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Tuesday July 16, 2013

Carmel residents have invested decades with Hamiton County 4-H / P13

Nine-year-old’s recipe takes her to the White House / P3

Progress continues on U.S. 31 / P4

Residential Customer Local ECRWSS

Carmel, IN Permit No. 713 U.S. Postage Paid Presorted Standard

Everyday pediatric and family medicine care has never been this expert. See back page for details. Š2013 IU Health 07/13 HY11513_0370

CCS partners with St.Vincents / P6


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July 16, 2013

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

ENJOY WHERE ART AND WINE MEET in the Carmel Arts & Design District

OF

SATURDAY • JULY 20, 2013 • 5-10 P.M. All ages are welcome to attend IU Health North Hospital Art of Wine, enjoy the music of Kopecky Family Band, take in unique art and visit the District’s shops and restaurants. Adults 21 years of age and older are invited to unlimited wine tastings from participating wineries for only $15. More than 15 wineries are registered to participate! Be sure to take advantage of the StorAmerica Wine Check area for any wine bottle purchases you make during the evening. Visit www.CarmelArtsAndDesign.com for more information and entertainment schedule! Follow the Carmel Arts & Design District on Facebook and Twitter. Please note: The $15 fee for the tasting is cash only. If you wish to purchase bottles of wine at the wineries’ booths, credit cards will be accepted at most locations.

Kopecky Family Band will play on the main stage.

Hear them on WTTS and see them in the District!


July 16, 2013

COMMUNITY Contact the Editor

Have a news tips? Want to submit a calendar event? Have photograph to share? Call Mandi Cheesman at 489.4444 ext. 204 or e-mail her at mandi@youarecurrent.com. You also may submit information on our website, currentincarmel.com. You can find the Contact Us form under About Us in the upper-left corner. Remember our news deadline is typically eight days prior to publication.

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Current in Carmel reaches 100 percent of the households in 46032 and 46033 by U.S. Postal Service every Tuesday. For more information about how to reach that audience, call Dennis O’Malia at 370.0749 or e-mail him at dennis@youarecurrent.com.

On the Cover

Vivian Summers, left, and her sister, Betty Estridge, have attended the 4-H fair for as long as they can both remember. (Photo by Jillyann Burns) Founded October 24, 2006, at Carmel, IN Vol. VII, No. 40 Copyright 2013. Current Publishing, LLC All Rights Reserved. 30 South Range Line Road Carmel, IN 46032 317.489.4444 info@youarecurrent.com The views of the columnists in Current in Carmel are their own and do not necessarily reflect the positions of this newspaper.

Current in Carmel

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Young chef honored at White House By Karen Kennedy • karenk@youarecurrent.com

“Ever since I was old enough to do anything in the kitchen, I’ve been in the kitchen with my mom,” 9-year-old Lydia Finkachievement beiner said. “I think my first dish was pigs in a blanket – you know, with a hotdog.” Obviously those culinary skills have evolved during her long years in the kitchen, because Lydia’s own recipe for “Sneaky Chili Surprise” was chosen from among 1,300 entries as one of 54 winners of the First Lady Michelle Obama’s Healthy Lunchtime Challenge, co-sponsored by Epicurious and the Departments of Education and Agriculture. Lydia learned about the contest when her mom, Kristi, was searching for healthy recipes on Epicurious and saw the contest announced. When asked about the inspiration for her awardwinning dish, Lydia said quite emphatically that she knew she wanted to make chili. Why? “Because I like chili,” she said. Of course. But what makes her chili a sneaky surprise? “Well,” Lydia said, “I knew I wanted to sneak carLydia Finkbeiner, 9, was asked to visit the White rots into the recipe because my brother Ryan hates House. (Submitted photos) carrots, and my other brother Matthew doesn’t like anything that Ryan doesn’t like. That’s what makes it to say hello. President Barack Obama spoke to the ‘sneaky.’ And I knew I wanted to make it vegetarian group, commending them on their healthy eating so my Aunt Tammy could habits, and took the time eat it. And I was surprised, to shake the hands of because it tasted good. every person in the room. That’s the surprise part.” Now that she’s back One never knows what in Carmel, Lydia is back might inspire a chef. to her usual routine of Her trip to Washington playing with her cats was certainly inspiring. and watching the Food The group had a guided Network. She used to like tour through the food exRachel Ray when she was hibit at the Smithsonian, “young,” but now prefers First Lady Michelle Obama hosted including a stop in Julia “Food Network Star,” “Resthe recipe contest winners for lnch. Child’s kitchen. And some taurant Impossible” and of their recipes will be on “Chopped.” display in the SmithsonAnd although she would ian this year as models for healthy school lunches. obviously make a great chef someday, she’s keeping The group also got to see the White House garden, her options open: and of course, eat lunch with the First Lady. But as “Teacher, I think. Or architect. Or artist. No. Teachthey were finishing lunch, they got the surprise of er. Yes, today it’s teacher,” she said. their lives when their hostess’ husband popped in Follow Karen on Twitter: @karenkcurrent

ON THE WEB

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DISPATCHES ‘Sweet Tooth Tuesday’ – Carmel City Center will host its second “Sweet Tooth Tuesday” event today, July 16, from 4 to 6 p.m. The Carmel Fire Buffs will present antique fire engines on the interior of Carmel City Center. Holy Cow, Cupcakes and Hubbard & Cravens will offer complimentary sweet samples and lemonade will be sold, with proceeds benefiting Riley’s Children Hospital. The public is invited to attend this free event. Young Republicans chair arrested – Marietto “Mario” Massillamany, chairman of the Hamilton County Young Republicans, was arrested and charged with drunken driving in Fishers on July 7. Shortly before 7:30 a.m., Massillamany was stopped by a Hamilton County Sheriff’s Office deputy for driving around 60 miles per hour in a 35-mile-per-hour zone in the 5300 block of Massillamany 96th Street, according to a police report. During the stop, the deputy developed probable cause to believe Massillamany was operating the vehicle while intoxicated. An OWI investigation was conducted and Massillamany submitted to a certified blood test. He was charged with OWI previous conviction and OWI with a blood-alcohol content between .08 and .15. He was booked into the Hamilton County Jail where he later posted bond and was released for a future court date. Massillamany is a former deputy prosecutor for Hamilton County and is an attorney. This is his third drunken driving arrest since 2000.  Ivy Tech hosting open house – Ivy Tech Community College is hosting an open house at its Carmel site July 17. The event will be 4 to 7 p.m. at the Carmel Community Life and Learning Center, 515 E. Main St. Ivy Tech invites residents of Carmel and the surrounding area to come explore the site and what it has to offer during this free event. Representatives from Ivy Tech advising and admissions will be on hand to answer questions and guide people through the enrollment process. Attendees can apply for admission, complete online orientation, sign up for assessment and advising appointments and get questions answered about starting college.

Volunteers needed A few volunteer shifts are available for the IU Health North Hospital Art of Wine on July 20 in the Carmel Arts & Design District from 5 through 10 p.m. If you or your group would like to volunteer for the event, email info@carmelartsanddesign.com or call 317-571-ARTS.

Another gun range Songbook competition DVD review Christopher Lloyd reviews “42,” the Jackie Robinson biopic from writer/director Brian Helgeland. The flick takes a hard, mostly successful swing at the icon’s story and journey.

High school vocalists representing 22 states will compete on July 26 at the Great American Songbook Vocal Academy & Competition at the Palladium in Carmel. The public is invited to attend the performance, which is the only U.S. competition dedicated solely to the music from Broadway, Hollywood musicals and the Tin Pan Alley era of the early to mid-twentieth century. To read more about these stories, visit currentincarmel.com

Carmel might not be the only Hamilton County city with a gun range. Developer Tim Tomich is seeking a building permit to build an indoor shooting range at 17777 Commerce Dr. in Westfield. Find out more about this story at www. currentinwestfield.com.


July 16, 2013

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U.S. 31 by the numbers

By Karen Kennedy • karenk@youarecurrent.com

In 1996, INDOT determined that U.S. 31 would be converted from a highway to a freeway. Progress is inevitable, and usually a good thing once it’s done. development Getting there, though, can be a painful process, and the timeline of that process was outlined as Steve Fleming, of engineering firm R.W. Armstrong, along with City Engineer Mike McBride and Director of the Dept. of Community Services Mike Hollibaugh presented Carmel Chamber of Commerce members with an update on the U.S. 31 project at the July 10 Chamber luncheon. “It’s their highway, but it’s our city” This has been the guiding principle of city leaders regarding the development of U.S. 31 as far back as 1980, when a city committee created what Hollibaugh referred to as a “cutting edge” set of regulations for future development on U.S. 31. This foresight presented itself again in 1991, as the Carmel-Clay comprehensive plan was revised to create an infrastructure that would support a freeway. According to McBride, “The planning effort to achieve this was monumental.” In 2001, according to Hollibaugh, city leaders “drew a line in the sand” by issuing a standing task force meeting invitation to INDOT, at which time the city planners made it clear that they would retain control of where interchanges went, how they were structured and how the finished project would look. As of last year, the city reached an agreement with INDOT that all interchanges with U.S. 31 would be roundabouts. The intersection of 96th Street and Keystone Parkway is the last interchange that has not yet been converted to a roundabout. The City of Carmel has applied for a Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery grant to subsidize that. Whether or not that grant is received, that roundabout will be completed as part of the U.S. 31 project. The subcontract for the city’s portion of the work has yet to be awarded. What’s the timeline? Construction began in the spring of 2011 at Ind. 38 and 146th Street. It is reaching as far south

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Chamber members heard a U.S. 31 update at their July 10 luncheon. (Photo by Karen Kennedy)

as 169th Street. Early phases of the project are already complete: the interchange at U.S. 31 and Ind. 38, the 146th Street bridge over U.S. 31 and the U.S. 31/Keystone Parkway/146th Street interchange. • 2014 – 151st to 161st streets will be completed. Full construction between Ind. 32 and 191st Street. Minimal disruptions to the U.S. 31 mainline; offline and shoulder work between I-465 and 136th Street and shoulder and pavement work from 106th Street to Old Meridian. U.S. 31 itself will have shoulder closures and nighttime lane closures. • 2015 – Ind. 32 through 191st Street will be completed. Full construction between I-465 on U.S. 31 through 136th Street with full closure of U.S. 31 through the summer and fall of 2015. The entire project is slated for completion at the end of 2015. For more information Businesses and residents may subscribe to an e-newsletter at: www.us31hamiltoncounty. in.gov. Real-time construction information will be posted on the above website under “Construction/Closure Information.” There is also a text messaging program which can be accessed by texting “ROADS” to 411247. Email updates will be sent to businesses along the corridor. The Dept. of Community Services also is offering to do presentations to groups who have questions or concerns about how their neighborhoods might be affected. Interested persons should contact the Dept. of Community Relations at 571-2494.

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July 16, 2013

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Breaking ground on the Nash building were, from left, Mayor Jim Brainard, Steve Sturtz, president of Pedcor Development Group, Phillip Stoffregen, executive vice president and COO of Pedcor, Bruce Cordingley, president and CEO of Pedcor, Steve Warne, vice president of commercial operations at Pedcor and Jeff Worrell with the Carmel Redevelopment Commission. (Photo by Karen Kennedy)

Interest in Nash building strong

By Karen Kennedy • karenk@youarecurrent.com

The Nash Building doesn’t even exist and yet it is experiencing active leasing.  Ground was broken July 11 to officially mark the beginning of the development construction of The Nash, a European-inspired, three-story, $10-million mixed-use building with an underground parking garage. It will offer 31 one- to three-bedroom apartments on the second and third floors and 8,300 square feet of commercial space at street level. The project is just south of the existing City Center along Range Line Road. Pedcor Companies President and CEO Bruce Cordingley said that the Nash building, whose construction is anticipated to be completed as early as the end of 2014, is already two-thirds pre-leased.  “Of the 8,300 square fee of retail space we have available, we are in negotiations to lease about 5,700 square feet of it,” Melissa Averitt, the senior vice president of marketing and sales at Pedcor, said.  Averitt would not comment on who exactly was planning to come to the site because nothing is a done deal, but she did say the majority of the negotiations are with “retailers and service-

oriented businesses with a retail angle.” She said examples of service oriented types of businesses could be a financial-planning business, a bank or a Realtor.  Momentum also has ramped up with the apartments, according to Averitt. “I’ve heard a lot of people express an interest in living in them,” Averitt said, adding that she doesn’t believe the apartments were being preleased at this time. Mayor Jim Brainard, who attended the groundbreaking event with members of Pedcor and the Carmel Redevelopment Commission, said, “the Nash Building is a great way to finish the Range Line Road frontage (of City Center). Pedcor hires the best and the brightest, and understands the ... long-term value of being a part of downtown Carmel.”  City Center is a public/private partnership and is one of the CRC’s largest projects to date. One of the most involved private partners in this venture has been Pedcor City Center Development Co. Ground was broken for Pedcor’s Phase I of City Center on March 23, 2006.   The CRC is responsible for the redevelopment efforts of both the City Center and Arts & Design District projects. In addition, the CRC manages other public-private partnerships where city land is being redeveloped to improve economic growth of targeted areas of Carmel.

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July 16, 2013

COMMUNITY

Current in Carmel

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CCS partners with St.Vincent Health

By Nina Johnson • news@currentincarmel.com

The school board voted 5-0 in favor of a proposed partnership with St.Vincent’s Health to staff four nursing vacancies in the school district. Education Board president Layla Spanenberg said current Carmel Clay school nurses “don’t need to worry about losing their positions. This is only to help fill the four vacant positions.” With the partnership, St.Vincent administrators would recommend qualified nurses and the school district would retain the right to approve recommendations. These nurses would remain St.Vincent Health employees while serving in Carmel Clay school positions. “We have really good (nurses) in our district,” director of Human Resources Ryan Newman said. “This is only to fill those four open positions.” Newman assured the board the lead nurse position would be filled with an existing Carmel Clay nurse. “We will (also) continue to employ our own substitute nurses,” he said. While the partnership is cost neutral, Newman explained how it would broaden the applicant pool and expand professional development opportunities for current nursing staff. School calendars often reduce applicant pools for school nursing positions. However, as St.Vincent employees, nurses could serve in schools while continuing employment through the summer within the hospital system. St.Vincent’s Director of Social Services and Community Outreach Beth Petrucce suggested inviting Carmel Clay nurses to St.Vincent’s training seminar before the school

year begins. “It’s three full days of training on the newest techniques on diabetes care, asthma care, and more for the school environment,” Petrucce said. St.Vincent would also consider telecasting monthly meetings. Nurses on duty at school sites would benefit from announcements of upcoming healthcare training opportunities. Board member Greg Philips approved of the partnership, but requested close monitoring by the school district. “I’m going to trust that administrators will keep a close watch on turnover,” Philips said. “If we felt there was a high turnover with these positions,” Newman said, “it’s certainly something we’d want to address.” When Newman initially proposed the partnership, he clarified the positions are “not on a rotation basis.” He said, “it will be a consistent person, keeping in mind illness or days off.” Interim Supt. Steve Tegarden assured the board all Carmel Clay nursing staff have been kept updated on this proposal. Newman added nursing staff have not contacted administrators with concerns. A similar partnership with St.Vincent has proven successful at the new Carmel Clay Schools Wellness Center. The wellness center provides Carmel Clay employees and their families a range of healthcare services just steps from the high school grounds. Staffed by St.Vincent, the center reduced healthcare costs for both employees and the school district.

Emerald ash borers still a threat By Karen Kennedy • karenk@youarecurrent.com It’s been 10 years since the emerald ash borer first came onto the radar of foresters. They were first discovered in the U.S. in Detroit in 2002. They had made it to northwest Indiana around 2004, and by 2006, they had forestry infiltrated our city’s landscape. “Ash trees were a huge part of Carmel’s city street program and private development in the early 2000’s,” said Mike Hollibaugh, Carmel Community Services Director. “It’s truly a disaster. We are still getting calls from homeowners, asking what they can do about them. But once a tree has been infected, there’s nothing you can do but cut it down. Even the most established and mature elm trees are in severe decline or already dead. The city has had to spend a lot of money removing the affected trees from municipal land.” Hollibaugh likens the emerald ash borer disaster to the scourge of Dutch Elm disease back in the 1960s, and notes that ash trees were most often the replacement tree of choice when the elms died. So history repeated itself. Preventing future forestry disasters “We’ve learned that diversity in planting is the key,” Hollibaugh said. Now, Daren Mindham, Carmel’s urban forester, maintains a spreadsheet of the planting and inventories of trees, and makes sure that the city doesn’t plant more than 10 to 15 percent of any one kind of tree. The city has become more involved in overseeing what private developers and home owners are planting as well. “We micro-manage in a way that we never did before, to ensure good species diversity and make sure this kind of thing never happens again,” Hollibaugh said.

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ROSA winner a worthy one

Commentary by Jeff Worrell

But the garden is really just a representation of Marcia’s entire body of work. As chair It was a supposed to be a surprise. But once of the Carmel Clay Schools Green Team for the past two years, her fingerprints are on many the presentation started, not much chance of that. The Rotary Club of Carmel gave out its an- more projects geared toward a healthier environment. I asked her what the award meant nual, super-special volunteerism award recently to to her. She said, “It is nice for our group to get a stamp of approval from a well-respected a worthy member group like the Rotary. But my initial reaction of our community who is not a member of was somewhat reserved because there are its club. It is called a “ROSA” taken from the so many people who have made the acronym which stands for Rotary CCS Green Team a success. This is a Outstanding Service Award. This year, shared award.” sitting in the crowd under the ruse of But Marcia is not ready to sit back accompanying friend Tricia Reynolds and let others do the work. She still to a luncheon as a guest, Marcia Robhas goals she would like to see come erts joined a select group of people to fruition. She said, “Elementary and from Carmel who exhibit “Service middle school kids are passionate Above Self.” Roberts about sustainable living but we do not Marcia Roberts has played a key have Green Teams in all schools yet. We need role behind the idea and execution of a comthat.” I could relate when she said she is still munity garden. Now up and running, Plots to pulling recyclables out of the garbage, lamentPlates is a growing success and open to all ing the need to increase the number of items Carmel residents. It inspires sustainable living that can be recycled at the schools. “There is while at the same time promoting a sense of lots more to be done but we are off to a great connection for people who use it. More than start.” Yes you are! just a community garden there are plans for it to be a community gathering area as well. Jeff Worrell is a member of the The vision includes not only the plots, but Carmel Redevlopment Commispicnic tables and benches and a possible stagsion.He recognizes volunteers on ing area. The existing playground will remain, “Connecting with Carmel” on cable which will make a nice retreat when those channel 16. Contact him at jworrell@advantagemedical.com little gardeners need a break.

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(From left) Ruth Nisenshal, Carmel Clay Public Library Foundation director; Richard Taylor III, Foundation board secretary; Wendy Phillips, library director; Anne Poindexter, Foundation board vice president;  Dale Theising, Guilded Leaf co-chair, Ginny Purvis, Foundation Guild hospitality Chair; Julie Shadinger, Foundation Guild vice president; Michelle Shadrick, Foundation Guild president; Betsy Laskey, Guilded Leaf co-chair; Gareth Evans, Guggenheim marketing communications specialist; Karen Maginn, Guggenheim vice president of marketing; and Megan Ulrich, Guggenheim marketing representative display the check presented to the Carmel Clay Public Library Foundation. (Submitted photo)

Guggenheim to sponsor luncheon news@currentincarmel.com Guggenheim Life and Annuity will be the sponsor of The Guilded Leaf Book and Author Luncheon. The luncheon is library a one-day signature event of the Carmel Clay Public Library Foundation, featuring nationally recognized and best-loved authors. “We are pleased to have partnered with an organization that provides excellent educational and cultural resources to our community,” said Karen Maginn, vice president of marketing at Guggenheim Life and Annuity. Last year’s luncheon was attended by nearly 500 guests, and since its inception in 2005 has generated nearly $500,000 to support children’s literacy programs at the Carmel Clay Public

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Library. “We are very excited to welcome Guggenheim Life and Annuity as the presenting sponsor of The Guilded Leaf. They recognize the value of education, literacy, and cultural opportunities in our community, and want to support the library’s efforts,” said Ruth Nisenshal, Foundation director. This year’s luncheon will be Oct. 24 at the Ritz Charles from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Six nationally known authors are scheduled to attend. Guests have the opportunity to speak to the authors, purchase their books, hear their stories, bid on silent auction items and have lunch. Tickets are $70 each, and $1,200 for corporate tables. Sponsorships or reservations can be made by calling the Foundation office at 814-3905.


July 16, 2013

COMMUNITY

Current in Carmel

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Chaucie’s Place earns grant news@currentincarmel.com

Chaucie’s Place has been awarded a $5,000 grant from the Indiana Service Challenge, sponsored by Companies Philanthropy With a Mission. The grant monies will be used to build a training room at Chaucie’s Place. Chaucie’s Place, a nonprofit Child Advocacy Center that focuses on the prevention of child sexual abuse and youth suicide, received the grant thanks to Carmel-based NextGear Capital, whose employees volunteered at the organization and nominated the nonprofit for the grant. “The minute the employees at NextGear Capital learned about Chaucie’s Places’ mission and their need for a training room, they supported the organization and this effort 100 percent,” said Patty Turner, director of marketing and administrative services at NextGear Capital. “NextGear Capital purchased the materials, and our employees volunteered to construct the storage barn, which was the first step in transitioning the garage into a training room. Through the Indiana Service Challenge, we had the opportunity to submit this project for grant funds for Chaucie’s Place. We were thrilled to help Chaucie’s Place get the $5,000 seed money for its training room.” One hundred and ninety-four nonprofits were vying for a total of $200,000 from the Indiana Service Challenge. Only 38 nonprofits walked away with grants between $1,000 and $15,000.

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Toby Stark, executive director of Chaucie’s Place, (in turquoise shirt), and NextGear Capitol’s Lori Kahre (in black-and-white shirt), are recognized on the court during an Indiana Fever game recently. (Submitted photo)

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“We are going to renovate our 4-car garage into a training room for our prevention programs,” said Toby Stark, executive director of Chaucie’s Place. “This training room will allow us to reach even more people in the community with our child sexual abuse prevention programs.” Based on its estimated costs for the renovation, Chaucie’s Place needs to raise an additional $20,000 to begin work on the training room. Those interested in supporting this project with a donation can visit http://chauciesplace.org/ donations.

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July 16, 2013

COMMUNITY

Current in Carmel

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CMS teacher earns fellowship

By Nina Johnson • news@currentincarmel.com

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Carmel Middle School social studies teacher Mark Matthews earned one of 56 James Madison Memorial 2013 Fellowachievement ships to fund $24,000 of his master’s degree studies. The fellowship supports select secondary school teachers of American history, American government and social studies. Application for the fellowship required several recommendations, transcripts and completion of a series of essays. “One of the more difficult requirements was getting as close to the word limit as possible without going over,” Matthews said. Named after the fourth U.S. president James Madison, the grant promotes the graduate study of history and the United States Constitution. “I (wrote) a great deal on the experiences I’ve gained in 29 years in the classroom,” Matthews said. “Many questions asked me to focus specifically on how I teach the Constitution, what I feel is important for students to know about both the Constitution and American history, and how I use primary sources.” Matthews engages students with class exercises such as “Socratic seminars and debates, mock trials, plus historical simulations of the Constitutional Convention, the Rocky Mountain Fur Trade, and the U.S. Civil War.”

His graduate studies are underway through Ashbrook Institute at Ashland University, Ohio. “Ashland has graduated more James Madison Fellows than any other university in the United States,” Matthews said. The university’s annual dinner has featured renowned political figures such as George H.W. Bush, Lady Margaret Thatcher and Mitt Romney. Recipients attend the foundation’s four-week summer institute on the American Constitution in Washington D.C. “I have for a number of years led Carmel Middle School’s eighth-grade trip to Washington, D.C.,” Matthews said. “So it will be great to see many of the historic sites with colleagues and professors.” Coursework occurs in Georgetown along the Potomac River waterfront. “It will be exciting to study the Constitution and history in such close proximity to the U.S. Congress and Supreme Court,” he said. Matthews is pleased to continue his studies with an institution focused on American history education. “I have been privileged over the last several years to attend workshops and seminars with several of the professors,” he said. The institute also maintains an invaluable resource for teaching American history at www. teachingamericanhistory.org.

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July 16, 2013

COMMUNITY

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Promising Futures needs homes By Dan Domsic • dan@youarecurrent.com

a case-by-case basis. She said volunteer families, vetted through background checks and more, care for a child’s Where can youth go in a time of emergency or basic needs while the organization works with trouble when home isn’t an option? both the youth and family to resolve what trigPromising Futures volunteerism of Central Indiana gered the crisis. “Our goal’s always to reunite the child with has given youth in their family as soon as possible,” Summers said. Hamilton and Tipton counties options since 2002 Currently, Promising Futures has four homes with its Host Homes Program, and it’s looking that provide this service, but Summers said the for more families to open their doors and lives goal is to get 20 families to children and teenagers with the program, but in need. “We just work with youths who more are welcome. The nonprofit organiFamilies that host zation, 294 S. Ninth St., are dealing with these chalNoblesville, is holding an lenging issues and we’re able to youth do not need to be informational meeting utilize our Host Homes Program social workers or able to give therapy, she said. about the program on July to provide shelter anywhere “Our best host homes 23 from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. from one night to 21 days.” are patient, understandHost Homes serves - Amanda Summers ing (and) willing to just be children ages 7 to 17 that a listening ear and to be a are dealing with challengsupport,” she said. es from homelessness While it doesn’t always happen, she said it’s to family conflict to divorce to a family going the organization’s hope that the youth develops through a housing or medical crisis, according to and maintains a relationship, as well as commuAmanda Summers, Safe Place and Host Homes nicates with their host families after they leave. coordinator at Promising Futures. “It’s really cool how that works,” she said. “We just work with youths who are dealing For more information, call Summers at 773with these challenging issues,” Summers said, 6342 or e-mail her at asummers@promisingfu“and we’re able to utilize our Host Homes Program to provide shelter anywhere from one night tures.org. To learn more about Promising Futures of Central Indiana and its other programs and to 21 days.” services, visit www.promisingfutures.org. Summers said the length of the stay goes on

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July 16, 2013

COMMUNITY

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Young learners look to the sky

By Colleen Peregrin • news@youarecurrent.com June 8 signaled the beginning of a new club in the Carmel area. The Young Astronomers Club met at the Carmel astronomy Clay public library for the first time. This club is designed to teach children about the universe in a way that is friendly to them and conducive to their learning process. The group was formed by the Link Observatory and Space Science Center in Indianapolis. This center uses a classic style observatory that is owned and operated by Indiana University. Its purpose is to teach space science to Indiana middle school and high school students and the general public. When the club met at the library for the first time, the Director of Education and Public Outreach for Link Observatory, Keith Turner, taught the kids how to use Zooniverse.org. These children learned about exoplanets and how to interpret NASA Kepler mission data in locating extra-solar transits. They also got to assemble their own astrolabs and measure the angle of the sun. They learned that if you measure the sun’s angle at the same time each day, you can start to understand the earth’s orbit.  “One of the comments I heard from one of the parents reassured me we are going in the right direction in our education and public outreach efforts,” said Greg McCauley, the executive direc-

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tor of the Link Observatory. “I was commenting that their 12-year-old child had a real interest in space science and that we were impressed with his level of knowledge. His father said he was so happy something like this was available – before this there was nowhere else to go for his son to get involved.”  McCauley excitedly promised that even more exciting learning opportunities were to be presented at next month’s meeting slated for July 13, such as projects to help better the kids understanding of the planet Mars.  For more informations, visit www.linkobservatory.org.


July 16, 2013

4-H FAIR

Current in Carmel

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Carmel residents have invested decades with Hamiton County 4H

A 4-H’er explains her clothing proje ct to a judge during the 1938 County Dres s Revue

By Kathleen Devaney • news@youarecurrent.com Hamilton County Supt. of Schools John F. Haines organized the earliest Indiana boys corn club meeting of record cover story on April 9, 1904. Ninetythree boys enrolled in that first corn club and each was given 1,200 kernels of corn for his project. At the end of the year, members exhibited their corn in the courthouse walkways. From this one project, the interest and growth of 4-H has increased to more than almost 2,000 youth in Hamilton County and more than 68 projects. Paul Woodward’s family moved to Hamilton County in 1932 when he was only 7. Woodward, now 87 and living in Noblesville, joined the Fall Creek Township 4-H Club in 1935. During his first county fair, Woodward remembers the hogs Woodward were in tents on Logan Street in downtown Noblesville and the cattle were sheltered in a livery stable, where the Hamilton County Judicial Center is now located. The women’s clothing exhibits were displayed in the Armory. “There were no livestock sales and most of the projects were directed toward rural families,” he said. The first Hamilton County 4-H fair was held three years later in 1938 at Noblesville’s Forest Park. “It was an idea that grew statewide and countywide to get more people participating,” Woodward said. “A bigger group of farmers got involved and really made a fair out of it.” Woodward still remembers that first 4-H fair and said times were different during the “horse and buggy” days. The county fair was held at Forest Park in 1936 and 1937. In the following years it moved around the county and was held in Sheridan, Walnut Grove, Carmel, Arcadia, Noblesville and Westfield. The 4-H fair moved out to the present 4-H fairgrounds on Pleasant Street in Noblesville in 1948. Monte Jessup donated 2.5 acres for the fairgrounds, and eventually the Hamilton County 4-H Council purchased 12 acres more land from Jessup. The 4-H Council raised more than $40,000 through donations, which they used to construct the current O.V. Winks building and the first swine barn, which now are used for small animals and horticulture exhibits.

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4-H By the Numbers Vivienne Summeier participates in a 4-H fashion event in the 1970s. (Submitted photo)

“The tax laws in the 1940s prohibited using tax money to build 4-H buildings and grounds. Those laws were changed in the early 1950s,” Woodward said. “The other buildings were added when the 4-H Council was able to raise donated money to pay for these buildings.” Vivian Summeier and her sister, Betty Estridge, who have always been rooted in the 4-H community, have attended the Hamilton County 4-H fair for as long as they remember. During the past 75 years, the 4-H fair has had many changes, but it has always remained a fun event. “If you ask the kids what they enjoy, it’s the animals and the food,” Summeier said.   The annual fair’s scope of projects has broadened and exhibits are held in buildings instead of tents. Judging for the event used to be done in private, but now the kids can listen to the judges’ comments, Summeier said. The Fashion Revue and the Queen Pageant, which always have been a traditional part of the fair, used to be held out in a field, said Estridge, who has been Queen Pageant chairperson for 17 years. “Then the girls would head over to model in the animal show arena. They would have to clean up the manure before they got there,” she laughed. Summeier, a member and volunteer of 4-H for more than 56 years, joined the organization in 1939 when she was 10 years old. She was excited to become a part of the organization from the moment her older sisters went to a 4-H camp, but she was too young to join. Summeier remained a member for 10 years, volunteered as a junior leader, served as a ceramics project leader and a Future Baker’s Inc. leader later in life. Estridge only participated in 4-H for a few

years when she was younger, but later in life she volunteered with the Carmel 4C’s club and served on the Hamilton County 4-H Extension Board. Both sisters served as 4-H Council chairpersons. Throughout the decades, 4-H has transformed from having club meetings held in schools to a widespread volunteer community activity, Summeier said. Projects have gone from “it’s not all the cows and cookies,” to just about any project the kids want to accomplish. The “learn by doing” motto is still prevalent, but has adapted with changes in society. Many areas of 4-H are trying to decrease the competitive nature of the program, Summeier said. “That beat-the-other-guy mentality is frowned upon these days,” she said. In present day, the traditional agricultural aspect of 4-H is not as across-the-board as it used to be, but still is relevant. There’s more focus on agro-business, Summeier said. As far as livestock are concerned, in the early days of 4-H, members had to own their own animals and the focus was on cows and pigs. Today, animals can be shared between members and there is an introduction to ducks, geese, chickens and other smaller animals. There’s a huge dog program in Hamilton county where you take your dogs and train them, Summeier said. There is also a llama program, Estridge added. In 75 years from now, Summeier hopes the organization continues to be a hands-on learning experience, that develops lifelong skills for the youth and provides a place for friendships to be made. “I would like to see it still focused on the individual doing and developing the skills that are relevant for the community in which they live,” she said.

In 1938, the Hamilton County Fair and 4-H Club Exhibit was held in tents at Forest Park and the girls’ projects were displayed at the Noblesville Armory. According to 1938 Extension Annual Reports 4,000 people were in attendance for the three-day event. 4-H Enrollment for 1938 was 160 boys and 303 girls • 19 girl clubs with nine volunteer leaders, two vocational teachers and 26 junior leaders • 11 boy clubs with six volunteer leaders Projects in 1938 • Entomology – Seven boys • Corn club – 29 boys • Potatoes club – Seven boys • Garden club – 24 boys, 10 garden exhibits • Tomatoes club – Four boys • Pig club – 40 boys and six girls, 80 pigs • Beef calf – 12 boys and one girl, 18 beef steers were shown • Colt club – 13 boys • Lamb club – Nine boys • Dairy club – 25 boys and three girls enrolled, 33 dairy calves • Poultry – 15 boys and three girls, 11 pens of poultry • Clothing – 182 girls • Baking – 103 girls and two boys, and canning had 43 girls. Total food exhibits was 352 • Room improvement – Seven members, 31 articles • Junior leadership – 26 girls, 16 boys • Demonstrations – Each club could send two representatives to the county exhibit contest, 11 senior and nine juniors participated.


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July 16, 2013

Current in Carmel

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July 16, 2013

4-H FAIR

Current in Carmel

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Gear up for another great fair

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

2013 Fair Entertainment/Extras

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Thursday, July 18 9 a.m. – Kitchen Invention Showdown 6:30 p.m. – Free 75th Birthday Cake in Hall B Noon to 2 p.m. – Pacers Fan Van 6 p.m. – Good Time Gosphel Friday, July 19 2 to 3 p.m. – Pink Slipper Performance 2 to 6 p.m. – Blood Drive 6 p.m. – Madison Franz 7 p.m. – Ice Cream Contest Saturday, July 20 1 p.m. – Antique Tractor Pull 3:30 p.m. – Silly Safari Animal Show 7 p.m. – Cicero Christian

• • • • • • guitar and Paige Laplante plays the acoustic she wrote song nal origi an ts,” tprin “Foo sings photo by (File . Show t Talen h during the 2012 Yout Robert Herrington)

• • • •

S chedu l e o f e v ents

Thursday, July 18 4-H Fair Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Exhibit Buildings Open: 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. • 8 a.m. – Llama Youth Judging in the Llama Barn. • 9 a.m. – 4-H Bucket Calf Show in the Show Arena. • 9 a.m. – Sheep weigh-in in the Sheep Barn. • 9 a.m. – Kitchen Invention Showdown (grades 3-5, 9 a.m.; grades 6-8, 9:30 a.m.; grades 9-12, 10 a.m.; and adultyouth partnership, 10:30 a.m.) in Exhibition Center Hall A. • 10 a.m. – 4-H Poultry Showmanship in Small Animal Barn. 4-H Poultry judging will begin immediately following Showmanship. • 10 a.m. – Open judging of Crops (small grains, 10 a.m.; soybeans, 10:30 a.m.; corn, 11:30 a.m.; and hay, 12:30 p.m.) at Crops Tent, south of Swine Barn. • 10 a.m. to noon – Extension Homemakers’ Flower Show exhibits check-in in Exhibition Center Hall B. • 10:30 a.m. – 4-H Dairy Show in Show Arena. Heifers will be shown first, followed by steers. • 11 a.m. – Llama Pack Obstacle Class in the Llama Barn. • 1 p.m. – Pygmy Goat Show in the Show Arena. • 4 p.m. – Beef Quiz Bowl in Exhibition Center Hall A. • 4 to 9 p.m. – Extension Homemakers’ Flower Show open for viewing in Exhibition Center Hall B. • 6 p.m. – Llama PR Obstacle Class in the Llama Barn. • 6 p.m. – 4-H Rabbit Ambassador Contest in the Small Animal Barn. • 7 p.m. – 4-H Clogging Exhibition in Exhibition Center Hall A. Friday, July 19 4-H Fair Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Exhibit Buildings Open: 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. • 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. – 4-H Livestock Auction entries accepted in 4-H Fair Office. • 8:30 a.m. – 4-H Beef Grooming Contest in Show Arena. • 8:30 a.m. – 4-H Rabbit Show in Rabbit Tent. • 9 a.m. – 4-H Chicken Barbecue, northeast of Exhibition Center. • 9:30 a.m. – 4-H Aquatic Science judging in Exhibition Center. • 10 a.m. – Horse & Pony Western Show Church Band in the Horse Arena. 8 p.m. – Micah Kunzer • 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. – Extension HomeSunday, July 21 makers’ Flower Show in Exhibition 10 a.m. – Victory Chapel ComCenter Hall B. munity Church Service • 1 p.m. – Walk-A-Llama (open to public) Noon to 1:30 p.m. – Times of in Llama Barn. Refreshing! Praise Band  • 1 p.m. – Sheep Fitting Contest in Show 2 to 4 p.m. – Mike Butler and Arena. Slim Pickins Bluegrass Band • 3 p.m. – 4-H Meat Goat Show in Show 2 p.m. – Youth Pedal Tractor Arena. Pull • 4:30 p.m. – Horse & Pony Mounted 3 p.m. (approx.) – Adult Pedal Color Guard in the Horse Arena. Tractor Pull • 5 p.m. – Llama Costume Contest in the 5 p.m. – Antique Tractor Parade Llama Barn. 6 p.m. – Pet Parade • 6 p.m. – 4-H Dairy Goat Show in Show 7 p.m. – Demolition Derby Arena. Monday, July 22 • 6 p.m. – 4-H Beef Barbecue Contest at 2 and 4:30 p.m. – Youth Talent Rabbit Tent. Show Contest • 7 p.m. – Open Homemade Ice Cream

discounts for fair food. The fair isn’t just for 4-H’ers. In addition to the food, animals, projects and variThe fun begins July 18 as the 2013 Hamilton County 4-H Fair officially opens to the public. As the days click away ous events, the community has several opportunities before the start, 4-H projects are be- to showcase its talents. Open events for the public to preview ing judged and displayed inside vari- participate include the Pet Parade, homemade ice cream contest, youth talent contest, youth and adult tractor ous buildings and the approximate pulls and Farmer Olympics 1,600 livestock animals that will call the 4-H fairgrounds A new feature this year is two ATMS on the fairgrounds. home for the next few days will move in July 17. Bohde said one machine will be placed outside near the There is no charge for food court and the admission or parking at other will be around the 4-H Fair, and most the Extension Homeactivities are also free.  maker’s kitchen in the Hamilton County 4-H Exhibition Center. Youth Development “People had Leader Kathleen Bohde stopped in and asked said projects from about them,” Bohde the 1,963 4-H’ers will said. “It’s more conbe on display to the venient for fairgoers… community – showIt helps the public out casing the work and since no one on the knowledge gained by Craig Kemp competes in the Lawn and Garden Tra grounds takes credit participants. ctor Pull last year. (File pho to by Robert Herrignton ) cards.” “The Hamilton Sarah Hammer and County 4-H Fair is a Kerilyn Schmidt are great way to showcase agriculture second-year members of 4-H. Both are looking forward to and to remind county residents where their food and fibers come from,” she said. “The whole process is learn- the start of the fair because they enjoy seeing the variing. From aerospace to veterinary science, 4-H has some- ous projects and seeing the rewards of theirs. “I can’t wait to see what ribbons I get,” Jolly Rogers thing for everyone.” 4-H Club member Hammer said. Hamilton County Purdue Extension officials estimate “I like looking at other people’s projects because it’s between 10,000 and 20,000 people will attend this year’s fair. Because the fair does not charge admission, officials fun,” Schmidt, a member of the newly formed Fishers Showstoppers 4-H club, said. “I also enjoy showing pigs.” say they have no way of knowing the exact attendance Christy Kettler is a member of the Jackson Hotshots each year. 4-H Club and a 10-year member. “It’s a great family atmosphere,” said Susan Peterson, “I’m looking forward to my last shows with all my Hamilton County Purdue extension director. “The fair is friends I grew up with,” she said. “This being my last time fun for all ages.” makes me sad.” A cake reception to honor the 4-H fair’s 75th anniverOne thing all 4-H’ers can agree on is how much they sary will be at 6:30 p.m. July 18 in Exhibition Center Hall look forward to the fair food. Proceeds from all the food B. Special events for the 2013 4-H Fair include the Silly vendors support Hamilton County 4-H and other commuSafari Animal Show (July 20, 3:30 p.m.), Demolition Derby (July 21, 7 p.m.) and a blood drive sponsored by the Hamil- nity programs – and everyone has their favorites. “Vanilla milk shakes,” Schmidt said. ton County 4-H Council and the Indiana Blood Center (July “The grilled cheese and milk shakes,” Kettler said. 19, 2-6 p.m.) Blood drive participants will receive special

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Contest, east of Show Arena. • 6 p.m. – Llama Limbo & Leaping Llama Exhibition in Llama Barn. • 7 p.m. – 4-H Consumer Clothing Revue in Exhibition Center. • 7:45 p.m. – 4-H Sewing Fashion Revue in Exhibition Center. Fashion Revue will begin after Clothing Revue finishes. • 8 p.m. – Walk-A-Llama (open to public) in Llama Barn. Saturday, July 20 4-H Fair Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Exhibit Buildings Open: 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. • 8 a.m. – 4-H Swine Show in Show Arena. • 8:30 a.m. – 4-H Public Speaking in Exhibition Center Hall A. • 9 a.m. – 4-H Llama Showmanship in Llama Barn. • 10 a.m. – Horse & Pony Dressage in the Horse Arena. • 11 a.m. – 4-H Demonstration in Exhibition Center Hall A. • 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. – Mini 4-H Projects on display in Exhibition Center. • Noon – Deadline for Livestock Auction entries, action demonstration registration and talent show registration for both junior and senior divisions. • 1 p.m. – 4-H Llama Field Obstacle in Llama Barn. • 1 p.m. – Antique Tractor Pull at Tractor Pull Strip. • 2 to 9 p.m. – Extension Homemakers’ Food and Craft Show on display in Exhibition Center. • 4 p.m. – 4-H Action Demonstration Contest in Exhibition Center Hall C. • 4:30 p.m. – Horse & Pony Mounted Color Guard in the Horse Arena. • 6 p.m. – Horse and Pony Contesting Show in the Horse Arena. • 6 p.m. – 4-H Dog Drill Team Demonstration in Rabbit Tent. • 5 p.m. – 4-H Cat Show in Exhibition Center. • 6 p.m. – Leaping Llama Exhibition in Llama Barn. • 7:30 p.m. – Walk-A-Llama games and activities (open to public) in Llama Barn. • 8:30 p.m. – Llama Limbo in Llama Barn. Sunday, July 21 4-H Fair Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. Exhibit Buildings Open: 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. • 9:30 a.m. – 4-H Sheep Wool Open Judging in Show Arena. • 10 a.m. – Community worship service by Victory Chapel Community Church in Rabbit Tent. • 10 a.m. – 4-H Horse and Pony English Show in Horse Arena. Horse and Pony Hunt Seat will follow the English Show. • 10 a.m. – 4-H Sheep Show in Show Arena. • Noon – 4-H Pocket Pet Show in Exhibition Center. All Pocket Pets must leave the 4-H Grounds immediately following judging. • Noon to 6 p.m. – Extension Homemakers’ Food and Craft Show and Mini 4-H Projects on display in Exhibition Center. • 1 p.m. – Lawn and Garden Tractor Contest, east of Show Arena. • 1 p.m. – Walk-A-Llama Games and Activities (open to public) in Llama Barn. • 2 p.m. – Youth Pedal Tractor Pull at Rabbit Tent. Continued on Page 16


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July 16, 2013

4-H FAIR

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

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• • •

2:30 p.m. – Parents’ Llama Show in Llama Barn. 3:30 p.m. – Adult Pedal Tractor Pull at Rabbit Tent. 5 p.m. – Antique Tractor Parade in Tractor Pull Strip. 5 to 7 p.m. – Food and Microwave Champion Auction in Exhibition Center. 6 p.m. – Pet Parade at Rabbit Tent. All pets must leave the 4-H Grounds immediately following the parade and owners must bring proof of current rabies vaccination. 7 to 9 p.m. – Do-Si-Squares in Exhibition Center. 7 p.m. – Demolition Derby in Tractor Pull Strip. There will be a cost for admission. 7 to 10 p.m. – Swine Check-out for all swine not going to Livestock Auction. 7:30 p.m. – Farmer Olympics in Horse Arena. Monday, July 22 4-H Fair Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Exhibit Buildings Open: 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. 9 a.m. – 4-H Beef Show in Show Arena. 9:30 a.m. – 4-H 1/16th Tractor Pull in Rabbit Tent. 10 a.m. – 4-H Horse and Pony Versatility Show in Horse Arena.

• 2 p.m. – Hamilton County Talent Contest (Junior Division) in Exhibition Center. • 3 p.m. – Royal Showmanship in Show Arena. • 3:30 p.m. – 4-H Rocket Launch, south of Tractor Pull Strip. • 4:30 p.m. – Hamilton County Talent Contest (Senior Division) in Exhibition Center. • 7 p.m. – Supreme Showmanship in Show Arena. Tuesday, July 23 4-H Fair Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. • 7 a.m. to noon – Non-sale livestock check-out in animal buildings. • 9 to 11 a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. – Mini 4-H and 4-H projects released. State Fair Livestock and Nonlivestock information available in Exhibition Center Hall B. • 4 p.m. – Joint Producers’ Barbecue • 5:30 p.m. – Livestock Auction in the Show Arena. Wednesday, July 24 • 9 a.m. – Clean-up at the Hamilton County 4-H Grounds.

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July 16, 2013

4-H FAIR

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Bring a healthy appetite

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

What would a county fair be without food? There are a lot of options available at the Hamilton County 4-H Fair – fair food some good, some not so healthy, and some you can only get once a year. Here are a few ways you can fuel up at the fair: Extension Homemakers’ Specials Those that need a break from the heat or spend all their time at the fair and need a home cooked meal should check out the Extension Homemakers’ Kitchen inside the Exhibition Center, southwest of Hall B. Breakfast is available 8 to 10:30 a.m. with specials available 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday to Sunday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday. This year’s meal schedule includes: Thursday – spaghetti and breadsticks; Friday – chicken & noodles; Saturday – meatloaf; Sunday – Swiss Steak; and Monday – ham & beans.

Producers’ Barbecue Outside in the commons area (next to the Small Animal Barn) is the individual species and joint producers’ food. The joint producers barbecue is available 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday to Monday. Individual species (food products that come from particular animals), which vary each day of the fair, are available from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Days include: dairy, Thursday; rabbit and poultry, Friday; pork, Saturday; sheep, Sunday; and beef, Monday. Food Tents More than 15 food booths will be located right outside the Hamilton County 4-H Exhibition Center and in the 4-H Commons. Vendors include county 4-H clubs and local churches, organizations and businesses. Each tent will offer something different – milkshakes, candy, fruit slushies, corn on the cob, chicken fingers, elephant ears, gyros, walking tacos, etc. While every vendor can sell water, soda pop can be purchased in the Junior Leader Soda Shop next to the entrance of the Small Animal Barn.

Hamilton County 4-H Clubs – There are 40 4-H clubs in Hamilton County including three new ones: Fishers Showstoppers led by Lisa Swain in Fishers, 4-Ever 4-H led by Susan Young in Carmel and Highlands 4-H Club led by Bryan and Michelle Vackar in Carmel. Combined they consist of 1,963 4- H’ers, including 483 first-year members and 153 mini 4-H’ers. Other clubs available in Hamilton County include: Clover Kids, White River Blue Ribbon, Sheridan Merry Makers, Sheridan Ag, Carmel Colleens & Gents, Carmel 4-C’s, Carmel 4-Star 4-H’ers, Carmel H4, Fire Crackin’ 4-H’ers, Fishers Four Leaf Clovers, Friends Forever, Jolly Rogers, Mudsockers, Progressive Farmers, Royal Rascals, Southeastern 4-H’ers, Husky 4-H’ers, Jackson Hotshots, Forest Hill, Heartland 4-H’ers, Noblesville H & H, Stringtown Pikers, Winners Unlimited 4-H Club, Westfield All American 4-Hers, Westfield City Slickers, Westfield Cloverleaves, Westfield Whiz Kids, Shamrock Shakers, New Heights, Walnut Lassies & Laddies, Harey Hoppers, Shooting Sports, Hamilton County Jr. Sheep Assoc., Llama Trekkers, Four Leaf Clover Cloggers, Giddy Up Gang, Trail Blazers and Sterling Shields Stables. IBC to host blood drive at fair – Fairgoers can give blood during their visit to the Hamilton County 4-H Fair on July 19. The Indiana Blood Center’s Mobile Unit will be open from 2 to 6 p.m. north of the Swine Barn. Donors will receive a voucher for a free milkshake courtesy of Hamilton County Farm Bureau, Inc. and a ticket to upgrade a meal in the Hamilton County Producers Tent to use any time during the 2013 4-H Fair, along with other incentives provided by the Indiana Blood Center. IBC is the agency through which lifesaving blood and blood components are supplied to more than 60 member hospitals throughout central and southern Indiana. IBC provides vital assistance to modern medicine through other related services including specialized blood typing for organ transplants, viral marker testing, tissue banks and the National Marrow Donor Program.

Homemade ice cream contest – Bring the family recipe and join the fun at the Homemade Ice Cream Contest at the Hamilton County 4-H Fair on July 19. The contest will be at 7 p.m. in the 4-H Commons on the east side of the Show Arena. The contest is open to all Hamilton County residents. Each team of two to four people will have 40 minutes to make its favorite ice cream recipe. Prizes will be awarded in three categories. They are: all flavors – electric freezer, all flavors – crank freezer and youth (ages 19 and under). A special award will be given to the team who best demonstrates the “Art of Ice Cream Making.” Participants using recipes with eggs must use cooked eggs, egg substitutes or powdered eggs. Teams must furnish their own supplies and register in the 4-H Office by 5 p.m. July 19. For more information or a registration form, visit www3.ag.purdue.edu/counties/hamilton/Documents/ IceCreamContest.pdf or contact the Purdue Extension Hamilton County Office at 776-0854. Help 4-Hers feed the hungry – Hamilton County residents can join the Hamilton County 4-H Program, Riverview Hospital and Good Samaritan in the ninth annual “4-H CAN Make a Difference” food drive in conjunction with the Hamilton County 4-H Fair. The public is encouraged to bring nonperishable food items such as canned soup, vegetables, beans, peanut butter, pasta, cereal/ oatmeal, powdered milk and rice to the fair. The food banks strive to acquire nutritious food for low-income families and individuals in our community. Drop off items in Exhibition Center Hall B during the 4-H Fair July 18 through 23.

Pet parade – Youth and their pets can explore their creativity by dressing in costumes to participate in the Hamilton County 4-H Pet Parade on July 21. The Pet Parade will be at 6 p.m. in the Rabbit Tent (west of the O.V. Winks building) at the Hamilton County 4-H Fairgrounds, 2003 Pleasant St., Noblesville. Participants must be 2 to 8 years old and accompanied by their favorite pet. All participants will receive a ribbon and awards will be given to the most creative participants. Participants are to report to the Rabbit Tent at 5:30 p.m. for registration. Proof of the pet’s current rabies vaccinations must be provided at time of registration. Immediately following the event, all Pet Parade pets must leave the 4-H Fairgrounds.

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1 0 - yea r membe r s • Corey Beck • Scott and Shantel Beck • Husky 4-H’ers • Matt Biddle • Ronald Biddle and Rebecca Adair • Sheridan Ag • Kathryn Bradberry • Jeff and Lisa Bradberry • Carmel 4 C`s • Emma Brown • Jeff and Cynthia Brown • Harey Hoppers • Annaka Burtron • Todd and Tami Burtron • Sheridan Ag • Allison Carey • Pete and Hollie Carey • Westfield Whiz Kids • Clayton Carley • Cliff and Angie Carley • White River Blue Ribbon • Stephanie Chinn • Deborah and Jeff Chinn • Westfield City Slickers • Jill Crampton • Tana and Jim Crampton • Stringtown Pikers • Kerrie Ecker • Jeannie and Keith Ecker • Jackson Hotshots • Jonathan Fenimore • Joseph and Sharon Fenimore • Fishers Four Leaf Clovers • William Fettig • Jennifer and Kevin Fettig • Jolly Rogers • Lauren Gibson • Margot and Joe Gibson • Carmel 4 C`s • Michele Gohr • Karen and Scott Gohr • Heartland 4-H’ers • Nathan Hahn • Rick and Sue Hahn • Husky 4-H’ers • Keltie Haley • Kathy and John Haley • Trail Blazers • Mackenzie Hamrick • Steve and Linda Hamrick • Noblesville H & H • Levi Hiatt • Dale and Jackie Hiatt • Westfield Cloverleaves • Cayley Higginbotham • John and Kimberly Higginbotham • Husky 4-H’ers • Shannon Ipock • Jeff and Donna Ipock • Progressive Farmers • Ben Isaacs • Jamie and Adrian Isaacs • Harey Hoppers • William Kelly • Melanie and Stuart Kelly • Stringtown Pikers • Grace Kicinski • Greg and Vickie Kicinski • Mudsockers • Kyleigh Kimbrell • Keith and Lillian Kimbrell • Clover Kids • Jessica Klemen • Donald and Julie Klemen • Carmel 4 C`s • Philip Klinger • Mike and Elaine Klinger • Heartland 4-H’ers • Lauren Kramer • John and Diane Kramer • Westfield All American 4-H’ers • Amber Kriech • Ken and Sharon Kriech • Carmel 4 C`s • Audrey Leonard • John and Deanna Leonard • Walnut Lassies & Laddies • Peter Lintzenich • Joseph and Karla Lintzenich • Westfield City Slickers • Miranda Lipps • Randy and Sheri Lipps • Progressive Farmers • Jana Lowery • Cindy and Kerry Lowery • Jolly Rogers • Skyler Majors • Tony and Jenna Majors • Husky 4-H’ers • Melanie Marshall • Charles Marshall and Karen Marshall • Harey Hoppers • Matthew Michaels • Jeff and Beth Michaels • Mudsockers • Quinn Miller • Scott and Teresa Miller • Progressive Farmers • Lea Mills • Deb and Philip Mills • Husky 4-H’ers • Kelly Moorhous • Kathy and Greg

Moorhous • Husky 4-H’ers • Macy Mullen • Cynthia Mullen and Michael Woolen • Sheridan Ag • Madison Mullen • Cynthia Mullen • Sheridan Ag • Travis Nuckols • Bill and Karen Nuckols • Sheridan Ag • Allison Osborne • Scott and Karen Osborne • Harey Hoppers • Raechel Patton • Rebecca Patton • Progressive Farmers • Wyatt Phillips • Laura and Joseph Phillips • Sheridan Ag • Colton Pouch • Terri and Mark Pouch • Four Leaf Clover Cloggers • Jack Powell • Jack Powell and Vicky Beechler-Powell • Southeastern 4-H’ers • Kaitlin Purdy • Emily and Steve Purdy • Westfield All American 4-H’ers • Ian Ransford • Brett and Kathy Ransford • Royal Rascals • Miranda Reuter • Laura and Mark Reuter • Walnut Lassies & Laddies • Nicholas Reynolds • Jackie and Steve Reynolds • Mudsockers • Monica Richards • Billy and Annette Richards • Heartland 4-H’ers • Brandon Ridings • Gary and Cathy Ridings • Heartland 4-H’ers • Kelly Ritter • David and Cindy Ritter • Westfield All American 4-H’ers • Briana Rooke • Steve and Cheryl Rooke • Mudsockers • Rebecca Roper • Joel and Dee Roper • Walnut Lassies & Laddies • Katherine Rueffer • Shannon and Marc Rueffer • Carmel 4 C`s • Kathleen Rulon • Jay and Jan Rulon • Walnut Lassies & Laddies • Brad Russell • Laura and Daryl Russell • Progressive Farmers • Olivia Ruthsatz • Greg and Beth Ruthsatz • Royal Rascals • Erin Scully • Steve and Kim Scully • Mudsockers • Zach Shepard • Brett and Andrea Shepard • Husky 4-H’ers • Carrie Smith • Wes and Janet Smith • Mudsockers • Veronica Smith • Ron and Karen Smith • Progressive Farmers • Austin Stewart • Mark and Betty Stewart • Westfield Whiz Kids • Alexandria Tate • Scott and Kathy Tate • Jackson Hotshots • Emily Wack • Jim and Joann Wack • Stringtown Pikers • Amelia Warren • Mike Warren and Lisa Meek • Giddy-Up Gang • Olivia Weprich • Will and Beatriz Weprich • Carmel 4 C`s • Kyle Wethington • Gene and Denise Wethington • Stringtown Pikers • Jacqueline Wieneke • Theresa and Kurt Wieneke • Friends Forever • Andrea Young • Lori and Mike Hippensteel • Walnut Lassies & Laddies • L. J. Young • J.C. and Kathy Young • Progressive Farmers Nine-year members who cannot be 10-year members in 2013: Andrew Butler, Kelsey Cross, Hannah Davis, Clara Garner, Alison Hittle, Sydney Johnson, Christin Kettler, Claire Meyer, Courtney O’Malia, Rachael Pielemeier and Kelly Schuetter.


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July 16, 2013

VIEWS

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Y O U R V I E W S

FR O M   T H E BACKSHOP More vitality coming to City Center tract

Losing focus It is our position that the alarming increase in the diagnosis of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, more commonly known as ADHD, should be closely monitored. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diagnosis of the disorder has escalated more than 50 percent in the U.S. during the past 10 years with one in five high school-aged boys being diagnosed. The most commonly prescribed treatments are stimulants commonly known as “study drugs.” Unfortunately, many of the individuals prescribed these “study drugs” are now distributing them among fellow students who don’t have prescriptions for the drugs, thereby using them as “mental steroids.” These drugs also are addictive and can cause anxiety. Since the diagnosis of ADHD is purely based on feedback from patients, parents and teachers, the question must be begged, “Why the increase in diagnosis and is drug therapy really necessary in all cases?” Interestingly, diagnosis of ADHD is not nearly as high in Hispanic and African American populations. Possibly the difference is due to lack of education on the issue, social stigma or varying perceptions of lack of concentration being categorized as a “disorder” that needs treatment. If the trend in “brain juicing” continues to escalate, it is a very troubling sign indeed.

Air traffic control Commentary by Terry Anker In the modern world, we have a strong variety of choice at our disposal. A dizzying array of food, lifestyle, and other options arrive in waves prompted by the stunning success of our capitalistic system from the past quarter of a millennium or so. Our grandparents (or even parents) would be amazed by the thousands of options of new products and services available to enhance or extend life. In the area of transportation alone, automobiles are safer, faster and more efficient and luxurious than at any previous time in our history. Airplanes fill the skies such that most cities of any consequence are all scrambling to invest in enlarged or redeveloped airports to keep up with the volume. This new-found mobility has flooded the roadways with scores of commuters overwhelming capacity and leading to calls for more efficient means of conveyance like the efforts aimed at regional transportation. But in the context of these seismic shifts in

consumer habits, one still has to figure out the best way to get from Indianapolis to Chicago for the mother-in-law’s birthday party. There was a time, in a U.S. domestic pre-terror world, that the fastest way to make the trip was a commuter flight. The airport was closer (the new terminal is great but it seems to take 30 minutes longer to get there) and the lines were short. One could arrive, park and board a plane in a third the time it now takes. Today is a very different story. The good folks at the Airport Authority (the name conjures up brown shirts and jack boots) work hard to make air travel stress-free, but when is it simply easier to drive? Is it distance, time or TSA agents who seem angry at you before you meet them that determines the route?

Terry Anker is an associate editor of Current Publishing, LLC. You may e-mail him at terry@currentincarmel. com.

Q U O T E   O F  T H E   W E E K Wanna write us a letter? You can do it a couple ways. The easiest is to e-mail it to info@currentinwestfield.com. The old-fashioned way is to snail mail it to Current in Westfield, 30 S. Range Line Road, Carmel, IN 46032. Keep letters to 200 words max (we may make exceptions), and be sure to include your home ZIP code and a daytime number for verification.

“When we protect ourselves from what we fear, we also undermine our capacity for wonder.”

- Johnathan Martin

It’s looking like Carmel City Center will have a boost in the not-too-distant future, bringing added vitality with the coming construction of The Nash. It’s a $10-million, public-private partnership between the city and Pedcor, which developed City Center, and it is the next phase in making reality a true downtown hub of activity at City Center Drive and South Range Line Road. The three-story building is an idea whose time has come. We like the way central Carmel is evolving, and the addition of 31 apartments of varying layouts and 8,000 square feet of street-front commercial space is appealing from aesthetic and economic-development standpoints. The project represents the combined vision of Mayor Jim Brainard and developer Pedcor’s president and CEO, Bruce Cordingley. Underground parking should set the table for even more pedestrian traffic at street level, which should bring about a certain vibrancy. And the project will rise out of the soil with more dispatch than did City Center, whose construction progress, begun in March 2006, severely was hampered by the cratered economy. The Carmel Redevelopment Commission is administering this project, which is responsible for the redevelopment efforts of both the Carmel City Center and Carmel Arts & Design District. City spokeswoman Nancy Heck stated the CRC manages other public-private partnerships where city land is being redeveloped to improve economic growth of targeted areas. Brainard and the Carmel City Council are responsible for the appointment of CRC members. The design will be New Urbanism. The CRC and the City Council have allowed Pedcor to use the property taxes that would have been paid on the building to pay the debt on parking-area construction. Pedcor can then invest in an additional level on the building, increasing the overall tax income on the property, Heck stated. It makes sense to us, and we’re enthused by the continued development of the 88-acre tract. Brian Kelly, publisher, and Steve Greenberg, general manager, are co-owners of Current Publishing, LLC. Write them at info@ youarecurrent.com.

BELIEVE IT! Our nation has all sorts of arcane, nonsensical laws on the books. Each week, we’ll share one with you. In Excelsior Springs, Mont., hard objects may not be thrown by hand.

Source: dumblaws.com


July 16, 2013

VIEWS

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

She pulls her in every time

Commentary by Danielle Wilson

I confess. This past weekend I committed a cardinal sin of parenting. No, I didn’t divulge Yogurtz plans to a toddler before humor we were actually pulling into the parking lot (that would be madness!) or retract a disciplinary verdict once the tears began (their tears, not mine), but I did break a mommy rule that I constantly critique other parents for disregarding. And though it pains me to admit that I am, on occasion, less than perfect, I’m hoping you can learn from my mistake. Here it goes. I engaged in an irrational argument with my 9-year-old daughter. There. I said it. I know, I know, I wasn’t in a good place when I went to check on her, and I should have walked away as soon as I saw that she was safe. But I was tired and irritable and as soon as she began crying and screaming, well . . . I just got sucked right in. Something about how I had lied to her and had broken my promise of staying away from people who smoke, including my husband Doo (because now I was going to die from lung cancer) . . . ugh, she made me so angry that I jumped right into the crazy and treated her as if she were a hostile, adult witness. Of course, as soon as I removed myself from the controversial situation, albeit way too late, I thought, “You’re an idiot, Danielle.” Doo concurred. “You know better than to engage her! She’s a

drama queen. She’s going to push all of your buttons so she can get and keep your attention.” I hate it when he’s right. I honestly think God gave me a gorgeous little girl/future Oscar winner as penance for my tendency to judge others’ parenting decisions. Not to their faces, of course. That’s just mean. But behind closed doors unfortunately, analyzing the way other people handle their children is, and always has been, one of my favorite pastimes. (At least it’s not porn!) In my defense, I empathize now, too, though that piece of maturity apparently goes unnoticed by God as He seems to enjoy watching me struggle almost daily with a precocious tween. It’s just so much harder to squelch tantrums when you’re emotionally involved. I have no issue dealing with nieces and nephews when they lose their wheels, but as soon as it’s one of mine, in particular a daughter, I can’t seem to stay “above the fray.” I completely disregard the “Shallow Water” sign and dive in head first. Stupid. We all have our parenting challenges; mine is avoiding middle-school arguments with my children. Ah, well. Who wants Yogurtz? Peace out.

Danielle Wilson is a contributing columnist. You may e-mail her at danielle@currentincarmel.com.

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July 16, 2013

VIEWS

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Bob Carter is dead, but not Sammy Saturday night cat attack special Commentary by Mike Redmond

The news came in the form of a text that said, simply, “Sammy Terry died.” How sad. And how wrong. If you took a look at the World Wide Interweb humor thingie in the days after the story broke, with comments by the hundreds on Facebook, you would have seen that Sammy Terry was more alive than ever in the memories of all us kids who peeked from behind sofa pillows (or, in the case of my brother, the sofa itself), when “Nightmare Theater” was showing on WTTV Channel 4. The death of Bob Carter, who created and played Sammy from 1962 to 1989, brings a couple of ideas to mind. The first is how much fun it used to be to watch a scary movie. Of course, my definition of scary has little in common with what passes for a scary movie today, unfortunately. I’m a big fan of the classic monsters – Frankenstein, Dracula, the Wolfman, the Mummy. Why? Because despite the visual impact of the monsters themselves, their movies rely on your mind to do most of the scaring. Blood and gore – the stock in trade for scary movies for the last three decades or so – aren’t necessary. The sight of the Frankenstein monster coming to life or Dracula’s riveting stare was more than enough to send a kid’s imagination into

high gear. One of the greatest – and spookiest – shots in any classic monster movie has to be in The Mummy, after Im-Ho-Tep comes back to life. As he shuffles away, the camera fixes on a piece of linen trailing after him out of the room, and you just know bad things are going to start happening. Bob’s death (I met him a couple of times so I’m taking the liberty of calling him Bob) also brings to mind how much we’ve lost with the death of local entertainment television. Kiddie shows like “Cowboy Bob’s Corral,” “Janie,” and “Harlow Hickenlooper” were just the beginning. Remember Jim Gerard’s interview show? I always thought that was one of the best things about being home from school. Oh, well. That’s why we have memories, I guess. Which gets us back to Sammy Terry. Bob Carter, the man who played spooky ol’ Sammy on Channel 4 during the 60s, 70s and 80s, might have gone, but Sammy himself? He’ll be around forever, or at least for as long as guys like me remember his spooky laugh, his spider George, and the creepy-campy fun of the classic monster movies he loved. Mike Redmond is an author, journalist, humorist and speaker. Write him at mike@ mikeredmondonline. com or P.O. Box 44385, Indianapolis, IN 46244.

Commentary by Dick Wolfsie

As of this past Saturday morning, I had nothing to write about. Then the cat bit my wife. I know, a cat bite is nothing humor to make fun of. Neither was my lung biopsy, but I managed to crank out an entire humor column about that several weeks ago. Mary Ellen had pretty much forgotten about the feline attack, but that night after dinner with friends, she casually mentioned the redness on her ankle while on the way home in the car. Bob and Cathy, both armed with their iPhones, were in the back seat googling away, entering phrases like: Fatal cat bites and, lethal kitten puncture wounds. Once Bob and Cathy had convinced my wife that the swelling was either pasteurella multocida or staphylococcus aureus, we headed for the nearest walk-in med center. I know that’s a really dumb way to spend a Saturday night with friends, but with my wife’s excellent health insurance, it was actually a cheaper evening than all four of us going to the movies. Before she was treated, Mary Ellen had to fill out a form. The first part was titled “Victim Information.” The second section was labeled “If the Victim Was an Animal,” which is either the kind of man-bites-dog story I’m always looking for as a reporter, or if it’s a dog bites dog story, then I want to be there with a news

crew when Fido picks up a pen and fills out that form. The receptionist said there was a long line to see the doctor and requested that Mary Ellen put herself on the waiting list and come back in an hour or so. I told the nurse that the next time my wife needed medical attention like this, we’d try to call about 45 minutes before she planned to torment the cat. Mary Ellen did not think that was funny. Cats and dogs aren’t the only attacking culprits. In fact, one part of the form provided a list of species that could potentially bite a human. They were in alphabetical order, so the first one on the list was bats, and number two was cattle (which I think would be embarrassing to admit to.) Okay, maybe a mad cow, but how do you let an entire herd bite you? When we finally saw the doctor, he confirmed the potential severity of a cat wound and suggested that an X-ray be taken to be sure the ankle bone had not been penetrated. Cathy, who was by now the leading cat bite expert in Central Indiana, wanted to know why that procedure was necessary. “Because the cat is now missing two front teeth,” I told her.

Dick Wolfsie is an author, columnist, and speaker. Contact him at wolfsie@aol.com.

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“A child sneaks out of the house, runs away, is hyper, has minimal focus and can’t socialize with friends for more than a minute. That used to be our son, Jack.

• SOCIALIZATION: Why is my child having difficulty making friends? • IMPULSIVENESS: Why doesn’t my child understand consequences of his/her actions? • FOCUSING: Why does my child have problems paying attention in school and at home? • HYPERACTIVITY: Why can’t my child sit still, and has trouble getting to sleep or staying asleep? • ANGER: Why does my child display such anger and gets out of control with his/her emotions? If you can relate to any of these questions there is help.

People think the answer to autism and ADHD are psychiatric medicines, but we knew that was only going to cover up his real symptoms. Despite this, we tried several mainstream treatments that produced little to no results. In the six months that Jack has been on the protocol through ASD Treatment Clinics, he has experienced much improvement with his focus, learning ability, behavior and overall wellbeing. Early intervention is very important for children on the autism spectrum and we thank God that we were led to the ASD Treatment Clinic. Jack now has a treatment that we can trust will improve not only his life but the lives of our entire family.” - Renee and Ted Zlotopolski, Arnold, MO

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July 16, 2013

VIEWS

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Cartoonist was drawn west

Commentary by Tim Campbell

Most of you only know me as the guy offering up the weekly Currentoon in the paper, but I thought I would break tradition and try my skills at communicating with more verbiage and less visual. Last week, I ventured to the American West and attended my first convention of the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists in Salt Lake City. Having arrived a day early, I spent most of my first afternoon walking the city visiting Temple Square, The Pioneer Museum (Utah’s attic), The Capitol building and a local downtown pub appropriately named “The Beerhive” (Utah is the “Beehive” state), where I received the unfortunate education that only 3.2 beer is served locally. Hello, vodka. The first day of the convention was held at The Leonardo (a cool museum combining science and art) and featured various sessions on The Art of Controversy. The highlight of the day came in the evening with the annual Cartoonist Death Match at the Tavernacle Piano Bar. In this event, four editorial cartoonists were given the chance to show their cartooning skills (and their firm grasp of foul language). Fortunately for the patrons of the Tavernacle, the participants were mercifully shot with a Nerf gun if they ran over their allotted time. The eventual champion was Steve Benson of The Arizona Republic, but I’m sure the judges’ decision still is in dispute as of this writing. The second day also was filled with various sessions on our craft, but the most interesting for myself was a discussion given by Jann Haworth. Jann, along with her former husband, designed the cover of The Sgt. Pepper’s Lonley Hearts Club Band album back in the 1960s. Along with many tales she shared about the Beatles and the album cover, the most amusing story she told concerned getting written permission from the various (living) celebrities that were to have their likenesses included on the cover. Having written and asked permission from Mae West, the legendary sex symbol/actress responded by asking why she would have any association with a Lonely Hearts

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Reconstructive Hand Surgeons of Indiana Respected Nationally, Providing Care Locally. Our physicians are Board Certified orthopedic surgeons with additional fellowship training in care of the hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder. With on-site diagnostics and specially trained occupational therapists, our team is structured to provide the highest quality care in the most comprehensive and convenient setting. Dedicated to providing an accurate diagnosis and and a treatment plan that will consider your unique circumstances, RHSI will get you back to what you enjoy as quickly as possible. Included in the spectrum of conditions we manage are:

Club. Thankfully, an explanation of the album cover’s concept was given and her classic image is included for eternity. Perhaps the most epic event for all of us occurred at the Natural History Museum of Utah where we spent an evening with a living legend in our profession, the great Pat Oliphant. Oliphant has been doing editorial cartoons since most of us were eating crayons. He charmed and delighted us at 77 years young in his Australian and tales of the good ol’ days when newspapers were abundant and lampooning former President Richard Nixon in caricature was a daily delight. Overall, I found my first AAEC convention to be phenomenal with respect to the people I met. It’s an amazing and satisfying feeling to be surrounded by so many people I admire (many of them Pulitzer Prize recipients); I came to realize they already knew of me and my work before I arrived. I left Carmel as a fan of all these talented and passionate people and returned from Salt Lake as their friend. I can’t wait for next year’s convention. Tim Campbell is the editorial cartoonist for Current Publishing. You may e-mail him at tim@currentincarmel.com.

Left to right: Dale Dellacqua MD, Michael Pannunzio MD, Alex Meyers MD, Lance Rettig MD

• Fractures, dislocations, tendon problems • Arthritis of the hand, wrist, elbow and shoulder • Nerve compression disorders • Congenital deformities, tumors • Deformity and dysfunction from old injuries • Rotator cuff injuries • Microsurgical reconstruction • Vascular disorders of the hand

Fishers - St. Vincent Medical Bloomington Bone & Joint Clinic Zionsville - Witham Health Carmel Ambulatory Center Northeast Services at Anson & Endoscopy Surgery Center 639 S. Walker St., STE E 13421 Old Meridian St., STE 200 6085 Heartland, STE 200 13914 Southeastern Pky., STE 301 Bloomington, IN 47403 Fishers, IN 46037 Zionsville, IN 46077 Carmel, IN 46032 (812) 333-4000 Opt. 2 (317) 249-2616 (317) 249-2616 (317) 249-2616

www.indianahandsurgeons.com

One of those days? Help is just around the corner.

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3

316 S Range Line Rd, Downtown Carmel Hours 9-6 M-F and 10-3 Sat. Call anytime.


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July 16, 2013

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

UPCOMING EVENTS at klipsch music center

» Train: Mermaids of Alcatraz Tour with the Script and Gavin Degraw – July 19 » Bad Company & Lynyrd Skynyrd: The XL Tour – July 20 » Luke Bryan: Dirt Road Diaries 2013 – July 21 » Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival 2013 – July 26 » Blake Shelton: Ten Times Crazier Tour – July 27 » Heart w/ Special Guest Jason Bonham Led Zeppelin Experience – July 30 » Summer Break Tour: Big Time Rush & Victoria Justice – August 2 » Honda Civic Tour Featuring Maroon 5 – August 3 » Under the Influence of Music Tour: Wiz Khalifa, A$AP Rocky & More – August 4 » Miranda Lambert & Dierks Bentley: Locked & Reloaded Tour – August 9 » John Mayer: Born & Raised Tour 2013 – August 10 » America’s Most Wanted Festival Starring Lil’ Wayne – August 13 » Black Sabbath – August 18 » X-Fest / Rockstar Energy Drink Uproar Festival – August 23 » Keith Urban – Light the Fuse Tour 2013 – August 24 » Kid Rock – August 25 » Mumford & Sons – September 2 » Ford F-Series Presents Toby Keith with Kip Moore – September 7 » Jason Aldean – September 21

HVB-164-ReturnVisitPromo-Current-21x11-07/16-FNL.indd 1


July 16, 2013

Current in Carmel

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Got guests? Get out and hear some live music! Celebrate the 25th birthday of central Indiana’s favorite outdoor music venue, The Klipsch Music Center, by inviting family and friends to attend a live concert. It’s the hottest summer lineup yet. Combined with one of the many super cool deals being offered by any of Hamilton County’s many hotels, and you’ve got the makings of an irresistible summer getaway package.

Create your own customized postcard to send to family and friends at VisitHamiltonCounty.com/postcard Spread the word.

just north of indy arts

W

history

W

shopping

W

dining

W

biking

W

hiking

TOURISM WORKS for Hamilton County!

7/9/13 11:56 AM


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July 16, 2013

Current in Carmel

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July 16, 2013 • currentnightandday.com

THIS WEEK Art of Wine – Enjoy a summer evening savoring unlimited wine tastings, music, art and Carmel District’s shops and restaurants CARMEL at the IU Health North Hospital Art of Wine, a can’t-miss event in the Arts & Design District, 111 W. Main St., July 20 from 5 to 10 p.m. Only adults 21 and older may participate in the wine tastings. Many of the district’s boutiques and merchants will host sales or promotions during the festival and the galleries will host exhibits that spotlight wine-inspired works. The cost is $15 per person and must be paid in cash. For more information, call 571-ARTS or visit www.carmelartsanddesign.com/.

Unique writer’s event coming to The Palladium

By Karen Kennedy • karenk@youarecurrent.com For one day only on July 20, The Palladium Theatre will be transformed from a home for musical arts into a setting where event the literary arts can be explored and celebrated in all of their various formats. Readers, writers (and especially those who aspire to be writers) can participate in a daylong writer’s studio featuring celebrity authors, screenwriters, columnists, publishers, editors, filmmakers and social media experts called Across the Arts. Writers Organizer J. Andy Murphy, together with the Center for the Performing Arts, has created this one-of-a-kind event. She has assembled an impressive team of writer panelists including Simon and Schuster author and Pulizter Prize finalist Michael Shelden, Academy Awardwinning screenwriter Angelo Pizzo, novelist and screenwriter Dan Wakefield, author Edward Kelsey-Moore (of Knopf Publishing,) Emmy-winning documentarian Michael Husain, and columnists Matthew Tully, Cathy Kightlinger, Jolene Katzenburger, T.J. Banes, novelist and publisher Ann Craig Cinnamon, children’s book author and poet Rebecca Dotlich, and humorist (and Current Publishing’s own) Dick Wolfsie. Publishers and editors Representing the publishing and editing side of the business will be: Ray Robinson, Dog Ear Publishing, Pat Terry, The Saturday Evening Post, Peter Froelich, Indiana University Press, Travis diNicola, Indy Reads Books and Tom Britt, Towne Post Publishing. Social media experts Three area experts will be on hand to discuss the role social media now plays in written communication. Amy Stark, of Stark ReAlity Check, Ben Risinger, of the Fox 59 WXIN “Do It Indy”

Murphy

Knox

Banes

Moskalenko

Brainard

Peterson

show, and Elizabeth J. Musgrave, syndicated fine-living and travel columnist. Filmmakers Andie Redwine, By the Glass Productions, Kate Chaplin, Karmic Courage Productions, Dan Hall, Vizmo Films and June Clair will represent the filmmaking industry. Film festival executives Louise Henderson, president of the Heartland Film Festival, Tim Irwin, director of Heartland Truly Moving Pictures, and Carmel High School teacher and actor Jim Peterson, who serves as

Froelich

Pizzo

Husain

Shelden

Irwin

Wolfsie

a narrative juror in the Heartland Film Festival will serve this special genre. Other special guests Event moderators will include: Indianapolis Monthly editor Amanda Heckert, Tania Castroverde Moskalenko, the president of the Center for the Performing Arts, author and WriteStuffWriters partner Marcia Ellett and television personalities Susanne McAlister and Amber Strong. The event will be hosted by WISH-TV anchor Debby Knox, along with Murphy. Carmel’s First Lady Liz Brainard is slated to appear as well.

Across the Arts The event will take place from noon to 6 p.m. and will be divided into two sessions of panelists. Current Columnist Dick Wolfsie will host a game show called, “Wait, Wait, Do Tell Me!” The event will close with a wine and cheese party provided by Dulce Martinez of Crush and Brew, followed by a screening of a film from Heartland Truly Moving Pictures. Tickets are available through The Center for the Performing Arts box office, 843-3800, or online at www.thecenterpresents.org. Current readers who mention the promo code “WRITESTUFF” are eligible for a discounted admission price of two tickets for $30. Student tickets are $18.00. A portion of all ticket sales will be donated to “All Access,” a program that provides field trips to the Center for the Performing Arts for K-4 students. More information is available at www.writestuffwriters.com, or on twitter: #acrossarts13.

Concert – Head to the Nickel Plate District Amphitheater, 6 Municipal Dr., tonight, July 16, for Dave & Rae’s performance FISHERS as part of the Fishers Summer Concert Series. The show is free and is from 7 to 9 p.m. Expect a huge turnout for this concert. Beat the crowds, and get there early for the best spots on the lawn in front of the amphitheater Hamilton County 4-H Fair – From Thursday, July 18 to Tuesday, July 23, the Hamilton County 4-H Fairgrounds, 2003 PleasNOBLESVILLE ant St., will be host to the annual county fair. The fair includes animals, food, exhibits by 4-H members, fun for the entire family. Each day contains new shows and food opportunities. Admission and parking are free. For a complete listing of events, contests open to the public and more fair information, visit www.currentnightandday.com. Historic Underground Railroad Ghost Walk – Join Unseenpress for a brief encounter with Westfield’s most haunting WESTFIELD legends and folk tales at 9 p.m. Saturday, July 20 at Asa Bales Park, 132 W. Main St. The walking tour is filled with stories of ghosts of the Underground Railroad and those who helped them escape mixed with modern day gangsters and mischief from Westfield’s haunted history. Reservation required. Cost is $18 and $13 for children and seniors 65 and older. For more information, call 840-6456 or visit www.unseenpress.com. Lincoln Park Concert Series – Bring your chairs or blanket and join fellow concert goers from 7:30 to 8:40 p m. July 17 at zionsVILLE Lincoln Park for Bluegrass on the Grass featuring Cornfields and Crossroads. For more information, contact Cynthia Young at 873-4900.


July 16, 2013

NIGHT & DAY

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Beach Bash • Who needs wednesday to travel outside the state for the beach, sun and fun? Stop by Morse Park & Beach for music, games and splashing in the water. Free to first 200 guests. • 19777 Morse Park Lane, Noblesville • 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. • Contact Joe Robeson at 770-4400 Summer Concerts at the Gazebo: The BackBeats • Love the Beatles? The BackBeats, a Michigan-based musical group, plays a musical tribute to the ‘60s rock band. • 1 Civic Square, Carmel • 7:30 p.m. • Free • www.carmelgazeboconcerts.org/index.html Hamilton County 4-H Fair • Watch a pygmy goat show or pet parade, participate in the youth talent contest and much on your favorite fair foods at the 4-H Fair. • 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. through July 23. • Hamilton County Fairgrounds, 2003 E. Pleasant St., Noblesville • Admission & parking is free • 776-0854 • http://www.hamiltoncofairgrounds.com/

thursday

Noblesville Summer Concert Series • Local country artist, Jessie Brown, performs. She has opened for Travis Tritt and Toby Keith on tours. • Forest Park, 701 Cicero Rd., Noblesville • 7 to 9 p.m. • Free • 776-6350 • www.cityofnoblesville.org Westfield Farmers Market • Americana Bank has opened its parking lot each Friday evening during the summer for Westfield’s Farmers Market. Stop by and browse through the array of vendors present. • 33333 Ind. 32, Westfield • 5 to 8 p.m. • Free

friday

Marsh Symphony on the Prairie: ‘50 Years of Rock ‘n’ Roll: Music of the Rolling Stones’ • The Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, along with vocalist, Brody Dolyniuk and conductor, Brent Havens, present music from one of the greatest rock ‘n’ roll bands, the Rolling Stones. • Conner Prairie Amphitheater, 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers • 8 p.m. tonight and Saturday, July 20. Gates open at 6:30 p.m. for picnicking; guests are encouraged to bring food and drinks. • $23 in advance for adults; $12 for children from Marsh, Main Street, and O’Malia supermarkets; $28 at the gate of the performance day for adults; $14 for children. • 639-4300 • www. indianapolissymphonyorchestra.org

Train “Mermaids of Alcatraz” • Tour with Special Guests, The Script and Gavin Degraw • Soft rock band, Train, performs; several hits, including “Hey, Soul Sister,” “If It’s Love,” and “Marry Me,” have reached successful heights on the Billboard 100. • 12880 E. 146th St., Noblesville • 7 p.m. • Tickets start at $24 • 776-8181 • www.livenation.com Carmel Farmers Market • One of the largest farmer’s markets in Indiana features more than 60 vendors, in addition to cooking demonstrations and music. Guests can also enjoy free parking. • 1 Center Green, Carmel • 8 to 11:30 a.m. every Saturday through Oct. 5 • 710-0162 • www.carmelfarmersmarket.com

saturday

Fishers Farmers Market • An array of foods ranging from locally grown fruits and vegetables to honey, jams and hot breakfast items will be on display at the market’s new location at the Fishers amphitheater on the north side of Fishers Town Hall. • 1 Municipal Dr., Fishers • 8 a.m. to noon through Sept. 28 • Contact Carol Doehrman at 5780700 • www.fisherschamber.com Saxony Farmer’s Market • Farm fresh produce, artisanal foods and baked goods from local vendors; live music; visitors are welcome to play a game of corn hole. • 13578 E. 131st St., Fishers • 8 a.m. to noon • 770-1818 • www.saxony-indiana.com/ market.html Noblesville Farmers Market • The 22nd annual market will display its locally grown produce, in addition to baked goods, plants, flowers, arts and crafts. • Riverview Hospital overflow parking lot, Ind. 19 and Ind. 38, Noblesville • 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. through Oct. 12 • Free • 776-0205 • www.noblesvillemainstreet.org Zionsville Farmers Market • More than 35 vendors show a colorful display of breads, pastries, cheeses, as well as farm-fresh eggs, meat, fruits and vegetables; live music and special events. • The corner of Main and Hawthorne streets, Zionsville • 8 to 11 a.m. through Sept. 28 • Free • farmersmarketzionsville@gmail.com • www.zionsvillefarmersmarket.org Sheridan Bluegrass Jam • Bluegrass fans may come to listen to or jam with other banjo/fiddler players; guests are encouraged to share food and drinks (no smoking or alcohol) • Sheridan Public Library, 103 W. 1st St., Sheridan • 1 to 5 p.m. • Free; donations welcome • Call Steve Martin or Robin Morris for more information at 345-1211 or 345-1221 • www.bluegrassfever.net

sunday

Carved in Stone

Present the 2013

Adults - $5

12 & under - Free

M

Fishers Summer Concert Series: ‘Dave and Rae’ • Indianapolis-based band, Dave and Rae, plays an energyinfused mix of pop, rock, disco, hip-hop and country. Guests are encouraged to bring blankets, chairs, and picnic food/drinks at this free concert. • 6 Municipal Dr., Fishers • 7 to 9 p.m. • 595-3150 • www.fishers.in.us/department/?fDD=9-0

Today

Pre-Sale 5 for $20

The great outdoors are even greater in Limestone Country! Thanks to the limestone terrain, we have rolling hills to hike, caves to explore, rivers to paddle and one of the best state parks around. Pack your sense of adventure, your walking shoes and carve out some time for fun and excitement in Limestone Country. (Luckily, we have some great spots to relax and spend the night, too!)

Just 1-1/2 hours south of Indy!

limestone country.com 1-800-798-0769

Cool Creek Park 2000 East 151st Street, Carmel/Westfield For details call 317-770-4400 or visit myhamiltoncountyparks.com

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July 16, 2013

NIGHT & DAY

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

AN OPTION

Pizza King The Scoop: At Noblesville’s Pizza King restaurant, old-fashioned meets innovation. Don’t like waiting? No problem. At Pizza King, each table has its own phone which allows you to order food and drinks right from your chair. Pizza King offers more than just pizza. Sandwiches, wraps, salads, and strombolis are just a few of the items featured on the menu. Pizza King is a family style restaurant that also has its own delivery service. Dining out or staying in, Pizza King is waiting on your call. Type of food: Pizza, pasta, sandwiches Price of entrees: entrees start at $7 Specialties: Pizza Food Recommendation: The Royal Feast Dress: Casual Hours: 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday and noon to 10 p.m. Sunday. Phone: 14 Harbourtown Center, 877-0636; 1225 S. 10th St., 770-1738 Website: www.pizzakingindiana.com

WHERE I DINE Aldon Duckett, manager, Oobatz Where do you like to dine? Puccini’s What do you like to eat there? I always have the fettuccine alfredo. What do you like about Puccini’s? I like it because it’s small, nice and cozy. Puccini’s has two locations in Hamilton County: 13674 N. Meridian St., Carmel, 580-0087; and 8993 E. 116th St., Fishers, 579-0572. They may be contacted at www.puccinissmilingteeth.com.

BEHIND BARS spiced cranberry cooler Bartender: Angie Carter at Wolfies Grill, 7695 Crosspoint Commons, Fishers Ingredients and directions: Combine 1 1/2 ounces Malibu Spiced Rum, 2 ounces cranberry juice and 1 ounce Sprite in a glass shaker. Pour into a large iced glass. Garnish with an orange slice.


July 16, 2013

NIGHT & DAY

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

The grilling season is still going strong

SUMMER

Take advantage of the sunny weather, and keep the grill going this week. Crank up the heat with Chipotle Crusted Pork Tenderloins, or indulge in a veggie option with Grilled Portobello Mushrooms.

FUN IS HERE! OUTLAW MUD BOG Fri, July 19, 7:00pm DEMOLITION DERBY Sat, July 20, 7:00pm GARDEN TRACTOR PULL TRUCK & TRACTOR PULL Sun, July 21, 7:00pm NAT’L TRUCK & TRACTOR PULL Mon, July 22, 7:00pm HOT AIR BALLOON RIDES Tues, July 23 & Thurs, July 25, 7:00pm

NEW CHEF’S FEATURES MADE FROM SCRATCH! NEW ITEMS EACH WEEK!

DAILY SPECIALS

Sunday - Thursday | 1/2 price appetizers | 3pm - 6pm & 10pm - CLOSE Including our famous Under Construction Tuesday | Burger Night | Burger, Fries & Beer under $10! Nick's Burger $5 • Specialty Burgers $6 • Add fries $1 • Corona/Corona Lt $3 Wednesday | 1/2 price Martinis, 1/2 price bottles of wine

STREET TRUCK MUD BOG Wed, July 24, 7:00pm

INFLATABLE GAMES DAILY

COMMERCIAL

BLDG EXHIBITS

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FREE FAIRGROUNDS ADMISSION FREE PARKING

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Grilled Portobello Mushrooms

Ingredients: • 1 teaspoon onion powder • 1 teaspoon garlic powder • 3 tablespoons chipotle chile powder • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt • 4 tablespoons brown sugar • 2 (3/4 pound) pork tenderloins Directions: Preheat grill to medium-high heat. In a large re-sealable plastic bag, combine the onion powder, garlic powder, chipotle chile powder, salt and brown sugar. Place tenderloins in bag and shake, coating meat evenly. Refrigerate for 10 to 15 minutes. Lightly oil grill grate, and arrange meat on grate. Cook for 20 minutes, turning meat every 5 minutes. Remove from grill, let stand for 5 to 10 minutes before slicing. Recipe via user KRAMNODROG and photo by user mominml on www.allrecipes.com

18

Chipotle Crusted Pork Tenderloin

Ingredients: • 3 Portobello mushrooms • 1/4 cup canola oil • 3 tablespoons chopped onion • 4 cloves garlic, minced • 4 tablespoons balsamic vinegar Directions: Clean mushrooms and remove stems, reserve for other use. Place caps on a plate with the gills up. In a small bowl, combine the oil, onion, garlic and vinegar. Pour mixture evenly over the mushroom caps and let stand for 1 hour. Grill over hot grill for 10 minutes. Serve immediately. Recipe via user BFOLLICK and photo by Allrecipes via www.allrecipes.com

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www.facebook.com/BooneCo4HFair www.extension.purdue.edu/boone

SUMMER

CONCERT

SERIES

July 18 The Tides July 25 Dane Clark Located on the Grassy Knoll just east of Kona Grill and Mitchell's. Bring lawn chairs and coolers. Plenty of nearby parking.

110 W. Main St., Carmel, IN 46032 | 317.571.0091 www.detourcarmel.com

TEXT TO WIN: EACH WEEK TWO $20 SIMON GIFT CARDS WILL BE AWARDED. Must be present to win. Terms and conditions apply.

ALL SHOWS 7 p.m. - 9 p.m SPONSORED BY


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July 16, 2013

NIGHT & DAY

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Pinheads – 13825 Britton Park Rd., Fishers – www.bowlatpinheads.com Saturday – The Why Store Casler’s Kitchen & Bar – 11501 Pavilion Dr., Fishers – www.caslers.com Friday – The Ripple Effect Saturday – Ryan Caudill And The Country Kross Roads Hopwood Cellars Winery – 12 E. Cedar St., Zionsville – www.hopwoodcellars.com Friday – Less Is More Saturday – Seismic Souls Three Ds’ Pub and Café – 13644 N. Meridian St., Carmel – www.threedspubandcafe.com Friday – Stella Luna Saturday – ‘Nuff Said Moon Dog Tavern – 4825 E. 96th St., Indianapolis – www.moondogtavern.com Thursday – Andrew Young Friday – Lemon Wheel Saturday – Toy Factory Sunday – Note to Self Hearthstone Coffee House & Pub – 8235 E. 116th St., Fishers – www.hearthstonecoffee.com Wednesday – Josh Kaufman Friday – LoopDaddys Saturday – Songwriters hosted by Branch Gordon Monday – Jon England Cobblestone Grill – 160 S. Main St., Zionsville – www.cobblestonegrill.com Wednesday – Jon England Thursday – Jon England Friday – Willie & The Tease Saturday – Matt Rousch

lIvE MUSIC

MONDAYS: (bar only) $3.50 mojitos & $10 pitchers WEDNESDAYS: 1/2-price bottles of wine THURSDAYS: Live music 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. $4 Cosmo (Valid 7.18 & 7.25)

14159 Clay Terrace Blvd., Carmel, IN 46032

317.575.9005 | STANFORDS.COM

SOR musicians hit the road

By Kathleen Devaney • editorial@youarecurrent.com Just like Jack Black got his band to battle in the movie “School of Rock,” Carmel’s own School of Rock battled it out June 29 and 30 at Summerfest, “the world’s largest music Music festival” in Milwaukee, Wisc. SOR bands played stages at Summerfest among artists like Pitbull, The Silversun Pickups, Alice Cooper and others. This year’s Battle of the Bands competition was called Gemba (which is Japanese for the “real place.”) There were 30 bands representing 21 Schools of Rock from across the country competing. The winner of the entire SOR competition hailed from Seattle, Washington. While SOR Carmel may not have made it into the six final bands to compete, the school of just more than a year old rocked out and played perfectly. “We were proud of our kids,” said the owner of SOR Carmel Steve McFarland. “In the end, the kids got an experience most musicians would kill for... playing on big stages at the largest music festival in the world, they met new friends, and saw just how good they can become when they stick with it.” SOR Carmel played six songs from a variety of artists. “Our covers of Led Zepplin, Soundgarden and the Doobie Brothers were flawless,” McFarland said.

School of Rock musicians perform at Summerfest in Milwaukee, Wisc. (Submitted photo)

Bands were judged by members of the Cold War Kids, the guitarist from Bowie, the drummer from Stray Cats and others. SOR Carmel consisted of 13 band members, ages ranging from 11 to 17 years old. Members played with different members depending on each song. “We don’t actually put kids in bands, we cast a show,” McFarland said. Since SOR Carmel has been open, bands have played venues such as Old National Centre, The Hard Rock café Indianapolis and the Van’s Warped Tour. The drummer for SOR Carmel, Cameron McLenaghen, said he was excited for Summerfest because it’s a good opportunity. “I’ve played a lot of shows before so I’m not nervous,” he said. SOR Carmel of whom has about 100 students, all mostly joined at beginners experience levels.

SEPTEMBER 28–29 SATURDAY 10am–6pm SUNDAY 10am–5pm

MAIN STREET IN THE CARMEL ARTS & DESIGN DISTRICT Free Admission • Entertainment on 2 stages This annual Art Festival brings together 135 juried artists, competing for top honors in their media fields with works in: Fiber/Mixed 2D, Photography, Oil/Acrylic, Watercolor, Ceramics, 2D Traditional, Printmaking, Jewelry, Wood and 3D Traditional. Sponsored in part by:

www.CarmelArtsFestival.org


July 16, 2013

NIGHT & DAY

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Supreme is more than a title

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

because someday they envisioned themselves in the contest and worked harder on their projects.” Back before Plum Creek Golf Course, NorthSupreme Showmanship started with five aniview Christian Church and three housing admals – beef cattle, dairy cattle, ditions 4h fair were built swine, sheep and horses – and has expanded to include around dairy goats and meat goats. East 126th Street in Carmel, the The contest, which is held on land was home to purebred Monday evening’s of the fair, shorthorn cattle and Berkshire is the culminating event of hogs. the fair besides the livestock Lynnwood Farm was deauction. veloped by Charles Lynn who “I’m thrilled and pleased was the vice president of Eli to know this contest has Lilly. The 632-acre farm was become so popular,” Peterson owned by Purdue University said. and run by Bob Peterson. “People you haven’t seen In addition to the responsifor years come that night,” Pebilities of running the massive terson’s wife, Trudy, said. “It’s farm, Peterson was heavily Bob Peterson holds a picture of really has become a crowd involved in 4-H with his chilthe first Supreme Showmanship dren. In 1972, Peterson created contestants. From left: Terry (Quear) pleaser.” Peterson’s children claimed the Supreme Showmanship Boone, cattle; Beth (Lancaster) the first three titles – Janet contest Moon, horses; Janet (Peterson) White, sheep; Marilyn (Foland), pigs; (Peterson) White, 1973; Ann “Our goal to begin that and Johnny Roberts, dairy. (Photo by (Peterson) Day, 1974; and John was to further recognize the Peterson, 1975. Ann’s sons, youngsters in the county that Robert Herrington) Nathan and Cameron, also won the contest in were doing a good job promoting their livestock 2003 and 2008 respectively. at the county fair,” he said. “My hope is the “You knew what you were going to do that younger kids see the older ones presenting their Monday night of the fair,” Nathan said. “The animals in Supreme Showmanship and they will stands are packed. I’ve judged at other county take better care of their animals the next year

Brownsburg Chamber of Commerce

Presents:

the 35th Annual

Featuring: Artists and Fine Crafters • Food • Free Hands-on Arts and Crafts Children’s Area • Live, Local Entertainment $3 Admission, children 12 & under FREE For more information, call

317-852-7885 Saturday, July 20, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Arbuckle Acres Park

Located 1 mile S. of I-74 just 8 miles NW of Indianapolis. Exit 66 on highway 267

www.brownsburgfota.com

“Hands-down the best use of our advertising dollars” Our ads in Current in Zionsville get great response! Most of our new customers say they found us through Current in Zionsville. I'm very happy with Current, hands-down the best use of our advertising dollars. Now you know why I'm always smiling!

489.4444

www.youarecurrent.com

- Paul Henderson, owner, Paul Henderson Plumbing

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July 16, 2013

HEALTH

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Swine-flu threat changes policies

By Robert Herrington • robert@youarecurrent.com

Custody Child Support Prenuptial Agreements Adoptions Education Law

According to the Indiana Board of Animal Health, 29 pigs from the Grant and Hancock counties fairs have wellness tested positive for variant influenza A (H3N2v), causing 12 human cases of swine flu as of July 3. To ensure the safety of Hamilton County 4-H Fair patrons, organizers are taking extra precautions – “over and above what the Indiana Board of Animal Health have recommended” according to Bill Rice, Hamilton County ag and natural resources extension educator. “We understand a lot of people want to see the animals but we’re just trying to think of their safety,” he said. “We’re discussing asking the public not to enter the (swine) barn. This is all part of public health safety to protect them.” Patrons should know that you can’t get swine flu from eating pork products. It’s a respiratory virus that’s passed the same way any other flu is spread, through droplet infection. Since there is no vaccine available for people to protect against this virus, the best way to prevent infection is to avoid sources of exposure to the virus. Rice said animal move-in day is July 17, before the start of the 4-H fair on July 18, but this year all swine will not be allowed on the fairgrounds until July 19. The incubation time is estimated at 72 hours and IBAH officials say the shorter amount of contact hogs have together the less likely the influenza A will pass from animal to animal. Rice added that like all animals, swine will be subjected to a check from a veterinarian before being allowed in the barn. “Those animals not going to the livestock auction will leave Monday morning,” he said. Unlike many counties, Rice said Hamilton County is requiring that their swine have two doses of the influenza A vaccination – with the last dose administered before June 30. “We’ll have a signed, notarized affidavit to that affect,” he said. “With the 72-hour period and vaccination protocol, we’ve certainly minimized

Rachel Flanders shows a swine during last year’s Supreme Showmanship contest. (File photo)

the risk,” In addition to an increased number of hand sanitizer stations at barn entrances and across the fairgrounds, Rice also suggests that parents with young children carry them when walking through barns. “They are at the same level of the animals breathing and try to touch them,” he said. Emily Peterson and her sister, Jenna, have two hogs each. Both are aware of the rule changes this year. “I think the shots are a good thing because it prevents the disease in the barn,” Emily said. “People come to the fair to see the animals.” Both girls said the biggest change will be the care of their animals. Since both show more than one species, move-in day is usually a long one as they prepare the temporary living quarters for their animals. This year, they will have to go through the process twice and care for their swine at home as their animals are at the fair. “We usually stay at the fair until 10:30 or 11 o’clock,” Jenna said, adding she’ll have to wake up earlier and leave the fair earlier when her hogs are not at the fairgrounds. Variant influenza A H3N2v was identified in Indiana last year, with a total of 138 cases in 2012.

Riverview Hospital executive honored FACHE distinction. To obtain fellow status, candidates must fulfill multiple requirements, including passing a comprehensive examination, meetAntonio D. Stewart, regional director of ing academic and experiential criteria, earning long term care services at Riverview Hospital, continuing education credits and demNoblesville, achievement was recently onstrating professional and community involvement. Fellows also are committed recognized to ongoing professional development and as a Fellow of the American College of undergo recertification every three years. Healthcare Executives. In addition to this recent honor, Stew“We are extremely proud of Tony’s acart also has been selected to participate complishment,” said Pat Fox, president in the Future Leaders of Long Term and CEO of Riverview Hospital. “This Stewart Care in America program hosted by the prestigious fellowship requires rigorAmerican Health Care Association/National Cenous criteria and indicates Tony has achieved the ter for Assisted Living. After a competitive review highest standard of professional development. process, Stewart was one of 35 long-term care We’re honored to have someone of this caliber professionals who were chosen to be part of as part of our team.” this program. Only 7,500 healthcare executives hold the news@currentinwestfield.com


July 16, 2013

DOUGH

Current in Carmel

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Is your jewelry protected?

Commentary by Jamie Ianigro

Question from Anonymous from Zionsville: I’m getting ready to buy an expensive piece of jewelry. What do I need to do to make sure it’s properly protected? Insurance Response from Jamie Ianigro: Congratulations! I hope you get the answer you’re hoping for. As you have recently realized, jewelry is high-valued, easily lost or destroyed and vulnerable to theft. Jewelry is covered on a standard home policy, but usually has a special limit on the total amount of coverage (usually a few hundred dollars). It doesn’t sound like a few hundred dollars is going to cover your potential purchase. Luckily, there are a few options available to protect your jewelry. Adding an endorsement to your home policy is the easiest way to protect your jewelry, but you can also purchase a separate policy or roll the dice and leave it uninsured. When deciding which method you are going to go with, there are a few questions you should keep in mind: • Does the coverage consider jewelry values that increase over time? • Does it cover mysterious disappearance (it’s gone, but you don’t know when or how it disappeared)? • What causes of loss does the policy cover and exclude?

The next thing you need to figure out is what your piece of jewelry is worth. Since this item will be newly purchased, you have a store receipt or certificate from the jeweler. If you don’t have a receipt or the item has not been appraised recently, it’s time to seek out an expert and get an updated appraisal. Sometimes a jewelry store that you frequent will offer free appraisals, but usually you have to pay for an appraiser’s services. The American Society of Appraisers is a good resource if you’re looking for an appraiser. You can use the “Find an Appraiser” feature on their appraisers.org website. It is common practice to have your appraisals updated every three to five years. In addition, there are a few other things you should consider doing: • Take photos of your jewelry from several angles • Keep original receipts and appraisals • Consider keeping your jewelry in a hidden safe or storage area Make sure you’re not being overprotective though. Jewelry is bought to be worn and can’t be enjoyed sitting in a safe. Jamie Ianigro is with Shepherd Insurance & Finanacial Services. Have an insurance question you need answered? Send it to asktheadvisor@shepherdins.com.

2013 HAMILTON COUNTY 4-H FAIR FRIDAY, JULY 12 7PM 4-H Queen Pageant THURSDAY, JULY 18 10AM Exhibits Open 9AM 4-H Dairy Show 1PM 4-H Pygmy Goat Show 4PM Extension Homemakers Flower Show FRIDAY, JULY 19 10AM Exhibits Open 8AM 4-H Rabbit Show 9AM Chicken Barbecue 10AM 4-H Horse & Pony 1PM & 8PM Walk-A-Llama 2-7PM Blood drive 3PM 4-H Goat Show 6PM Llama Limbo 7PM Homemade Ice Cream Contest 7PM 4-H Fashion Revue SATURDAY, JULY 20 10AM Exhibits Open 8AM 4-H Swine Show 10AM 4-H Horse & Pony 1PM Antique Tractor Pull 2PM Extension Homemakers Craft Show 5PM 4-H Cat Show 7:30PM Walk-A-Llama SUNDAY, JULY 21 10AM Exhibits Open 10AM Worship Service 10AM 4-H Horse & Pony 10AM 4-H Sheep Show 1PM Walk-A-Llama 5PM Antique Tractor Parade 5PM Champion Food Auction 6PM Pet Parade 7PM Demolition Derby 7:30PM Farmer Olympics MONDAY, JULY 22 10AM Exhibits Open 9AM 4-H Beef Show 2PM Youth Talent Contest 3PM Royal Showmanship 7PM Supreme Showmanship TUESDAY, JULY 23 5:30PM 4-H Livestock Auction

Owners of Matt the Miller’s to expand By Karen Kennedy • karenk@youarecurrent.com CLB Restaurants, a Columbus, Ohio, restaurant group which owns and operates Matt the Miller’s Tavern in Carmel City Center, has recently consolidated its three Matt the Miller’s entities into a single holding company. “We undertook the merger to help put the company in a position for growth,” said Craig Barnum, president of CLB Restaurants. “The merger will help us meet our goal of opening two restaurants per year.” The original Matt the Miller’s Tavern opened in 2008, in Dublin, Ohio. The second location was opened in Grandview, Ohio, in 2011, and the Carmel location in September, 2012. The company also operates an Italian concept called Tucci’s in Dublin. “The Carmel restaurant has become our flagship restaurant and has performed well beyond expectations in its first year,” Barnum said. As a result, CLB is planning a second restaurant for City Center, a new concept called The Langton’s Irish Pub, within the next year. The concept behind Matt the Miller’s, according to company representative Jennifer Dring, “Is to offer an upscale feel without the upscale price, and to be a community gathering place.

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July 16, 2013

LIFESTYLE

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The new hipster look Commentary by Nikki Blaine

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Feel young again by adopting an effortless look, a long, flowy dress with light fabrics, subtle paisley prints or other soft The pleasure of dressing patterns for a stress-free day effortlessly and making a bold out-and-about. statement This year’s bohemian FASHION can be trend is all about mixing, mixstimulating with femininity, culture ing. Boho chic is all about emoand ethnicities, luxury, rock tion. The feeling of being free ‘n roll, etc. You can get this with a unique sense of relaxby the company you keep; ation, there’s nothing better your accessories – bracelets, with a carefree fit. Who doesn’t bangles, long chain necklaces want those feelings? Especially with pendants, rings, hair if it all can be made possible accessories, strappy shoulder through what you wear. Boho bags and scarves. Make this chic is back, better than ever diversified look all yours this and ready for your everyday life. summer and stand up and The carefully thrown together speak out against business look is still chic and easy gocasual. Spice things up and ing, but now the “traditional” bring your individuality to the hippie look we all imagine is table. Everyone wants to get modernized. We’re seeing classic to know the real you. And silhouettes, beading, dangling on that note, I am your Glam embellishments, eclectic prints, Photo courtesy Polina Osherov. Chic Gal signing off until next time. bold textures and patterns. Try out a wide brimmed, floppy hat with a flowy Nikki Blaine is “The Glam Chic Gal,” maxi dress or a fun texture to give any ordinary your fashion trend forecaster, and day a runway look. is a nationally known designer and Going on a date? Give that romantic touch owner of Nikki Blaine Couture Bouthrough your style and try out delicate laces tique on Main Street in ZIonsville. She can be reached at nikkiblane@ and flower patterns he’ll be sure to remember. gmail.com.


July 16, 2013

LIFESTYLE

Current in Carmel

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Teotihuacan is an ideal solution for pyramid seekers. (Photo by Don Knebel)

Mexico’s pyramids rival Egypt’s Commentary by Don Knebel

For anyone with an insatiable desire to see ancient pyramids and for whom a trip to Egypt is out of the question, Travel a trip to Mexico offers an ideal solution. Just a few miles from Mexico City are the monumental pyramids of Teotihuacan, one of the world’s most important cities during the first millennium. Teotihuacan was founded as a religious center on a highlands plateau in about 200 B.C. By 600 A.D., Teotihuacan had a population of up to 200,000, making it the largest city in what are now the Americas and the sixth largest city in the world, about a third the size of Constantinople. Multi-story apartment buildings accommodated the large urban population, which included skilled potters and artists whose remarkably well preserved murals are still on display. Teotihuacan’s brick and stone pyramids are connected by a broad boulevard. The Pyramid of the Sun, constructed in about 100 A.D. along the boulevard, is the third largest pyramid in the world. At 733 feet per side, its base is about the size of that of the Great Pyramid of Giza but it rises only half as high. The Pyramids of the Moon and of the Feathered Serpent, at opposite

ends of the boulevard, are smaller but equally impressive. The pyramids of Teotihuacan were built as places of worship, with temples to influential gods on their flattened summits. Bodies buried in the pyramids with their hands tied have been interpreted as sacrifices to those gods, probably made at the times the temples were dedicated. Teotihuacan collapsed in the seventh or eighth centuries. When Aztecs later discovered the ruins, they gave the city its current name, which means “the birthplace of the gods.” Mistaking the pyramids for tombs, they named its boulevard the “Avenue of the Dead.” Americans often assume they must cross an ocean to see the important cities of antiquity. But at about the time Rome was falling to the barbarians, Teotihuacan in nearby Mexico rivaled the great cities of the world in size and influence. A trip there provides the bonus of seeing a collection of pyramids whose only real rivals are in Egypt. Don Knebel is a Zionsville resident who works for Barnes & Thornburg LLP. For the full column visit currentzionsville.com. You may contact him at news@currentzionsville.com

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July 16, 2013

LIFESTYLE

Current in Carmel

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What about the Oxford comma? Commentary by Jordan Fischer

Question: “Have the rules for serial commas changed? When I was in school, it was ‘red, white and blue’ (the grammar guy second comma being unnecessary with the ‘and’), but in my children’s school books, it appears to be ‘red, white, and blue.’ Is there a rule about this?” (David Ballard) Answer: Thanks for writing in, David. The serial, or Oxford, comma is a popular point of contention between writers and grammar enthusiasts. It’s also the name of a popular single by the band “Vampire Weekend,” but that’s not really germane to this column. To answer your question: Yes, there is a rule about the serial comma – many of them. Which rule you abide by tends to be decided by what country you’re in or what style guide you follow. The “Chicago Manual of Style,” Strunk and White’s “Elements of Style,” and the AMA and APA stylebooks all mandate the use of the serial comma. It is also mandated by the “Oxford Style Manual” (thus an “Oxford comma”). The typical reasoning behind using the serial comma is to create

uniformity and to eliminate ambiguity about the relationship between the last two items in a series. On the flip side, omitting the serial comma has its proponents as well: “The New York Times Stylebook;” the AP Stylebook (used by the vast, vast majority of newspapers and magazines in the U.S.); the style guide of “The Economist,” the “Cambridge Guide to English Usage;” etc. Why not use the serial comma? The argument goes that it is redundant in simple lists since there is already a conjunction separating the last two items. On this particular grammar debate, in the end it’s a matter of choice and consistency. If you’re writing for a medical journal, or following the Chicago (or agreeing) style guide, use the serial comma. If you’re writing for a newspaper or magazine, omit the serial comma. Otherwise, pick a side, grab a style book and join the debate. Nobody likes a fight like grammar nerds.

Buddy system – A new app can help you meet savings goals. An iPhone application called PeerPressure allows you to “create goals and share progress” with your buddies. Balances, on the average, double “when peers monitored one another’s savings progress,” according to a study. – CNNMoney

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Jordan Fischer is a contributing columnist for Current Publishing. To ask Jordan a grammar question, write him at rjfische@gmail.com.

Oddball scents – A new collection of colognes – D.S. & Durga HYLNDS – uses different kinds of scents that set them apart, including smelted iron and marsh violet. Now, there’s a different smell! – esquire.com


July 16, 2013

LIFESTYLE

Current in Carmel

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The art of fabric selection

Commentary by Vicky Earley

Knit & Crochet Classes • Shopping • Fun

fabric feels when it is touched and how it drapes when held. Descriptions such as softness, crispness, dryness and silkiness are all terms that describe the hand of the fabric. Pattern is just as important to consider with window treatments. Remember that any pattern will be lost when the fabric is actually a drapery due to the pleating. Vicky Earley is the principal designer for Artichoke Designs in Carmel. If you have an interior design question, please contact artichokedesigns@aol.com.

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Recently, I was shown a fabric that a client had hoped to use to recover her sofa. The fabric was decorating purchased from the clearance rack at a local fabric store and met her need for a color match. She wanted my blessings before moving forward. Without saying a word, I took her swatch and with just five scrapes of a fingernail, I was able to dig a hole in the fabric. Needless to say, this was not a textile suitable for upholstery usage. It might have worked for a drapery application but it would have been a complete disaster on furniture. Upholstery fabrics have to withstand the lifestyle of those in the home. They are typically made of durable fibers and often backed with latex for stability. The durability of an upholstery candidate is indicated by a double rub factor. This is also referred to as the Wyzenbeek factor which is a testing system that indicates the ability of a fabric to resist surface wear caused by rubbing contact with another fabric – 15,000 is the minimum for heavy duty upholstery usage. Fiber blends are frequently the best choice as the negatives of one fiber can be balanced by a positive of another. Linen that is blended with polyester will be far more resilient to wrinkling, and polyester that is paired with cotton has a nicer sheen than poly alone. Upholstery is intended for the long haul so the pattern is just as important to consider. A floral or plaid all over a sofa or sectional can be overwhelming. A solid texture is an ideal choice as the accent pillows can be changed as tastes change. Ideal window treatment fabrics will feature different qualities. An ideal textile depends on the room and the application. Fabrics for drapery can be loose and delicate while a cornice or shade can be stiffer or coarse. The drapability of a fabric is indicated by “the hand.” This term simply means the way the

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Do you equip or enable others? Commentary by Kristen Boice

Do you tend to make excuses for the behavior or choices of others? Do you want to rescue or save others? Do you relationships want to help people and end up feeling exhausted? Are you working harder than the other person? Do you do things for others or stuff your feelings just to keep the peace? Do you rationalize or minimize other people’s choices or behavior in order to keep from being embarrassed? These are all key questions when exploring whether or not you are an enabler. What exactly does it mean to be an enabler? Enablers have good intentions of helping other people yet they provide solutions and fix things for others preventing them from suffering their own consequences. Ultimately, people never learn the lessons they need to make better choices and grow. Enablers end up doing the work for them and the person floats along without solving their problems. There is a big difference between enabling and equipping people. When we equip someone, we give the person the information or guidance and then let that person make their own decisions. We let go of the outcome and understand it is out of our control and the other person has to want to help themselves. We also let the person know they can handle it on their own. We understand we are doing a

disservice to another if we try to save or rescue them. They have to want to help themselves. We model what it looks like to have good boundaries by saying “No” when necessary. There is an understanding that we are all responsible for our own decisions. We empower others to step into who they are and help them learn from every decision they make. On the other hand, an enabler tends to want to save and rescue others. Enabling doesn’t allow the other person to make their own choices and understand the connection to the consequences. Many people have to learn from experience to not repeat the same mistakes. Enablers have a hard time seeing someone struggle and learn from their own choices. They take responsibility for other’s choices and somehow feel responsible themselves. We can often see an enabling pattern with parents. The best job we can do as parents is equip our children so they can make the best choices. Let them learn from their own choices and understand the cause and effect between choices and consequences both positive and negative. Ask yourself, “Am I equipping or enabling them?” before taking action. Kristen Boice is an individual, couples and family counselor and speaker with Pathways to Healing Counseling & Education. Contact her at kristen@pathwaystohealingcounseling.com.

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BEACH-READY ABS Confidence is the best accessory for your bikini, and there’s no better way to gain that confidence than with a good ‘ol fashion workout. Since it is bikini season, focusing on your abs can result in quick toning if paired with proper cardiovascular activity. Pair this toning ab workout with three to five days of cardiovascular exercise. You might surprise yourself with incredible results! SWISS SPORTS SWING Lie back, knees bent, feet flat on floor, arms at sides, palms down. Extend right arm overhead and left leg straight out, then bring right hand and left foot up toward each other as you curl your upper back off floor. Exhale; lower. Do 20 reps, then repeat on opposite side. TRUNK TWISTER Stand with feet together, arms down, elbows bent to 90 degrees. Jump about 6 inches to left as you twist torso right 45 degrees. Repeat in opposite direction for 1 rep. Do 3 sets of 20 as fast as you can. HIP SWIVEL Get into a plank position, resting on forearms with your hands clasped. Lift butt toward ceiling while rotating left hip toward floor; return to plank. Repeat on right side for 1 rep. Do 3 sets of 20. Admire your rock-star abs in the mirror.

Gel – Gel is great for almost every hair type and it will provide control and shine, while also enhancing volume. Ideal for spiking shorter hair, or laying down longer hair. Hold = 4 (Salon 01 suggests Gage Shaping Gel). Cream – Creams are less shiny then gels or pomades and work best on medium to long hair of any texture to build volume and density. Hold = 4 (Salon 01 suggests Gage Shaping Cream). Paste – Use this if you have thick and/or straight hair to improve texture and to achieve maximum control. Hold = 5 (Salon 01 suggests Gage Shaping Paste). SALON 01 Q&A: YOU ASKED, WE ANSWER! “How can I get smoother hair without damaging it?” We have a couple options at Salon 01 to get the smooth, silky hair you desire! The first is the Keratin Complex Smoothing Treatment or the Express Keratin Blowout. These services infuse keratin into your hair’s cuticles without overloading your hair with chemicals. The treatments are then sealed in with high heat from a flat iron. Generally, the results from these treatments last about six to eight weeks, depending on how well you maintain the upkeep regimens. The second option, which has become our most popular, is the Brazilian Blowout. This service enriches hair with amino acids and acai berry extract and creates a smooth silky finish that lasts up to 12 weeks. Each of these treatments will eliminate frizz in your hair as well as reduce drying and styling time.

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July 16, 2013

INSIDE & OUT

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Simple solutions can also be smart choices

Commentary by Randy Sorrell

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PC or MAC? Me, I’m a Mac junkie. Our business and family successfully transitioned a few years ago after an avalanche outdoors of viruses and clunky programs. We have been thrilled with the ease and how solutions seem to flow naturally. Our creative “green” industry is ripe for forward programs and the elegant Apple world. The biography of Steve Jobs, authored by Walter Isaacson, celebrates the brilliance of simplifying, among other progressive views, and his fruitarian lifestyle. His outrageously strong opinion proved that when implemented correctly, simple can also be very smart. Easy to operate. Gorgeous. Stunning. Simple. Smart. Brilliant. Curiously, the same can be said regarding outdoor living spaces and the design thereof. Complicated spaces can be a challenge to navigate and difficult to appreciate. Our interpretation of this brilliant simplicity translates to oversized patio landings, gracious step systems with flowing treads/risers, clean materials, natural stone, the use of anything real, repurposing where appropriate and plants that perform multiple functions (shade, privacy, color, fragrance, intrigue). The featured natural boulder retaining wall is oddly synonymous to the PC or MAC dilemma. Sure, the wall could have been constructed out

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The five-ton Indian Hill boulders simply, but smartly, hold the hot tub and patio in place. (Submitted photo)

of popular segmental retaining wall stone that frequents many neighbors’ back yards as seat walls (included elsewhere in this project). But, the locally sourced, five tons of Indian Hill boulders installed quickly, confidently holds the hot tub and patio in place, screams color, provides unique texture and looks stunning as the dragons blood creeping sedum and yellow moonbeam coreopsis make themselves at home. Which would you rather have?

“Design is not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works,” Steve Jobs Sorry to all the PC fans, but we’ve joyfully moved on without regret. Randy Sorrell is president of SURROUNDINGS by NatureWorks+, a Carmel home improvement firm. He may be reached at 679-2565, randy@choosesurroundings.com or www.choosesurroundings.com.


July 16, 2013

INSIDE & OUT

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Subway tiles are still a good choice

Commentary by David Decker

Subway tiles have been a go-to design choice in kitchens and bathrooms for generations. These rectangular shaped indoors tiles are excellent for creating a current, contemporary look that still feels very timeless. Today, subway tiles are being used in backsplash designs, flooring and more. The subway tile design first debuted in the New York City underground subway system back in the early 1900’s. The sleek, contemporary design quickly caught on with the general public, and soon the entire country was decorating kitchens and bathrooms with these “subway” tiles. Back then, most subway tiles were made from ceramic, measured 3 x 6 inches, and came in white. The key to their popularity was their ability to make any room look more open and airy. Plus, they were stain resistant and easy to keep clean, which was a huge bonus for homeowners who didn’t have the luxuries of modern cleaning equipment. More than 100 years have passed since those first tiles were laid, and subway tiles remain as popular as ever. Ceramic is still the most popular material, because it is easy to clean and maintain, but subway tiles can be found in almost every color, texture and finish imaginable, you can be sure that there is an option available to match any home décor. Manufacturers have even

reworked the 3 x 6 inch size standard. Now, almost any rectangular tile with a height twice its length is classified as a “subway tile.” The two most popular places where homeowners install subway tiles are in the kitchen and bathroom. But they’ve made the leap into other spaces that benefit from easy-care surfaces Subway tiles are easy to maintain. (Submitted photo) such as laundry rooms, basements and fireplace designers have used subway tiles to create dissurrounds. Many people love the way they can create sleek, modern looking backsplashes or tile tinctive border or frame patterns. Place a border around the shower area, or frame your bathroom surrounds. Visually, the shape of the tile tends vanity space. And don’t forget, these types of tile to draw the eye upward, which makes the space accents are a great way throw in a pop of color seem wider and the ceilings appear higher. This that won’t overwhelm the space. is especially true for the larger-sized subway tiles. Large-scale tile is becoming increasingly David Decker is president of the popular because its size tricks the eye into makAffordable Companies, which include ing the room look larger than it really is. Affordable Kitchens and Bathrooms and now Affordable Custom Flooring. When planning your subway tile placement, They are based in Carmel (575-9540, keep direction and accent pieces in mind. Shiftwww.the-affordablecompanies.com). ing the direction of the tiles can radically alter E-mail home improvement questions the look you are creating. Additionally, many to david.decker@the-affordablecompanies.com.

Signature Gala

2013 Saturday August 24

The Renaissance In Carmel 11925 N. Meridian Street

Presented By

Partner Sponsors

Event Schedule 6pm - 7:45pm 8:00 pm 8:30-9:30 p.m. 9:30-11:00 p.m.

Cocktails & Silent Auction Dinner Black Tie Optional Program and Live Auction Dancing to Lemon Wheel

Emcee

Tickets

$100Each / $1,250table of 10

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Current in Carmel

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Across 1. Swindle 5. Words of wisdom 10. Kind of stick at Mass Ave Toys 14. Like most Fishers streets 15. ISO instrument 16. WXIN’s “American ___” 17. Vincennes native in photo who was born 100 years ago this week (2 wds.) 19. Gusto 20. “The results ___!” (2 wds.) 21. Zionsville Farmers Market corn unit 22. Donatello’s staple 23. Responds to pain 25. Former WTHR anchor: Anne ___ 27. PC key 28. WIBC reception helper 32. Resembling used socks in a Monon Center locker 35. Stewed to the gills 36. Word before Castle and Harmony in Indiana 37. Camp Atterbury bed 38. Uptight (2 wds.) 42. Lullaby composer 45. Time capsule activity 46. Ex-Colts coach Meyer 47. Fairy tale brother 50. Surrounded by

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54. Improvise on “The Bob & Tom Show” 57. James Whitcomb Riley’s “nightfall” 59. Ham it up at The Tarkington 60. Displease Santa, according to song 61. Character of 17-Across: Freddie the ___ 63. Sicilian erupter 64. Part of UHF 65. Spinners from Toys”R”Us 66. Genuine 67. Plant again 68. UIndy Latin 101 verb Down 1. Drinker’s request at Bub’s 2. Former First Lady Daniels 3. Last name in Nordstrom cosmetics 4. Performance at Clowes Hall, often 5. Noblesville hardware store 6. The Current proofreader’s mark 7. Saint Maria Goretti church part 8. “Mine eyes have seen the ___...” 9. A long time at the Indiana Geological Survey 10. Conqueror of the Incas 11. Poems of praise 12. Big kid in an Indiana State

C P E E L E R

A G R A T E R P B

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C O N J U N C T I O N S T V A T U N W

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AND GPO LIND LOT MER NES NG PIN SEE TEN UNN UPL

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S I X T Y N I N E H Q E S

1) NFL Titans' State (3)

N A I P B K R M N E A I T B F E K E P C D A S E U T R

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2) Indiana Fever Coach (2) ___ ___ ___

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___ ___ ___ ___

4) Taylor University Town (2) ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

5) Red Wine Variety (2) ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___

Using the letters in WAL-MART, create as many common words of 3+ letters as you can in 20 minutes. No proper nouns or build the words foreign words.

6 Parts of Speech

5 Kitchen Tools

Use all the letter segments below to fill in the answers to the clues. The number of segments you will use in each answer is shown in parentheses. The dashes indicate the number of letters in each answer. Each segment is used only once.

3 Indiana "P" Cities

__________________ __________________ __________________ 2 Indy Banks

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1 Fishers to Ft. Wayne Interstate

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WAL-MART __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________

__________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________ __________________

20+: Word wizard 15-19: Brainiac 10-14: Not too shabby <10: Try again next week

Fair barn 13. Earthenware pot at the Eiteljorg Museum 18. Funeral toll 22. David & Mary Spa treatment 24. Hoosier hog heaven 26. Small amount 29. Poison ivy symptom 30. Westfield HS physics class topic

31. Beazer home sites 32. Better-than-you type 33. Kincaid’s handout 34. Ritz Charles decorative pitcher 39. The D of DTV 40. Clothing 41. Peyton’s younger brother 42. PillowTalk item 43. Juliet’s beau

55. Act like a grandma 44. Put into cartoon form 56. Broad Ripple record store 48. Haggard of HANK FM name 49. Butler track events 58. Emperor who “fiddled” 51. Idiots 52. Stairs at One AmericanChallenge61. Purchase from Elan or Day Indiana Wordsmith 62. Indiana Supreme Court’s Square sphere 53. To the point Answers on Page 43 54. Copycat

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41 KELLEY GREEN July 16, 2013

3C Plumbing Inc. REPAIRS.

cy@3CPlumbing.com

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16 years experience Free home inspection Guaranteed work/referrals Lic. # PC1Q701074

Indy Gun Safety Armed with knowledge!

Learn to shoot a handgun! Beginner thru advanced pistol, CCW & instructor training courses. Firearm sales & transfers Yes, there’s a Gun Shop in Fishers! www.IndyGunSafety.com

13287 Britton Park Rd., Fishers, IN

(317)345-3263

V NAILS ONE WEEK SPECIAL

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FREE EYEBROW WAX WITH SERVICE OVER $25

Cannot be combined with other coupons.

Lawn & Landscape

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REASONABLY PRICED. RESIDENTIAL PLUMBING

- water heaters - sump pumps - garbage disposals - bath & kitchen faucets - water softeners -

Current in Carmel

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Cannot be combined with other coupons.

12441 N. Meridian St., Carmel, IN Between Office Depot & Starbucks

(317) 564-8500

Vicky and Ron moved from 146th St. OPEN SUNDAY NOON - 5PM

Frank Kelley, Owner Get your card in front of 105,749 households! Call Dennis O’Malia @ 370-0749 for details

HANDYMAN SERVICES CHIP TRAIN REMODELING KITCHENS • BATHROOMS • BASEMENTS

Remodeling Carmel and Zionsville since 1992 Licensed • Bonded • Insured Chip Train 317-258-2650 • chiptrain@msn.com

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HANDGUN SHOOTING & HANDLING INSTRUCTION

Toys, Glassware, China, Pottery, Coins, Trade Books, Trains and much more.

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SEND SEND YOUR YOUR DOG DOG ON ON VACATION! VACATION!

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• 5 Acre Country Setting • Indoor/Outdoor Kennels • Private Dog Parks for Boarding Dogs • Doggie Day Care • Grooming Services

We Buy Any Car: • Running • Junk • Wrecked, etc

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Mon.-Fri. 6:45AM-6PM Sat. 7:30AM-Noon Sun. 3PM-6PM CLOSED HOLIDAYS

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VISA, MasterCard accepted Reach 105,749 homes weekly

Services Woodsmen Tree Service William Wainscott 317-412-1306 *Fully Insured *Free Estimates *Tree Trimming *Tree Removal *Stump Grinding The Right Choice is as Clear as Black and White Full-time Infant and Toddler Openings; 844-7207 Licensed, Carmel CPR certified: 1st Aid; 32 Years Experienced; Warm and Balanced Meals; Planned activities; TLC

With Baker Scott

Beginners thru Advanced All styles Electric-Acoustic-Bass Private Lessons Parent-Child Lessons near Carey Road & 146th Carmel 317-

910-6990

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Insured/Bonded Serving Carmel & Westfield www.pawpatrolindy.com

3501 Westfield Rd, Suite 101 • Westfield IN (317) 913-2828 info@hoppenrathlaw.com • www.hoppenrathlaw.com

Member of the Indiana and Indianapolis Bar Associations

Classifieds

For pricing e-mail your ad to dennis@youarecurrent.com

Services

FOR SALE

SEEKING

PAINTERS LLC

4 E Construction

Restoration Prayer – John 14:12 new Hilton Inn Express Carmel 9797 N. Michigan Rd. 1st & 3rd Saturdays monthly @ 9am Starts July 6th & 20th All Welcome Prayer for the sick - Mark 10:27 For info call Bob 317.910.9385

Baldwin Piano for Sale

Elderly Woman - Needs Companion

Residential/Commercial Painting Interior/Exterior Free Estimates 1-317-937-2803

Guitar Lessons

Wth recording artist Duke Tumatoe Learn from professional and have fun All levels - in Carmel duke@duketumatoe.com or 317-201-5856

Clean of Hearts Cleaning Service Now accepting new clients! Call Lana @ 317-769-3622

Locally owned/operated over 38 YRS * SPRING CLEAN UP * MULCH * MOWING * FERTILIZING * TEAR OUT/REPLACE * FREE ESTIMATES CALL 317-491-3491

Happy Pets In-Home Pet Care

A less stressful and economical alternative to boarding with loving care for your pets in the comfort of your home. Experience in Exotics. Insured/Bonded Member of Pet Sitters Associates LLC happypetsitter@gmail.com Hamilton County only 317-645-6043 • References available

• Decks • Trellises • Gazebos • Sun Shades • Screen Houses • Privacy Fences Custom built for your individual needs 36 YEARS FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED BUSINESS 317-580-1265

FREE MOWING!

…for one week with weekly mowing 2010-12 Angie’s List Award Winners WALLA LAWN CARE Most lawns $35 Includes MOWING, TRIMMING & EDGING Servicing Carmel, Westfield & Noblesville Offer for new customers only 698-5480 or wallalawncare@gmail.com

Kingston’s BAND REHEARSAL SPACE Book a session for your band! 3 hours/$50 1,000 SF studio, lounge with 60” plasma TV, full PA & backline provided, drums available 340 Ridgepoint Drive, Carmel rick@idealtalentinc.com 317-979-0137 Like us on Facebook! “Between the awesome physical facility, and the exceptional personal service, look no further than Kingston’s.” -Travis Jensen, An Innocent Band

Auction

Years Experience 149Years

“The Safe and Reliable Alternative to Boarding”

Wesley N. Hoppenrath

Services

Pet & House Sitting Service 317-802-6565 317-432-1627

Law Office of

• Power of Attorney • Health Care Directives • Living Wills

Services

Lawn Care & Landscaping

Guitar Lessons

• Estate Planning & Reviews • Wills • Trusts

$18 $48

hour long foot massage hour long body massage

317-914-4780 175 Sheridan Rd, Noblesville, IN 46060

Skip’s Auctions Gallery Every Monday Night 6 p.m. Auction Zip #26565 We buy estates, households, gold, silver and coins 14000 St. Rd. 32E, Noblesville, IN 765.606.6001 Always accepting clean consignments.

Small Dog Sitting in My Home www.ThePuppyInn.com 317-748-8462

STUDENT PAINTERS

FREE PAINTING ESTIMATES Brandon Hoge will be painting the town this summer, with an internship he acquired through Purdue UniversityA and running his own franchise with Student Painters, (which was founded in 1987). He is in charge of all marketing, recruiting, and sales for his business. He has now given 4 motivated college students a chance at a steady summer job. The crew has already completed many exterior jobs in the Carmel area this summer! His purpose in taking on this internship is to gain real world business skills and help out Carmel citizens with their painting needs. For a free estimate, call Brandon at 317-374-4480.

Childcare CARMEL AREA DAYCARE

Immediate Opening: Fulltime: Breakfast, lunch and snacks provided 30 Years experience. References Available Hours 7 - 5:30 844-0450 ask for Lea

For Rent Artist studio space

for rent at Studio 421 (421 S. Rangeline Road) Ideal for active artist, sculptor, lessons, shared space, etc ... $400 per month. 317-679-2565 Garage Annex Space $750

For info call: 317.844.8579

FOR SALE:

Entertainment Center Cabinet (Walnut): NEW 3.5’ W X 6’ TALL (2’ Deep) Carmel – 317-848-9499

FOR SALE

Twin Antique Jenny Lind bed - $125 and antique hand-painted Winnie-the-Pooh ches of drawers. Good for nursery - $100 Call 317-773-8340

Garage sale

Call 848-9499 Marge: please call. I lost your number

LOST PET LOST FAMILY MEMBER

Our cat Carlos is missing. Tan and White stripped, Missing as of June 25th, at Conner Prairie//Allisonville Rd. area LARGE REWARD Please call 317.695.2157

now hiring Garage Sale

111 Carlin Dr. Carmel 46032 July 19th and 20th Antiques, Fishing equipment And Christmas

HUGE MOVING / ESTATE SALE 14035 Sedona Court, Carmel Springmill Ponds Subdivision July 18th - July 20th 8am - 3pm Furniture, electronics, power tools, pinball machine, foosball table, autographed sports items, die cast and model car collections, clothing, house wares, and more…

Your New Career in Real Estate

Local real estate office needs two careerminded persons willing to learn real estate and work hard in a recovering market. Free training. 1st-year earnings can exceed $40k. Call David at 317-590-4401

Garage Sale - July 19th and July 20th

8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. 10670 Tarragon Court Fishers, IN 46038 Berkley Ridge Subdivision 106th & Hague Rd: Household items, furniture, gardening tools, glassware, bicycle, kitchen items, etc

LOT FOR SALE HOMESITE....

scenic and charming with nice water view in The Pines of Westfield.  83’ x 148’ deep. Ideal for walkout!  PERFECT! Call 317-697-5690

BUS AIDES Carmel Clay School Corporation is accepting applications for School Bus Aides for the 2013-2014 school year. Assist special needs children to and from school working a maximum of 4 hrs./day on morning and afternoon routes. Training provided. $11.56 per hour. Available to earn attendance bonus. Must be able to pass criminal history check. Apply on-line to www.ccs.k12.in.us AA/EOE


July 16, 2013

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

now hiring

now hiring

now hiring

now hiring

now hiring

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now hiring

Be Part of Something Big Xerox Services has immediate positions for Customer Service Representatives The first 75 agents hired in July will go into a drawing for a $500 Amex card awarded after 30 days of employment.

JOB FAIR Thursday, July 18, 2013 8:30 to 11 a.m. Adult Full and Part-time Positions Before and After School Care (BAC), Zone 58 After School Care and TOTS & All Aboard Childcare Programs

Questions? Please contact Tessa at 765-778-6219

Student Support Programs will be hosting a Job Fair on Thursday, July 18, 2013 for full-time and part-time positions in Westfield Washington Schools child care programs. The BAC program for grades K—4 is offered in each of the Westfield Washington Schools elementary buildings and the Zone 58 program for grades 5—age 13 is offered at Westfield Intermediate School. The TOTS program for infants to preschool children is offered at Monon Trail Elementary School and the All Aboard program is offered at four of our elementary buildings for pre-kindergarten children.

www.xerox.com/Careers Click “Search for jobs related to business process and IT services” and search Job # 13014983

Apply in person: 2828 Enterprise Drive Anderson, IN 46013

Candidates will need to complete an online application for the BAC Assistant positions and/or TOTS and All Aboard Assistant positions through the school district’s website at:

Must pass background and drug screen.

http://www.wws.k12.in.us/apps/pages/index.jsp?uREC_ID=210783&type=d&pREC_ID=471603

EOE/AA

Work hours in BAC vary and during school days are split shift from 6:30-9 a.m. and 2:30 to 6 p.m. TOTS and All Aboard part-time and full-time positions vary between the hours of 6:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. Positions are Monday through Friday and are year-round including staff development days, school breaks days and summers.

©2013 Xerox Corporation. All rights reserved. Xerox® and Xerox and Design® are trademarks of the Xerox Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. BR6828

The Job Fair will be at the Westfield Intermediate School, 326 W. Main Street, Westfield. Please enter door #10 behind the football stadium bleachers. Interviews are on a first come/first serve basis between the hours of 8:30 to 11 a.m. Applicants should bring a resume to the interview. If you have any questions regarding the Job Fair, please call (317) 867-8069.

Director of Client Relations

Want to

Home Instead Senior Care, the market leader in personal home care has a unique opportunity for a director of Client Relations. This full-time position is responsible for marketing, maintaining existing relationships and building new ones. If you have a passion for service And at least two years sales experience please contact us. Please forward your resume to:

advertise your Noblesville Schools is accepting applications for several part time food service positions at various schools. Apply on line at www.noblesvilleschools.org

homeinsteaddirecto@gmail.com Home Instead Senior Care 941 E 86th St. Suite 250 Indianapolis, In 46240

Garage Sale? E-mail Dennis o’malia today. dennis@youarecurrent.com

“Hands-down the best use of our advertising dollars” Our ads in Current in Zionsville get great response! Most of our new customers say they found us through Current in Zionsville. I'm very happy with Current, hands-down the best use of our advertising dollars. Now you know why I'm always smiling!

489.4444

www.youarecurrent.com

- Paul Henderson, owner, Paul Henderson Plumbing

now hiring S T R A W

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Answers to BUILD THE WORDS: TENNESSEE, LIN DUNN, PING PONG, UPLAND, MERLOT Answers to HOOSIER HODGEPODGE: Parts: ADJECTIVES, CONJUNCTIONS, INTERJECTIONS, NOUNS, PREPOSITIONS, VERBS; Tools: GRATER, KNIFE, PEELER, SPATULA, STRAINER; Movies: BAMBI, CARS, PETER PAN, TOY STORY; Cities: PAOLI, PERU, PLAINFIELD; Banks: CHASE, PNC; Interstate: SIXTY-NINE Answers to INDIANA WORDSMITH CHALLENGE: ALARM, ALTAR, TRAWL, LAMA, MALT, MART, TRAM, WARM, WART, ARM, ART, AWL, LAM, LAT, LAW, MAR, MAT, MAW, RAM, RAT, RAW, TAM, TAR, WAR


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July 16, 2013

Current in Carmel

www.currentincarmel.com

Now Riley doctors are treating the everyday needs of kids every day.

Introducing Riley Physicians. Expert physicians conveniently located to treat all your kid’s daily needs. From strep throat to asthma to school physicals, Riley Physicians provides the same kind of expert care you’ve come to expect from Indiana’s only nationally ranked children’s hospital. And with pediatrician and family medicine offices near you, getting the everyday care you’re looking for is as convenient as it is exceptional.

To make an appointment, visit iuhealth.org/rileyphysicians

©2013 IU Health 07/13 HY11413_0370


July 16, 2013