On the Boards

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Social Action

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Design Excellence

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Values Spotlight

Celebrating our 85th anniversary with an inaugural company magazine, a nod to history, and a commitment to a bright future.

Peek into the work of preservationists and dive into project examples that showcase what’s possible when re-envisioning historic buildings.

Sustainability Director Ashleigh Powell describes the major milestones we saw in 2023 and why they matter.

Flathead Valley Community College’s Wachholz College Center seamlessly blends two distinct programs in harmonious balance.

Discover how Uwajimaya’s Seattle flagship store redesign honors its cultural history while embracing the future of the community.

Look to the future and get excited for the projects we’ll see realized in the years ahead.

Photos from our team “in the wild” — engaging in volunteer activities, industry events, site visits, and team bonding.

Design Director David Koel speaks to the value of continuous learning and continuous improvement in our quest for the best design solutions.

Have fun.


Founders Ralph Cushing and Everett Terrell


DESIGN MEETS YOU

LET T E R

FROM THE

CEO

2023 marked 85 years since our firm was founded. Eighty-five years of integrated, collaborative design practice with multiple generations of team members working to cultivate trusted relationships with clients and realize successful projects in our communities and beyond. I’ve been with Cushing Terrell for nearly 30 years now. This means I’ve seen many of those projects and relationships take shape, and I’ve experienced our firm evolve to meet just about every unique need and circumstance. We’ve targeted growth in new urban locations, deepened our expertise in key areas, established new market and service sectors, refined our design process and how we work, and seen an everincreasing focus on how our projects contribute to the natural environment, the greater built environment, and the user experience therein. In honor of history and evolution, the inaugural issue of Design Meets You, our company magazine, is primarily dedicated to showcasing historic preservation and adaptive reuse projects. We look at the great potential of buildings that already exist and how we can modernize them to serve contemporary purposes. Old buildings, like old firms, come with great stories, and it’s a pleasure to know there will be many more stories to come.

Greg Matthews President and CEO Cushing Terrell 1


HI STORIC PR E S E RVATIO N Improving Buildings and Beyond

The work of preservationists and the tools they employ help history stay relevant while contributing to a more sustainable built environment through adaptive reuse. A familiar example of historic preservation is fixing up an old building and putting it back into use. But the work of preservationists goes far beyond this. Preservationists play a key role in uncovering forgotten stories, repurposing buildings through adaptive reuse, revitalizing neighborhoods, and celebrating local communities.

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“The historical context of a place can and should play a significant role in shaping a building’s identity and character,” said Ava Alltmont, an architect and preservationist with Cushing Terrell. “As designers and preservationists, we consider and integrate this context into our projects. We aspire to not only contribute to the preservation of cultural heritage but also create spaces that resonate with a sense of continuity and connection to the past.”


BEHIND THE DESIGN

Cushing Terrell’s Historic Preservation team understands old buildings, their materiality, and how to design new buildings that are sympathetic to historic contexts. They combine a love of history with specialized knowledge and an understanding of preservation tools. They apply their expertise to support historic building projects, planning efforts, and new buildings that feel at home with history.

feasibility analysis,” said Mia Kaplan, an architectural historian and architect. “These conversations are important in our field because we care about doing good work that lasts, just as our clients do.”

Much more than a one-time fix to a dilapidated building, historic preservation services offer long-term solutions to address compliance, context, compatibility, and use.

Sometimes the words “historic preservation” are associated with strict guidelines and deep pockets. And while that can be the case in some instances, most of today’s work in preservation is much more responsive to contemporary values with adaptations that give a place new life and a lens of practicality when it comes to balancing design goals with a client’s needs.

“There are conversations to be had about how to build or adapt a building in a way that minimizes negative environmental and sociocultural impacts and avoids short-lived development through lack of an adequate

Historic preservationists not only work to protect and safeguard the physical remnants of the past, but also work to enrich the present and shape the future by fostering a sense of identity and continuity.

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BEHIND THE DESIGN

“Historic buildings that are thoughtfully preserved and maintained contribute to the overall character and identity of a community and tie that community to it’s past,” Alltmont said. “By maintaining and enhancing historic structures for contemporary use, we also see the added benefits of thriving business and social sectors, which tend to yield higher property values for building owners.” One of the tools Cushing Terrell uses to help support their clients’ preservation endeavors is coordination of National Register of Historic Places nominations. Nominations can be for broad patterns of history, specific people, an architectural style, or information important in prehistory or history. If a client wants to initiate the listing process, the team will explore their goals and why they want the building listed. Sometimes it’s about being eligible for historic preservation tax credits, but sometimes it’s about recognizing something significant. To improve the

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chances of a listing, “we may encourage someone to submit under a different category than the one they initially envisioned,” Kaplan explained. Once the team has identified the best set of criteria to get a building listed, they complete a thorough process to document, research, write, map, coordinate, and present the information for review. Listing approval or denial ultimately is decided by the National Park Service.

Architecture is so personal, but we all own it, even if we don’t do so directly. It lives in our memories and in our consciousness,” Kaplan said. “What we do as preservationists is help provide the lens.


BEHIND THE DESIGN

Historic Preservation Tax Credits

The Value of a Team Approach

State historic preservation tax credits, which vary by state, can be a means to make a historic preservation project more economically feasible, especially when combined with the 20% federal historic tax credit. A building owner can leverage both federal and state credits, along with other incentives such as preservation façade easements and grants to make a project financially viable.

As building owners and communities decide what to do with historic sites — and exactly what qualifies as a historic site — the discussion can be illuminated with a historic preservation team in the mix.

Tax credits are a great tool, but the flip side is, to take advantage of a tax credit program, you have to foot the bill up front. Thus, an additional tactic is to partner with an organization interested in the preservation of the building or structure who might purchase the tax credits outright or share in the cost. Programs like these help owners take care of their historic buildings and keep them relevant.

“As designers and preservationists, we seek to thoughtfully enhance the value of a place whether it’s by advising a building owner on how to reuse a historic structure through feasibility studies or elevating a property’s value with a national register nomination,” Alltmont said. “The end goal is always the same — to increase the quality of life and contribute to the cultural richness of a community.”

Pictured in the article: Historic Canyon Lodge | Yellowstone National Park, WY Carroll College Chapel | Helena, MT Masonic Temple | Bozeman, MT

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BEHIND THE DESIGN

ALBERTA BAIR THEATER D E S T I N AT I O N DOWNTOWN BILLINGS


BEHIND THE DESIGN

After almost a century of existence, Alberta Bair Theater now has the bones, backstage, and cultural presence to last at least a century longer. The $13.6 million renovation of the Alberta Bair Theater in Billings, Montana, is the culmination of a decadelong effort to breathe new life into the venerable old theater. Originally opened in 1931 as the Fox Theatre, the venue was a regional destination for film and stage performances. It was designed by Robert C. Reamer and financed in part by the 20th Century Fox Corporation, which purchased the land from Charles M. Bair.

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The last Art Deco-style theater in the United States built by 20th Century Fox, the design displayed elegance with crystal chandeliers, period design elements, luxurious dressing rooms, and decorative stage detail. Much of this historical detail was lost in the mid-80’s fly-loft expansion and facility remodel to bring larger theatrical and music performances to this remote part of the country. What little Art Deco detail was left has been carefully preserved and showcased within the new design.


BEHIND THE DESIGN

Making an Entry Following a feasibility study to establish priorities, the renovation and expansion project focused on the visitor experience (including accessibility) and buildingperformance improvements. Beginning at the entry, the project team reworked the street frontage by bumping out the building envelope to capture an area of the sidewalk for an expanded lobby and ticketing area and to provide improved vertical circulation and ADA access.

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BEHIND THE DESIGN

Behind the Scenes The two-story, 4,800 sq. ft. addition is wrapped with a glass curtain-wall system making a visual connection to the activity within the theater. A metal fabric scrim covers portions of the glass to reduce energy loads and is pulled up at the corner to playfully animate the exterior aesthetic. The addition also supports a more efficient ticketing and lobby experience, while guest comfort improvements include a remodeled theatrical house with updated acoustics, new seats, updated balconylevel seating, and additional restroom capacity.

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Less visible but equally important back-of-house improvements include upgrades to the building’s structural, mechanical, electrical, roofing, and plumbing systems. The team also modernized performance spaces such as stage rigging, catwalks, lighting, and audiovisual capabilities. “The technical rigging aspect of this project was very involved and detailed,” said Dane Jorgensen, structural engineering lead for the project. “We tripled the capacity of the existing stage rigging to support bigger, more involved productions.”


BEHIND THE DESIGN

The 26,800 sq. ft., 1,390-seat Alberta Bair Theater remains the only performing arts center in the Northern Rockies (between Spokane, Washington, and Denver, Colorado) that is fully equipped to present shows by major professional touring companies and artists.

As an extension of its mission, Alberta Bair Theater provides ongoing educational programming for 22,000 school children annually. With the renovation, the theater is now restored to prominence as a preeminent performance space providing an important resource for Billings and the greater Intermountain Region.

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BEHIND THE DESIGN

LUCK OPRY HOUSE AND SALOON

D E S T I N AT I O N TEXAS HILL COUNTRY


BEHIND THE DESIGN

Located on Willie Nelson’s 500-acre Luck Ranch in Spicewood, Texas, the pop-up town of Luck was built in the mid-1980s as a set for the film adaptation of Willie’s iconic 1975 album “Red Headed Stranger.” The original script for the movie called for burning down the set, but because Willie loved the makeshift Old West town so much, the script was revised, and Luck was saved. Over the years, Willie has transformed the former movie set into an event venue where family, friends, and fellow musicians come together to share music and comradery.

In 2019 — ahead of the annual music festival Luck Reunion — Cushing Terrell conducted a feasibility study to look at opportunities and operational needs for the town with the first phase focused on the Opry House and Saloon. The Opry House features a small stage and dance floor, saloon-style bar, and back-of-house support spaces.

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BEHIND THE DESIGN

Cushing Terrell, with structural engineering firm Hollingsworth Pack and general contractor Bill Ball, carried out the work to preserve and renovate the Opry House and Saloon. The goal was to stabilize the building and adapt it to meet current building standards and contemporary use without losing its Old West look and feel.

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keep the same look and feel while optimizing the venue for its new purpose. A 642 sq. ft. addition, bringing the total square footage to 1,982, was paired with structural upgrades, egress improvements, and general repairs to the building. The exterior was largely left as it was, except for repairs to the siding and roof.

Initial plans for a larger renovation project, including demolishing the Opry House except for its front façade, were scaled back to focus on the essence of the 1,340 sq. ft. building.

One of the biggest challenges was meeting the aggressive construction schedule to ensure the renovation work would be completed in time for the Luck Reunion, which brings nearly 4,000 guests to experience more than 35 bands.

Even though the structure is not historic by definition, the design team approached it with the same level of care as they would for a preservation project. The idea was to work with what was already there — wood-clad walls, wood floors, and exposed wood trusses — and

With five stages, including one inside the Opry House, people come to the Luck Reunion for a singular music festival steeped in a feeling of community and with a mission to “provide a space for craftmanship, preservation, and discovery.”


BEHIND THE DESIGN

Looking at the Opry House building from the outside, it’s hard to tell that we did anything at all and that was the point. With the care taken to achieve Willie’s vision and apply a subtle design touch, the hope is to keep the wonderment alive for future musicians, audiences, friends, and family. Alexander Bingham Project Architect | Cushing Terrell

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INVESTING in the F UTURE


SUSTAINABILITY SPOTLIGHT

Our Role as Agents of Transformation I grew up in a family of architects — people driven by a deep love for design and its power to improve lives. When this is your mindset, work is never just work — it’s an opportunity to use your imagination, creativity, and problem-solving skills to make a positive difference in the world. With today’s urgency for climate action, the AEC industry must be at the forefront of efforts to accelerate the decarbonization of buildings, strengthen the resilience of our built environment, and advance holistic, regenerative solutions. At the Visionary 200 conference, I heard repeatedly from business leaders that we’re in an era of transformation with companies around the world committing at unprecedented rates to ambitious sustainability goals that address the environmental and social impacts of their businesses. In 2023, we took two big steps to align our practice with these imperatives. In January, Cushing Terrell joined the SME Climate Commitment, a group of 4,200 smalland medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) who’ve committed to cut GHG emissions in half before 2030, achieve net-zero emissions before 2050, and disclose progress on a yearly basis. In December, we announced a new service sector focused on sustainability. This move enables a more rapid, comprehensive response to client needs, as well as greater cohesion and focus on sustainability across our 30 disciplines, seven market sectors, and 13 offices. Understanding our role and responsibility in this transformative moment, our multidisciplinary team stands ready to help clients find the best solutions to meet decarbonization, ESG, health, wellness, and social equity goals — so they can make their own positive difference in the world. Ashleigh Powell Director of Sustainability Cushing Terrell 17


Romney has been an incredible sustainability success in that we were able to reuse a 100-year-old building, transforming an iconic and historical structure into a premier teaching facility to serve students for decades to come. John How Associate Vice President | University Services | MSU


MO N TA N A STAT E UN IV E R S ITY ’S Romney Hall


SUSTAINABILITY SPOTLIGHT

The renovation of Romney Hall on the Montana State University campus modernized the historic building, originally constructed in 1922, while preserving its Italian Renaissance-style character and helping meet the needs of a growing student population. The project transformed the former physical education building into much-needed instructional space, adding 17 classrooms and centers for mathematics, writing, veterans, and students with disabilities.

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The team implemented modifications to bring the building up to code, improve energy efficiency, add restrooms, reinforce the building against seismic events, and provide accessibility at all levels. The goal of providing 1,000-plus classroom seats was achieved through various classroom types ranging from 24-seat instructional rooms to a 300-person “classroom in the round,” which showcases the former gym floor.


SUSTAINABILITY SPOTLIGHT

The Story Behind Romney Hall’s SolarWall® Addition A new stair/elevator core addition incorporating SolarWall® technology replaced the existing stair tower on the south side of the building to make all floors of the building accessible. The enclosure is primarily comprised of aluminum curtain wall, which provides transparency to reveal the historic brick wall, while the elevator shaft is clad in dark-colored perforated metal panel, which captures solar-heated air. This heated air is incorporated into the building HVAC system, helping to reduce energy consumption and heating costs.

Another fun fact: Romney Hall benefits from a high-efficiency geothermal energy system. The system will serve other nearby buildings as part of MSU’s campuswide energy master plan being developed by Cushing Terrell’s Energy Services team. In alignment with MSU’s sustainability commitments and the state of Montana’s High-Performance Building Standards, modernizing Romney Hall included pursuit of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) green building certification. Romney Hall was awarded LEED Gold in 2022.

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I think it strikes a wonderful balance of modesty with a scale that complements its surroundings, but still carries an impressive wow-factor, especially after you walk through the doors and realize the magnitude of the space. Shawn Pauly Architect | Cushing Terrell


FEATURE STORY

Music in Motion

FLATHEAD VALLEY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

WACHHOLZ COLLEGE CENTER


FEATURE STORY

The Paul D. Wachholz College Center brings world-class performance space to northern Montana, showcasing the region’s love of the cultural arts and creating a destination place. The Wachholz College Center is a 67,000 sq. ft. facility that combines two distinct venues into one stunning building on the Flathead Valley Community College campus. The goal was to meld two programs that are usually separate — performing arts and athletics — into one grand facility. The project theme: music in motion. Designed by Cushing Terrell, with consultants Schuler Shook and Threshold Acoustics, and built by Swank Enterprises, the College Center features McClaren Hall, a 1,000-plus-seat performing arts center with

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state-of-the-art acoustics and the flexibility to accommodate concerts, lectures, dance performances, and musical theater productions. Additionally, the facility houses the Stinson Family Event Center, a dual-court gymnasium with breathtaking northeastern views, a fitness center, and a flexible health and wellness space for yoga, Pilates, and other classes. A reception hall and art gallery connect McClaren Hall and the Stinson Family Event Center, while an outdoor amphitheater rounds out the performance and gathering spaces.


FEATURE STORY

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FEATURE STORY

Creative Acoustic Solutions The project’s design challenges — or opportunities for creativity and invention — involved delivering superior acoustic performance as well as acoustic separation for the two different programs while connecting them in a natural, harmonious manner. Leveraging the idea of music in motion, the design team worked to ensure all elements of the facility responded to and aligned with this theme — everything from exterior elements that represent musical scales and piano keys to the smallest interior details, such as balcony railings and wood accents that mirror music vibrations and convey a sense of repetition and rhythm. 26

The two primary spaces (performance hall and gymnasium) are made of massive pre-stressed concrete panels. The concrete panels not only provide for highquality acoustics, but also a solid structure with durable finishes. Additionally, the project boasts large ductwork to create low-volume air for better acoustics. To solve for the issue of sound separation between the programs, the team utilized an acoustic isolation joint with isolation pads that support the balcony-level bridges between the two venues. These engineering features act to split the building in half and separate the spaces acoustically.


FEATURE STORY

To describe the acoustic solution we implemented, I give the example of two tin cans connected with a string,” said Shawn Pauly, architect and design lead for the project. “The performance hall is one can, and the gymnasium is the other can. The isolation joint and pads effectively cut the string, severing the connection between the two spaces so that sound cannot travel across. Leveraging the Topography of the Site The site itself is another interesting element of the project story. The facility is built into a steep hill and is adjacent to an existing parking lot on campus. The ability to utilize the parking lot (performances tend to be in the evening, while classes are during the day) was a significant benefit of the location while building into the hillside kept the front entrance of the facility at a scale that fits in with the rest of the buildings on campus. The wow factor happens when you walk in through the front entrance, experience the interior volume, and descend into the lower-level theater. The site also provided the opportunity to utilize the topography for an outdoor amphitheater at the back of the building, which looks out toward a wooded area and a pond.

“Our FVCC client wanted to bring something truly spectacular and unique to the Kalispell community, and we think they definitely succeeded. Our project team is incredibly thankful for the opportunity to work with them and with our incredible project partners,” Pauly said. “Since opening in November of 2022, the Wachholz College Center has been a game changer in terms of being able to bring world-class talent and a variety of concert tours to the Flathead Valley,” said Matt Laughlin, college center director. “We’ve heard time and time again from patrons that the overall experience of attending a performance at the Wachholz College Center rivals that of most ‘big city’ performing arts centers, and many patrons comment they cannot believe they are still in Kalispell once they step inside the exquisitely designed venue.”

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UWA JIMAYA ASIAN MARKET D E S T I N AT I O N C H I N AT O W N I N T E R N AT I O N A L D I S T R I C T S E AT T L E


CULTURAL ICON

Uwajimaya’s flagship store has been a beacon in Seattle’s Chinatown-International District for 75 years. As the owners sought to reimagine the store through a redesign, their goal was to honor the neighborhood’s history and help secure its future. Grocery stores provide an essential service for millions of people. But beyond the fundamental purpose of helping us put food on the table, grocers often have an outsized impact on their surrounding neighborhoods. They serve as gathering places, sources of culinary inspiration, and reflections of cultural and social environments. They offer a give and take of influences that represent the pulse of our communities.

Seattle’s Chinatown-International District (CID) has been the cultural nexus for the city’s Asian American community for more than 100 years. The area has given rise to countless businesses that have served as purveyors to and cultural touchstones for generations. Situated just south of Seattle’s downtown core, the CID is also a favorite spot for tourists and locals of all backgrounds to experience the delicacies of other cultures.


Design to Invite Exploration and Maintain Loyalty One stalwart of the Seattle community is Asian grocer Uwajimaya whose first store opened in nearby Tacoma in the 1920s and later relocated to Seattle. As the owners sought to reimagine the store through a redesign, they were determined to place equal value on honoring the neighborhood’s history and securing its future. Uwajimaya planned a future that redoubled its commitment to the neighborhood.

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Working with owners and store leadership teams, Cushing Terrell and Hoshide Wanzer Architects provided brand integration and store planning services to revitalize the historic Seattle store. Store leadership engaged in cultural outreach with a brand anthropologist to truly understand what the community was looking for before embarking on the renovation. Results were discussed among leadership and design partners, with the goal of harmoniously combining what might seem like disparate goals.


CULTURAL ICON

Key areas addressed through the design included: 1.

Invite explorers to try new items. A primary goal was to reach a broader audience, thus the new layout had to be easy to navigate for new customers hoping to discover Asian cuisine and products. Design solutions included organization of the store, signage, wayfinding, and areas for inspiration. Sight lines were opened and access to grab-and-go selections was improved.

2. Maintain loyal shoppers. Repeat customers who embraced the look and feel of the original store were foundational to the business, so the owners needed to apply thoughtful, impactful changes without departing from Uwajimaya’s unique character. Design solutions involved conveying value, maintaining variety, and organizing the store to make shopping efficient. 3. Celebrate core, fresh offerings. Uwajimaya is known for unique items such as Japanese baked goods, Hawaiian musubi, Japanese sake, and sashimi. Design solutions centered around highlighting Asian-inspired raw ingredients in produce, meat, and seafood with enhanced experiential retail spaces including a Bussanten space — like a fair or market — to showcase goods, a new sashimi-cutting station, BBQ duck-cutting station, and food demonstration stations. 4. Maintain and enhance store security and deter theft. Security and loss prevention were improved by redirecting traffic flow and circulation, as well as refined sightlines throughout the store.

As grocers respond to changing consumer preferences, new technology and socio-economic factors, the ones best positioned to thrive are those that can be a bridge from past to future, honoring cultural foundations and creatively introducing them to a new generation.

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Opening in 2025, the Montana Heritage Center in Helena will be a world-class destination, gathering place, and space to tell the stories of Montana and the state’s people.


ON THE BOARDS

Looking Forward

What’s to come...


ON THE BOARDS

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Top: Opening in the spring of 2024, the Little Africa

Bottom: Currently in conceptual design, the ImagineIF

Plaza in Saint Paul, Minnesota, will turn a vacant

Library in Bigfork, Montana, will involve a full interior

building into an entrepreneurial center with a grocery

and exterior renovation of an existing 6,000 sq. ft.

store, retail spaces, and a museum.

church hall.


ON THE BOARDS

Above: Planned for completion in 2026, the new YMCA in downtown Boise, Idaho, will be the cornerstone of an urban revitalization project comprising 2.5 city blocks.

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#teamcushingterrell

ENGAGING with our COMMUNITIES


SOCIAL ACTION

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SOCIAL ACTION

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SOCIAL ACTION

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SOCIAL ACTION

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SOCIAL ACTION

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F E AT U R E


DESIGN EXCELLENCE

CONSTAN T CURIOSITY What Drives Our Design Solutions In the design world, there’s no such thing as perfection, because there’s no end to our capacity to learn and to improve upon what’s been done before. And this can be freeing, but also daunting. We’re always on a quest for the best design solutions, knowing we must also work within the parameters of site, budget, geography, client preferences, timeframe, and more. While we strive for design excellence and work to build the creative network across our firm, we also give team members space to get creative without consequences; space to be okay with not being perfect but to learn with each new go round. We embrace experimentation, play, and what we call “constant curiosity.” This curiosity, and encouragement to ask questions, helps us gain a deeper understanding of our colleagues, clients, competitors, partners, and neighbors so our designs become more human-centered, nuanced, contextual, and responsive. As designers, we must be resilient, able to take a deep breath, step back, see the bigger picture, and never give up. When you have ideas and they get changed or squashed, there’s usually a silver lining; and that’s what we discover on just about every project. Along the design journey, you rarely achieve everything you initially imagined — instead, something even better comes along through the magic of the process. Success begins with the ability to let go of fear and believe — in your team, your process, and yourself. David Koel Director of Design Cushing Terrell

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VALU ES S POT L I GH T

HAVE FUN We take our work, but not ourselves, seriously.

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DESIGN MEETS YOU

CO N T R I BU TO R S Design Meets You | Content and Design Marni Moore | Andy Meyer | Rebecca Miraglia | Travis Estvold | Amanda Herzberg | Katie Karaze

Project Teams HISTORIC PRESERVATI O N Architect/Preservationist | Ava Alltmont Architectural Historian | Mia Kaplan A LB ERTA B AIR THEATER Cushing Terrell Project Principal | Joel Anderson Project Architects | Kevin Nelson, Mallory Johnson Project Manager | Bob LaPerle Architectural | Corey Stremcha, Logan Hendricks BIM/CADD | Ralph Habeck, Trent Schwartzkopf Commissioning | John Tobol Electrical | Michael Gieser Envelope | Brady Gauer Interior Design | Madeline Randolfi Mechanical | Raelynn Meissner, Mark Schaff, Kevin Schriver Structural | Dane Jorgenson Project Partners Acoustics | Threshold Acoustics Civil | Sanderson Stewart Contractor | Langlas & Associates Geotechnical | SK Geotechnical Theater Planning/AV/Lighting Design | Schuler Shook Photography | James Ray Spahn, Zakara Photography LU CK OPRY HOUSE & SA LO O N Cushing Terrell Project Principal | Wayne Freeman Project Manager | Bill Wood Project Coordinator | Joe Maloney Architectural | Alex Bingham, Brad Thigpen Interior Design | Tiffany Wikstrand Project Partners Contractor | Bill Ball Structural | Hollingsworth Pack Photography | Casey Dunn

M O NTA N A STAT E U N I V E R S I T Y, R O M NE Y H ALL Cushing Terrell Project Principal | Jim Beal Project Architect | Kevin Nelson Project Managers | Bob Franzen, Melinda Talarico Architectural | Trae Schwenneker, Diego Zapata BIM/CADD | Daniel Rister, Trent Schwartzkopf, Debbie Schueler, Sawyer Arneson Civil | Kris Desper Energy Modeling | Tim Johnson Envelope | Brady Gauer Electrical | Alan Bronec, Jeffrey Fain Fire Protection | Dan Kopp Historic Preservation | Lesley Gilmore, Chelsea Holling Interior Design | Jeff Morrison Landscape Architecture | Wes Baumgartner, Deb Rosa Lighting Design | Michael Gieser Mechanical | Rick DeMarinis, Ronald McLean, Garett Mitchell, Ammon Palmer, Alex Russell, Ryan Schwartz Structural | Kevin Feldman, Dane Jorgensen, Kenneth Penney Sustainable Design/LEED Certification | Ashleigh Powell Project Partners Acoustical Engineer | Big Sky Acoustics Contractor | Swank Enterprises Geothermal Engineer | Major Geothermal Theater Planning/AV | TEECOM Photographer | Karl Neumann

F LAT H E AD VALLE Y CO MMU NIT Y CO LLE G E , PAU L D. WAC H H O L Z CO LLE G E C E N T E R Cushing Terrell Project Principal | David Koel Project Architect | Shawn Pauly Project Manager | Fran Quiram Architectural | Keith Jacobson Electrical | Carl Maehl Fire Protection | Dan Kopp, Steven Bingham Interior Design | Jessica Murray Landscape Architecture | Wes Baumgartner Mechanical | Gerry Nichols-Pagel, Michael DiStefano Plumbing | Ron McClean, Nathan Ratz Structural | Zach Diede, Connery Wiggins Project Partners Acoustics/AV | Threshold Acoustics Civil | Robert Peccia and Associates (RPA) Contractor | Swank Enterprises Geotechnical | Alpine Geotechnical Theater Planning/Lighting Design | Schuler Shook Photography | Heidi Long/Longviews Studios U WAJ I MAYA AS I AN MAR K E T Cushing Terrell Project Principal | Kara Eberle-Lott Architectural Lead | Alice Wang Architectural | Rei Schultz, Brad Fry Electrical | David Sodini, Neil Schupp Mechanical | Mike Amestoy, Don Koberg Plumbing | Jerry Pimley, Mike Amestoy Project Partners Architectural | Hoshide Wanzer Contractor | Abbott Construction Interior Design | Hoshide Wanzer Refrigeration Design | RUI Refrigeration Unlimited, Inc. Signage Design | Bruce Hale Design Structural | Swenson Say Fagét Photography | Kevin Scott

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P U B L I C AT I O N


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