Page 1

PAPER

SCHMUCK

2014

MUNICH

CURRENT OBSESSION

— CURRENT OBSESSION PAPER Is an attempt to give a voice to the artists taking part in Schmuck 2014 and to show that the existence of artist-run exhibitions and the possibility to experience them directly brings unprecedented richness to what we know as contemporary jewellery. This paper began as a simple tool to lead the visitors through the exhibitions in the city and has evolved into something that has helped

us understand the substantial role Schmuck plays. It provides a crucial reoccurring development and a harbour of energy for the field every year. Do collateral exhibitions at Schmuck need to be filtered and curated? We can’t fit it all in one week or one PAPER. Instead, we give space and opportunity to everyone and highlight the exhibitions we truly believe in.

+ MAP

Free Reign By Kellie Riggs Talente Nominees Underneath it All By Kamal Nassif & Mariah Tuttle Studio Visits Schmuck Selectees 2014 City map Info on Munich Must-See List Curated exhibition selections

€10.00

Contemporary Jewellery Magazine


Content

3

Free Reign by Kellie Riggs

Talente: Jewellery Nominees 7 Underneath It All Mariah Tuttle& Kamal Nassif

11

Studio Visits

13

Map

15

Must-See List

19

Credits This newspaper was published on the occasion

PRINTED IN THE NETHERLANDS BY

CITY MAP MADE IN COLLABORATION WITH

Jansen, Jantje Fleischhut, Melanie Isverding,

of Schmuck 2014 by CURRENT OBSESSION

Rodi Media/Dijkman

84 GHz, Martina Niklas, Jörg Ritterbecks

Despo Sophocleous, Francisca Bauzá, Märta

www.current-obsession.com

PUBLISHED BY CURRENT OBSESSION

COPYRIGHT: No part of this publication may

Mattsson, Jasmin Matzakow, Hannah Joris,

Antwerp, Eindhoven, Amsterdam, Stockholm

Marina Elenskaya & Sarah Mesritz

be copied and / or reproduced without the

Susanne Wolbers, Nora Rochel, Shari Pierce,

ADVERTISING

written permission of the copyright holder.

Mia Maljojoki, Karin Roy Andersson, Sanna

FOUNDER/EDITOR IN CHIEF

For advertising opportunities and other

SPECIAL THANKS

Svedestedt, Flora Vagi, Kirsten Becken,

Marina Elenskaya

enquiries, please get in touch via:

Dr. Sylvia Katzwinkel and the team of 84GHz,

Volker Atrops

info@current-obsession.com

magazine@current-obsession.com

Dr. Petra Hölscher

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

COVER IMAGE BY

Sarah Mesritz

Linda Beumer

All the jewellery artists who contributed to the

International Trade Fair Munich,

magazine@current-obsession.com

JEWELLERY BY — Christine Bukkehave

content of the CURRENT OBSESSION PAPER:

12.–18.3.2014 Management and Organization:

ART DIRECTION & GRAPHIC DESIGN

Door to the past, Brooch, driftwood, amber,

Iris Eichenberg, Andy Gut, Kristi Paap, Beppe

Handwerkskammer für München und

Anna Hennerdal & Linda Beumer

18kt gold, marine varnish, 2013

Kessler, Gésine Hackenberg, Lina Peterson

Oberbayern, Wolfgang Lösche. Eva Sarnowski

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Weeping tree, Brooch, driftwood, amber,

Nicolas Cheng, Beatrice Brovia, Nora Rochel,

and Dr. Michaela Braesel

Kellie Riggs, Mariah Tuttle & Kamal Nassif

18kt gold, 2013

Dana Hakim, Ineke Heerkens, Jeannette

Schmuck 2014, special show of the


SCHMUCK

3

Free Reign

Free Reign / Artist-Run p. Exhibitions in Munich 3 by Kellie Riggs Contemporary Jewellery is aging. We know this because we throw it a party every year in Munich. We invite the same people, they come, dedicated as always. They invite their friends and the party grows. Aging doesn’t mean getting old, though. I’d say things are getting pretty good and ripe right now, as seen in the different ways we experiment with Contemporary Jewellery and continue to get to know it and ourselves.

1.

1. SOLO Defrosts, exhibition view 2006

Every Schmuck Week in March presents the field with an opportunity to look back on itself and reflect on its evolution and maturation, seen most clearly through the expansion of collateral or satellite shows that coincide with the juried show at the Handwerksmesse. It appears that these independent initiatives are the most attractive aspect of Schmuck Week, where innovation is found as artists push to frame their work most appropriately and without limits. These exhibitions represent what I look forward to most, the search for something new and a place to understand ideas. One of the earliest exhibitions like this brought to my attention was the Salon des Refusés, organized by Felix Lindner, Peter Bauhuis, David Bielander, Christiane Foerster, Andi Gut and Normen Weber twelve years go after not being accepted to the official juried Schmuck exhibition. This might have gotten the ball rolling, as since then - and especially in just the last few years - we have seen a growth spurt in the amount of Contemporary Jewellery artists that seek to organize themselves independently. Although the artist-run exhibition is nothing exclusive to Contemporary Jewellery, it is worth investigating. It is a magical extension of the field that goes far beyond mere trends borrowed from design or contemporary art. Instead, and at its best, Contemporary Jewellery’s artist-created spaces are logical extensions of the work. Schmuck Week gives artists new opportunities to experiment that become fulfilling alternatives to existing, more traditional exhibition outlets. We’re moulding the event into its own unique system that more accurately reflects Contemporary Jewellery’s precociousness and indefinability.

Another early sign of Schmuck Week’s experimental shift was in 2006 when Ineke Heerkens, Jeannette Jansen, and Jantje Fleischhut organized their show SOLO Defrosts at the Görres 10 project space. The three invited other recent Rietveld graduates to make new work with the project title in mind, a title that not only fit with the time of the year (winter melting, spring around the corner), but that also worked as an analogy for a blossoming new generation of makers. Together they collected plastic containers from used refrigerators to suspend from the ceiling for display. “The cold, almost technical style fit perfectly with the space we rented from a group of artists and designers,” Jansen and Fleischhut said. “Defrost was very much reacting to the space itself - tile on the floor, neon light, cool not cosy, an enormous fridge to walk through, the sound of cracking ice and snowdrops outside.” Additional flourishes like an audio track of dripping water in the background and a row of pots with snowdrop flowers in the window contributed to the conceptual presentation of strong work, well-considered and appropriately curated. This group set the bar quite high and went on to create two more exhibitions for Schmuck, including Handarbeit Nord in 2008. Eight artists showed one necklace each made specifically for the show along with a manual of how to replicate their necklaces step by step, “to exactly copy a so called one-off,” Jantje recollects. This was followed in 2009 by the -known and relatively radical OP VOORRAAD (AUF VORRAT) that went on to be exhibited numerous times internationally, eventually becoming a web-shop in 2011.

So what is it about these exhibitions that make them memorable years later? And why did these three artists put them together in the first place? They shared the desire to create a real experience for the viewer versus just putting several works by several makers on display in a room. Fleischhut says that freedom “can add another layer to the work… the maker can complete his or her world. An independent space brings additional possibilities, as well as attract an audience not familiar with the Contemporary Jewellery by way of a spectacular presentation.” If we look at these projects as recipes to follow, are they similar to other noteworthy artist-led exhibitions? Yes, they are inspired by a craving for freedom and fuelled by collaboration and often times friendship. We see this spirit in the last five years of programming at the Georgenstrasse project space in Munich by Melanie Isverding and her collaborators who always push the boundaries of expected jewellery exhibitions. Speaking for the group that changes slightly every year, Isverding says: “I think that organizing our own exhibitions in somewhat neutral [independent] spaces seems to offer an unconventional way of showing the work of the artists. This is a great platform for experimentation. Possibilities appear to be more open and it is about finding one’s own framework and visual language to create stories. And perhaps it’s also about challenging the audience, in the sense of taking them out of their normal viewing habits and introducing another perspective for adopting new surroundings for jewellery.” The need to create distinctive environments for jewellery is a shared objective for artist-run exhibitions. Traditional gallery settings are harder


CURRENT

OBSESSION

PAPER

2.

2. OP VOORRAAD (AUF VORRAT), detail 2009-2013

and harder to come by as the growth of the field continues, and those settings are seen as artistically limiting with regard to exposition possibilities. One of the secrets to a successful artist-run group show is to maintain a balance between experimental and practical display while allowing the work to speak for itself. “All parts should be very open to interpretation and imagination,” Isverding says, “allowing the viewer to read [the work] with his/her own experiences. We are all people from our own times, we all see things in different dimensions and have various parameters. Our exhibition concepts are just suggestions and one style of communication in relation to Contemporary Jewellery.” In 2010 Isverding, along with Nicole Beck, Costanze Schreiber and Florian Weichsberger, presented their first group initiative, Eternal Shine - It’s Not a Pony, where even the promotional material brought an added sense of validity to the event. Each year the projects at the Georgenstrasse restate the group’s high standards without risking redundancy. The choice to keep a short artist list indicates a considered selectivity. Last year’s show All Aboard! (Nicole Beck, Despo Sophocleous and Mirei Takeuchi) was no exception, and this year keep an eye out for Bonzo Gonzo! at the same project space where Isverding, Weichsberger, Alexander Blank and Kiko Gianocca will play with their group interaction once again. Does the need for better, higher quality shows in Contemporary Jewellery supersede Schmuck’s international allure? Does Schmuck give artists an excuse and a place to realize the projects they’ve always wanted to create, or are the creation of the projects motivated by the event’s existence? The 2012 exhibition Pin Up came together by taking both possibilities into consideration. This lovely project was organized by a group of friends and colleagues from Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands whose first experience together was at the B-Side Festival in Amsterdam in 2011. The show was ignited by a good excuse to see each other and once again reframe their work with attempts to break away from banal display conventions, thus the title of the show. Pin Up is an example of how an exhibition project can be worth putting together even just to learn about the process of self-curating or finding a new opportunity for dialog and feedback. “For us as a group, the most important thing about curating our own show is not just the single jewellery piece or the exhibition itself; it’s more about the journey from beginning to end. We keep in contact to help and push each other, we discuss and communicate

about jewellery,” states Francisca Bauzá, one of the five participating artists. Through such examples we see how Schmuck Week can give certain projects a better chance for success by offering groups a safety net in respect to audience and promotion. Schmuck Week does not discriminate nor have a hierarchical bias. Some say that this is an organizational weakness of Schmuck; the event’s growth could perhaps create a free-for-all of poorly organized shows and/or mediocre work… I do not think, though, that the collateral events should have to go through a juried selection process. It’s important to remember that the beauty of it all lies in the potential for maturity. If a group of friends want to try their shot at exhibiting in Munich to get

concept. In addition, the final selection of pieces was finalized by a voting process using the internet. The group of eight met in person for the first time only a day or two before the official set up began, each eager to create a different setting for their work instead of the more commercial events in jewellery that some were used to. Susanne Wolbers, one of the eight artists says, “it is very inspiring for an artist to develop his/her own exhibition concept instead of being placed in a situation where you have little or no influence on the installation.” Her colleague Hannah Joris adds: “In my opinion, on one hand, many jewellery artists are hungry for more than we feel is provided by other channels– galleries, museums, NTJ… There is a need to contextualize one’s work, relate it to other work, relate it to a particular space, relate it to a certain theme, or to a particular dialogue or contemporary issue, whether that’s social, economical, political… in my experience, curating our own shows is a way to research possibilities concerning the issues mentioned above in relation to one’s artistic interests.” Joris makes a good point when she talks about there being a lack of opportunity for artist exposure within the field’s long established system. No matter how many artists I talk to there seems to be a great need for additional outlets or more places for the work to go. But today these places cannot be so ordinary, artists are demanding that they need to respect the work being made and recognize what the work is trying to do. With this in mind, it makes perfect sense that artists have begun to do it all themselves. Schmuck gives artists this chance. Contemporary Jewellery’s lack of appropriate exhibition platforms is mutually exclusive to its uniqueness. It’s almost like the work we make is two steps ahead of us and we’re still trying to figure out the best thing to do with it. One could call this frenzy an accurate litmus test of how the work has changed over the past five decades, but our exhibition struc-

Contemporary Jewellery’s lack of appropriate exhibition platforms is mutually exclusive to its uniqueness. It’s almost like the work we make is two steps ahead of us and we’re still trying to figure out the best thing to do with it. their work out there, let’s let them; it’s up to the critics to discern what’s good or bad. Exhibition examples at Schmuck using friendship as the only unifying component for artist-run projects can be a recipe for a boring show when lacking in consideration, purpose and openness. But as this field continues to change it makes sense that artists at any level in their career want to take things into their own hands and learn how their world works, or can work. It’s a journey of growth through experience. Bauzá and group support this idea: “Making jewellery is much more than just creating the actual piece. Another big part of it is to present it to the public. There are limited possibilities to show your work… artists have the chance to take responsibility for how their pieces are presented and how they want or expect them to be received.” Like any well-organized artist-run show a cohesive sense of curation can be achieved without there being one singular curator directing the project. Alternatively, we’ve established this artist-group turned curator system and the democracy that emerges from it can be impressive. Flora Eats Fauna, a 2013 collateral event located at the Nymphenburg Palace, is a great example of this consensus in action, where each of the four initial participants were able to propose another artist who fit in with the exhibition

tures haven’t adjusted accordingly. Artists today are focusing more on the creation of a series or body of work where individual pieces are stronger as a collective and the singular is seen in how well the pieces work together as a group. In the past there was more concentration on the singular piece, where one object could tell you something interesting all by itself, independent of that artist’s other pieces. Today it’s as though we need the support of a contextual environment to bolster the intentions of the artist, not because work lacks depth but because that depth is more subtle and adaptive. We know artists have understood this to a large degree and that it is why we see exhibitions becoming more complex. Some even take it a step further and consider their collective curatorial work part of the artwork itself. Last year Karin Roy Andersson and Sanna Svedestedt utilized this approach and produced (ig) noble, a project born from what they had learned in their past experiences at Schmuck with In the Forest (2012) and the well thought out A Pieceful Swedish Smörgåsbord (2011). Unfortunately, their group did not sell any pieces in their second year, inspiring them to reflect more seriously on the economic realities of Contemporary Jewellery with work related to questions about time,


SCHMUCK

5

3.

4.

5.

3. Eternal Shine - It’s Not A Pony 2010 4. (ig)noble, artists, exhibition view 2013 5. Flora Eats Fauna, exhibition view 2013

value and money. The five artists (including Andersson and Svedestedt) gave themselves a set of restraints when they set out to make work for this project, ultimately showcasing four different tables with four variations of the work of each artist divided by four assigned and shared price values ranging from thirty-five to two thousand euro. “How to survive economically and still be able to keep on doing what you love/trained to do is a common subject among young jewellers… We often feel that people from outside

the art jewellery world do not really understand why a pair of earrings made of paper and glue or a brooch made of silicon can cost more than a set of silver earrings from a well-known jewellery brand. With creating (ig)noble we wanted to raise the question of how we price our work and how we can communicate the time and ideas behind our objects,” say Andersson and Svedestedt. Although they admit receiving criticism for their decision to place the work atop simple white tables, in practice it wasn’t at all detrimental to the effectiveness of the project. Part of the experience was to interact with the five artists present, to get to know how the pieces were made, why they were priced the way they were, and what they looked like on the body. The praise they did receive was entirely based on this level of interaction and transparency that in the end worked to their advantage, as students, artists and collectors alike ultimately walked away with something. It’s safe to say that Schmuck’s audience enabled this exchange. When done right, one can associate Contemporary Jewellery so closely to ‘product’ that eventually one can discover how unlike ‘product’ it can really be, making the object all the more desirable. This was a big part of (ig)noble’s overall concept that each artist addressed equally. Here, again, we have no single curator. “An artist can take on the role of a curator only when showing other artists, but if the exhibition includes his or her own work, the concept and theme become part of the completed, final pieces,” say Andersson and Svedestedt. Self-referential art exists in every artistic practice, yet Contemporary Jewellery’s particularity as an ‘in-between’ field (hovering somewhere between art, design, fashion) can lead to dynamic and original exhibition projects. 2013’s Bucks n’ Barter is probably the best example of this to date, with every aspect of its production highly considered and well-executed. The group’s Beatrice Brovia and Nicolas Cheng say that the exhibition came about after brainstorming with Katrin Spranger and Friederike Daumiller during Schmuck 2012: “We decided that we wanted to work together on an exhibition that could speak to a wider audience and that dealt with themes current in our own practices as much as it did on a more global scale… interdisciplinarity and collaboration were strong motivations.” When organizing the participants, the four original artists asked themselves about their personal challenges, their limits and frustrations within the field and in the wider context of being an artist or designer in a time of economical crisis. Questions like, “what is the value and relevance of what we do, when value is by definition something transient and impossible to grasp or quantify, today more than ever?” remained at the heart of the project’s progression along with the wish to create a platform that would also be a space for conversation and exchange of stimulating ideas rather than just a normal exhibition space. To formulate the final group Brovia, Cheng, Spranger and Daumiller reached out to other colleagues and artists whose work orbited these ideas, work “that not only enriched the project, but that created a fuller spectrum of artistic positions around the topic,” explains Brovia and Cheng jointly. The result was a sharply edited and compelling display of objects almost unrecognizable to the idea of what one thinks of as jewellery but without denying its relationship to jewellery at all. By focusing on the idea of conviviality, their opening also presented a participatory food experience for their viewers, a one-up from the average ‘we might feed you if you come and look at our work’ mentality. This year Brovia and Cheng, along with Vivi Touloumidi, will present Kosmos Kino at the Galli Theater, an exhibition with a much different scale, “stripped down to the essentials of collaboration, the three of us weaving together the narratives of our works… an invitation to renegotiate the role of jewellery in our society.” Together Brovia and Cheng will present a film which they say works as a test to see how elastic the boundaries of the jewellery field are

Free Reign

alongside the more political work of Touloumidi that will require audience participation. With these two projects we have two intelligent iterations of self-referential concepts inherent to Contemporary Jewellery. The group agrees that the experimental nature of Schmuck Week creates the right territory to test out these kinds of ideas. When asked why they thought it was best to come together as a group to flush this stuff out, Brovia and Cheng state: “The too few proper curators, the lack of institutions, the lack of a discourse, the lack of a truly diverse audience, the lack of exposure, the lack of money to make it all sound more professional; the abundance of self-motivation, the wish to change things, the need to communicate ideas and let them be contaminated by others without commercial pressure; the urge to make things happen as you had envisioned them with little to no compromise; all of the above – and probably much more – makes it sometimes a necessity for artists to initiate and curate their own projects.” And they aren’t wrong. Realizing complex artist-run exhibitions with the potential to connect the field to new audiences relies on a functioning collaboration, especially with artists and designers from outside the field. The Bucks n’ Barter team saw the value in that, perhaps pointing to the project’s overall success (for example one of its members, Friederike Daumiller, is an industrial designer). More and more artist groups in Contemporary Jewellery recognize this opportunity. Take, for instance, this year’s Realm of Reversals, where jewellery artist Flora Vagi paired up with photographer Kirsten Becken. Their collaboration was long-distance, Becken being the one to discover Vagi’s work and having first reached out about some kind of future project. Vagi has always seen the potential within Contemporary Jewellery to be more than what it’s given credit for giving sense to an interdisciplinary exhibition. She says, “I just don’t think I have come across any other discipline in art that had so many modes of being and so may interpretations.” Speaking of interpretations and collaborations, Schmuck veteran Volker Atrops has always lived and breathed this approach and continues to take his work a step further through his BfG project. BfG is a continuing endeavour that started in 2002 with off-gallery exhibitions using the name Bund für Gestaltung (roughly translates to Design Federation), chosen to suggest the notion of a big company. Atrops says that BfG, “originates in the moment that I am collaborating with someone; in the beginning I worked with music ethnologists, graphic designers, street art jerks, fine art-artists, punks n’ party people, but we didn’t care to make any proper documentation…” Three or four years ago BfG became the company of Atrops and his wife; under that name they create jewellery, fashion, and even landscape gardening. “Even when I cook a meal or play with my kids I think it is a BfGwork. Life, art, culture, earing a living all at once, just BfG,” Atrops says, and relates this philosophy to the ‘social sculpture’ of Joseph Beuys he learned about when he was growing up. For Schmuck week this year the BfG project will show up as an online shop, a surprising choice yet not one bit arbitrary. Over the last ten years Atrops has always done his own thing. That’s partially because he shares some disaffection towards the gallery scene in both Contemporary Jewellery and Fine Art, that is, jewellery’s tendency to exclude other art mediums and Fine Art’s tendency to exclude any kind of jewellery. “The ideal of a gallery existed around twenty years ago. It was the Gallery Carin Delcourt van Krimpen, and they showed famous artists, no-names, jewellery, ceramic, fashion, African arts… it was open minded, intelligent and beautiful, just freedom. I want to be in such a place again”. So here we have Atrops inventing a new version of this in Munich, something cosy he calls it, where at his usual antique bookshop location (Antiquariat Dieter Zipprich) he’ll show a few pieces of his own, some rare Karl Fritsch pieces circa 1989, and what he


CURRENT

OBSESSION

PAPER

4.

5.

6.

The ideal of a gallery existed around twenty years ago… they showed famous artists, no-names, jewellery, ceramic, fashion, African arts… it was open minded, intelligent and beautiful, just freedom. – Volker Atrops describes as “a sham from India of little rings, let’s say sculptures, far away from just graduated high school diploma styles or deep in the history of jewellery, art and decoration… very relaxed but soul searching…” This display functions as a window shopping experience for his BfG online shop wittily referred to as Best Friends Gallery (www.bund-fuer-gestaltung.de). Examples like these are a far cry from what Schmuck looked like eight years go. In 2006 the official announcement listed twelve collateral events in total including a lecture and a show in Pforzheim; this year there are almost seventy. “People pilgrim to get here. It can easily be criticized for being inbred but at the same time we think many artists enjoy seeing colleagues in what often is a very lonely work, and that these meetings serve as a huge source of inspiration and motivation,” speculate Andersson and Svedestedt. Surely the steady progression of artist-run exhibitions at Schmuck has to do with that too, along with the idea that during Schmuck Week jewellery can live out its fantasies with free reign. When done well the most rewarding aspect of artist-run exhibitions at Schmuck is that they give today’s Contemporary Jewellery the context it needs to go beyond the general implications of the words that name it. I see Schmuck’s potential synonymous to that of the Venice Biennale in the way that it is its own self-sufficient entity. The Biennale is neither a museum nor a gallery nor a fair ultimately providing an anything-goes type of freedom. Schmuck similarly hovers between existing expositional arenas and for that it offers new freedom to its artists as well. But it goes beyond that; Contemporary Jewellery needs the boost provided by these new environments, a characteristic of the field I find quite magical that Schmuck ultimately enables. It is cyclical. Schmuck week lets us walk away with so much more than a memory of jewellery trapped behind glass. We are now remem­ bering being led through experiences that strongly connect us to artists and their work far more intimately than before. It is a cycle of creative

dependency unique to Contemporary Jewellery, and it is growing.

What is to come next? Here’s to looking forward.

6. Bucks n’ Barter, exhibition view 2013 7. All Aboard!, exhibition view 2013 8. Window display, Volker Atrops at Antiquariat Dieter Zipprich 2013

Kellie Riggs (b. 1986) is an American writer and artist currently based in Italy. She is a postFulbright Grantee and her continuing research encompasses Contemporary Jewellery’s relation to the visual arts. She received a BFA in Jewellery + Metalsmithing from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2011 and is the founder and main content provider for www.greater-than-or-equal-to.com.

CURRENT OBSESSION would like to thank all mentioned exhibition groups for your openness and participation in the realization of this text!

(End)


SCHMUCK

7

Talente

And The Nominees Are... p. This Year’s Talente 7 Competition in Jewellery Photography by Linda Beumer

“For the past 5 years I was and still am a jury member at Talente, the international competition for young talent no older than 33. It is quite remarkable to be seen as a young talent at that age, having regard to the fact that students graduating are getting younger and younger. During these years I have seen some exceptional and intriguing work, which shows that craft nowadays is more than just good handwork or skills. It is about innovative techniques, social and sustainable context. It is about objects of desire and tradition, about products or concepts that raise questions. And above all it is about storytelling and authorship.” (Chequita Nahar)

Nominees of the Talente competition this year:

Christine Bukkehave, Patrìcia Correia Domingues, Samira Götz, Sophie Hall, Ann-Kathrin Hartel, Jing He , Steven Holman, Dorry Hsu (Hsu YunChin), Tammy Yound Eun Kim , Chen Liang , Xiao Liu, Charlotte Maslov, Jhana Millers, Marek Mrowinski, Maria Sais Fluviá, Moniek Schrijer, Martina Singerova, Julian Steimer, Lauren Tickle, Katerina Vorlova, Kate Wischusen, Gabriela Hájková, Xiaoya Guo, Soili Rautanen, Kristyna Spanihelova, Zhiqian Yang, Helena Johansson Lindell p.7: Patrícia Correia Domingues. 'Untitled' Serie 'Duality' Brooch (Reconstruted wood, Steel), 2013 Photography of the brooch by Manuel Ocaña p.8: Steven Gordon Holman, Geode Torque, Neckpiece (Dugway geodes, bonze, steel, u-bolt), 2013 p.9: Dorry Hsu (Yun-Chin Hsu), Aesthetic of Fears, Ring (3D print clear resin, color dye, latex), 2013 Dorry Hsu (Yun-Chin Hsu), Aesthetic of Fears, Mask (3D print clear resin, color dye, latex), 2013 p.10: Liu Xiao, The Rice Stone-2120130711 (Rice, dust, silver – 7x5x3 cm)


SCHMUCK

p.

11

Underneath It All

Underneath It All by Mariah Tuttle & Kamal Nassif

11

What is Schmuck? The seven days of festivities, conversations, highlights, questions, cultivated relationships and of course jewellery devouring are based on the steadfast yet dynamic foundations of an annual craft fair.

Schmuck 2014 Participants’ nationality in percentage Germany, Netherlands, Japan, Sweden, Denmark, Australia, Argentina, Korea, USA, G.B., Taiwan, New Zeeland, Norway, Italy, Hungary, Finland, Spain, China, Belgium, Austria

Supplemental to the constant confluence of established and new jewellers during the fair, there is a substantial rise in the amount of applicants and number of countries represented in the official curated exhibition. This increasingly global reach offers breadth yet many people do not know the history of this seminal event. People know prizes are awarded and that there is a plethora of exhibits to explore, but how many people are familiar with the history of the fair and the judicial processes that determine prizewinners and exhibit participants? Like many, our initial curiosity centred on these judging processes but has evolved into a broader understanding of the overarching role of this fundamental event. Our writing is predominantly limited to the official ITF exhibitions and awards without opening the discussion to include the growing presence, vibe and alternative perspectives offered by the surrounding exhibits that saturate the city. We are simply offering a glimpse of our explorations, questions, realizations and connections regarding the development and organization of Schmuck: all of which have shifted during our research and have fostered a new appreciation of the quiet power, dedication and passion underneath it all. The curator for the official Schmuck exhibit and the set of judges for the Herbert Hofmann awards are two separate positions that are filled each year by a different group of discerning individuals associated with the jewellery community. Which of course begs the questions and lays the path we started to probe and ponder – who determines the curator and judges each year? Behind the scenes of most major decisions and organizational efforts is the Head of the Department of Fairs and Exhibitions Handwerkskammer für München und Oberbayern, Mr. Wolfgang Lösche who is assisted by Eva Sarnowski, a generous and stalwart presence at the institution. By selecting the annual curator and team of jurors, they quietly decree and influence the resulting exhibit and selection of award recipients. Mr. Lösche describes choosing the annual curator as a role that “attempt[s] to describe the thrust and focuses of contemporary jewellery design in the here and now, and to explore the issue of what characterizes present day jewellery… By enlisting a different curator each year, the organizers of ‘Jewellery’ purposely encourage a subjective selection of the type seen in the previous years’ exhibitions.” (Preface 2010)1 A stance he usually reiterates in the annual catalogue accompanying Schmuck. Although the adherence to a structure of oscillating subjectivity continues, the coordinators acknowledge the growing conversations and ideas offered by the independently organized exhibitions

and performances that dot the city when stating that “as far as innovations in the field are concerned, we as organizers of the show remain true to our credo of focusing on wearable jewellery as opposed to jewellery installations or conceptual works… As always, [the] selection is subjective and based on the decisions of an individual. Whether this procedure might be altered some day is a question we, as the organizers of the special show, will answer on the basis of the submissions received, and also of the developments which contemporary jewellery may see in the future.” (Preface 2006/2012) Procedural methods aside, Mr.Lösche describes the ‘continuing charm’ of seeing new jewellers showing alongside established artists, a sentiment that is at the heart of Schmuck. Dorothea Prühl (Curator 2005 and this year’s Modern Classic) explains, “In the case of difficult decisions, when and how often the applicant in question had participated in previous special shows tipped the balance… [L]ess familiar names with interesting contributions… required more space than established ones [where] a single characteristic work could… serve as a point of reference for their entire oeuvre.” The collection of jewellers exhibited at Schmuck has always been, even on a small scale, international with a representation of both reputable and unknown jewellers offering a timely range of conventional and innovative work. However, in the beginning, the countries represented were for the most part European. Now, the statistical descriptions of the entries document a growing amount of other countries applying and slowly being included in the show. In his curatorial preface Ruudt Peters (2006) asks: “Has everything become inextricably mixed? All around the world, jewellery makers are offering workshops, students are learning the art in countries other than their own, and professors are accepting positions abroad… Making a selection for [Schmuck] solely on the basis of national origin would have been outmoded.” Although the space and show itself limit the number of exhibited artists to approximately 60, the number of applicants has risen sharply. Now the curators must make selections from over 700 applicants representing at least 35 countries. Schmuck has evolved into an overwhelming and numbing amount of jewellery exhibited around the city throughout the week. The curators go through a similar experience as their jurying is usually done over two days and based on images alone. They must contemplate the deluge of images they are asked to absorb and sift through to create the crowning formal exhibit of Schmuck that is scrutinized and surveyed by the hoards of attendees. The image based process and observations result in limitations several jurors


CURRENT

have vocalized: “It is not possible to reach a judgment on the basis of original work. The selection was made on the basis of… images that can convey a deceptive impression in both a positive and negative sense.” (Hermann Jünger 2004) Some curators speak to the process of choosing by describing the varying levels of importance of aesthetics or thematic content to their decisions. Others prefer to not explain their process whatsoever – embracing the influence of partiality and perspective. By reviewing the statements of curators over the past decade in the context of one another, those who identify a framework to their process invariably create a pendulum that swings back and forth over time between the broader relative importance of such factors as materiality, craftsmanship and global trends: Rüdiger Joppien (2011) Today jewellery has become an important segment of contemporary art to an extent un-thinkable just a few decades ago. It combines design, aesthetics of materials, artisanry, experimentation, research, zeitgeist, world-view – in short, there is hardly another activity so suitable to reflecting the state of our world… The exhibition reflects the incredible richness of ideas in the field, provides a summing-up, and motivates practitioners to further work. Dorothea Prühl (2005) The most important selection criteria were individuality of approach, a submission that was highly diverse without sacrificing inherent consistency, and independence of current trends. I personally am critical of the mere aesthetic of process and technique. Jorunn Veiteberg (2014) I had not defined any clear criteria in advance, but I tried to envisage the exhibition all the time during my assessment. What would be a good match aesthetically or thematically or what contrasts were needed to achieve visual tension were the questions that governed my choices… Seen as a whole, disenchantment and re-enchantment are… opposites that can be said to constitute the thematic thread of [this year’s] Schmuck. Ruudt Peters (2006) To my mind, a piece of jewellery should communicate with the outside world and convey an attitude, for which a lucid formal language is required [and] I have tried to include as many and different forms of expression as possible.

OBSESSION

Jorunn Veiteberg

2014

PAPER

Art Historian, Writer and Curator

2013

Bernhard Schobinger

Jeweller and Educator

2012

Dr. Karl Bollmann

Jewellery Collector

2011

Rüdiger Joppien

Art Historian, Museum Curator and Educator

2010

Monica Gaspar

Writer, Independent Curator

2009

Marjan Unger

Historian and Publicist

2008

Ralph Turner

Jewellery, Curator Writer and Critic

2007

Ramon Puig Cuyàs

Jeweller and Educator

reasons why jewellery fascinates you.” Which brings us back to why we are here: the fascination and infatuation with the potential of jewellery. What began as a modest but earnestly promoted idea to exhibit jewellery has expanded into a near spectacle of opportunities and curatorial offerings beyond the doors of the International Trades Fair. This evolution offers an interesting turning point in the exponential growth and possible symbiotic dialogue between the official and unofficial parts that now comprise the jewellery event of the year. Schmuck has evolved. The cross-pollination and dissemination of what this event has become counter balances the continuous rotation of subjective structure maintained by the ITF as a foundation for the presentation and awards given each year. The tandem growth of Schmuck and its unofficial entities inspires possibilities for other events, forums, geographical locations and venues to begin to support the overflow our community seemingly needs. Until then, we envision this CURRENT OBSESSION PAPER creased and stuffed into bags, the gallery listings and maps written on, crossed out, and circled with anticipation. People trying to fit in more than can be had in six days. Schmuck provides a balance to the studio, classroom, and gallery and an equilibrium to the critics, writers, curators, master artisans and emerging jewellers. Even though the exhibitions continue to grow and develop, the integrity and in fact mystery of the official process quietly reaffirms that we all offer questions and possibilities for both the foundations and future of Schmuck.That what is underneath it all is hope, passion, diligence, philanthropy, making, risk-taking, conversations, adopted family, and ultimately the power of jewellery.

Herbert Hofmann award Jurors 2014 Dr. Cornelie Holzach, Pforzheim, Warwick Freeman, Auckland, Dr. Marjan Unger, Amsterdam, Prof. Dr. Thomas Raff, München 1

Ralph Turner (2008) Whenever assessing such diverse entries, my critical pattern of work tends to follow a familiar path: whatever the materials, or technique, it is ideas that I search for first. I then look for context, lucidity, and dexterity, along with quality and fitness for purpose. My choice doesn’t necessarily reflect my personal taste, but the work should relate to these criteria. As is the point, each of the curators brings their own style and description (or lack there of) to the process. However, even the ones that open windows to their thoughts and goals preface these explanations with an earnest emphasis on the unimportance of their opinions. This year’s curator Jorunn Veiteberg specified that her role as juror was to create a grouping “about something other and more than just my personal taste, even though the result is undoubtedly coloured by what interests me.” Karl Bollman offered that “the idea that I personally might become visible behind Schmuck 2012 disturbs me.” Instead he wanted the viewers to ponder the presence of empathy and freedom in the work presented. Marjan Unger (2009) described “the invitation to make the selection for Schmuck [i]s a privilege as well as a challenge and even a worry.” yet poignantly added “the one thing you can do is rely on your gut- feelings, the

2006

Ruudt Peters

Jeweller and Educator

2005

Dorothea Prühl

Jeweller and Educator

Hermann Jünger

2004

Jeweller and Educator

All quotes come from the statements provided in the yearly catalogues noted. All statistical numbers were sourced from Schmuck catalogues and klimt02.net

Mariah Tuttle and Kamal Nassif are jewellers, writers and the founders of risdjm.com. Although they have never been to Schmuck, they are enthusiastic nerds about jewel(le)ry - obviously - music, vintage dresses, hot sauce, and their budding projects to promote emerging artists under the umbrella {x}collaborations. xcollaborations.com

Annual Schmuck Curator DE,

NL,

GB,

NO/DK,

ES,

AT,

CH

(End)


SCHMUCK

13

Studio Visits

Studio Visits

p.

13

CURRENT OBSESSION is peeking into the studios of some of the Schmuck’14 competition selectees… Iris Eichenberg

Bench

View of overall studio

Kirsti Paap

Portrait

Usually my table is quite a mess... and dusty

Details waiting to be assembled into a piece of jewellery

Corner of the studio with a sculpture and a lamp

Music box, rhythm, replay, repetition. Sometimes one disc plays for days

Lina Peterson

A shelf of stuff… The ceramic pieces are all tests made by me for different projects and they have ended up next to paints, pebbles and a fishing float on this shelf

Painting wood

A necklace is hanging up on my mannequin waiting to go to Munich and SCHMUCK

Studio Gate

Wood shavings


CURRENT

OBSESSION

PAPER

Beppe Kessler

New works displayed in the atelier

Paint table

Portrait in the painting atelier

Works in progress /chaos

Gésine Hackenberg

Studio detail, Galvano experiments: some ruins and try-outs Work in progress: paper models and stencils, a pink goldplated pear

Work in progress: cutting copper foil

Work in progress: the pattern for grape beads is cut out, mounted and then being electroformed

Iris Eichenberg Educator, visual artist, jeweller 1965, Göttingen, Germany "You have to let go of the idea of a studio as a constant, a fixed place. A studio is in evolution, constantly transforming along with you and your work. As much as you try to rethink things in your work, you also rethink your studio. Your work is at war with the things that you surround yourself with. So, I never start with a white canvas there is always a residue in the air. We bring things into our life, but we have no idea how these things ultimately constitute and effect us. There are bodies of work that you don’t immediately understand. It takes years and different stages in life to unpack your work, and you have to bare with this enormous tension. This brings you to an edge where you think you know your work, but all you know are growing pains, which are familiar but you can’t see the result of your growing.” Studio location: Cranbrook Academy of Art, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, USA Kristi Paap Visual artist, jeweller 1973, Tallinn, Estonia

“I continue the search for the sound - like leaves rustling in the wind, the drone of insects, and waves lapping against the shore, something that surrounds us daily but mostly stays unnoticed. Something that triggers the senses. My tools are mostly cherry and other similar stones and wood. The jewellery is a part of nature’s low-key sound or loud silence and makes a quiet noise when put into motion. It is an act with rhythm and movement; a ritual, a meditation, or perhaps a routine.” Studio location: private dwelling in Mustamäe district, Tallinn, Estonia Lina Peterson Jewellery artist and educator 1979, Gothenburg, Sweden “I’m continuing my work with painted and carved wood, but I am combining wood with metal and textiles this time. Focusing on texture, pattern and colour I’m seeing how these different materials can work together. I’m looking to introduce some aspects of traditional Swedish folk jewellery in to these pieces as I am intrigued by the inclusion of moving parts in these pieces. The challenge is not to romanticise, but to develop these influences

into something that feels current. We’ll see how it works out!” Studio location: Stoke Newington, London, UK Beppe Kessler Visual artist, jeweller 1952, Amsterdam, Netherlands “One group is the ‘music pieces’: brooches made of a mix of CD’s, records and old ivory piano keys. Making music with (old) materials that got forgotten over time. The brooches are also a kind of history pieces: they tell about the passing of time. We don’t use old records any longer, but vinyl is a nice material to work with. Elephants are not to be hunted anymore, but the old ivory is precious. And the CD is now and will soon vanish too.... The other focus point in my current work is about carrying ‘space’ along with you, hidden in a brooch. The brooches are miniature paintings: pieces of painted wood, covered by sculpted magnifying acrylic fiber, which enhances the illusion of space. An intriguing integration of painting and jewellery.“ Studio location: old school building in a Zeeburg district, Amsterdam

Gésine Hackenberg Jewellery artist and educator 1972, Mainz, Germany “The intention of my jewellery is to represent fruit and vegetables’ relationship with people and their bodies. Everyday contact with these natural products – shopping, peeling, preparation and eating - serves as the chief source of inspiration. The sensual pleasure entailed in these acts invites us to celebrate the little things in life, playing with fruit and vegetables and adorning ourselves with their splendour… In the execution of this work, the emphasis lies on the human perspective and constructed nature, made of thin copper sheet. The copper colour ages over time and references the idea of growth and ripening of the fruit and vegetables. These fragile constructed copper objects are then reinforced through electroforming techniques.” Studio location: Slotermeer district, Amsterdam, Netherlands

(End)


Englisch

annstra

ße

tr .

Römerstra ße

instr aße

Friedrichstr. tr. ens Tür k

str .

e raß e

hstraß e

traß

instr aße

traße

traß e

König

mayers

ers ting Oet

Widen

Kaulb ac

tra

nst

ße

g

imme r-Rin

as-W

fst

ra

ße

Thom

or sd

e raß llst Ze

e Steinstraß

ein St

. str er ad Ba

rer A

Unte

s-Str.

-Sach

Iffl an d

r.

r.

r St

dol phs t

rau

Bar e

ken s

Am alie

str .

Sch

rstr.

th

raß

Lo

ße

rS e aß

tr

Bal

Ostbahnhof U e aß tr ss n a rle O

e

a tr

tra

ße

s en

ed

i Fr

ße

ra

St

r.

Hu

re

mb

ns

tra

old

tst

raß

e

U Kolumbusplatz

U

rn se er L

an

raß

ds

e

ße

ße

hy

tra

Sc

Is

Zug

spit

zstr

.

Sc

Te ge

ftla

rns t

Implerstraße

Meindlstraße

Harras

ße

ra

st

al

t ar

. ger Str

Hansast raße

Gotzin

60 Oberländerstr.

U Silberhornstr

Garching-Forschungszentrum Garching

U2

Hasen- DülferFeldHarthof Am Hart moching bergl str.

Garching-Hochbrück Fröttmaning

Georg-Brauchle- Oberwiesen- Petuelfeld ring Ring Westfriedhof Gern

Hohenzollernpl. Josephpl. Theresienstr.

Stiglmaierpl.

Rotkreuzpl.

Cand

idstra

Brudermühlstraße Kieferngarten

Frankfurter Ring Moosacher U1 Milbertshofen St.-Martins-Pl. OlympiaOlympiaMoosach Einkaufszentrum zentrum Scheidplatz Bonner Pl.

U3

Karlspl. (Stachus)

U Giesing

Events March 12

Arabellapark

U4

Münchner Freiheit

Events March 13

Richard-Strauss-Straße

Giselastr.

Böhmerwalsplatz

Universität

Prinzregentenplatz

Lehel

Events March 14 Events March 15

Odeonspl. Max-Weber-Platz Moosfeld

Ostbahnhof

Marienpl.

Trudering

Hauptbahnhof

U5

Friedenheimer Str. Laimer Platz

Holzapfelkreuth

Theresienwiese

U4 Heimeranpl.

Schwanthalerhöhe

Westenstr. Partnachpl.

Harras

U6

Klinikum Großhadern

Implerstr.

Westpark

MachtlfingerStr. Forstenrieder Allee Basler Str.

U3 Fürstenried West

Goethepl.

Poccistr.

Aidenbachstr. Obersendling Großhadern

Kreillerstr. Sendlinger Tor

Brudermühlstr.

Thalkirchen (zoo)

Kolumbuspl. Frauenhoferstr. Candidpl.

Untersbergstr.

Silberhornstr.

Giesing

Innsbrucker Ring KarlPreis-Pl.

Josephburg Michaelibad Quiddestr. Neuperlach Zentrum

Wettersteinpl.

Therese-Giehse-Allee

St.-Quitin-Pl. Mangfallpl.

U1

Events March 08

U Untersbergstr

ße

Events March 11

Freimann Studentenstadt Alte Heide Nordfriedhof Dietlindenstraße

Königspl.

Maillingerstr.

Haderner Stern

er

raße

U6

rstraße

ng

Ehrengutst

47

Albert-Roßhaupter-Str. U

nstalle

afi

Li

Welserstr.

Hecke

Gr ße

ans

ck

ße

hb

ra

ac

lst

nb

ge

rin

e

nst

ra

ck

he

Jah

St

e Ha ns

aße Str

59 ße

ra

Bordeuaxplatz Orleansplatz

er

er

st

m

hn

ör

ei

irc

W

19

ic

alk

6

17

Isar

st

aße

Str

th

sb

Re

Th

en Wi

e

iu

U Fraunhoferstr

üh

tti

Einsteinstraße

nh

traße

ück

el

Mais

ere

Inn

rn

Herzog-Heinrich-Str.

sbr

er

Co

Pestalozzistr.

g

1

se

2

ke

Ro

Bavariarin

.

e nz

e

Kl

wig

str

ße

ra

e

r st

Lud

Gärtnerplatz 40

st

14

23

brüc

26

K

us

r.

eli

.

str

r lle

rm

ße

ilians

n le

rn

en

um

Bl

f

te

ra

Maxim

t str. zes ord

Rum

Co

5 lers tr.

.

r st

e aß

ne

st

e

Isar

Fr

15

es

str

Ze

er

51

Mül

4

er

r.

st

tra

s

m

ur

w nd

ße Poccistr

ell

straß

str. 66

auenstraße

W

zin

pu

ci U

39 38 37

er

er

Goetheplatz

nten

U Lehel

ilian

3

of

LU

erst

nh

11

Rothmundstr.

fing

au

ms

Kau

g an

Ob

35

12 68 Maxim

Schäffler Frauenpl str. atz

Fr

ße

tra

ur

w ind

30 Sc

hm

64

nger

Goethestraße

he

Se

Sendlinger Tor -Platz 17 43

rege

r. Le de Marien- U re platz rs tr. e ß Viktualien57 15 a tr S Tal Isartormarkt r e R g osenta lin platz l nd er 13

8

Ka

13

c Po

Westpark

p ans

tr.

U Sendlinger Tor

Theresienwiese

Prinz

Odeons-67 platz 9

latz

cellis Promenadetr. platz

Sonnenstr.

Paul-Heyse-Straße

Landwehrstraße

-Str.

U Odeonsplatz

61 Maxi

bac

Englischer Garten

Tann

56

U Karlsplatz (Stachus)

Schwanthalerstr.

Chinesischer Turm

der-

atz hpl Pa

Len

ße

tine

tr.

stra

Monopteros

Von-

i mil

str .

Bahnhofplatz

ens

16

aße

Ohm

iller-Ring

Karlsplatz Neu hau ser (Stachus) S

U Theresienwiese

Theresienhö

U Schwanthalerhöhe

r. Arc

. str

aße

str.

Ott o

ke

Ligsalzstraße

Parkstr.

ße

annstra

Bergm

Kazmairstraße U Heimeranplatz

Elis

Bayerstraße

28 34 Gollierstr.

raße

U Universität

22

18

tr.

tr.

Hackerbrüc

hien

10 Westendstraße Schwanthalerstraße

lastr

genst

Oskar-von-M

er S

U Hauptbahnhof

r Straße

29

Sop

e

18

8

33

aße

Landsberge

Gise

Geor

20

Thea

lfstr

14

str.

6

str.

-S ph ose

Arnu

aße

ße

69

enn

raße Seestraß

49 58 A kade mie str. Ada 46 lbe rts 16 19 tr.

62

ien

r.

str

ße

lstr

9

65

rst

Bri

Königsplatz U

Kar

rge

x-J Ma

Don

tra

er Stra

rss

ße

laist

-Str.

53

tr.

Lui sen

Ma

Seid lstr.

ner

aße

Dachau

lfstr

tra

res

sbe

45

36

The

bel

er S

aße

Kleinhesseloher See

Niko

Franz-Joseph

Die ne rst r.

enn

Arnu

ngs

isst

e raß nst ste Aug u Bri

sbe rge r Br

50

Ga

U Stiglmaierplatz

rnstraße

31

Reichenbach

raße

ück

e

er St

elli

21

e

e

burg

rstr

32

ße

U Theresienstr

r Straß

r Straß

phen

Sch

str.

e Dachau

e rsberg

Nym

the

5 2

tra

Lui sen

Donne

U Mailingerstr

nds

Heß

ß

reu

e

bla

tr.

Neu

Tür

raß

41

55

ella

sst

ße

Hohenzolle

raße

54

Isab

rre

Münchner Freiheit

Ainmillerst

str.

48

traße

Bism arck s

Erich

aße er Str

Winz

Schle ißheim

Zie

ns

Ma

traße

enss

Kaiserstra

beth

Agness

Josephsplatz U

U Rotkreuzplatz

44

Elisa

Georgenstraße

7

Viktoriastr.

-Kästn er-Str

Straße Hilten sperge rstr.

erers traße

10

63

n ma

Herzogstr.

11

4

Clem

nsstr.

str. Kurfürsten ße Nordendstra

o

Le

r.

st

th

aße

U Hohenzollernplatz

nstr.

Hohenzoller

42

Lo

chesstr

Cleme

Hohenzollernplatz

r.

ße ra St

Landshuter Allee

ob

Destou

r. Tengst

er au ch Da

ße

a

tr

ds

o nr

Elis . abeth st Str

us

i-K

th Ka

heime r

erstr aße

Schwere-Reiter-Straße

Schleiß

Winz er

Olympiapark

52

e Belgradstraß

Ackermannstraße

.

.

r.

raße

Un ge re r st

Bonnerplatz

eodor-St

König

Karl-Th Angerstr

Morawitzkystraße Leopoldstraße

Luitpoldpark

Lud wigs

Ackerm

Neuperlach Süd

U5

Cafes and Restaurants

MessestadtOst West

U2

U

Underground Station

Events outside Munich 24 Hauptbahnhof Nürnberg 25 Neues Museum Nürnberg 3

Rottach-Egern, Tegernsee

Mobile Exhibitions 7

12

27


EVENTS

3 GALERIE ANNA PIRK Zwiefacher Kerstin Becker, Christine Graf

1 INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR MUNICH, INTERNATIONALEN HANDWERKS­MESSE MÜNCHEN Messegelände München, Halle B1, Sonderschauen der 66

— 17:00 Seestraße 24, 83700 Rottach- Egern am Tegernsee 11.3.-22.3. Tue-Sat, 11:00-19:00 Sun 16.3, 14:00-18:00 and by appointment T. +49 8022 1884222

TALENTE 2014 — 15.3., 15:30 Talente-Award ceremony 2014 Halle B1 on stage SCHMUCK 2014 —15.3., 16:00 Herbert Hofmann-Award ceremony 2014 Halle B1 on stage

TUESDAY 11 MARCH

— 13.00 Morawitzkystraße 1, 80803 Munich

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION More information on page 24 Arnoldsche Book presentation —15.3, 14:00-15:00 Halle B1, Frame Chrome Yellow Books, Jewellery in Israel, Iris Bodemer Rebus, Cosmic Debris with jewellery from Reinhold Ziegler.

11.3.-16.3. (Tue-Fri) 13:00-19:00 Sat 10:00-13:00

5 ANTIQUARIAT DIETER ZIPPRICH Initial-BfG, Introducing a new online shop by Volker Atrops. Zieblandstraße 2, 80799 Munich 16.2.-18.3. 24h window display

Exempla 2014 – Partnership, Meister der Moderne 2014 Frame’ with Platina Contemporary Swedish Art Jewellery, an exhibition in connection with the publi­cation, written by Inger Wästberg, ARVINIUS + ORFEUS Publishing Galerie Ra, focus on Mirjam Hiller Galerie Marzee, Book presentation — 13.3., 14:30 Halle B1 on stage Die Welt hinter den Dingen Silber Sommer Galerie: Tafelgerät-Gegenwärtige Positionen. Talks by Deborah Werbner, Isabell Enders, Simon Pattison

— 14.3., 16:00 Halle B1, Aktionsbühne Die Welt hinter den Dingen Silber Sommer Galerie: Tafelgerät-Gegenwärtige Positionen. Talks by Anders Ljungberg, Drummond Masterton, Juliane Schölß

SATURDAY 8 MARCH

6 VENTIL Heidi Saul Schmuck

10

MOBILE EXHIBITION ‘Our Only Gold Is To Get Attention’ by Schmock. 12.3.–18.3., in the city of Munich continuously Within the field of author jewellery we are searching for different possibilities of presen­ tation. Our main question is: How do we reach people that are unaware of this field and how do we communicate the difference with commercial or traditional jewellery? In this project visual aspects of the commercial world are used to create an installation concerning value in an urban context. During Schmuck 2014 you don’t have to come to us, instead we’ll come to you. But pay close attention or you might miss us. Schmock is a collective consisting of Charlotte Van de Velde, Eline Willemarck, Octave Vandeweghe, Saskia Nachtvreugd and Clarisse Bruynbroeck. www.schmockism.tumblr.com

8

GALERIE WITTENBRINK Warwick Freeman Türkenstraße 16, 80333 Munich 12.3.-18.3. (Tue-Sat) 10:00-18:00 Thu 10:00-20:00 Warwick Freeman’s (New Zealand)

BLANCO Christie Schellings, Babs Zwanink, Anne Eissen, Heike Pipapo, Sangji Yun, Anke Huyben ­— 16:00-20:00 Frauenstraße 18, 80469 Munich 12.3.-16.3., 10:00-18:00 We present to you ‘Blanco’. We are an independent group of convinced jewellery makers. We take Schmuck as a personal project. We use this exhibition as a meeting place in the hope of finding or receiving answers.

14 GALERIEGEDOKMUC New spirit–fresh colours Susanne Elstner, Susanne Holzinger, Christiana Jöckel, Michaela Köppl, Kristina Kundt, Daniela Osterrieder Schleißheimer Straße 61, 80797 Munich 16.3.–18.3., Mon-Sun 11:00-19:00 Thu 11:00-22:00

GALERIE ARTEFAKT Emailkunst Julika Müller, Melanie Nützel, Christja Tritschler — 16:00-20:00 Hans-Sachs-Straße 13, 80469 Munich 12.3.-29.3., Mon-Fri 11:00-19:00, Sat 11:00-15:00

15

Gedok is exhibiting 6 jewellers in their new gallery space for applied art, fine art, literature and music.

11

WELTRAUM Peacock green & old rose Eunmi Chun & Dongchun Lee — 17:00-21:00 Rumfordstraße 26, 80469 Munich 12.3.-16.3., 11:00-19:00

III Hyorim Lee, Junwon Jung, Mari Iwamoto

GALERIE BIRÓ Endangered Pink Robert Baines

7.3–26.4 (Tue-Fri) 14:00-18:00 (Sat) 11:00-14:00 12.3-18.3., 11:00-19:00 and around the city of Munich

Reinhold Ziegler (Norway) is inspired by spirituality inside the individual and how contemporary artists combine old myths, symbols and rituals in contemporary artistic expression.

WEDNESDAY 12 MARCH

2

— 11:00 Zieblandstraße 2, 80799 Munich

WITTENBRINK FÜNFHÖFE Reinhold Ziegler

— 19:00 Steinstraße 17, 81667 Munich 12.3.-19.3. (Tue-Fri), 11:00-19:00 Sat, Sun, Mon 11:00-16:00

7

the public in a walking exhibition. You can find them all through the city during the Schmuck event days from 10 am until late and follow them on: www.facebook.com/MADaboutSchmuck?fref=ts

13

9

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 23

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION see article by Kellie Riggs on page 3

‘FRAME’ at Chrome Yellow books IrisBodemer, Rebus, Book signing —16.3., 14:00-15:00 Edited by Arnoldsche Art Publi­s­­hers, with a contribution by Marjan Unger. The book is publi­shed on the occasion of the joint exhibition with Ute Eitzenhöfer, now on view at the Goldschmiede­haus Hanau from February 27th until May 4th and further at CODA Apeldoorn from June 1st until 14th of September.

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 25

Theatinerstraße 14, 80333 Munich 12.3.-18.3., 10:00-19:00

4 ATELIER SHARI PIERCE Car Crashes and Butterflies Mia Maljojoki & Shari Pierce

DOROTHEA PRÜHL Modern Classic As a part of the Schmuck’14 exhibition Dorothea Prühl will present a special selection of her work.

work is characterized by reduced clean, simple geometric forms, which refer to local natural materials, like stone, bone or shell.

Elisabethstraße 16, Rgb., 80796 Munich 13.3.-15.3. (Thu-Fri) 10:00-20:00 Sat 10:00-18:00 In addition to the jewellery work, three artists will present their media, which are used in the process of their work as byproducts in existence, or through a completely new formation mechanism.

Reduced forms, minimalistic and conscious use of material, with sensitivity to texture characte­ rizes Dongchun Lee’s work. Eunmi Chun creates a communion of the living; plants, animals and if worn, humans, are intertwined. Both artists have been trained in Korea and Germany and have created their specific and artistic languages, both in their own way combining Asian and Western influences.

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 25

PONYHOF ARTCLUB Vienna 4 Michelle Kraemer, Viktoria Münzker, Claudia Steiner, Eva Tesarik — 17:00- 20:00 Pestalozzistraße 14, 80469 Munich 12.3.-14.3., Thu 11:00-20:00, Fri 11:00-18:00 4 Women from Austria, Luxemburg and Slovakia have identified common ground in Vienna, all of them adopting this city as the centre for their work. During the IHM/SCHMUCK 2014 event the group will present their latest work, which reflects the diverse range of jewellery art and the different backgrounds and approaches of the artists.

18

MOBILE EXHIBITION MAD about Schmuck Object&Jewellery, MADFaculty, Hasselt (BE): Machteld Lambeets, An Jonckers, Noana Giambra, Kenny Appermans, Anneleen Swillen 13.3.-16.3. Thu-Sun 10:00 till late This Year the five Master students Object & Jewellery of the MAD-Faculty in Hasselt, Belgium, present their project “MAD about Schmuck” in Munich. The title expresses both their passion for jewellery and how their profession can drive them mad. This ‘mad’-ness in several senses connects them as a group and is the common ground for their diverse approaches to the field. Instead of inviting their audience to a specific location, these five emerging jewellers will bring a teaser of their graduation work to

— 17:30 U-Bahn Universität Zwischengeschoss, Station Universität U6/U3 13.3.-16.3. Thu-Sun 11:00-21:00 17.3.-21.3., 16:00-20:00 An exhibition of three students, Schmuckklasse Otto Künzli, presenting their newest work at the Akademie Galerie, which belongs to the Munich Academy of Fine Arts.

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 21

17

— 18:30-20:00 Luisenstraße 49, 80333 Munich 13.3.-18.3., 11:00-20:00 www.bench886studio. weebly.com The Taiwan contemporary jewellery group ‘Bench886’ presents the exhibition entitled ‘Ni Hao!’ and gives people a warm regard through their work and to share the creative energy that comes from their passion and culture.

22 MAURER ZILIOLICONTEM­PORARY ARTS Canvas Context Cash Karen Pontoppidan — 18:00 Amalienstraße 21, 80333 Munich Aperitivo 14.3., 17:00 11.3.-16.3. (Tue-Fri) 10:00-19:00 In the trilogy Canvas Context Cash, presented for the first time in Munich as a cohesive work group, Karen Pontoppidan takes her stand in the non-ending debate on the relation between the free and applied arts, and particularly between painting/ drawing on the one hand and the identity of the contemporary goldsmith on the other.

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 19

MICHEKO GALERIE Mass Sungho Cho, Akiko Kurihara, Fumiki Taguchi — 19:00-22.00 Theresienstraße 18, 80333 Munich 13.3.-22.3., 11:00-20:00 Three artists (Sungho Cho, Akiko Kurihara and Fumiki Taguchi) present their works under the theme of ‘Mass’ in addition to their own style of works. www.micheko.com

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 19

23

19 SHOWROOM LOTHRINGER STRASSE 7 Silenzio Oltre la Forma, Dentro il Tempo-Stille. Jenseits der Form, Innerhalb der Zeit Inea Gukema-Augstein, Renzo Pasquale, Annamaria Zanella — 18:00-22:00 Lothringer Straße 7, 81667 Munich 12.3.-23.3. (Thu-Tue) 16:00-21:00 Jewellery, Sculpture and Photography.

20

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 26

AKADEMIEGALERIE 48 Kilogram Light Nadine Kuffner, Janina Stübler, Annamaria Leiste

GALLERY KOBEIA Ni Hao! 10 Contemporary Jewellery Artists from Taiwan

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 21

16

12

21

ACADEMY OF FINE ART MUNICH The Home of Jewellery, Munich-London-Tokyo Nicole Beck, Martin Papcun, Despo Sophocleous, Évelie Mouila, David Roux-Foillet, Silvia Weidenbach, Saika Matsuda, Hiroaki Nagata, Rei Yamada — 18.30-21:00 Akademie der Bildenden Künste München, Historische Aula im Altbau, Akademiestraße 2, 80799 Munich 12.3.-16.3. Thu-Fri 12:00-19:00, Sat 12:00-15.30, Sun 12:00-19:00 This exhibition of nine current and recently graduated students from the Academy of Fine Art Munich, the Royal College of Art London and the Hiko Mizuno College of Jewellery Tokyo will take place in the historic Aula (Mainhall) of the Munich Academy. It is the fifth time since 1993 that three students from three institutions exhibit their works in the corresponding three cities.

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 28

TSCHECHISCHES ZENTRUM In the Mood Eva Eisler, Katerina Vorlová, Markéta Kratochvílová, Janja Prokic — 19:00 Prinzregentenstraße 7, 80538 Munich 15.03., 12:00, Saturday brunch 12.3.-18.3., 10:00-18:00 Professor Eva Eisler from the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design Prague, together with three of her diploma students will present four different approaches to an art of making jewellery. www.munich.czechcentres.cz

24 HAUPTBAHNHOF NÜRNBERG Malerei mit Gerät Anne Fischer, Fatma Güdü Hauptbahnhof Nürnberg/ Underpass Königstorpassage/ at the exit to Altstadt and Neuem Museum, right 21.2.-18.3., 24h window display www.vitrine-nbg.blogspot.de

25

NEUES MUSEUM IN NÜRNBERG, STAATLICHES MUSEUM FÜR KUNST UND DESIGN Die Welt hinter den Dingen ­— 18:00, Positionen Talk Klarissenplatz, 90402 Nürnberg TafelgerätGegenwärtige Talk in Nürnberg 13.3., 14.30 A Jewel show by Gabi Dziuba Exhibition talk


6.2.-4.5. Tue-Sun 10:00-18:00, Thu 10:00-20:00 Monday closed www.nmn.de A lecture together with the jewellery artist Gabi Dziuba in her exhibition “A Jewel Show by Gabi Dziuba”

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 22

26 MUFFATHALLE SCHMUCK-Show —21:00 Live Jewellery-Presentation Zellstraße 4, Munich www.schmuck-show.de

THURSDAY 13 MARCH 27

MMM! Gemma Draper, Janet Hinchliffe McCutcheon, Jewellers in Residence at mima and Teesside University. Lucy Jolly, film, Teesside University. Chloe Lawrence, co-ordinator. 13.3.-16.3. Mobile team operating in a variety of locations in central Munich A series of recorded interviews with artists, curators and gallerists related to mima’s international jewellery collection. www.visitmima.com

28

31

GALERIE CHRISTIAN PIXIS Trip to Munich jewellery by Bettina Speckner and Daniel Spoerri — 18:00-21:00 Kurfürstenstraße 7, Munich 80799 14.3.– 16.3., 11:00-20:00 The Trip to Munich exhibition juxtaposes radically different pieces of jewellery. Spoerri has his garish, humorous and sometimes sarcastic creations produced in manufactories, whereas Speckner places emphasis on handcrafting her inconspicuous and enigmatic yet dynamic pieces herself. Acquaintances from earlier days in Munich, these two artists also share an almost animist love for materials and objects, from which they create small yet self-contained, autonomous worlds. In addition, both are passionate flea market visitors, trying to find the meaning behind the material as such.

32

ATELIER VON GIERKE-BERR Collectomaniacalicity Peter Vermandere

33

STUDIO GABI GREEN Suspended in Green Curated by Laura BradshawHeap

Suspended in Green is a touring exhibition curated and organized by Laura Bradshaw-Heap. The participants where selected through an open call by the jury: David Clarke and Mah Rana. With over 30 artists taking part, this exhibition, the last in the Suspended Series, brings together a cacophony of styles, concepts, techniques and themes each dealing with green in their own personal way. We can’t wait to see you at our opening on the 13th March from 10am! www.facebook.com/suspendedingreen www.suspendendingreen.blogspot.be

PERFORMANCE Sup Brooch Sharon Massey, Cortland Dewitt Max-Joseph-Straße 4, 80333 Munich Performance 13.3., 12:00 Outside the Munich Trade Fair Centre Brooches for brooch lovers. In this exclusive event for Schmuck, co-founder of one-wall-gallery. com, Sharon Massey, will present 20 limited-edition Sup Brooches to the first 20 people already wearing brooches who approach her performance, which will be located outside the Munich Trade Fair Centre at noon on Thursday, March 13, 2014. Sup Brooch is an online-juried exhibition and print catalogue of brooches worn exclusively by men. www.one-wall-gallery.com

29 PARASITEN Susanne Blin, Florian Buddeberg, Anna Maria Eichlinger, Gabi Green, Anna Moll — 10:30 Bergmannstraße 28, 80339 Munich 13.3-17.3., Mon-Sat 24h window display

30 TRAGBAR Plum & Plum Martina Mühlfellner, Alja Neuner — 11:00 Zenettistraße 33, 80337 Munich 13.3.-16.3. Thu-Sun 11:00-18:00

34

— 12:00 Rothmundstraße 6, 80337 Munich 13.3.-14.3. & 16.3. 12:00-17:00 www.henrietteschuster.com

36 SAFFEELS Synthesis Babette von Dohnanyi — 14:00 Barerstraße 63, 80799 Munich 13.3.-16.3., Thu-Fri 11:00-19:00, (Sat, Sun) 10:00-18:00 www.saffeels.com

With the growth in popularity of the Internet and social media within the art jewellery world our work ‘travels’ across the virtual

ALMSTADT SCHMUCK Melanie Nützel & Kirsten Wittstruck

origin and a similar sense of visual aesthetics. www.floravagi.net, www.kirstenbecken.de

44

GALERIE HELL Dialogue 16. The Dialogue Collective. From London to Hell.

41

— 17:00-21:00 Georgenstraße 66, 80799 Munich 14.3.-16.3., Fri 11:00-18:00, Sat 11:0016:00, Sun 11:00-18:00 MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 23

42

48

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION see article by Kellie Riggs on page 3

— 16:00 Reichenbachstraße 25, 80469 Munich 13.3.-16.03., 11:00-19:00

PROJEKTRAUM J. BAUMEISTER BONZO GONZO! Alexander Blank, Kiko Gianocca, Melanie Isverding, Florian Weichsberger

14.3.-16.3., 12:00-18:00

SHOWCASE 20A Máquina Anne Achenbach, Laura Alvarado, Maren Düsel, Beate Eismann, Ariane Ernst, Silke Fleischer, Phylicia Gilijamse, Christina Karababa, Karin Maisch, Vivian Meller, Daniel Michel, Denise Julia Reytan, Maryvonne Wellen — 17:00 Donnersbergerstraße 20a, 80634 Munich 12.3.-18.3. 24h window display Máquina presents the work of a group of jewellery-makers eager to explore the potential of achieving new contemporary jewellery styles. They translate their creative ideas into tangible pieces of adornment by merging a range of modern production techniques with traditional craftsmanship methods to materialize their vision.

— 18:00 Isabellastraße 17, 80799 Munich with 84 GHz 13.3.-16.3. Fri-Sun 12:00-20:00 It’s 1888. Whitechapel in London’s east end is gripped by the horrific aftermath of Jack the Ripper’s murderous campaign. Fast forward to the present. Standing outside The Cass, their spiritual home, in the pouring rain on a dark, dank and cold night, less than a hundred metres from one of the Ripper’s alleged victims, Dialogue Collective start their journey into ‘The Dark Side’. A journey that takes them into silvermithing and jewellery workshops via late night discussions in pubs. A journey that ends in Munich, at Galerie Hell. www.dialoguecollective.co.uk

49

37 45

Marry Ted Noten Students of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp — 15:00-19:00 Welserstraße 11 UG, 81373 Munich 14.3.-16.3. Fri-Sat 10:00-18:00, Sun 10:00-14:00 ‘Marry Ted Noten’–that’s not an easy task. This year ‘Marry Ted Noten’ is the 4th edition of an on-going jewellery project by the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp. Students were asked to design a wedding ring for Theodorus Johannes Maria Noten and his girlfriend Clemence-Marie van Lieshout. The deal was this: if one of the students was able to design an unprecedented wedding ring, an outstanding example that would pass the test to be chosen by Ted as well as by Clemy independently and unaware of each others choices, they would marry indeed. Among the different conceptual designs of the Antwerp students, Ted and Clemy choose a ring with a twist. A saucy thing, made from readymade materials, two coupling heads that fix the lovers forever. The rings have been engraved and are gilded. The photos are proof of the story’s happy ending…. Liesbeth den Besten, Art historian

ATELIER STACH Pearls, you are choking me! Gisbert Stach

— 13:00-19.00 Ligsalzstraße 27, 80339 Munich 13.3.-16.3. Fri 11:00-19:00, Sat-Sun 11:00-16:00

40

GESCHÄFT figure Henriette Schuster

38

HEIMAT PUNK & LUXUSBABA Destination Schmuck Farrah Al-Dujaili, Natalie Smith, Jo Pond, Sally Collins, Li-Chu Wu, Hannah Fewtrell-Bolton

Welserstraße 29-31, 81373 Munich 14.3.-16.3., Fri-Sat 10:0018:00, Sun 10:00-14:00

35

— 11:00 Schraudolphstraße 16, 80799 Munich 13.3.-16.3., 11:00-19:00 For the true collectomaniac, more is not enough. Corals, cigar bands, books by Willem... any pile of personal dada will do. Take a walk through the tableauxcollages and jewellery works of Peter’s Collectomaniacalicity.

— 10:00-12:00 Gollierstraße 7, 80339 Munich 13.3.-16.3., Thu 10.00-20.00, Fri, Sat, Sun 9.30-18:00

world everyday. You are able to recognize a piece of work or a face of a jeweller you have only ever seen on a computer screen. Those jewellers and their work congregate yearly in Munich for those few days of Schmuck. Initial virtual connections of Likes, Tweets and Pins are turned into tactile experiences and burgeoning dialogues. ‘Destination Schmuck’ will showcase new work created in response to the theme of Travel by the participating artists. Each member’s work exudes craftsmanship, imagination and creative ingenuity distinctive of the art jewellery approach. http://madetomakecollective. blogspot.co.uk/

— 15:00-19:00 Welserstraße 15 UG, 81373 Munich 14.3.-16.3. Fri-Sat 10:00-18:00, Sun 10:00-14:00 www.3stations.de

39 WELSER.PUNKT Lights ON/Lights OFF Dimitar Stankov, Jonathan Hens — 15:00-19:00

GALERIE KATRIN EITNER Gast at AUSSTELLUNGSRAUM RUZICKA Take a walk in my soul Rahel Fiebelkorn, Nicole Schuster /Karl Wunderlich, Juliane Noack — 17:00 Georgenstraße 142, 80797 Munich 14.3.-16.3., 11:00-18:00 Take a walk in my soul shows jewellery and objects by Rahel Fiebelkorn and Nicole Schuster for the first time together. While Rahel Fiebelkorn faces the inward, Nicole Schuster shows the external world. The outcome of these two viewing directions is shown in the exhibition. Rahel Fiebelkorn goes further into the questions about myths of femininity with her jewellery and her superhero-objects. The wearable sculptures by Nicole Schuster describe abstract cities and landscapes. Some reflect on real places, others seem to be futuristic landscapes. Both artists will be present at the opening. www.galerie-eitner.com

43

DAS PROVISORIUM Realm of Reversals Flora Vagi jewellery and Kirsten Becken photography — 17:00 Lindwurmstraße 37, 80337 Munich 12.3.-18.3., Wed-Tue 13:00-20:00 Mon-Tue 13:00-20:00 Realm of Reversals is a long-distance collaboration between a jewellery artist Flora Vagi and a photographer Kirsten Becken. What served as a base for the theme are fiction, reflections and reversals. Interpretations of both artists are exhibited in an installation within a space where cultural and social lives merge. The artists used interaction with the two media and their personal visions on the subject, while the end results had a common

SCHLEGELSCHMUCK Katja Schlegel, Curator: Christian Hoedl Barbara Schrobenhauser, Grant McCaig, Nhat-Vu Dang, Rafael Hafner, Jie Sun — 17:00–19:00 Nordendstraße 7 A/Ecke Adalbertstraße, 80799 Munich 13.3.-21.3., Tue-Fri 11:00-19:00, Sat, Sun 11:00-14:00, Monday closed Presentation of 5 young contemporary jewellers at the Showroom of ‘Schlegelschmuck’ www.schlegelschmuck.de

GALERIE SPEKTRUM guest at GALERIE KLAUS LEA QI Ruudt Peters — 18:00–21:00 Türkenstraße 96 Rgb., 80799 Munich Sun 16.3. 13:00-18:00 Fri 13:00-19:00, Sat 11:0014:00, Sun 13:00-18:00 Ruudt Peters will present QI-his latest body of work based on the teachings of the Chinese alchemy.

50

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 21

46

GALLI THEATER MÜNCHEN Kosmos Kino Vivi Touloumidi, Beatrice Brovia, Nicolas Cheng — 17.30-21:00 Amalienpassage, Türkenstraße 86, 80799 Munich 13.3.-16.3, 12:00-19:00 Kosmos Kino is an invitation to renegotiate the role of jewellery in our society: its power and its potential. The materiality of Touloumidi’s hand-carved brooches highlighted by the immaterial projection of Brovia, Cheng’s film and vice-versa. www.vivitouloumidi.com, www.conversationpiece.com

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 26

47 MARGARITIFERA Gates by Chance Antje Godglück, Dana Seachuga, Susanne Kunz — 17:00-20:00 Meindlstraße 4, 81373 Munich

ATELIER&GALERIE PUNKTPUNKTKOMMAKUNST Portrait me: Origo (Interactive exhibition) Laura Alvarado & Vivian Meller — 18:00 Donnersbergerstraße 48, 80634 Munich 12.3.–18.3. Wed-Tue 12.00–18:00 19.3.-31.3. Tue & Thu 14:00-19:00 Portrait Me is the first collaboration of the jewellery designers Vivian Meller and Laura Alvarado redefining the alliance between jewellery and portraiture in the post-digital era. Vivian and Laura invite a person to pose and scan the model directly using a 3D scanner. A pattern is projected over the bust and face to obtain a three-dimensional image that shows up on the computer screen. The obtained file can be edited using 3D-software and then materialized using a 3D-printer. The result is a sketchy fragment of the sitter’s alter ego that is mounted on the Plexiglas, masking and de-masking at the same time. Designers create jewellery objects that restage the old giving the essence of the contemporary. Dr. Rita Schulze Vohren


51

84 GHz, OBSESSED WITH PAPER The Current Obsession Party GOLDBERGSTUDIOS Refuge – Zuflucht Kinga Huber, Orsolya Kecskés, Mária Pecsics, Krisztina Stomfai, Fanni Vékony — 18:00-21:00 Müllerstraße 46 A, 80469 Munich 13.3.-16.3., 11:00-19:00 We do not like rules; we design our pieces of jewellery according to our own principles and that’s what makes them very diverse from the perspectives of material and technique alike. Although our objects differ from each other, there is one thing all of us agree upon: creation with no restraints or restrictions, the surmounting of expectations either real or presumed and the avoidance of conventional thinking – in short, artistic freedom – is, for us, a Refuge. This is the concept our exhibition explores.

52 WINTER & WINTER SHOWROOM Yuragi Emi Fukuda — 18:30 Viktoriastraße 28, 80803 Munich 13.3.- 30.6., 9:30-17:00 www.emifukuda.com

53

STAATLICHEN ANTIKENSAMM­ LUNGEN PREISVERLEIHUNG mineralART 2014: “between layers – worlds within agate” — 19:00 Königsplatz 1, 80333 Munich 13.3.-11.5. Tue-Sun 10:00-17:00, Mon 10:00-20:00 mineralART competition hosted in Idar-Oberstein has been organised since 1995. This year 275 pieces were admitted for the competition focusing on agate, a typical stone found in the region. Selection of the best work (50 pieces by 38 designers), demonstrating a fantastic range of styles and techniques will be presented at the Antikensammlungen along with the announcement of the winning pieces. www.mineralart.de

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 20

54

84 GHZ, SOLOS : “never odd or even” Part II Tanel Veenre and Märta Mattsson — 19:00 Georgenstraße 84, 80799 Munich 13.3.-16.3. Fri-Sun 12:00-20:00 A Palindrome is a word, phrase, number or other sequence of symbols or elements, meaning of which may be interpreted the same way in either forward or reverse direction. What happens when two artists decide to mirror their own work but also reflect and bounce off each other’s visual language? www.martamattsson.com www.tanelveenre.com

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 27

— Party 13.3., 21:00-24:00 Georgenstraße 84, 80799 Munich CURRENT OBSESSION celebrates its 1st anniversary! A year ago we’ve launched our first magazine and today we present our special PAPER edition discussing Schmuck’14. You are welcome to come by and have a drink with us! Let’s celebrate these jewel­ lery-obsessed days in Munich!

MUST-COME PARTY more information on the back cover!

PLATEAUS JEWELLERY PROJECT Barbora Dzuráková, Patricia Correia Domingues, Katharina Dettar, Edu Tarín. In collaboration with a graphic designer Marta Veludo. — 13:00 Adalbertstraße 11, 80799 Munich 14.3.-16.3., 11:00-19:00 Where stones dare to shape precious metals, metal alloys, exotic woods or reconstructed materials – is the place where we would like to be mute to keep you watch and see what we live for..! www.plateausjewelleryproject. com

59

14.3.-26.04. Fri 18:00-21:00, Sat 11:0014:00, Sun 13:00-18:00 “As a small child I was of the firm belief that the disused railway sheds on the other side of the swamp where I grew up were haunted and that even touching the walls of these buildings with a piece of wood would lead to certain death. The fear was genuine, but so was the fascination. Carefully kept trinkets from that distant past have become symbols of a primal contradiction.” Helen Britton www.galerie-spektrum.de

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 23

CAFE CLARA Tan lejos, tan cerca/In weiter Ferne, so nah. Joyería contemporánea argentina en Munich Luz Arias , Iacov Azubel, Patricia Gallucci, Alejandra Koreck, Francine Schloeth, Sabina Tiemroth

Wörthstraße 23/I, 81667 Munich 14.3.-15.3., 15:00-18:00 www.dianadudek.de

60

— 19:00, at 20:00 we are going to raffle 6 pieces of jewellery (one of each artist), among those present Isabellastraße 8, 80798 Munich 12.3.-18.3., 10:00-19:00 (Monday closed) Tan lejos, tan cerca/In weiter Ferne, so nah. (So far, so close) reveals the desire to transform dreams into reality, reflects the physical and invisible distance that we make visible through the material, our personal work. Our aim is to display the essence of our characteristics and to bring fragments of Argentinian contemporary jewellery into a space intended for meeting and conversation. We wish to stimulate the desires between the beholder, the wearer and the maker, in an attempt to narrow distances. www.tanlejostancercajewelry. blogspot.co.uk

FRIDAY 14 MARCH 56 GALERIE HANDWERK Wunderruma Catalogue presentation with Karl Fritsch and Warwick Freeman — 11:00, Catalogue presentation Max-Joseph-Straße 4, 80333 Munich Sun 16.3., 10:00-14:00 7.3.-19.4., Mon, Tue, Fri 10:00-18:00, Thu 10:0020:00, Sat 10:00-13:00 www.hwk-muenchen. de/galerie

57 ARTOTHEK/BILDERSAAL DEMIURG David Bielander Françoise van den Bosch Award exhibition — 14:00, Introduction by Jorunn Veiteberg Rosental 16, 80333 Munich Fri 14:00-18:00, Sat 9:0013:00, Sun 14:00-18:00

KUNSTGIESSEREI MÜNCHEN SOLOS: “never odd or even” Part I Märta Mattsson and Tanel Veenre — 18:00 Schleißheimerstraße 72, 80797 Munich with 84 GHz 14.3.-16.3. Sat 11:00-19:00, Sun 11:00-16:00 www.84GHz.de www.martamattsson.com www.tanelveenre.com MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 27

IM FRUCHTHOF Farbe und das Gegenteil Edda Licht in collaboration with PE/AH — 16:00-21:00 Gotzingerstraße 52 A, 81371 Munich 14.3.-16.3. Sat, Sun 10:00-18:00 Clear Classics and some more. Designed by Edda Licht and PE/AH. www.eddalicht.de

64 GALERIE ISABELLA HUND Black is beautiful Gigi Mariani, Maria Rosa Franzin, Sabine Steinhäusler — 18:00 Frauenplatz 13, 80331 Munich www.isabella-hund.de

65

61

BAYERISCHER KUNSTGEW­­ERBE­­VEREIN E.V. Hallimasch Mushrooming Peter Bauhuis Pacellistraße 6-8, 80333 Munich 15.3., 17:00, the special inauguration 28.2.-5.4. Mon-Sat 10:00-18:00 Hallimasch is the German name for Armillaria Mellea or honey fungus. It builds up a huge network in the ground, out of sight. Its mycelium emits light in the dark due to the enzyme Luciferin. Peter Bauhuis shows his latest work, offering not only a comprehensive overview of his metalwork, but building a cabinet of wonder: jewellery, vessels and other cast objects plus texts, drawings, found objects and their captions form an entity. The presentation acquires a character of an old-fashioned museum installation. Like a honey fungus has grown to be a many-branched organism, Peter’s work expands to a never-ending horizon. www.hallimasch.artfree.de

MUST-SEE EXHIBITION more information on page 21

­— 19:00 Barer Straße 40, 80333 Munich Tue-Sun 10:00-18:00 Thu 10:00-20:00 In 2014 ten years of jewellery in the Pinakothek der Moderne are celebrated with a new, ‘revisited’ exhibition in the Danner Rotunda - open to the public as of March 15. Since 2004 Die Neue Sammlung has incorporated contemporary jewellery in the Pinakothek der Moderne in its permanent display in the Danner Rotunda as well as in temporary exhibitions. As such, one of the most multifaceted artistic forms of expression today is permanently being presented in a museum of this type for the first time alongside art, architecture, graphic works and design. The Danner Rotunda forms a central core in which exhibits by more than one hundred jewellery artists from around the world are shown. www.die-neue-sammlung.de

Talk: Pravu Mazumdar: Understanding Surfaces. On Jewellery and Identity Talk 16.3., 11:00 Pinakothek der Moderne, Barer Straße 40, 80333 Munich Human surfaces are hybrid objects involving biological and cultural elements like dress, makeup, jewellery, gait, skin, posture, voice. Contemporary societies manifest not only surfaces of products, but also human surfaces functioning as ‘packaging’ and emitting discourses on interiority that place humans within limits and define their individuality… Modern jewellery–in its contemporary, critical manifestations and its inherent tendency of breaching tradition–can break open the shell of identity and involve individuals in an open play of enhancement and change of masks. It can indeed be understood as a means of counteracting the pressure towards identity in daily life in modern societies. www.die-neue-sammlung.de

GALERIE SPEKTRUM Unheimlich Helen Britton — 18:00-21:00 Theresienstraße 46, 80333 Munich

Opening 14.3., 19:00 Since 2008 Die Neue Sammlung -The International Design Museum Munich - invites jewellery classes from all over the world

2 TRACHTENVOGL Reichenbachstr. 47 Café/lounge in a 50’s setting

3 CAFÉ FRÄULEIN Frauenstr. 11 Different types of fondue

4 AROMA KAFFEBAR Pestalozzistrasse 24 Varieties of coffee

6 CAFÉ KOSMOS Dachauerstrasse 7 ASTRA beer for €1,80

7 ALTER OFEN Zieblandstrasse 41 Local pub in Maxvorstadt CORLEONE 8  Sendlinger-tor-platz 7 Small and good music

9 BRASSERIE TRESZNJEWSKI Theresienstrasse 72 Food from the region

10  MARAIS Parkstrasse 2 “the marais is almost too good to be true”

11 Schnelle Liebe, Thalkirchnerstrasse 12

LUNCH / DINNER 12  COSMOGRILL Maximillianstrasse 10 Fresh burgers and potato wedges

13  GOLDMARIE

— 22:00, Party Maximilianstraße/ Unterführung Every year the jewellery class of Otto Künzli gets together to organize a party to celebrate…

SATURDAY, 15 MARCH

Schmellerstrasse 23 Delicious food and good wines

14 THERESA GRILL Theresienstrassee 29 Very good food and nice place to be

15 BRATWURSTHERZL Dreifaltigkeitsplatz 1 Traditional bratwurst

16 RILANO NO.6 Ottostraße 6 Elegant and traditional

67 GALERIE BIRO guest at EINSÄULENSAAL Returning to the jewel is a return from exile 7 Robert Baines, Karl Fritsch, Gerd Rothmann 15.3.-16.3., 11:00-18:00

68 GALERIE FRED JAHN Giampaolo Babetto Zeichnungen 1965-2013 — 11:00-14:00 Maximilianstraße 10, 80539 Munich 15.3.-12.4. www.fredjahn.com

69

STARING IN HINDSIGHT: The State University of New York at New Paltz

Ledererstrasse 23 Breakfast and aperitivo

MAXIMILIANS FORUM Klasse Künzli – Die Party

62

58

1  BAR CENTRALE

Müllerstrasse 50 Charming day-time café and cocktails till 1pm

66 DIE NEUE SAMMLUNG– The International Design Museum Munich Wiedereröffnung/opening der Danner-Rotunde

CAFES / BARS

LORETTA BAR 5 

63

55

BROKEN HEART SERIES BY DIANA DUDEK

to be part of the international Schmuck weekend in Munich showing their work in an exhibition presented in the Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich. After the Hiko Mizuno College in Tokyo, the classes of the Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, the Academy of Art, Architecture, Design in Prague, the Royal College in London, Ädellab/ Kon­stfack Stockholm, and the Academy of Art in Munich this year the State University of New York at New Paltz is welcomed to be on stage with their own show.

AUGUSTINER KELLER Goldschmiedetreffen — 19:00, Dinner Arnulfstraße 52, 80335 Munich www.augustinerkeller.de

17

EL TEATRO Balanstrasse 23 Tapas Bar

18 POMMES BOUTIQUE Amalienstrasse 46 Belgian fries

19 GRATITUDE Turkenstrasse 55 Vegan restaurant


SCHMUCK

19

p.

Must-See

19

Must-See List Schmuck 2014

One of the key features of CURRENT OBSESSION PAPER is a list of highlighted exhibitions – a Must-See List. As a contemporary jewellery publication, we see this list as a way to give most interesting exhibitions space and opportunity to make a statement and announce themselves. The Must-See List is a selection of exhibitions curated by the editors of CURRENT OBSESSION.

18

22

Canvas Context Cash In the trilogy CANVAS CONTEXT CASH, presented for the first time in Munich as a cohesive work group, Karen Pontoppidan takes her stand in the non-ending debate on the relation between the free and applied arts, and particularly between painting/drawing on the one hand and the identity of the contemporary goldsmith on the other. Born in Kerteminde/Denmark, she has dealt with this topic time and again under a variety of headings in the course of her complex biographical trajectory and has in fact devoted her energies essentially to this problem to have her work resonate with it in a series of steps. Against the backdrop of her previous works her recent objects can be seen as a matured conclusion creating interstices of humour and irony and presenting jewellery that renders the viewer thoughtful and yet never ceases to “clothe” the wearer. CANVAS consists of geometrical bodies of wood wrapped in canvas and beset with jewellery quotes like embossed ornaments, appliquéd medallions or floral décor. Art and craft unite in a cheerful conspiracy. CONTEXT fathoms out further possibilities of this terrain and reaches out for bolder forms – in the way of a response to a rising trend that intends to eliminate all individual traits involved in the artistic process or as intrinsic elements of an artistic strategy. Pontoppidan commissions befriended painters to colour the interior of miniature boxes of industrial canvas, leaving the job of binding to other colleagues. The whole set consists of 99 objects and functions as a witty and enigmatic comment on a common practice in contemporary art. CASH constitutes something like a concluding remark on the economic system associated with aesthetic behaviour. Art reveals itself more and more as a simple definition, dependant on things like context, success and the ambience, in which the individual objects are anchored. Thus we find ourselves treading on an elastic ground generating value shifts and hybrid creatures.

Contemporary jewellery has become part of such a trend, involving positions that associate themselves with the general discourse of art and respond to it by means of an aesthetic language that is immanent to its material. Karen Pontoppidan’s work is one such voice. A jewellery artist with an absolutely avant-garde breeding, she worked from 2000 till 2006 as an assistant to Otto Künzli and since 2006 as a professor at the Konstfack in Stockholm. Although she mercilessly eradicates all traditionalistic temptations besetting jewellery art, although her work displays a strong proclivity towards things like absurdity, defamiliarization and play, she values her background in jewellery and the goldsmith’s craft, even though this is not always immediately visible. Were that not the case, her “nasty” approach could never be quite so effective. For the process involved in her work jewellery is subjected to a mysterious transformation, with conceptual action and critical reflection on the one hand and aesthetic and ornamental recapitulation on the other melting into a compact and handy form. Karen Pontoppidan Maurer Zilioli-Contemporary Arts as guest at kunstbüro reillplast Amalienstraße 21 80333 Munich Opening 12.3.2014 18:00– Aperitivo 14.3.2014 17:00 12.3.2014-16.3.2014 Tue-Fri 10:00-19:00 CASH#1, pendant, 2013, silver coins, paint, string (photographer Karen Pontoppidan) CASH#2, pendant, 2013, silver coins, paint, string (photographer Karen Pontoppidan) CASH#4, pendant, 2014, silver coins, paint, string (photographer Karen Pontoppidan)

Mass

Sungho Cho, Akiko Kurihara, Fumiki Taguchi, Micheko Galerie Theresienstraße 18, 80333 Munich Opening 12.3.2014 19:00-22:00 13.3.2014-18.3.2014 11:00-20:00, 19.3.2014-21.3.2014 15:00-20:00 22.3.2014 11:00-16:00

Fumiki Taguchi, Ballooned forms, bracelet, aluminum, stainless steel, bronze

The title Mass means one liter beer mug, which is a specialty of Munich, as well as ruler and scale in German. It also encompasses the meaning of “mass” in English, like quantity or volume. Three artists (Sungho Cho, Akiko Kurihara and Fumiki Taguchi) present their works under the theme of Mass in addition to their own style of works.


CURRENT

53

OBSESSION

mineralART: “Between Layers – Worlds Within Agate”

The worlds within the agate, its unusual layered structure and variety of colours, have fascinated man for thousands of years. Each agate druse is irreplaceably unique; its cut excites the beholder’s imagination and evokes fantastical images. Since its discovery, the abstract beauty of agate has inspired countless artists to create objects as well as jewellery from it. The history of agate in art and jewellery is very diverse. Recent years have seen it become devalued, as a so-called semi-precious stone used to make mass-produced ornaments. Engravings, on the other hand, tend to be based on traditional images and themes, which no longer reflect the Zeitgeist and the depth of artists’ experiences. The aim of the “between layers – worlds within agate” therefore, is to reset the focus on the uniqueness of agate, to find contemporary ways of working and artistically interpreting it and to produce an innovative piece of jewellery or an object from or in connection with it. The mineralART competition for innovative gemstone design is organised since 1995. In late January 2014 the jury consisting of five experts: Jiro Kamata (JP), Helena Lehtinen (FI), Estela Saez Vilanova (ES), Gerhard

Schmidt (DE) and Dr. Marjan Unger (NL) gathered in Idar-Oberstein to select the winners of this competition dedicated to agate. An overwhelming number of 275 pieces by 161 participants was the subject of discussion and debate. Exhibitions State Collection of Antiques The prize-giving will take place on Thursday, 13 March 2014, as part of a celebratory event inside the Munich State Collection of Antiques. The competition-winning pieces and other outstanding works will be on display here during the SCHMUCK 2014 exhibition and until 11 May 2014 during museum opening hours. Following the exhibition in Munich, the winning and other selected pieces will be displayed in the German Gemstone Museum in Idar-Oberstein. The competition is organised by the Museum and the “mineralART 2014” exhibition will also be shown between the end of May and end of October 2014.

Staatlichen Antikensammlungen Königsplatz 1, 80333 Munich Opening 13.3.2014 19:00 13.3.2014-11.5.2014 Tue-Sun 10:00-17:00 Mon 10:00-20:00 www.antike-am-koenigsplatz. mwn.de/antikensammlung/ haus/index.html www.mineralart.de

Above: Typhaine Le Monnier - Giovanni Sicuro - Philip Sajet - B. Schuch u. XO G. Edinger Right: Li Tianqi Typhaine Le Monnier Yeonkyung Kim Annamaria Zanella

PAPER


SCHMUCK

65

21

Must-See

16

STARING in HINDSIGHT: The State University of New York at New Paltz

48 KILOGRAMS LIGHT

Nadine Kuffner, Janina Stübler, Annamaria Leiste AkademieGalerie U-Bahn Universität Zwischengeschoss, Station Universität U6/U3

Die Neue Sammlung – The International Design Museum Munich Barer Straße 40, 80333 Munich

Opening 12.3.2014 17:30 13.3.2014-16.3.2014 Thu-Sun 11:00-21:00

Opening 14.3.2014 19:00

17.3.2014-21.3.2014 16:00-20:00

Designed in response to the physical space that houses the exhibition -informally referred to as ‘under the stairs’, is an interstitial space formed by the galleries that surround it, a negative of a positive, the leftover from a functional form - Staring in HINDSIGHT is an exercise in looking, finding, seeing and knowing.

45

Aliyah Gold on Alexis Mosquito necklace, 2013 Sterling silver, stainless steel

Janina Stübler

Michael O’Neill on Danny Cell Phone Tower (Woodstock), 2014

constant seeking / surrendered recovering / things said / forgotten relations / LIGHT connects / used underway / 3 betake themselves / 48 move into the space / diagonal moment in time / absurd stage / concrete

Pre & post-production styling: Steven Gordon Holman & Anna Hammer Camera: Kim Zitzow

turn / expanding 
patterns / saved stories / KILOGRAM intervene / support 
rituals / abstract end / colourful condition / collected surface / kept within bounds / destination still unknown

Schlegelschmuck Katja Schlegel, Curator: Christian Hoedl Barbara Schrobenhauser, Grant McCaig, Nhat-Vu Dang, Rafael Hafner, Jie Sun Nordendstraße 7A/Ecke Adalbertstraße, 80799 Munich Opening 13.3.2014 17:00–19:00 13.3.2014-21.3.2014 Monday closed Tue-Fri 11:00-19:00 Sat, Sun 11:00-14:00 www.schlegelschmuck.de Nhat-Vu Dang, Activate Series, Loading, 2014

21 The Taiwan contemporary jewellery group ‘Bench886’ would like to present the exhibition entitled ‘Ni Hao!’ and to give people a warm regard through their work and to share the creative energy that comes from their passion and culture. ‘Hi (Ni Hao in Chinese)’ has been recognized as a word of greeting, 
the communication literally starts from this magic word, like a key to
open a topic, a bridge to link relationships. Language might be the 
code to exchange information whilst it could build up an obstruction 
between each other sometimes, but if there is an ability to express the concept without language barriers, to feel

And the Winner is… often the one that confuses the whole issue. Schlegelschmuck, Katja Schlegel in cooperation with the curator Christian Hoedl for a second time during the international Schmuck week present their selective choice of 5 young contemporary jewellery artists: Barbara Schrobenhauser, Munich, Grant McCaig, London, Nhat-Vu Dang, Berlin, Jie Sun, Amsterdam, Rafael Hafner, Munich. Prove their genuineness, find the child prodigy and enjoy our 5 dashing beauties and their very different languages in contemporary jewellery.

Ni Hao different frequencies from
the world, however, ‘art’ seems one of the ways to get there. Mei-Fang Chiang dialogues the relationship between soul and work 
itself; Cai-Xuan (Molly) Wu and Heng Lee discover the beauty of 
knitting and embroidery in unconventional way; Wen-Miao Yeh and 
Yu-Ping Lin develop the Origami and paper cutting in structural 
dramatic forms; Shih-Dea (Deborah) Tseng and YingHsiu (Zita) Hsu 
reveal the vague and abstract spirit of ‘Zen’ in the perceptions of 
touch and vision; Han-Chieh (Joy) Chuang、Ying-Hsiu Chen and 
Yung-Huei Chao combine the inspiration from Mother Nature.

with 
the memory toward motherland. 10 Contemporary Jewellery Artists from Taiwan Gallery Kobeia Luisenstraße 49, 80333 Munich Opening 12.3.2014 18:30-20:00 13.3.2014-18.3.2014 11:00-20:00 www.bench886studio.weebly.com

Wen-Miao Yeh, The Space, 2012


CURRENT

25

Neues Museum in Nürnberg, Staatliches Museum für Kunst und Design Klarissenplatz, 90402 Nürnberg Talk in Nürnberg A jewel show by Gabi Dziuba, exhibtion talk 13.3.2014 14:30 6.2.2014-4.5.2014, Tue-Sun 10:00-18:00 Thu 10:00-20:00 Monday closed

Above: Gabi Dziuba, 3-piece brooch, 1981, wood decorative strip, paint Right: Gabi Dziuba, brooch, 1983, wood, beaten gold

OBSESSION

A Jewel Show by Gabi Dziuba

Painter and installation artist Martin Kippenberger owned a gold sword studded with diamonds and rubies by her; Munich-based artist Hans-Jörg Mayer wears one of her coral skull pendants with a golden cowboy’s hat; and Austrian artist Heimo Zobernig had her design his wedding rings from the diamond-studded letters “EGALEGAL”. Gabi Dziuba develops her exhibition concepts together with artists such as Günther Förg and Christian Philipp Müller. Born 1954 in tranquil Singen am Hohentwiel not far from Lake Constance, like few other jewellery designers Gabi Dziuba has remained in close contact with artists of her generation, the “Neo-Expressionists” and “New Wild Ones” of the 1980s, whose works seek to set themselves apart from the intellectualism of Minimal Art and

Concept Art through expressiveness, narrative quality and emotionality, through strong colouring and large formats. With her narrative qualities and colourfulness, but also in her open-minded approach Gabi Dziuba occupies a special position in so-called Autorenschmuck. Her individual designs are influenced by her affinity with contemporary artists, literature and music. Jewellery to her mind always has a function determined by the intrinsic need for it to be wearable. 
Today, the jewellery designer Gabi Dziuba lives and works in Berlin. A Neue Sammlung exhibition in collaboration with the artist and in cooperation with the Neues Museum für Kunst und Design in Nuremberg.

PAPER


SCHMUCK

23

Helen Britton Unheimlich

62

Galerie Spektrum Theresienstraße 46, 80333 Munich Opening 14.3.2014 18:00-21:00 Sunday open 16.3.2014 13:00-18:00 14.3.2014-26.04.2014 Fri 18:00-21:00 Sat 11:00-14:00 Sun 13:00-18:00 Trapped Gold, 2014, Silver, fine gold. Photography by Helen Britton

41

Must-See

Unheimlich: The Ghost Train

“When I was growing up in Australia there was the yearly Show. In fact there still is. Everyone comes to town to show their best animal, their best vegetable and the best thing they can bake, pickle, or preserve. There are show bags to be had, wonders to be seen; shearing, wood chopping, dogs with wild hairdos. A fabulous spectacle connecting the country to the city.

BONZO GONZO!

Reach, touch, clap, new one in. Rest, relax...a bit of breath... shortly and back in, all of us. Crunchtime baby! Headbutt or headlock, overdrive in season´s clash. With the right position, hold ‘em tight! “Ding!” Damn! The bell rings! Next round.

Then there is Side Show alley. Fun rides, shooting parlours, mangy, bad tempered ponies that children can ride at their own risk. It’s a seedy scene, with rumours of sex and violence, of transient livelihoods; jailbirds and petty criminals, the underbelly. Nestled in amongst all this are The Ghost Trains. As a small child, in a state of fear and excitement, I would avert my eyes when walking past a Ghost Train. A glimpse was enough. I was also of the firm belief that the disused railway sheds on the other side of the swamp where I grew

4

Car Crashes and Butterflies Two Artists. Two Women. Two Friends. Hopes. Dreams. Struggles. Failures. Achievements.

Alexander Blank, Kiko Gianocca, Melanie Isverding, Florian Weichsberger Projektraum J. Baumeister Georgenstraße 66, 80799 Munich Opening 13.3.2014 17:00-21:00 14.3.2014-16.3.2014 Fri 11:00-18:00 Sat 11:00-16:00 Sun 11:00-18:00

Mia Maljojoki & Shari Pierce Atelier Shari Pierce Morawitzkystraße 1, 80803 Munich Opening 11.3.2014 13:00 11-16.3.2014 Tue-Fri 13:00-19:00 Sat 10:00-13:00

Exhibition flyer

up were haunted and that even touching the walls of these buildings with a piece of wood would lead to certain death. The fear was genuine, but so was the fascination. Carefully kept trinkets from that distant past have become symbols of a primal contradiction. The allure of the unknown and ultimately unknowable...“ (Helen Britton)

This exhibition is about a journey. A journey through metamorphosis to find direction and a sense of purpose. Sometimes this cannot be achieved without difficult situations or the beautiful pain and joys that life often brings in generous doses. We present to you our Tears. Laughter. Choices. Mistakes. Wine. Whiskey. Cigarettes. Truth. Lies. Consequences. New People, New Places. Forgotten People, Forgotten Places. Love. Hate. Forgiveness. Passion. Art. Change. Never and Forever. Car Crashes And Butterflies – we experience life.


CURRENT

1

OBSESSION

Dorothea Prühl – Modern Classic

“Jewellery is important to me for the meaning originally inherent in it. They include wearability, durability and intrinsic value in the broadest sense. My themes are impressions of phenomena from the surrounding world. The material qualities that interest me most are, apart from the aesthetic ones, the properties that determine form. Neck jewellery is, as I see it, jewellery par excellence.” (Dorothea Prühl)

International Trade Fair Munich Internationalen Handwerksmesse München Messegelände München, Halle B1, Sonderschauen der 66

Dorothea Prühl, Große Katzen, Big Cats, Aluminium, 2007 Photography by Helga Schulze-Brinkop

PAPER


SCHMUCK

25

Must-See

Warwick Freeman

8 Warwick Freeman is a leading jewellery maker of contemporary New Zealand jewellery, with an international standing. Born at Nelson in 1953 he took up jewellery-making, largely self-taught, in Perth, Australia, in 1972. In the early 1980s, he was a prominent member of a group, which began exploring the use of local materials and developed a significant style of contemporary jewellery-making, that is now recognised internationally as a unique expression of New Zealand culture.

Freeman works and lives in Devonport, Auckland, New Zealand. “Jewellery should: confer dignity, bestow beauty, arouse an erotic response,signal intent, protect the wearer, evoke anger, insult the intelligence, say something, lack

ambition, offer certainty, fulfil desire, confront apathy, convey spirituality, make the wearer look foolish, reflect the spirit of the age, provide status, provoke annoyance, communicate willingness, emancipate the wearer, make a stand,

show a zest for life, be indifferent to what others think, claim national significance, encourage daring, be geometric, be floppy…” (Warwick Freeman, 2003)

The work of Warwick Freeman is characterised by the use of natural materials such as bone, stone and shell. The exhibition by the Gallery Wittenbrink shows the wide range of Warwick Freemans work.

Galerie Wittenbrink Türkenstraße 16 80333 Munich 12.3.2014-18.3.2014 Tue-Sat 10:00-18:00 Thu 10:00-20:00

Warwick Freeman, Story of the Hook

15

Peacock Green And Old Rose Growing plants are morphing into animals - wood is sensitively carved into abstract flowers. A vital and magical colour, peacock green in contrast with the grounded and humble feel of old rose. Reduced forms, minimalistic and conscious use of material, with sensitivity to texture characterizes Dongchun Lee’s work. It is about the passing of time - evolution, growing and withering. In spring trees are blossoming, but in which season will wood transform into a flower? Eunmi Chun creates a communion of the living; plants, animals and if worn, humans, are intertwined. It is a reflection on the unknown spirit that distinguishes living beings from dead matter, manifested in jewellery. Both artists have been trained in Korea and Germany and have created their specific and artistic languages, both in their own way combining Asian and Western influences.

Eunmi Chun Dongchun Lee Weltraum Rumfordstraße 26 80469 Munich Opening 12.3.2014 17:00-21:00 12.3.2014-16.3.2014 11:00-19:00

Top: Dongchun Lee, Flourish wither, Brooch, Wood, thread, 2014 Bottom: Eunmi Chun, Eagle, Necklace, Pig’s skin, small intestine of cow, silver, zinc plated steel, 2013


CURRENT

OBSESSION

III

11 Hyorim Lee, Junwon Jung, Mari Iwamoto Elisabethstraße 16, Rgb., 80796 Munich 13.3.2014-15.3.2014 Thu-Fri 10:00-20:00 Sat 10:00-18:00 Left: Hyorim Lee, Untitled orange, Necklace, leather, beads, 2014 Right: Top: Mari Iwamoto, Untitled, Brooch, Holz, Kastanienschale, Silber, Farbe, 2014 Bottom: Junwon Jung, Moonlit, Brooch, titan-zinc, Plexiglas, stainless-steel, 2013

In addition to the jewellery work, three artists will to present their media, which are used in the process of their work as by-products in existence, or through a completely new formation mechanism. The fragments that have certainly played a decisive role in the realization of their jewellery work - but also represent a moment’s own expression. 
The exhibition was planned with the subtitle ‘III, and the shadow, III’ by Junwon Jung and Mari Iwamoto of the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich and Hyorim Lee Munich-based artist.

Kosmos Kino

46 Vivi Touloumidi, Beatrice Brovia, Nicolas Cheng Galli Theater München Amalienpassage, Türkenstraße 86, 80799 Munich Opening 13.3.2014 17.30-21:00 13.3.2014-16.3.2014 12:00-19:00

Kosmos and Kino. Two characters at play; two stories laid out and entwined by artists Vivi Touloumidi, Beatrice Brovia & Nicolas Cheng, each exploring the jewellery medium in the expanded field. In her work “What will kosmos say?” Vivi Touloumidi asks if jewellery can contribute to social change. Her installation of about a hundred brooches, each hand-carved from volcanic pumice stone, addresses the role of jewellery in the present time of political and social turmoil, as well as the medium’s inherent implications: adornment, self-exposure and engagement in the public domain. In Kino, Beatrice Brovia & Nicolas Cheng, having as a starting point the notion of entertainment - its power to engage an audience emotionally as much as physically - present a film work where jewellery is the essential

character. The film looks at how jewellery has shaped, reinforced or subverted clichés of status, beauty, gender and power, through its portraiture in popular culture and media. As in a play, the works are in dialogue in the space of a small theatre: the

materiality of Touloumidi’s handcarved brooches highlighted by the immaterial projection of Brovia, Cheng’s film and vice-versa. Kosmos Kino is an invitation to renegotiate the role of jewellery in our society: its power and its potential.

PAPER


SCHMUCK

54 63

27

Must-See

SOLO : NEVER ODD OR EVEN Tanel Veenre & Märta Mattsson

[palindrome] is a word, phrase, number or other sequence of symbols or elements, meaning of which may be interpreted the same way in either forward or reverse direction. Palindromes like, A NUT FOR A JAR OF TUNA or EVIL RATS ON NO STAR LIVE, might not make so much sense to us but nonetheless they are symmetrical riddles that play with our perception of how we see things. Many believe that symmetrical objects have an inner harmony, and value them for this. In nature, symmetry is approximate. For example, plant leaves, while considered symmetric, rarely match up exactly when folded in half. If there is no such thing as perfect symmetry in nature, can we find perfection in imperfections? What happens when two artists decide to mirror their own work, but also reflect and bounce off each other’s visual language? Will we BORROW OR ROB ideas from one another? Will we feel the need to be the one who MUST SELL AT TALLEST SUM? Will our work end up at the same LEVEL? Or will ‘DAMMIT I’M MAD!’ for doing this pop up in our heads? Our new series of work has been created under an echo of two minds exploring the contradictory meanings of symmetry in nature and life.

“Many sensible friendships start through the art. I knew Märta’s pieces long before we talked for the first time; I have been wondering around in her gardens of Paradise. I have been admiring her amazing creatures - mystically self-defining, whimsically glittering, and proudly speaking about beauty. Märta’s Paradise isn’t a getaway, her creatures are here - in this very moment – and they speak intensely with the time they are created in. There is a perfume of decay in her garden that is honestly and irresistibly alluring. I have one of her magnificent insect brooches that I would wear with pride once while walking towards the sunset. Don`t ask how she makes them, believe me - they are born like this”. (Tanel)

“The first time I met Tanel was in Munich in 2011 at his solo exhibition, Paradise regained. At the exhibition I was very drawn to a white necklace that looked like it consisted of two deer hooves. The necklace had such a simple shape but it contained so much emotion. I imagined that it would look like a warm embrace around the body when being worn. I asked Tanel what the piece was made of and his answer was ‘unicorn legs and cosmic dust’. I became intrigued by this funny and mystical response. Not only was his jewellery like little poetic enigmas, he also seemed like a very quirky and unique man. I got the feeling that I really wanted to pick his brain and get to know him better”. (Märta) The idea of collaborating and working on a project together arose from this shared admiration for each other’s work, worlds and minds. We have now begun our journey together and we have decided to work on a set of exhibitions based on Palindromes – symmetry and reflections.

54 SOLO : NEVER ODD OR EVEN Tanel Veenre & Märta Mattsson SOLO : never odd or even Part II 84 GHz, Georgenstraße 84, 80799 Munich Opening 13.3.2014 19:00 13.3.2014-16.3.2014 Fri-Sun 12:00-20:00 63 SOLO : never odd or even Part I Kunstgießerei München with 84 GHz Schleißheimerstraße 72, 80797 Munich Opening 14.3.2014 18:00 14.3.2014-16.3.2014 Sat 11:00-19:00 Sun 11:00-16:00 www.martamattsson.com www.tanelveenre.com

SOLO SƧ: never odd or even, Part III, Gallery Platina, Stockholm 23.08-20.09.2014 SOLO S: never odd or even, Part III, Gallery ATTA, Bangkok 7.01-22.02.2015

Left: Tanel Veenre, Palindrome II Right: Märta Mattsson, Cicadawings


CURRENT

20

OBSESSION

The home of jewellery, Munich-London-Tokyo

Academy of Fine Art Munich Nicole Beck, Martin Papcun, Despo Sophocleous, Évelie Mouila, David Roux-Foillet, Silvia Weidenbach, Saika Matsuda, Hiroaki Nagata, Rei Yamada Akademie der Bildenden Künste München, Historische Aula im Altbau, Akademiestraße 2, 80799 Munich Opening 12.3.2014 18.30-21:00 12.3.2014-16.3.2014 Thu, Fri 12:00-19:00 Sat 12:00-15.30 Sun 12:00-19:00

Left Top: Nicole Beck, 2014 Bottom: Installation at the Pinakothek der Moderne, Munich, 2010 Middle: Despo Sophocleous, 2014 Right Top: Invitation-card, Munich, 2010 Middle: Inside the exhibition, Tokyo, 2009 Bottom: Tokyo, 2009

PAPER

A short history of the 3- School Project

The so-called 3-School Project was initiated in 1993 by three jewellery artists and friends: Joke Brakman teaching at the Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam, Kazuhiro Itho from the Hiko Mizuno College of Jewellery Tokyo and Otto Künzli head of the jewellery department at the Akademie der Bildenden Künste in Munich; with the three mentioned institutions engaged as well. The basic idea was to bring together three students from each school and to let them exhibit their work in the three cities where they study, in other words, also to travel, visit and experience other places and to get to know different cultures first-hand. It was clear that we should do this not only once, but as a loose series, let’s say every third or fourth year. The first project was organized by the Hiko Mizuno College and they were responsible for the theme, the publication and the overall organization. In 1997 Munich was in charge and again the work of 9 students was exhibited in the three cities in very different ways. After Joke Brakman left the program at the Rietveld Academy we

decided to continue with the Sandberg Institute and Marjan Unger was in charge of the third project in 2004. In that year we focussed on the different presentation forms in the electronic medias, in the printed medias and in reality. In 2009/10 we found a new partner, Hans Stofer and the RCA (Royal College of Art London). The overall title was “Living Treasures” and while the works were exhibited in Tokyo in a spectacular open-air installation in the yard of the school, they were also shown in London at Gallery S O and in Munich during Schmuck in March in the Pinakothek der Moderne. In March 2014 Munich is again in charge of the publication and organization, and this year we will exhibit for the first time in the Mainhall (Aula) of the historic building of the Akademie der Bildenden Künste München. After all, this project has been extremely fruitful not only for the participating students, but also for the entire departments and the international networking of the schools. It resulted in many on-going friendships and we can say that this exchange program is, in the real sense of the word, sustainable.

This year participants are: From London: Évelie Mouila, David Roux-Foillett, Silvia Weidenbach From Tokyo: Saika Matsuda, Hiroaki Nagata, Rei Yamada From Munich: Nicole Beck, Martin Papcun, and Despo Sophocleous After the kick-off during Schmuck 2014 in Munich the exhibition will be shown in London at the end of March and then proceed on to Tokyo in early October 2014.


TAKEAWAY

TakeAway

TAKE AWAY is a special advertorial section in the CURRENT OBSESSION MAGAZINE + PAPER and a series of online articles featuring upcoming shows, events and fairs.

Depot Basel and Current Obsession are collaborating on a contemporary jewellery exhibition focusing on the subject of Fake.

5.06.2014, Vernissage 16.06.2014, Magazine launch #3 FAKE issue (during Art Basel)

AMBER IN CONTEMPORARY ART JEWELLERY

GALERIE RA Exhibition Programm 2014: 29.03. – 17.05. Luzia Vogt, Jewellery and objects

Art Gallery PUTTI Marstalu iela 16 Riga (Old Town), Latvia gallery@putti.lv www.putti.lv

23.05–2.08.2014 Art gallery PUTTI will be organizing an international contemporary jewellery exhibition, within the European Capital of Culture ‘Riga 2014’ framework ‘Amber Vein’. The core idea of the exhibition is to demonstrate the possible range of application of amber in the contemporary art jewellery created by professional jewellers. This area of interest is largely based on the specific materiality of amber -and its historical significance.

09.05. - 12.05. Collect, London

Janis Vilks

Artists: Andris Lauders (Latvia), Claudia Steiner (Austria), Eva Tesarik (Austria), Eve Margus-Villems (Estonia), Fanni Vékony (Hungary), Gigi Mariani  (Italy), Gun­t is Lauders (Latvia), Heidemarie Herb (Italy), Helfried Kodré (Austria), Janis Vilks (Latvia), Jurgita Erminaite-Šimkuviene (Lithuania), Maria Cristina Bellucci (Italy), Maris Auninš (Latvia), Maris Šustinš (Latvia), Nataša Grandovec (Slovenia), Nikolai Balabin (Russia), Pawel Kaczynski (Poland), Sara Gackowska (Poland), Valdis Brože (Latvia) and Viktoria Münzker (Austria).

24.05.-12.07. Nils Hint, Jewellery Rebekah Frank, Jewellery Sophie Hanagarth, Jewellery The winner of the Françoise van den Bosch Award 2014!

Sophie Hanagarth, Lipstick, rings

04.06.–09.06. Kunstrai, Amsterdam 19.07.–06.09.14 Jorge Manilla, Jewellery Tanel Veenre, Jewellery Nes 120 1012 KE Amsterdam Netherlands Open: Wed-Sat 12.00-18.00

T. +31 (0)20 62 65 100 mail@Galerie-Ra.nl www.galerie-Ra.nl

Sophie Hanagarth, Trap, bracelet


TAKEAWAY

ALCHIMIA, CONTEMPORARY JEWELLERY SCHOOL, Florence Presents upcoming Workshops Tourism: The Tourist Teachers: Mia Maljojoki and Pau Faus Date: 12-18 April, 2014 Cost: 600 EUR + VAT Tax Jewellery is (especially in Florence) a common touristic souvenir, a witness of a specific place, moment and experience. To question the nature of these ‘memory objects’ is to question the way we want to represent both the visited place and our role as visitors. Tourists will become the principal actors of our research. We will watch, study and represent them, in other words we will ‘touristify’ them.

WALKA, CONTEMPORARY JEWELLERY SCHOOL, Chile

MA: Contemporary Jewellery and the Poetics of Space Teacher: Sayumi Yokouchi Date: 30 June-7 July, 2014 Cost: 850 EUR + VAT Tax

Enrolment 2014

This workshop is a unique collaboration between the world of contemporary jewellery and the notion of Ma. Ma is a Japanese expression that roughly translates as ‘gap’, ‘pause’, or ‘space’ between structural parts. While there is no clear definition of Ma in Western languages, it permeates all aspects of Japanese aesthetics. Because Ma is both invisible and indefinable, it is often described through depictions of negative space or emptiness.

Mia Maljojoki

Travelling Workshops 2014* Mia Maljojoki, Caroline Broadhead Mari Ishikawa, Tanel Veenre * Along With Otro Diseno www.walka.cl

www.alchimia.it info@alchimia.it Sayumi Yokouchi

Stedelijk Museum ‘s-Hertogenbosch

15.02.2014–15.06.2014 Studio Formafantasma, Prima Materia

The Stedelijk Museum ‘s-Hertogenbosch combines a unique collection of ceramics and jewellery with exhibitions of contemporary art and design. The core of the museum collection consists of art jewellery and ceramics from the 20 th and 21th centuries. In

changing displays one can see art by masters such as Pablo Picasso and Luciano Fontana, Dutch design by Gijs Bakker and Hella Jongerius, as well as promising young talent.

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART AND DESIGN

Ron Arad, Not Made by Hand, 2002

JOYA BARCELONA ART JEWELLERY FAIR 9.10.2014–11.10.2014 Barcelona, Spain New edition, new location. JOYA will hold its 6th edition at Santa Mónica Arts Centre (right on the famous Las Rambla of Barcelona), where it will present a carefully selected program of events, conferences, schools, artists and galleries. With last year´s introduction of Latin America, presenting collectives and conferences from Brazil, Mexico and Chile, the goal of bringing the international art jewellery community together keeps expanding as JOYA introduces a glimpse of selected works from South Asia. It is through this interaction of different views, per spectives and methods, that JOYA can create a week of personal and professional synergies among par-

ticipants and its growing audience. JOYA keeps working alongside its Very Special Collaborators. With partners such as Fondazione Cominelli, Gioielli in Fermento, Autor Bucarest, Legnica Silver Festival, SWAB Barcelona, and Schmuck Fair, the effort of promoting contemporary art jewellery becomes extra exciting to share and celebrate. And last but not least there is Off-JOYA, which after much dedication and success from the 14 participating locations in 2013, this initiative of parallel events aims to present bigger and better content throughout Barcelona for all art jewellery lovers alike.

From 29.03.2014 onwards: Tangents 2–the collection in a new light.

29.03.2014-14.09.2014 Dinie Besems, 25 De Mortel 4 5211 HV ‘s-Hertogenbosch The Netherlands www.sm-s.nl


TAKEAWAY

GALERIE ROB KOUDIJS 01.03.2014-12.04.2014 JIRO KAMATA Bi ANYA KIVARKIS September Issue

Jiro Kamata

Wed–Fri 12:00–18:00 Sat 12:00–17:00 info@galerierobkoudijs.nl www.galerierobkoudijs.nl Elandsgracht 12 1016 TV Amsterdam The Netherlands

KLIMT02 GALLERY THE ART JEWELLERY SPACE Barcelona

Designed For Klimt02 2013-2014 Exclusive Jewellery An on-going collection. Presencial and online exhibitions with the first pieces designed by:

Anya Kivarkis

Riera Sant Miquel 65 08006 Barcelona Open: Tue-Fri 17:00-20:00 or by appointment klimt@klimt02.net www.klimt02.net/gallery

BEYOND FASHION

Autor is the only Contemporary Jewellery Fair in South-Eastern Europe, is the initiator of a con­­ cept never seen before in Romania: an innovative event, which strives to promote contemporary talents within the jewelry design arena.

4 June–04 July, 2014 A Fickle Sonance by Kevin Hughes “There is a beauty in the way people hear music in ordinary sounds, mixing and manipulating to make interesting musical  arrangements. It is much in the same way, that I strive to create work.”

Annelies Plantheydt Sari Liimatta Karin Johansson Jiro Kamata Fritz Maierhofer

AUTOR

Beyond Fashion opened in the year 2000 and is a gallery specialized in contemporary art jewellery and products. The gallery repre­­sents a selection of International designers who are committed to develop products that are one of a kind and communicating the artists’ inspiration and concept. Exhibitions are organized on a regular basis in co-operation with promising or established talent. Management: Karin De Buysere & René Darmont Pourbusstraat 7 2000 Antwerp, Belgium Open: Thu-Fri-Sat 11:00–18:00 www.beyondfashion.be beyondfashion@antwerpen.be

Hearts by Karin Johansson

Lemons and oranges by Kevin Hughes

(End) We hope you enjoyed the PAPER! For advertising opportunities and other enquiries visit www.current-obsession.com or email to: magazine@current obsession.com


84 GHz OBSESSED WITH PAPER

The Current Obsession Party! 13 March 21:00–24:00

CURRENT OBSESSION celebrates its 1st anniversary! A year ago we’ve launched our first magazine and today we present our special PAPER edition discussing Schmuck ’14. You are welcome to come by and have a drink with us! Let’s celebrate these jewellery-obsessed days in Munich!

www.current-obsession.com

CURRENT OBSESSION PAPER 2014  

#1 Current Obsession Paper /SS - 2014/ is a yearly publication produced by Current Obsession Magazine & Platform. The Paper is presented dur...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you