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CHAMBER GETS GOOD WORD FROM MAYOR / P6

PARENTS HEAR DANGERS OF ‘SEXTING’ / P7

FIRST FRIDAY FOCUS ON FALL, HALLOWEEN / P12

TUESDAY September 29, 2009 FREE

Path to ‘Idol’ and beyond starts here for NHS sophomore / P2

Photo by Zach Dunkin

Fifteen-year-old Brooke Roe hoping to make a name for herself in Noblesville and Indiana in a plan to reach country music success.


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Country Contender

Path to ‘Idol’ and beyond starts here for NHS sophomore Although next summer’s tryout sites have By Zach Dunkin yet to be announced, Brooke will be at one Current in Noblesville or two of them attempting to stand out Brooke Roe figures she has “a one in a among 20,000 others in her 15-second audimillion shot” at making the big time as a tion. That’s all the time they get to impress country music singer. That’s a pretty realistic the screeners who seem to be looking for approach to a dream for a 15-year-old. someone very, very good or someone very, Sitting on a park bench outside the very bad. Hamilton County Courthouse in the heart “I’ve been waiting my whole life for this,” of downtown, the talented and striking she said. Noblesville High School student speaks with While Dad has been steering Brooke confidence and poise well beyond what one toward the pop/rock side of things, Brooke might expect of a sophomore. She may want was leaning toward country. to be the next Carrie Underwood or Taylor “I’m not the rock type,” she said. “My dad Swift, but she’s pragmatic about the odds of is trying to get me to like Led Zeppelin but that happening. I’m not really feeling it. But we both love “Even if I don’t make it on a national level, Rascal Flatts.” I hope I can at least make a living singing It wasn’t until Mike saw country band locally,” said Roe, who has been taking vocals Rascal Flatts perform in Pittsburgh that he lessons since she was 7 when her then-vocal had what he described as an “epiphany.” coach Carol Sue Hill predicted a “monster” “I’ve never really followed country, but career for the youngster. “I can’t think of a after listening and watching these guys, I better way to get paid for something you thought, ‘Man, this is just like rock ’n roll,’ ” love.” Photo by Zach Dunkin Fifteen-year-old Brooke Roe says many of her he recalled. “After I saw them I realized I And playing locally right now is just the Noblesville High School classmates are unware could probably write a country song because start of a measured route that she and her of her country music talent. today’s country is a lot like rock ’n roll.” father/manager/vocalist Mike Brooke are “That’s when I told Brooke, ‘I think we ought to go the country following to Nashville. When Brooke isn’t singing the national anthem at some Pacers or route.’ ” Father and daughter have written a half-dozen songs for a demo Ice game – she’s done at least 40 times such performances all over they plan to have produced in Nashville. Mike writes most of the Central Indiana since age 11 and will do it again Nov. 1 at a Colts lyrics, but Brooke tweaks them because “he’ll use words I would game – she and her dad perform as a duo at parties, wedding recepnever use.” tions and special events with their own PA and light show. Brooke insists her dad is not the fanatical father/manager pushAnd while Brooke has made connections with Nashville movers ing his daughter to reach a level of success he never obtained. So and shakers like Toby Keith’s manager T.K. Kimberly, who was reared in Noblesville, and Grammy Award-winning Chuck Howard, many parents try to re-live their dreams through their children. Not this man, says Brooke. who produced LeAnn Rimes, and Rascal Flatts’ lead singer Gary He always said, ‘If you lose the passion for it, I’m done,’ ” she said. Levox, Nashville will have to wait. “He said he’d never push me to do something I didn’t want to do.” “We’ll build a strong base here first,” explained Mike, who cut Take that, Simon Cowell. his music teeth on local rock bands in the 1980s. “We’ve already got a commitment from some of the top players in Indianapolis to play behind her next year.” all about brooke “I’d be just another singer in Nashville,” said Brooke, “I can get more attention here.” Favorite singers: Celine Dion, Carrie Underwood More notice, yes, even though some of her NHS classmates are and Taylor Swift hardly aware of her talent. Favorite sing-along hit: “You Belong to Me,” by Taylor Swift “I don’t walk around singing,” she said. “I get embarrassed when Another favorite pastime: Figure skating. someone finds out. Favorite Food: Cereal “Besides, a lot of them don’t even like country, which bothers Favorite TV show: “Reba!” me. They’d rather listen to rap and hip hop and don’t really give country music a chance.” Favorite school subject: Science Oh, by the way, students, Brooke turns 16 in February which Favorite boy: Currently single means she is eligible to try out for “America Idol,” the monster Scariest career moment: Almost being late to sing the television talent show which launched the careers of new country National Anthem at a Fever game. (“I ran onto the court music stars like Underwood, Kellie Pickler, Josh Gracin and others. out of breath, but I sang fine.”) Maybe that will get your attention.

Photo courtesy of Mike Roe

(Above) Noblesville country singer Brooke Roe sings at a local party. She says the best thing about these gigs is “looking down and seeng all of the little girls’ eyes light up. (Below) Roe has performed the National Anthem at more than 40 different special events and sporting events including the Indiana Pacers.

Listen to Brooke

To hear Brooke’s latest recording, “It’s About Time,” a tribute to Indy race driver Danica Patrick, and other songs, visit www.brookeroe.com

2 | September 29, 2009

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Innovative Founded Sept. 15, 2009, at Noblesville, IN Vol. I, No. 3 Copyright 2009. Current Publishing, LLC All Rights Reserved. 1 South Range Line Road, Suite 220 Carmel, IN 46032

317.489.4444 Publisher – Brian Kelly brian@currentincarmel.com / 414.7879 General Manager – Steve Greenberg steve@currentincarmel.com / 847.5022 Managing Editor - Zach Dunkin zach@currentnoblesville.com / 908.2697 Associate Editor – Terry Anker terry@currentincarmel.com Art Director – Zachary Ross zross@ss-times.com / 787-3291 Associate Artist – Stefanie Lorenz stefanie@currentincarmel.com / 340.1836 Senior Reporter – Brandie Bohney bbthegrammarguru@gmail.com /260.750.4266

OUR VIEWS

It is our position that innovation, by-in-large, is good and should continue to be pursued aggressively in this great nation of ours. Solutions to both the mundane and spectacular have been and will always be within the reach of humanity because of our innate desire to push our accepted boundaries and seek new and increasingly productive ways to meet our challenges and objectives. But even as innovation ushers in new and “improved” standards, the previous and time honored values are cast aside – often without adequate consideration. But innovation should not be shunned – instead a balance between tradition and advancement must be struck. In our own fair city, much change is afoot. Construction at Exit 10 marches on with additional projects already underway. Meanwhile the Square continues to act as a hub of renovation and rejuvenation for the surrounding neighborhoods. Assuredly innovative in their thinking, Mayor Ditslear and his team must work to not neglect the long history of teamwork and prudent financial management that has been the hallmark of this Community’s stakeholders. Political and economic realities should not be controlling – but should likewise not be ignored. Innovate, but be thoughtful in so-doing.

De-regulate Debate

It is our position that our Federal Government, in its efforts to perfect our banking and financial system through regulation, must avoid the temptation to further regulate private equity investment.  Since the collapse of the mortgage market and the subsequent financial market meltdown our well-intentioned government has set forth scores of new standards and bureaucracies designed to reduce the systemic risks that may have prompted massive and controversial Wall Street bailouts. And many Americans believe that a free market unable to self-regulate and avoid the adverse risks large financial institutions took (the adversely affected parties were so disconnected from the risk decisions) must be regulated especially since banks pose a direct risk to taxpayers via the FDIC. New regulations presently proposed may very well serve to curtail private equity investment even though in such transactions the general public, taxpayers and the risk-averse are not exposed. Current rules require an investor certified to have the financial position to assume significant risk (aka “sophisticated” investors). Such are not risks to the financial system and certainly pose no “systemic” risk. In these times of economic recovery if any significant regulatory changes occur, they should include deregulation in the private equity markets to encourage investment.

Advertising Sales Executive – Dennis O’Malia dennis@currentincarmel.com / 370.0749 Sales Executive – Lara Acton lara@currentincarmel.com / 409.1418 Sales executive – Mike Janssen mike@currentnoblesville.com / 490.7220

Business Office Bookkeeper - Deb Vlasich deb@currentincarmel.com / 489.4444 The views of the columnists in Current In Noblesville are their own and do not necessarily reflect the positions of this newspaper.

strange laws

CONSTITUTION CLOSEUP

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Our nation has all sorts of arcane, nonsensical laws on the books. Each week, we’ll share one with you. In Alabama, putting salt on a railroad track may be punishable by death. Source: Weird Laws (iPhone application)

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Every week, we will print an portion of the U.S. Constitution, followed by a portion of the Indiana Constitution. We encourage you to benchmark government policies against these bedrock documents. Today: the Indiana Constitution.. Section 1. Inherent rights Section 1. WE DECLARE, That all people are created equal; that they are endowed by their CREATOR with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that all power is inherent in the People; and that all free governments are, and of right ought to be, founded on their authority, and instituted for their peace, safety, and well-being. For the advancement of these ends, the People have, at all times, an indefeasible right to alter and reform their government. (History: As Amended November 6, 1984).

Section 2. Right to worship Section 2. All people shall be secured in the natural right to worship ALMIGHTY GOD, according to the

dictates of their own consciences. (History: As Amended November 6, 1984). Section 3. Freedom of religious opinions Section 3. No law shall, in any case whatever, control the free exercise and enjoyment of religious opinions, or interfere with the rights of conscience. Section 4. Freedom of religion Section 4. No preference shall be given, by law, to any creed, religious society, or mode of worship; and no person shall be compelled to attend, erect, or support, any place of worship, or to maintain any ministry, against his consent.

September 29, 2009 | 3


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From the backshop It certainly was a perfect Noblesville night! Last Saturday was a Noblesville night for us – and a good one, at that. We began by visiting with proprietress Jacque Bilbrey at 10th and Cherry, where she had a reception for the Russian artist, Sandro; his works are powerfully impressive. Sandro is about to hit it really big, courtesy of a publishing deal that will have his art for sale in Europe and the U.S. Bilbrey made it happen. She is a true gem of the Noblesville business community. From there, we went to Hamilton Town Center and – finally! – got our first extended look at the lifestyle center. We arrived after most businesses had closed for the night, so after grabbing a quick meal at Stone Creek, we walked … and walked … and walked some more … until we ambled upon an outdoor Flying Toasters gig. While we’ve always been overly impressed with Simon Property Group’s Clay Terrace in Carmel – and still are! HTC is a serious amp-up on the theme. It took a long time for us to spend a long time there, but it was well worth it and we’ll be back, no doubt! ••• The internal investigation of U.S. Sen. Charles Rangel (D-NY) is turning into an eternal investigation, for Pete’s sake! He is being scrutinized by the House Ethics Committee for violating public disclosure laws. Whoops! He forgot to report

Brian Kelly & Steve Greenberg in excess of $1 million in outside income. And he also failed to report $3 million in business transactions as required by the House. Freelance columnist Bill Wilson adroitly observes, “The truth is, that committee’s charge of rooting out corruption in the House may have been perverted by none other than Charlie Rangel, himself. He apparently has ‘purchased’ favor within the Ethics Committee - thus yielding any investigation compromised.” It has been reported that Rangel has given campaign donations to 119 members of Congress, including three of the five Democrats on the House Ethics Committee. Get the buffoon out of office!

Look who’s back, Noblesville! By Zach Dunkin After a short absence from the media channel we call the newspaper business, the town’s talking head for print, Jan Hart Baker, aka The Car and Truck Lady at Don Hinds Ford, is back trumpeting the tales of two cities – Old Noblesville and New Noblesville – on these pages. For the last three years she had been doing something like that for another publication in town but BAKER was let go in a recent staff reduction. We’ve heard you missed her. Their loss. Our gain. Baker brings with her a lifelong cache of local knowledge – she’s admits to 54 years of it – and a positive attitude that makes Zig Ziglar look like Rodney Dangerfield. And, she confesses without going into detail, life ain’t been easy. “I’m a positive person; I can’t help it,” Baker told us during the “interview process. “I’ve been

through a lot with a divorce and being a mother and, no matter what, I’ve always tried to make the best out of the worst circumstances.” She navigates the streets of Noblesville and life, in general, on what she calls her “Yellow Brick Road.” She has the courage of the Cowardly Lion and the brain of The Scarecrow. “And I certainly have the heart (of the Tin Man),” she adds. A big piece of that heart belongs to this town where she grew up and graduated NHS Class of 1974 when there still was a Noblesville ABC Drive-in and the Rainbo roller rink and still is the Jim Dandy burger shop. “I was born and raised on small-town values I still see them here despite our growth,” she says. “It’s important never to lose that.” Welcome back, Jan. Now, get to work. Zach Dunkin is the managing editor for Current in Noblesville. You may e-mail him at zach@ currentnoblesville.com

She navigates the streets of Noblesville and life, in general, on what she calls her “Yellow Brick Road.” She has the courage of the Cowardly Lion and the brain of The Scarecrow.

Does the time call for a ‘celebrident?’

harVest is a unique, family-owned fresh, marketplace that offers naturally healthy fooDs froM local faMily farMs. We strive to offer the freshest possible organic and conventional produce, natural, grass-fed beef, free-range chicken, wild-caught seafood, fresh-baked artisan breads, home-made baked goods, a full-service deli and select wines and beers. We also offer nightly Dinners to Go so that your family may have a fresh, tasty, nourishing dinner as soon as you get home. We hope you will visit the Market, meet some of the farmers and artisans, enjoy their stories, and savor the Harvest fresh difference.

Harves t fresh Market & Delicatessen

Coming to The Village of WestClay 12770 Horseferry Carmel, IN 46032

Visit our website for updates! www.theharvestfreshmarket.com

Always Fresh. Locally Grown. Naturally Healthy. 4 | September 29, 2009

By Terry Anker It is good to have a president who is widely admired for his commanding presence in front of a crowd. Reports in the popular media at the time often referred to George Washington as a tall, handsome and somewhat dashing figure. Studies have shown that the good looking (and often of above average height and facial symmetry) are advantaged. Even daytime talk show host Tyra Banks, known for her Sports Illustrated swimsuit photos, found that while she was clandestinely dressed in a fat-suit she did not enjoy her former deference. Did she really think that it was all about personality? But to borrow a phrase from Tyra, how do we keep it real? Is it possible to value quality over style in a world that is widely preoccupied with the charming sycophant rather than the substantive mensch? In Paris a few weeks after the last U.S. election, our newly elected President Obama was getting a lot of love. And vicariously, so were we

Americans. One cab driver confessed that a black (or female for that matter) head of state in France is highly unlikely, but he liked the fact that we had one. So did I. And now, Mr. Obama is routinely referred to as a rock star president. He takes his seat next to Jay Leno in Los Angeles and next to David Letterman Photo Illustration in New York. He waits his turn behind a monologue and stupid human tricks to pitch his health insurance plan like Selma Hayek sells her next movie – with star appeal. But does our country need a president, or do times call for a “celebrident?” If celebrity is the currency of the day, is Obama simply using his gifts? Has the presidency become a reality show with a really big budget? Terry Anker is an associate editor of Current Publishing, LLC. You may e-mail him at terry@ currentincarmell.com.

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DISPATCHES » Sustain Noblesville starts – The

City of Noblesville has joined with other organizations to form the first ever Sustain Noblesville Committee.  The mission of this committee is to combine public and private efforts to ensure that Noblesville continues to be an energy efficient community and to strive to educate its businesses and citizens on energy saving strategies. Sustain Noblesville’s initial goals are to provide a format for city departments and other organizations to share energy savings efforts with one another; to generate ideas for future energy saving efforts; to help the environment and cut costs; to initiate public-private partnerships for programs that will further benefit the community; to work together to apply for grant opportunities that focus on energy savings and green efforts; and to establish a Web site and other avenues for Noblesville residents and businesses to learn more ideas on how they can make a difference with their own efforts at home and in their workplaces. Sustain Noblesville held its first meeting Sept. 21 at City Hall. Representative included members of several city department as well as individuals from Riverview Hospital, Keep Noblesville Beautiful, Vectren, and the Noblesville Chamber of Commerce. For more information, contact Amy Shankland, Committee Chair, at (317) 776-6324 or ashankland@noblesville.in.us. 

» HHHC director resigns – Carrie

Petty, the Executive Director of Habitat for Humanity Hamilton County for the past year and a half, has resigned due to personal reasons specifically related to a terminal health issue associated with a family member. Habitat’s Board of Directors is actively searching for a new Executive Director who can continue to build on the organization’s positive momentum. Jim Schneider has been named Director of Operations. Those interested in the executive director position, should send a letter of interest and resume’ to: Habitat for Humanity Hamilton County, 17902 U.S. Hwy 31 N, Suite 4, P.O. Box 247, Westfield, IN 46074.

» Flap jack open house – The Nobles-

ville Fire Department Auxilary is hosting its annual pancake breakfast and open house from 7:30 a.m. to noon Oct. 3. at Fire Station No. 71, 135 S. 9th St. Highlights of the open house will include safety presentations, the “Get Out Safe” house, station tours and the opportunity to meet and talk with some of Noblesville’s firefighters.  Cost of the pancake breakfast is $5.50 for adults and $2.50 for children under the age of 12.  The breakfast and open house will kick off Fire Safety Week which will be October 4 – 11. For more information, call 317-776-6336.

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Pregnancy is stressful, but highly rewarding By Danielle Wilson Pregnancy is stressful, whether or not you have complications – from the minute you get a positive result to the moment your baby first cries. Added to this anxiety, you’re expected to make choices, actual decisions, while you’re strung out on hormones and cherry pie. Here are the biggies you’ll be forced to weigh in on, and of course, my two cents. Announcing before 12 weeks: Everyone says not to spread the good news until you’ve completed your first trimester, when the odds of miscarriage drop. I say “bologna!” Telling friends and family you’re expecting is one of life’s greatest pleasures, whether it’s a quick phone call or an elaborate surprise. Plus, weeks six to 14 are when you’ll most likely feel like crap; you’ll need sympathy, and loads of it. If something does go wrong? Then you’ll have the support of your loved ones to help you through. Genetic testing: These days, people can find out just about everything there is to know about Little Cletus before he’s even born, including diagnoses of genetic disorders and birth defects. The question is, “Do you want to know?” We declined testing during all of my pregnancies, because my husband and I differed on the course of action we would take if we received bad news. We didn’t want to go there, especially if the results turned out to be a false positive. On the other hand, knowing the difficulties that lie ahead can help prepare you for the emotional and physical demands of having a sick or special needs child.

My thought? Discuss the worse-case scenarios with your partner, and determine whether knowing makes any kind of difference. If so, do it. Finding out the sex: We’ve done it both ways. We did not find out on our first baby or our fourth, but did with our twins. And guess what? It was a wonderful surprise each time, just at different points of the pregnancies. If it’ll help you prepare and/or you don’t want all yellow, white and green onesies, then definitely find out! If you couldn’t care less and want to have your moment in the delivery room, then wait. Just know that the future grandparents would rather know ASAP so they can begin shopping. Getting an epidural: Here’s the deal on drugs: You can’t possibly know what labor and delivery will be like until you are living through it, and even then you will have no idea of how long it will last or if you’ll have complications. My advice? Go in with a plan, but be OK with scrapping it. If you change your mind and need something for the pain, then get it! Birth can be a scream-free experience if you want. Don’t feel guilty if that’s for you! Circumcision: This is a tricky one. We talked a long time with our doctor about the pros and cons of circumcision, and what it finally boiled down to for us was wanting our sons to fit in with their peers. We live in America, and most males here are circumcised. The procedure is usually done with a local anesthetic and involves little risk. Circumcision can also aid in hygiene, making it easier to keep the area clean. And it’s

Mayor: Trip good for link with SMC, future Chinese businesses By Martha Allan Current in Noblesville Noblesville mayor John Ditslear said his recent trip to Asia was an eye-opener to the possibilities of doing business with China and Japan. Ditslear and economic development director Kevin Kelly joined Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels and 50 other Indiana business leaders on a 12-day trade mission that began on Labor Day weekend, stopped in several cities in China and wrapped up in Japan. In Tokyo, Ditslear and Kelly lunched with top officials of SMC Corp., including Chairman Yoshiyuki Takada. SMC employs 475 workers in Noblesville at its North American headquarters, a $40 million facility that opened this year. “We know their company a little more and they know us a little more,” said the two-term mayor, noting the Japanese place great emphasis on building relationships with people with whom they do business. The pair also paid a courtesy call on officials with Bridgestone Firestone, which in June closed the Noblesville plant it had operated since 1936. While in China, the Indiana visitors met with many companies that are interested in coming to the U.S., and in two cases, were introduced by familiar corporate faces.

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much less traumatic on an infant than a teenager. I say, “Snip it!” Congratulations if this article applies to you! Pregnancy is tough, and the decisions you have to make even tougher, but hang tight. You’ll soon get to make another important decision: Should you try for another? Yikes! Peace out. Danielle Wilson is a Carmel resident and contributing columnist. You may e-mail her at danielle@ currentincarmel.com.

READER’S VIEW Reminiscing Noblesville’s past

Photo by Wayne Images

Mayor John Ditslear updated the Noblesville Chamber of Commerce about his trip to Asia during last week’s State of the City address.

China’s development, Ditslear said, is where Japan’s was 20 to 25 years ago, noting he was surprised at how western China was, particularly Shanghai. Dealing with foreign companies may pose more challenges than with American firms, but the obstacles are not insurmountable, Ditslear says. “Frankly, they are very friendly, and other than language and some cultural differences, people are people, and they love their kids like we love our kids,” Ditslear said. “There’s nothing that can’t be accomplished.”

Editor I had to laugh when I read Zach Dunkin’s column (9/22) as I truly thought it had to of been written by our neighbor. It was just this weekend at a BBQ that we were discussing the Rainbo roller rink and what is there now. I have not lived here very long but was filled in on all of the changes. Two weeks ago I drove my kids 26 miles to a drivein so they could experience what I had as a child. Little did I know Noblesville had one as well. If only we could get some of these back. Kim Holmes 46062

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You can do it a couple ways. The easiest is to e-mail it to info@currentnoblesville.com. The old-fashioned way is to snail mail it to Current in Noblesville, 1 South Range Line Road, Carmel, IN 46032. Keep letters to 200 words max (we may make exceptions), and be sure to include your home zip code and a daytime number for verification.

September 29, 2009 | 5


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Life’s experiences, friendships are priceless By Jan Hart Baker It was 1970-somethin,’ as the Mark Wills song goes. Bellbottoms and eight-track tapes. Farrah Fawcett hair-do’s. It was 1974 for 196 Noblesville High School seniors . We cruised the Jim Dandy, made out at the ABC Drive-In and skated the Grand March at the Rainbo Roller Rink. We didn’t have iPods or Wii’s but we were hardly ever bored. There were no cell phones for text messaging but we always knew what was going on with our friends. We would be graduating. Ready to conquer the world. “I’m outta here,” some said, and they ventured far. For others there was no place like home. Life seemed simple then. Our parents would live forever, and we would be rich. We would marry and live happily ever after. The “rich” kids’ fathers brought home a median income of about $11,000 that year. Now we send our kids to college for $11,000 a semester, and we are not rich. Or maybe we are. Not stocks and bonds and 401K’s rich, but rich in life’s experiences, friends

and environment. There’s a reason Family Circle Magazine selected Noblesville as one of the Top Ten Places to raise a family. We knew that; we lived it. We had great mentors. Not only did our parents teach us the facts of life, but they taught us dreams can come true. In a few days, some 35 years later, we will reunite for reminiscing, telling “our stories” and about our dreams – some realized and failed. Roberta Flack’s No. 1 hit “Killing Me Softly” could be playing in the background The girls will laugh about wearing mini-skirts and hot pants and the guys about their long hair and leisure suits. Yes, we had a lot of cheesy looks back then, but as the song goes, “I wouldn’t trade those days for nothing.” Jan Hart Baker is a lifelong resident of Noblesville, a former decorator and today is the car and truck lady at Don Hinds Ford. Photo courtesy of Noblesville resident Sid Davis, owner of the Noblesville Golf and Batting Center.

Originally named the Olympia Theatre, the Diana Theatre was Noblesville’s first movie house. It was built on the southeast corner of Ninth and Clinton streets in 1919. The building included three leased business spaces which over the years included Wimpy’s Grill and a Greyhound Bus station. It was torn down in the 1980s and the space is now a parking lot.

Photo by Wayne Images

Steve Powell (left) of AT&T and Marshall White of the Noblesville Fire Department chat at last week’s Chamber of Commerce gathering.

State of City address to Chamber filled with good news By Zach Dunkin Current in Noblesville Noblesville Mayor John Ditslear delivered his annual State of the City address to a jam-packed room of more than 200 Chamber of Commerce members at the Harbor Trees Golf Club Sept. 23. When he offered to answer any questions following the chat there were no questioners. No challengers. The news was that good. “There is much I could share with you,” he said. “But I only have time to hit on some of the highlights today.” Those 2009 highlights included: • Two national honors – Noblesville was named one of the 10 best cities and towns in the U.S. for families by “Family Circle” magazine and the 10th best place in the U.S. for affordable homes by CNNMoney.com. • The addition of more than 353,000 square feet of commercial building area and more than $113 million in improvements. • A population estimate of 50,000. The official census will be conducted next year. • Last month’s start of the Wastewater Utility

6 | September 29, 2009

Maple Avenue infrastructure project, which will help prevent raw sewage overflow in the White River during heavy rains, plus the implementation of the state’s first Environmental Management System for lowering chemical usage and improving energy usage. • The continued renovation of the 839 Conner Street building into a Visitors Center with public rest Looking ahead, Ditslear noted that 2010 will be a busy year for the city’s Engineering Department. Scheduled to be completed in 2011, Union Chapel Road will be extended from 166th Street to SR 32 as a four-lane roadway with five roundabouts and multi-use trails. It will be the main north-south thoroughfare on the east side of Noblesville, much like Hazel Dell Road is on the westside. Other road projects include resurfacing, more roundabouts and road extensions and widening. Also next year, the town’s 911 dispatchers will move to the Hamilton County Sheriff Department’s newly constructed Communications Center.

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Law enforcement officials: ‘Sexting’ won’t go away

By Hannah Davis Current in Noblesville For many teens, it’s hard to ignore the temptations that technology provides. At a community forum Sept. 23, the Hamilton County Sheriff’s Department warned parents and teens about the consequences of personal pictures that often become public. “Sexting,” the act of sending sexually explicit messages or images to others, is a growing problem across the country. These inappropriate messages can have lasting, devastating, and emotionally scarring effects. “If someone who’s involved in child pornography gets a hold of that, it’s over,” Noblesville detective and cyber crime specialist Mike Widener said. “It’s happening every place,” Hamilton County Sheriff Doug Carter said. “This is not an issue that’s just going to go away.” Widener shared the story of an Ohio teen whose sexting exploits ultimately ended in her suicide. After an explicit cell phone picture sent to

her boyfriend ended up in the hands of hundred, she decided that she couldn’t handle the stress. “It was too much for any 18-year-old to handle,” her mother explained in a video shown at the meeting. “There is no changing your mind in cyberspace… nothing you post or send will go away,” Hamilton County sheriff Alex Petty said. Widener suggested that photos taken on cell phones will be accessible for more than 50 years. The first step, police say, to ensuring a child’s safety is knowing what his or her cell phone is capable of doing. Checking for Internet access and the capability to quickly share photos is vital. It’s recommended, though, that parents don’t stop there. “You pay for that cell phone. You own that cell phone,” Petty pointed out. “Read their text messages. See what they’re doing.” Although immediate responsibility belongs parents, Widener said, “We (law enforcement agencies) are doing the best we can to stay prepared… I know that technology always changes, but we’re doing the best we can.”

Reason and discovery By Bob Walters It slipped my notice, but Sept. 17 was the 222nd birthday of the U.S. Constitution. I am fascinated by the Christian and nonChristian implications of America’s founding philosophies, and by the mix of religious and nonreligious colonials, who all agreed that personal liberty, economic autonomy, spiritual freedom and limited government composed the best stateof-being for mankind. “Separation of church and state” appears nowhere in America’s founding documents. It was penned in an otherwise obscure letter written by Thomas Jefferson; a “reason and nature” deist who believed God created the world and left it to run itself. While “Father of Our Country” George Washington wrote fabulous Christian prayers, Jefferson, like several of his contemporaries, was a humanist who dismissed the Christian supernatural – virgin birth, miracles, Christ’s resurrection, etc. Jefferson framed the liberty-loving language of the Declaration of Independence and had almost nothing to do with the writing of the Constitution. “Separation of church and state” is nonetheless considered a Jeffersonian dictum and Constitutional tradition. Nearly forgotten is that it was uber-patriot Thomas Paine, not Jefferson, who wrote rebelliously against religion. Famed for “Common Sense,” published in 1776, Paine provided the American revolutionaries – from farmers to intellectuals – with a compelling call to arms. The Declaration of

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Independence was signed that summer, and in late 1776 Paine’s “Crisis” was published containing the line, “These are the times that try men’s souls.” Paine’s words crystallized the colonials’ yearning for freedom and lit the emotional fires of the American Revolution. Yet negative blowback from his anti-religious views caused him to leave America for Europe, where he was an outcast in England and nearly executed in France. His 1794 anti-religion book “Age of Reason” sparked further outrage. Paine considered scripture to be mere hearsay. Not quite an atheist, he believed in one God, hoped for “happiness beyond this life,” and obviously conceded the existence of men’s souls. But he saw no faith, only “reason,” and considered any church or religion an impediment to man’s freedom. “My own mind is my own church,” he wrote. How many times we Christians hear that line, or some version thereof, when non-believers are invited to share our faith. “I’m too smart for church,” they imply. It seems reasonable that God gave us the great gift of intelligence not so we could merely find ourselves, but so we could discover Him. That’s the proper use of freedom. Bob Walters (www.believerbob. blogspot.com) hopes we are indeed “one nation under God,” and not a reasonable facsimile..

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Six reasons why I homebirth By Krista Bocko Contrary to the popular saying that “all that matters is a healthy baby.” I believe that women matter too. After two hospital births, I sought out the amazing alternative of homebirth. I am now a homebirth junkie. Two of my children were born gently at home. Here are six reasons why: 1. I knew I needed my own time and space to go within myself, free from time constraints and hospital protocols to conform to. I didn’t want to be “on the clock.” 2. I didn’t want to subject myself to the typical hospital interventions, not to mention the MUCH increased risk of a C-section (about one in three hospital births on average end in cesarean). 3. I wanted to feel the power of birth and know that WE did it ourselves. I wanted a gentle, welcoming entry to the world for my baby, who would be surrounded by people who loved him or her. 4. I believe birth is for families, and I wanted my older children to be participants if they chose. 5. Every story I’d read of homebirth was beautiful and empowering for the woman and her family. I wanted to experience that. 6. I knew homebirth was safe and that by empowering myself and taking responsibility for pregnancy and birth, by choosing my attendants and by consciously releasing the societal conditioning of fear of the birth process, I had done everything I could to ensure a happy and healthy birth.

» Not so, ginkgo – The results of two recent studies in people in their 70s, 80s, and 90s should give you – and Bayer, with its relentless pitches for its multivitamin for seniors – pause. In both studies, ginkgo did nothing to delay the onset of dementia. And it didn’t appear to be harmless, either. “In patients aged 75 and older with cardiovascular disease, ginkgo biloba may have risks, and the decision to use it should be carefully considered,” notes Lon Schneider, an Alzheimer’s expert at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. -Nutrition Action Healthletter

Krista Bocko is a self professed birth junkie. Two of her children were born gently at home. She and her husband and four children live in ‘Old Town’ Noblesville in a historic home. She can be reached at kbocko@sbcglobal.net or via her blog: www.cachet-cachet.blogspot.com.

Prevent complications

» Younger hands – If you want youngerlooking hands, a good place to start is your fingernails. If your nails are discolored, it may be from excess sun exposure. The UV filters in Orly Sunscreen for Nails prevent yellowing and help maintain a lustrous sheen. And at only $9 for a bottle, it’s an inexpensive way to help maintain youthful hands. -www.prevention.com

of diabetes from ruining your feet. Same Day and ours Evening H ents Appointm b Availa le

» Flu shot clinic - The Visiting Nurse

Service will administer seasonal flu and pneumonia shots for adults and children six months and up at the Carmel Clay Public Library Oct. 1 from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. A flu shot costs $25.00, while a pneumonia shot is $45.00. FluMist will be available for $35.00. Children 6-35 months receive a ½ dose of the flu shot, which costs $15.00.

8 | September 29, 2009

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David R. Sullivan, DPM

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Help your body heal If you have a cold or another malady, keep these tips in mind for a quicker recovery: Give in to sleep. Don’t fight it: Shorting your sleep for even one night blunts the body’s immune response. Avoid intense workouts. Moderate activity won’t hurt and may even boost immune function to fend off the next cold, but strenuous exercise can make your symptoms now worse. Eat lightly. Your immune system dials back appetite to preserve energy during a cold, but be sure to drink plenty of fluids. Relax. Studies show that individuals under great stress develop more severe symptoms than those who were less stressed. -Good Housekeeping

Good for the heart The kids’ rhyme is true: Beans really are good for your heart. Rich in fiber, iron, and protein, beans of all sorts can be a key ingredient in an occasional meatless meal. Beans of all types are nutritionally similar. Kidney beans will give you marginally the most protein and fiber with the fewest calories, but pintos are tops in folate. Cook your own using dried beans to avoid added salt in canned beans. -Tufts University Health and Nutrition Letter

Cookbooks for healthy eating Clean Eating recommends the following cookbooks to make your next trip to the bookstore a quick one. The Healthiest Meals on Earth: The Surprising, Unbiased Truth About Wht Meals You Should Eat and Why by Jonny Bowden Baking with Agave Nectar: Over 100 Recipes Using Nature’s Ultimate Sweetener by Ania Catalano The South Beach Diet Supercharged: Faster Weight Loss and Better Health for Life by Arthur Agatston Robin to the Rescue: Quick and Simple Recipes for Delicious Home Cooking by Robin Miller

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DISPATCHES

It’s time for a tune-up Photo Illustration

Photo Illustration

» 15 ways your laziness is costing you money

1. Not choosing the best rate on your savings account 2. Not opening a retirement fund (as soon as possible) 3. Not sending in rebate offers 4. Not paying attention to 0% financing deadlines 5. Waiting until the last minute to send the mail 6. Not taking advantage of corporate wellness incentives 7. Not bothering to negotiate a better deal 8. Oversleeping (but not for reasons you may think) 9. Not making a grocery list 10. Not selling stuff you don’t use online 11. Not rooting through your change for valuable coins 12. Ignoring the lingering fat in your budget 13. Not going the extra inch (exercise) 14. Not paying your credit card bill on time 15. Not finding a deal on smaller, regular purchases -forbes.com

» What successful CEOs know - In ev-

ery business, critical issues surface. Somerset CPAs will discuss those issues in its presentation of “The 7 Critical Things Successful CEOs Know” Oct. 14 from 8:15-9:30 a.m. at the Somerset Conference Center, 3925 River Crossing Parkway in Indianapolis. The Somerset CEO Series is designed to address those issues and much more. It will provide a general overview of the program and its benefits to you and your organization.

» Realtors® Oktoberfest - REAL-

TOR® Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the Metropolitan Indianapolis Board of REALTORS®, partners with existing organizations to combat homelessness throughout central Indiana. This year, the Foundation partners with Hansen & Horn and Monarch Beverage for an evening of live music provided by the Jay Fox Band, as well as German food and beverages. The event is Oct. 7 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Hansen & Horns’ Anson Development, 6290 Central Blvd. in Whitestown. For more information, call 317-956-5232.

10 | September 29, 2009

By David Cain Have you ever been to an expensive restaurant that offered plastic silverware? Ever shopped in a high-end retail store and spent a lot of money only to find that on check-out you didn’t even get a “thank you?” How about your family? Do your kids have the same ideas and message to the world as you do? Getting people aligned and acting in a manner consistent with the overall mission or vision is an area that requires constant attention and ongoing improvement. Think of a car. We get check-ups every few thousand miles to make sure everything is aligned. If you have one of your wheels misaligned, it can cause serious damage. And you only have four wheels. What if you had a business with hundreds of employees or wheels? A few

misalignments in their attitudes or the overall experience, and you’ve got a serious repair bill headed your way. Consider everything in a business – the people, the process, the service, the physical environment – as a part of one big experience. If that experience isn’t consistent with what you are trying to accomplish, you’ll have trouble. Would a family of five buy a house with only two bedrooms? How would you design the kitchen if you were planning to entertain hundreds? An organization is the same way. Having just one person misaligned with the vision can ruin the experience – like one determined fly at a picnic. Alignment relates to all aspects of your business. From how you answer the phone to how you tell someone what your organization does. It all

Mentoring: Do it the Mel Simon way By Brian Shapiro Last week, I sat in Temple Beth El for the funeral services of former Carmel resident and real estate magnate Melvin Simon. The various speakers told of Mel’s desire to create an empire and his desire to give back to the community. He did both very well. Melvin would bring his executive staff to the Shapiro’s downtown deli when they first got started in Indy. Melvin also would order a sandwich and a half of corned beef on rye bread. In particular he instructed the slicer that he wanted it “wet,” which was code for “leave the fat on it.” Melvin knew from his early days in the Bronx that the true flavor was in the fat. He also would bring his fat-cat New York bankers to the deli to challenge them with our food. Melvin knew that for him to convince New Yorkers to loan money in Indy that he had to one-up them. So, he brought them to the deli. He would have his brother, Herb, call my Uncle Max to make sure that his favorite table near the mirrors was reserved for his group. This was the beginning. Melvin knew that he had to break bread with his business contacts to get the deal finished in a place that was “foreign” to New Yorkers. Melvin was as loyal as they came. When he took his family on vacations, he would always stop and get food for the plane or the condo. Melvin knew what he wanted and how he wanted it. Even in his last few months, Melvin would sneak away to the Carmel deli and eat Jewish soul

matters. People are ambassadors for the company, and all things they use in their job are part of the experience, including their office, the phone system, the e-mails – everything. Do you work in an aligned environment? If you asked 10 people you work with (or the rest of your family) what the three-year goal was, would anyone know? If you ask them to explain what the company does in six words or less, how many words would match? It could be time for a tune-up. David Cain works at MediaSauce, a digital media and online marketing company in Carmel. David welcomes your questions or comments at David.Cain@MediaSauce.com.

www.perfectpilatesstudio.com 100 N. uNioN street, westfield 317-804-9542

Pre-Natal and Post Partum Pilates Private and Group Classes

SIMON food. He would enjoy his sandwich in the back seat of his car, amidst his many small dogs, as his chauffer would whisk him to his appointment. I am positive that his driver was told to take him to a doctor’s appointment, but Melvin knew what he wanted. And, NOBODY was going to argue with Melvin. Melvin was a mentor to his family and his friends. He was passionate with his ideas for success. But, Melvin and Uncle Max taught me about loyalty. Businesses can talk about customer service and customer satisfaction, but customer loyalty is the real success. Thank you, Melvin, for your teachings, and may these good deeds serve as a blueprint for future generations of mentoring. Brian Shapiro is a Carmel resident and contributing columnist. He owns Shapiro’s Deli and is a nonpracticing CPA/JD. You may e-mail him at brian@shapiros.com

Buy one class get two classes

FRee

Now through October 15th. First-time customers only.

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MONEY MATTERS What do you think is the greatest financial problem in Noblesville? “When you look around there are many for sale or lease signs for office buildings.” Karla Williams Noblesville

“I think we take good care of our citizens and town. I don’t think we have problems.” Rhonda Evanger Noblesville

“I’m not sure but I am glad the recession hasn’t hit us hard. Most people in Noblesville seem to be financially stable for the most part.” Richard Clarke Noblesville

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NOW OPEN

WHAT’S IT WORTH?

J. Baker Interiors/Albert Square Ltd.

MY OPINION

$

205K

Schmidt (left) and Baker This piece ran last week with inaccuracies. They are corrected here. J. Baker Interiors, LLC is a full service design firm specializing in the unique vision of its clients and helping them achieve their signature look and style.  The interior design firm was formed by its owner and principal designer, James A. Baker in 1955. Patrick Schmidt, senior designer, joined the firm in 1985. Locating in the Indiana Design Center was a natural progression for the firm, which began in Tipton, with past locations in the Nora and Carmel Drive areas. With a primarily residential design client base, Baker and Schmidt have also designed spaces for hospitality and commercial clients. With the move to the Indiana Design Center, the firm will showcase its traditional and transitional style with a retail shop for those one of a kind finds that are both unique and individual. As part of the business plan, Baker formed Albert Square Ltd., LLC, a “to the trade” showroom for interior Owners: James Baker and Patrick Schmidt designers and architects who want the best selecLocation: The Indiana Design Center tion for their clients. The 200 S. Rangeline Rd., Ste. 105 showroom features brands Carmel, IN 46032 that are exclusive and also Phone: 317-568-1301 offer a variety of custom Web: jbakerinteriors.com options. 

Type: Traditional Age: Built in 2001  Neighborhood: Setters Run, 146th Street between Gray and Carey roads Square footage: 2,344 Details: Four bedrooms, living room, family room, dining room, kitchen/ nook, laundry room, two-car garage Strengths: Home is in great condition; it is move-in ready and located on a great homesite. Weaknesses: Home does not have a basement, and there are no real custom features in the home setting it apart from the competition.

Keith Albrecht is a Carmel resident and realtor with RE/MAX Real Estate Groups. Contact him at 317-819-3388 or Keith@ KeithsHomes.com.

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DISPATCHES » Return to the days of old – More

than 250 costumed characters will make more than 100 performances daily Oct. 3 and Oct. 4 at the Fishers Renaissance Faire at Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Road. The event pays homage to Fishers’ sister city, Billericay, England. Attractions include the Queen’s Show and the twicedaily joust with the  champion Knights of Valour.  See beautiful birds of prey as they are handled by the Royal Falconer or laugh at Fishers’ own Hey Nonny Nonny Players: Pirates of the Luna Sea. There’ll also weapon demonstrations, madrigal choirs and Molotov, the gypsy fire-eater. Dozens of artisans and craftspeople will be selling their items. The event is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

» Replacing pillows – You should

replace your pillows every five years. If you can’t recall when you purchased the pillows, do the shoe test: Fold the pillow in half and place a shoe on the top. If the pillow flips the shoe off and opens back up, it’s fine. Stays bent? Time to replace. -Good Housekeeping

» Fall finale – The Noblesville Parks in

collaboration with the Hedgehog Music Showcase will stage its final fall concert event from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 4 at Forest Park, 701 Cicero Road in Noblesville. The Juggernaut Jug Band and Brigid’s Cross will perform. The event is free.

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This First Friday has a spooky twist By Martha Allan Current in Noblesville Food and family-friendly fun, with a touch of Halloween, highlight the First Friday Fall Festival on Noblesville’s historic town square on Oct. 2. Events for children include pumpkin painting, ghost tours, hayrides and a movie “Monsters Inc.” on the courthouse lawn. The movie starts at 8 p.m. The group Tonos Triad will perform its sleek, jazzy brand of music from 6-8 p.m. on the square, where Ninth Street will be closed between Logan and Connor streets. The event is free to attend; there is a cost for food and some activities. “We try to do a lot of things for kids downtown. We try to make it possible for a lot of people to come downtown and shop and enjoy the evening,’’ said Joe Arrowood, executive director of Main Street Noblesville, the organization that sponsors the monthly First Friday events. For adults of legal age who feel like raising a toast to the fall season, the Barley Island Brewery is the official site of the “Oktoberfest” portion of the event. Vendors from several restaurants on the square will be selling food. There will be vendors from the farmers’ market selling kettle corn, flowers and other merchandise, Arrowood said. For the past 15 years, Main Street Noblesville has been dedicated to the preservation and promotion of the historic downtown. The First Friday events are always outdoors, with some activities taking people inside stores or restaurant for tours or refreshments, said Arrowood. There is a charge for the ghost tours and pumpkin painting. The hayrides are free, courtesy of Stonycreek Farm. The hayrides will start at the Hamilton County employee parking lot north of Syd’s Bar & Grill. “It’s a big fun night,” Arrowood said.

First Friday Fall Festival When: 5 to 9:30 p.m., Oct. 3. Admission: free; there is a cost for food and some activities Info: (317) 766-0205, www.noblesville.biz/mainstreet/

Photos provided Mainstreet Noblesville

(Above) A tractor-driven hayride through downtown Noblesville is one of the fun things to do at the First Friday Fall Festival. (Left) Kids display their artistic skill painting pumpkins at the festival.

PICK OF THE WEEK

“The producers”

» Wii at the library – Visitors to the

Noblesville Library can play Wii games on two dates in early October. Family Game Time for all ages is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Oct. 4. Refreshments are provided. Then from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 8 it’s teens only at Teen Gaming Night with games like Guitar Hero and more. Both programs are free. For a full listing of library programs visit www.hepl.lib.in.us.

» Go to the bridge – The 10th annual

Potter’s Bridge Fall Festival is from 11 a.m to 3 p.m. Oct. 3 at Potter’s Bridge Park, 19401 N. Allisonville Road. The event features a plant and pumpkin sale, arts and crafts booths, a climbing wall and other children’s activities. Chooch and the Enchanters will entertain. The event is free.

12 | September 29, 2009

What: “The Producers” Where: The Belfry Theater 10690 Greenfield Avenue, Noblesville When: Oct. 2-3 at 8 p.m. and Oct. 4 at 2 p.m. Cost: $15 for adults and $12 for children under 12 Details: An adaptation of the Mel Brooks original, a producer of an unsuccessful Broadway show learns that, under the right circumstances, a lot of money could be made from a flop. Teaming with his accountant, they oversell interests in a show and set out to produce the worst musical ever. They are in a pickle when the show proves to be very successful. Not suitable for children. Info: 317-773-1085 to reserve tickets

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At Play THEATRE

SPEAKERS

‘My Way’ tribute

Featuring nearly 60 classic songs made famous by Frank Sinatra, Actors Theatre of Indiana is staging a musical tribute to “Ol’ Blue Eyes” that runs for two weeks this November in the Carmel Community Playhouse at Clay Terrace (14299 Clay Terrace Blvd.). Performances run Nov. 4-15. Nightly performances Wednesday through Saturday begin at 8 p.m. Sunday shows start 6 p.m. Tickets can be purchased for $32 by calling 317-669-7983 or by visiting www. actorstheatreofindiana.org. Senior Citizen, student, and group discounts are available.

Ramsey

Dave Ramsey comes to Indianapolis Nationally syndicated radio talk show host and best-selling author Dave Ramsey presents his common sense debt reduction and wealthbuilding strategies live in Indianapolis Oct. 1 from 6-9:30 p.m. at the Pepsi Coliseum, 1202 E. 38th St. in Indianapolis. Tickets are $43. For more information, call 888-227-3223.

Get outta town

Bob Evans farm festival As Ohio’s landscape begins to transform in preparation for fall, an array of festivals kick off the season. Two festivals worthy of checking out the weekend of Oct. 9-11 are the 39th annual Bob Evans Farm Festival in Rio Grande and the 40th annual Ohio Sauerkraut Festival in Waynesville. The Bob Evans Festival, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily Oct. 9-11, is appropriate for all ages and offers country arts and crafts, Photo by Gale Leslie One of the many crafts-making demonstrations, a woodcarver creates a sculpture farm contests, livestock at the Bob Evans Farm Festival. and, of course, Bob Evans-inspired home-cooked meals. Live music entertainment features some of the region’s favorite bluegrass bands, including Dailey & Vincent, winners of the “2008 Entertainers of the Year” award from the International Bluegrass Music Association. For information call 800-994-3276 or visit www.bobevans.com. The Sauerkraut Festival, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Oct. 10 and 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Oct. 11, pays tribute to the culinary delights German immigrants brought with them when they settled in southwest Ohio. Nearly 13,000 pounds of sauerkraut will be served. Enjoy more than 30 food booths featuring unusual concoctions like sauerkraut fudge and pizza, or enjoy traditional dishes such as reubens and kraut Dogs.  There’s also craft vendors, music and entertainment. For more information call 515-897-8855 or visit www.sauerkrautfestival.com.

WINES Argentinean dinner and wine class

Join Vine & Table (313 E. Carmel Dr.) and learn about the dynamic Argentinean wine region with Mike Palmer from Vinture Wine Group and Jeff Miller, National Sales Ambassador for The Southern Wine Group, Importer of Latin America’s Fine Wines Oct. 6 from 6:30-8:30 p.m. For more information, call 317-817-9473.

‘Lafferty’s Wake’

Main Street Productions of Westfield will present the comedy with music “Lafferty’s Wake” at the Westfield Playhouse (1836 S.R. 32 in Eagletown) Sept. 25-26 and Oct. 2-4 and Oct. 9-11. Show times are Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 ($8 for kids and seniors. For reservations or more information, call 317-896-2707.

‘Seven Brides for Seven Brothers’

The lively stage version of the rip-roaring MGM film “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” plays through Oct. 4. Get ready for some fun as these brothers get a lesson in “goin’ courtin’” through Oct. 4. For reservations, call the box office at 317-872-9664. For complete show schedule, visit www.beefandboards.com.  

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ONLY $17.99

LIVE MUSIC Mickey’s Irish Pub

The following musical acts will be playing live at Mickey’s Irish Pub,13644 N Meridian, Carmel. For more information, call 317-573-9746 October 2: Zanna-Doo! October 3: Cousin Roger October 10: Jester Kings October 16: Bunny Brothers October 17: Why Stop Now October 23: The Aberdeen Project October 24: Big Daddy Caddy

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Where I Dine

Erica Cabreream Waitress at Michelangelo’s Bistro Where do you like to eat? Bob Evans What do you like to eat there? Breakfast. I like their eggs and potatoes. What do you like about Bob Evans? The food is good, and it’s clean. Also the servers are very nice.”

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You say parmesan, I say parmigiana

Bob Evans Hours: Sun-Sat 6-10 16645 Mercantile Blvd (SR 37, 1 mile south of SR 32). Noblesville, IN 46060 (317) 776-6037

RESTaurant Photo Illustration

Jan’s Village pizza

10th and Cherry Streets Noblesville, IN. Phone: 317-770-7779 Hours: 11 a.m.-9 p.m. daily. Jan’s Village Pizza started in 1997 in Sheridan and expanded into Westfield and Noblesville, where it is housed in a remodeled Sinclair service station. A pair of non-operative gas pumps greets customers at the door, and the building is filled with Sinclair signage and memorabilia. The ingredients are fresh, and the dough is made there where it is allowed to come to the right stage of yeast fermentation. Prices for the basic pie range from $3.79 for an 8-incher to $19.99 for a 20-incher, not including extra cheese or a choice of 15 toppings. A dozen gourmet pizzas, including a veggie pizza, range from $5.19 to $29.99. Sandwiches, spaghetti, salads, wings, bread sticks and garlic bread are also served. Jan’s offers a rare guarantee: if you are not satisfied with a pizza bought there or ANY OTHER pizzeria, return the box or receipt for another pizza matching your original purchase. They feel “no one should have to eat a bad pizza.”

14 | September 29, 2009

By Katja Baird Melanzane alla parmigiana, or Eggplant parmesan, is an ancient Southern Italian dish originating in Sicily. The word “parmigiana” literally means “from Parma,” a Northern Italian city in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy. Parma is where the famous parmigian reggiano – or parmesan -- cheese is originated. The name parmigiana does not come from the cheese used, but from the Sicilian dialect word “parmiciana,” which refers to the middle area of a shutter where the slats of wood overlap the same way the slices of eggplant used in the dish do. While eggplant parmigiana is a traditional Italian meal, the commonly found variations, such as veal parmesan and chicken parmesan, are not. These were developed outside of Italy, yet are often served as Italian dishes in the U.S. and Canada. Eggplant parmesan is a very simple dish made of sliced eggplant that is first dipped in egg and

then breaded. It is pan fried in oil, layered with tomato sauce and mozzarella cheese, then oven baked. Some recipes do put parmigiana cheese or a harder type of grated cheese on top of the dish. Traditional Eggplant parmesan can be served as an antipasto (appetizer) or as a pietanza (complete meal). American versions of this dish are often too greasy and overcooked and contain basil or oregano where the original doesn’t. The key ingredients I like to use when making this dish are fresh tomatoes from my garden for the sauce and freshly made buffalo mozzarella cheese from the restaurant where I work. Katja Baird has been in the restaurant business for more than 10 years and currenly works at Matteo’s Ristorante Italiano in Noblesville. You may email her at katjabaird@yahoo.com.

Melanzane alla parmigiana Ingredients • 2 large eggplants • 3 1/2 cups fresh tomato sauce • 1 clove of garlic • 1 cup bread crumbs • 4 eggs • ½ cup grated parmigiana cheese • 8 tbd. olive oil • 1 lb. fresh buffalo mozzarella cheese • 1/2 cup cooking salt Directions: 1. Thinly slice eggplants. 2. Cover in cooking salt and let sit for 30 minutes to remove excess water. 3. Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. 4. Thoroughly rinse eggplant slices in cold water. 5. Wisk eggs.

6. Dip eggplant slices in eggs then cover with bread crumbs. 7. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium heat. 8. Place one layer of eggplant in skillet and brown on each side. Repeat for remaining eggplant slices. 9. Spread 1 1/2 cups of fresh tomato sauce in a casserole dish 10. Arrange one layer of eggplant slices evenly on tomato sauce and sprinkle a generous portion of buffalo mozzarella cheese over eggplant. 11. Repeat layering process until all of the eggplant and cheese is used. 12. Pour remaining tomato sauce over top layer and sprinkel with parmigiana cheese. 13. Bake for 30-40 minutes.

RECIPE

CHICKEN TERIYAKI MEATBALLS

Ingredients: • 1 1/2 cups long-grain rice • 1 1/4 pounds ground chicken • 2 scallions, chopped • 2 tbsp. grated fresh ginger • 2 tbsp. canola oil • 1/2 pound snow peas, halved crosswise (3 cups) • 1 cup frozen shelled edamame, thawed • 1/2 cup low-sodium soy sauce • 2 tbsp. brown sugar Directions: 1. Cook the rice according to the package directions. 2. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the chicken, scallions, and ginger. Shape into 16 meatballs. 3. Heat 1 tbsp. of the oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the meatballs, turning, until cooked through, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer to a plate. 4. Wipe out the skillet. Heat the remaining oil over medium-high heat. Add the peas and edamame. Cook, tossing, for two minutes. Return the meatballs to skillet. 5. In a small bowl, combine the soy sauce and sugar. Add to the skillet and simmer until slightly thickened, 2 to 3 minutes. Serve over the rice.

Cocktail

crown sidecar Ingredients: • 1 oz. Crown Royal Special Reserve • 1/4 oz. triple sec • 2 oz. sweet and sour mix • 1 wedge lime Directions: 1. Add Crown Royal Special Reserve, triple sec, and sweet and sour mix. 2. Shake with ice and strain into chilled sugarrimmed cocktail glass. 3. Garnish with lime wedge.

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Attention:

Capt. Critic’s DVD pick

Away we go

former City fit members!

R, 98 minutes

Noblesville Athletic Club Welcomes You We are the only fitness club that has been around for 28 years Clubs have come and gone, but Noblesville Athletic Club has been in the same location for 28 years Photo courtesy of AllMoviePhoto.com. (cq)

Drop by and check us out!

Maya Rudolph (left) and Catherine O’Hara star in Sam Mendes’ “Away We Go.”

Director Sam Mendes’ first film, “American Beauty,” won a slew of Oscars, and he’s had his ups and downs since then. Last fall’s “Revolutionary Road,” pairing Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio in a disintegrating marriage, was a major disappointment. But Mendes redeems himself somewhat with “Away We Go,” a funny and quirky take on relationships. John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph play Burt and Verona, an unmarried but committed couple expecting a baby. They’re in their early 30s, a bit scatterbrained and irresponsible, but basically good people. When Burt’s parents -- whom they’d hoped to rely upon for child care help -- suddenly decide to move away, Verona and Burt begin a cross-country trip to find a new home.

They visit a variety of friends and relations, played by wonderful actors like Catherine O’Hara, Jeff Daniels and Allison Janney. The hosts grow increasingly kooky, and as enjoyable as these visits are, we come to realize that such characters exist only in the movies. But still, I was never bored and the laugh-outloud moments, while spread fairly far apart by screenwriters Vendela Vida and Dave Eggers, earn their chuckles. Grade: B Read more of Chris Lloyd’s reviews of current films and DVD’s at www. captaincritic.blospot.com. Or www. TheFilmYap.com or www.captaincritic.blospot.com.

• Fitness Classes • Great Equipment

• Strength and Stamina for Seniors • Spin and Step Classes

• Zumba • Racquetball • Circuit Room • Free Weights

• Childcare Available

Noblesville Athletic club 411 S. Harbour Dr.

(2 miles NW of Riverview Hospital off SR 38 at the entrance of S. Harbour)

• Karate

776-0222

• RetroFit

www.NACfitness.com

2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S – Cabriolet

2007 Jaguar X-Type 3.0 Sedan

2006 Jaguar S-Type 3 Sedan

2006 Mercedes-Benz M-Class ML350 4MATIC

2007 Mercedes-Benz E-Class E350 4MATIC

2006 Volvo S80 2.5T Sedan

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7,175 miles

Tom Wood Porsche Audi

3473 East 96th Street, Indianapolis, IN 46240 www.currentnoblesville.com (coming soon)

317-848-5550

www.tomwoodporscheaudi.com September 29, 2009 | 15


Views | Community | In Spirit | Anti-Aging | Dough | Diversions | Toys | For the Record | Education | Laughs OBITUARIES Judith M. Williams, 54, Noblesville, passed away Sept. 16 at Riverview Hospital in Noblesville. She was born in Bellefonte, Pa., to Merle and Mary (Foote) Williams. Her father preceded her in death. Judy was retired after 30 years as a customer service rep for Caitlin-Morgan Insurance Services. She is survived by her mother Mary Williams, sister Linda (Mark) Winzenread, brothers Dave (Veda) Williams and Don (Michelle) Williams and several nieces and nephews. Memorial contributions may be made to Hamilton County Humane Society, 1721 Pleasant Street, Suite B, Noblesville, IN  46060.    Crystal D. (Cannata) Smith, 27, Noblesville, passed away Sept. 16 at St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis. She was born April 24, 1982 in Columbus, Ga., to Renato and Debbie (Jacobs) Cannata. Crystal had been employed with the Kids’ Zone Childcare Ministry at her church, Family Praise Center in Noblesville, for seven years. She is survived by her husband John L. Smith, sons Jonathan and Gavin Smith, daughter Hayden Marie Smith, parents Renato and Debbie Cannata, brother,James Anderson, sister Nickie Overstreet, brother Matthew Cannata, paternal grandmother Josephine Cannata, maternal grandparents, Mildred and Jr. Jacobs and several aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Memorial contributions may be made to Crystal’s children, in her memory, c/o Family Praise Center, 2140 Greenfield Avenue, Noblesville, Ind.   James T. Longworth, 77, of Noblesville, formerly of Mauldin, S.C. passed away Sept. 20. He was born on Sept. 28, 1931 in Corbin, Ky., to the late Lawrence and Celia Crawford Longworth.  Jim served in the U.S. Army, then the Air Force during

the Korean War.  He worked for General Motors more than 30 years retiring in 1989. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a brother John and sister Shirley.  He was married 56 years to Eunice Dyar Longworth. Other survivors include his son Zachary Longworth and wife Kim, daughter Sandra McAloon and her husband Michael, grandchildren Laura and Michelle McAloon, Samantha Longworth, Steven McCauley and wife his wife Melody, great grandchildren Sean and Daisy, brothers Frank, Bill, Charlie and Everette\ and sisters Etta May, Eula and LuAnn.  Memorial contributions may be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Society, Indiana Chapter, 7301 Georgetown Road, Suite 112, Indianapolis, IN  46268.   James T. Crook, infant son of Timothy and Ashley (Shephard) Crook of Noblesville, passed away Sept. 21 at Riverview Hospital in Noblesville.  In addition to his parents, James is survived by paternal grandparents Randy and Bev Crook, maternal grandparents Mike and Kim Shephard and several aunts, uncles, cousins and extended family. Memorial contributions may be made to the James Crook Memorial Fund, c/o Community Bank, PO Box 1990, Noblesville, IN 46061. Shannon E. Roe, 31, Noblesville, passed away Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2009 at home. She was born July 28, 1978 in Crown Point, Ind. Shannon was a 1996 graduate of Noblesville High School and a server at the Olive Garden Italian Restaraunt. She is survived by sons Chad Pharis and Jacob Giordano, mother and stepfather Patricia and Bret Cole, sisters Courtney and Sara Cole, and grandparents, Vernon and Vivian Roe.

Enjoy a festive fall on the Sunny Side of Louisville Families come each year to Southern Indiana, the Sunny Side of Louisville, the home of many fall traditions. One of the most popular is spending the day in the country while enjoying Indiana’s best fall foliage. The Huber Orchard, Winery and Distillery in Starlight was recognized by USA Today as one of the top ten places in the United States to pick apples. The family farm offers activities such as a children’s hands-on farm, pumpkin picking, wagon tours, cheese and ice cream factory and a farmer’s market. Plus you can sample award-winning wine and every weekend enjoy live music on the patio in October. You will savor your time at Huber’s, one of the largest farm-based wineries and Indiana’s only farm-based distillery. Nearby are the Joe Huber Family Farm and Restaurant and the Stumler’s Restaurant and Orchard. Fall fun is bountiful at both of these which are noted for their country cooking. New Albany hosts Harvest Homecoming, Indiana’s third-largest festival, with booth days October 8 – 11. Autumn on the River in Bethlehem, a quaint and historic village, offering high quality crafts, food and entertainment is the weekend of October 17 – 18. That same weekend, Clarksville celebrates its heritage with a festival commemorating founder Revolutionary War General George Rogers Clark and the departure of the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1803. Round out your visit to Southern Indiana with an evening of suspense at Clarksville’s Derby Dinner Playhouse and “Murder on the Nile” and sample local favorites at New Albany’s downtown brewery and winery. Plan a family weekend getaway in Southern Indiana, the Sunny Side of Louisville; south on Interstate 65. Choose from a variety of lodging facilities from national hotel chains to cozy bed and breakfasts. Log onto www.sunnysidetourism.com or call 800-552-3842 to plan your fall time Sunny Side weekend. Advertorial

16 | September 29, 2009

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DISPATCHES » Board to vote on school budget – Noblesville Schools school board will vote on the 2010 budget at a special meeting at 7 p.m. Sept. 29 at the Central Administration Office annex, 1775 Field Drive. The meeting is open to the public. Terry Rich, director of financial services for Noblesville Schools, presented the school district’s proposed budget to the school board earlier this month. To read a copy of the proposed budget visit the school’s Web site at www.noblesvilleschools. org.

» Indian project a winner – “Indiana Indians,” a project created by six students at Hazel Dell Elementary School, is a winner in this year’s International Student Media Festival. The project was created by the six students during the last school year as a part of their third-grade FOCUS reading class with Mrs. Duska Landry as their teacher. The project received a second-place award in the Indiana State Media Fair in the spring. “Indiana Indians” tells the story of the Miami, Shawnee, Wea, Piankashaw and Illini Indians of Indiana. It shares their cultures, population changes, food, clothing, interactions with other tribes and languages. Each child prepared a PowerPoint project about a tribe and then the six projects were linked together into one.

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No buts allowed! By Brandie Bohney Ever get a half-hearted apology? How about an excuse that is supposed to serve as an apology?  When I first moved to Carmel, I had to get a new phone number.  The number I got apparently previously belonged to someone with serious credit issues and dozens of questionable acquaintances. One morning between 2 and 3:45 a.m., we received more than a dozen calls from the same number. Being technologically declined, I didn’t realize I could block the offending number. I wouldn’t have been able to accomplish the task at that hour and level of frustration, anyhow.  Later that day, I got another call from the same number. I politely explained that she had the wrong number and that she had called us in the wee hours of the morning, as well. Here’s the remainder of that conversation:  Ms. Excuse: “Yeah, this number must be real close to my friend.” Me: “I understand.  Please just try to be more careful. There were a lot of calls very early in the morning.” Ms. Excuse, angrily: “I said I was sorry, b----!” Me (to myself): “No, you did not say you were sorry. You told me that your friend has a similar number. That’s an excuse. In order to apologize,

you need to use a word such as sorry or apologize or even my bad. An excuse is not the same thing.”   What I actually said was nothing. I promptly hung up, dialed the phone company, and had our number changed.    I find that I regularly hear excuses for poor behavior, unacceptable work, and lessthan-reasonable reasoning, and the same people offering those excuses assume that they have apologized. But they haven’t.    Folks, when you wrong someone and owe that person an apology, give it to him or her. No excuse in the world equals, I’m sorry.    I can understand the confusion to a certain degree. Sometimes an apology needs to be accompanied by an explanation. Not an excuse, but an explanation. If you need to explain yourself, do so, but include the apology prominently.    And leave your but out of it. When your apology is followed by but, the explanation becomes an excuse and cancels the apology entirely. No buts allowed! Brandie Bohney is a grammar enthusiast and former English teacher. If you have a grammarrelated question, please email her at bbthegrammarguru@gmail.com.

Keep it on green

Show choir over the top? By Hannah Davis If you’ve ever been in show choir, you’re aware of how ridiculous it is.  The choreography. The sparkly dresses and polyester suits. The fundraisers. The braggy yard signs. The tooth-and-nail competition. It’s flashy, gaudy and just downright farcical. And for that exact reason, I dropped out of the high school’s top all-girl choir. It was too much for any sane person to handle. On the other hand, what makes choir hell is exactly what makes for great entertainment. Welcome “Glee,” Fox’s most popular new show, to the stage. Yes, it’s about show choir. No, there aren’t any crime scenes. Nothing gets blown up. But there is dancing and singing and a gung-ho group of high school kids whose one dream is to win nationals. Don’t fret guys. It’s not ALL about the sparkle and the shine. “Glee” is – dare I say? – just as funny, snarky and addicting as “The Office” and “30 Rock.” You just have to put up with a little more fancy footwork. Hannah Davis is a senior at Noblesville High School and the opinions editor for The Mill Stream.

Photo Illustration

» Call out for subs – Noblesville Schools

is looking for qualified individuals interested in substitute teaching. To be eligible to substitute teach for Noblesville Schools, applicants must meet only one of the following criteria: hold a valid Indiana teacher’s license or a valid Indiana substitute teacher’s license or have successfully completed 30 college semester hours. Interested individuals should complete an on-line application at www.noblesvilleschools.org. Applicants will be contacted by Noblesville Schools Central Office staff for an interview and to complete the appropriate paperwork. The pay rate for substitute teachers is $65.00 per day.

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By Becky Kapsalis My daughter and son-in-law recently went away for a few days to celebrate their wedding anniversary. My husband and I had the privilege of staying with their four children. The youngest is in all-day kindergarten.  During dinner, we had the kids report, individually, what the best part of their day was in school, and what the worst part was. Each one of them gave their rendition of the best and the worst.  When it came to our kindergartner, he reported that the best part of his day was recess and the worst part of his day was that he had to flip his card to yellow! YIKES!  His older brother, having been there last year, chimed in and said, “Don’t worry YiaYia, it’s just a warning.” It appears that the teacher, in order to maintain a sense of behavioral accountability, has assigned each student three cards on a flip book.  Green is good behavior; yellow is a warning, and red is – well you can imagine.  Now when our little guy was asked if he knew what “flipping a yellow” meant, he replied “yes” and said that he would try to do better next time.

“Awesome. Lesson learned.” Or so we thought. The next night, we went around the dinner table again, and once again we came to the little guy.  “The best part of my day was recess; the worst part was that I flipped a yellow again, YiaYia.” I very dramatically said “this is unacceptable,” and he responded with, “It’s OK, Yiayia, the cards turn to green every night.” I had to laugh, and then I thought, “How profound.” He sees every new day as a chance to start over and stay on green. His mom told me that he has been getting green turtles (good) almost every day since then.  We would all do well to end our day with the knowledge that “tomorrow” we get to start over “on green” – new beginnings, second chances, fresh starts. Stay on green! Thanks Evan. Hugs! Becky Kapsalis. aka YiaYia (pronounced Ya-Ya.) is a certified parenting advocate and child behavior coach. You may reach her at 317-848-7979 or e-mail becky@ askyiayia.biz.

Hannah’s unscientific student survey of: Favorite TV shows • • • • •

“Glee” (Fox, 9 p.m. Wednesdays) “Secret Life of the American Teenager” (ABC Family, returns in January) “The Office” (NBC, 9 p.m. Thursdays)_ “Mythbusters” (Discovery, various times) “Project Runway”(Lifetime, 10 p.m. Thursdays)

September 29, 2009 | 17


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The name game: Some play it better than others By Dick Wolfsie Do you love your first name, or did your parents saddle you with a label that is making your life miserable? New research suggests that your name can serve as either a boost or a burden to your social, business and educational success. In one study, teachers were asked to grade three essays, but attached to these stories were different names. The research found that students with “normal” names like Karen and David scored higher than those with “unusual” names like Bertha and Elroy. As a former teacher, I really resented the implication of this study. In all my years in education, I was never partial to anyone because of his or her name, with the exception of three students I had, named Charisma, Anjeanette  and Wendolyn, all of whom I flunked  just for the heck of it, because if their parents didn’t want to cut their kids a break when they were born, it wasn’t my job to interfere. With the help of Google, Facebook and various other Internet innovations, I have tried to track what has happened to some of my former students with uncommon names. For example, I discovered that a kid named Broderick that I had in class has apparently spent time in a federal prison. How

strange; she seemed like such a sweet girl. I also had two Sashas over those 10 years. One married a doctor, one became a doctor. This is information parents need to have before they kick-start their daughter’s life with a name like Morningstar. I have no problem with unique names, as long as they aren’t a source of derision. I once knew someone name Robyn Banks. In this case, it’s the parents who should be arrested. I’d throw them in the clink with the moms and dads of Doug Graves, Chris Cross and Ash Hull. My favorite was the guy from Wyoming who lived across the hall from me at George Washington University: Duane Pipe. There are only two possible explanations here for horrid name choices: Either the parents are guilty of cruel and unusual punishment, or they’re so dense that it never dawned on them to say their new child’s first and last name together before they loaded that ton of cement on the kid’s back for the rest of his life. My biggest gripe is when parents take a perfectly good name and decide that the normal rules of spelling that have evolved over the past 300 years should no longer apply. I once signed an autograph picture for a 7-year-old who said his name was

Christopher. When I returned the photo, he indignantly informed me that his named was spelled “Kristfah.” I was tempted to call Child Protective Services. I figured that my friend over there whose name is Jeff (Geoff) would be pretty sympathetic to my concerns. I’m also not a big fan of how guys’ names can be pretzeled into girls’ names. This came about in the old days when the patriarch of the family really wanted a boy and was saddened with the outcome. Frederick became Fredrica and Robert morphed into Roberta. I was once madly in love with a girl named Georgette. She may have been a big disappointment to her father, but she was exactly what I was hoping for. Anyway, I think “Paulette” and “Samantha,” send the wrong message. Come to think of it, so did Georgette. I’m willing to debate this issue any time. Just name the day. As long as it’s not Toosday. Dick Wolfsie is an author, columnist, and speaker. Contact him at wolfsie@ aol.com.

I once signed an autograph picture for a 7-year-old who said his name was Christopher. When I returned the photo, he indignantly informed me that his named was spelled “Kristfah.” Hoosier Hodge Podge

Indiana Wordsmith Challenge

Build the words

Answers to INDIANA WORDSMITH CHALLENGE: SMILER, EMIRS, ILLER, LIMES, MILES, MILLS, MIRES, MISER, RILES, SLIME, SMELL, SMILE, ELMS, EMIR, ILLS, IRES, ISLE, LEIS, LIES, LIME, MILE, MILL, MIRE, REIS, RILE, RISE, SELL, SEMI, SILL, SIRE, SLIM, ELL, ELM, ELS, EMS, ILL, IRE, LEI, LIE, REI, RIM, SIR Answers to BUILD THE WORDS: MERIDIAN, INSOMNIA, BILL CLINTON, FEVER, HARVARD Answers to HOOSIER HODGEPODGE: Transport Modes: AIRPLANE, BUS, FERRY, SUBWAY, TRAIN, TROLLEY; Richards: BURTON, DREYFUSS, GERE, LUGAR, NIXON; Ingredients: FLOUR, SALT, SHORTENING, WATER; Game: DEER, DUCK, TURKEY; Brew Pubs: ALCATRAZ, ROCK BOTTOM; Toilet: COLUMBUS

18 | September 29, 2009

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I just don’t ‘get’ the video game craze By Mike Redmond Among the things I just don’t get – and that list grows every day – is video game rock stardom. It’s been kind of difficult to avoid lately, what with the release of The Beatles: Rock Band game, the one where you get to play along with John, Paul, George and My Close Personal Friend Ringo* at various stages of The Beatles’ career. (*Not really. That’s a joke from my music critic days. Ringo called me to do an interview. I answered the phone and he said, “Hello, Mike. This is Ringo.” “Ringo who?” said I. He didn’t think it was funny.) Now that I think about it, I really don’t get video games, period. That doesn’t mean I disapprove. If, for example, my brother – who lives in Pennsylvania now, having worn out his

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welcome in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio – chooses to spend his entire visit to his home state by camping in our sister’s basement to play Let’s Pretend To Be Soldiers And Shoot Each Other, that’s his choice. It’s just not something I would choose for myself, seeing as how I have a life, and how I stopped playing Army a long time ago. But back to this Rock Band thing. It’s fun to pretend to be a Beatle – I did my share of it as a kid – but I find myself agreeing with Bill Wyman, former bass player for The Rolling Stones, and Nick Mason, drummer for Pink Floyd, who expressed some concern about Rock Band in an interview with the BBC: “It encourages kids not to learn, that’s the trouble,” said Wyman. “It makes less and less people dedicated to really get down and learn an instrument. I think is a pity, so I’m not really keen on that kind of stuff.” Added Mason: “It irritates me having watched my kids do it - if they spent as much time practicing the guitar as learning how to press the buttons they’d be damn good by now.”

Tons of homes participate. Make sure you get to all four neighborhoods! Designer clothing, furniture, housewares, kids stuff, and incredible deals! this sale is too good to miss! Waterstone is east of Gray Road between 116th and 126th Entrances to neighborhood are at 116th, 126th, and Gray Road Includes: Bayhill, Brookfield, Stonewick, and Windpointe October 1st, 2nd, and 3rd from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. daily

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HUGE GARAGE SALE Oct.1,2,3-Thur.Fri.Sat 8am-4pm Rain or Shine 17306 Austrian Pine Way, Westfield Many nice things for sale, including 5’2 petite clothingsome items new

Not to pick on my brother – well, actually, I am, but as I said, he’s in Pennsylvania, so it’s not like he can do much to stop me – this is like when P.D. got all whacked out about a computer flight simulator. Played it night and day. He worked his way up from flying small personal aircraft to piloting jumbo jets – on the computer. But when I’d ask him why he didn’t take this diligence and apply it to real flying lessons, he shrugged his shoulders and mumbled, which is P.D. for “I dunno.” I’ve been playing guitar since I was about 10. One of the things I love most is that I’m still learning the instrument. Guitars have a lot of secrets, and for most of us, they give them up grudgingly. That’s what keeps me playing – the chance that I’ll uncover more secrets. But that takes work and dedication, qualities that are in diminishing supply these days. It’s easier to get a computer game and play make-believe. Why go to all the trouble of learning a skill when you can just pretend? Oh well. As I said, I don’t get it, which is good. Those video games, I am told, can be addictive, and the last thing I need is an addiction to something that keeps me connected to fantasy for days at a time. I may not get video games, but neither can they get me. Mike Redmond is an author, journalist, humorist and speaker. Write him at mike@ mikeredmondonline.com or P.O. Box 44385, Indianapolis, IN 46244.

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RENTALS

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

Do you know three reasons you should consider living in THE NEW YORKER APARTMENTS located at 3707 – 3715 N. Meridian Street in Downtown Indianapolis. • You will save time & money • You will meet new people and new friends • You will have access to public transportation, to churches, schools, entertainment and shopping You work hard, so by living at The New Yorker Apartments you will have time to enjoy your life … and to have all the convenience of living downtown. Come on in and visit The New Yorker Apartments. Call - 784-5899 or 435-8618 and make an appointment. You might be surprised at the pleasant, large apartments that are available at such affordable prices. IT’S TRUE: Schedule an appointment to just come and see how much time and money you can save. STUDIOS, 1-2 BEDROOMS - FENCED PARKING LOT Professionally Managed by: MOYNAHAN-WILLIAMS Call Debbie – 317-435-8618

For Rent 1321 Brookton Ct

ROOM FOR RENT IU ROOMMATE WANTED Share 3bd/2ba Apartment $330 a month each + cable Move in now, call for details 317-402-4267

Now Hiring Driver

needed for transportation reasons/errands. Part-time/flexible hours. Great job for seniors. Call 317-816-0583 & ask for Frank for an interview.

NOW HIRING

3 Bed, 2 Bath, 1650 sq ft home, Washington township schools, Brick exterior, NO GAS BILL! Huge yard, Attached garage, Stove, Refrigerator, Dishwasher, Microwave. Available Oct. 1. $1250 per month. Call 253-1533

Seeking fun, energetic, customer friendly workers; 18+ Apply within Pinheads 13825 Britton Park Rd. Fishers, IN 46038

September 29, 2009 | 19


20 | September 29, 2009

www.currentnoblesville.com (coming soon)


September 29, 2009