Munich Jewellery Week 2021 Participants

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CURRENT OBSESSION — MUNICH JEWELLERY WEEK 2021


The creation of this Current Obsession Paper x Munich Jewellery Week 2021 came in the light of cancellations and postponements of exhibitions and fairs around the world. Facing the uncertainties of the current situation we decided to invite the MJW community to contribute to a beautiful, printed publication, designed and published by Current Obsession, and delivered directly to the doorsteps of potential visitors who aren’t able to travel to Munich. Through an open call, artists, curators, academies, and cultural institutions were invited to create exhibitions on the pages of the Current Obsession Paper, just as they would in a space in Munich. In typical MJW fashion, no project or a piece of jewellery was edited out. Because this is what we all love about MJW — its openness, and the way it celebrates all jewellery. The democratic and everexpanding nature of MJW is reflected by the size of this publication — the bulkiest one we have ever made (256 pages!) and its unbounded design – where every page could become a potential cover, or could just be pulled out and hung on your wall as a poster, to engage with the work and get inspired.

HOW TO READ THIS PAPER The Paper comes in several sections. 1 EXHIBITIONS IN PRINT — the one you are holding in your hands — consists of submitted exhibitions by artists, curators, galleries and cultural institutions from around the globe: from New Zealand to Denmark, from Mexico to South Korea, and everywhere in between, these manifestations of jewellery are beautiful editorials, staged exhibition space environments, fictional stories and more. 2 JEWELLERY ENVIRONMENTS — you will find 160 individual jewels submitted to us via the MJW Basic Campaigns hiding inside eight incredible commissioned illustrations designed by Théophile Bartz, Benjamin Langford, Jānis Melderis, MITSUME, The Scissorhands, Thami, Andrew Tseng and Elvis Wesley. The invited image-makers created fictional environments — underwater and outer space worlds, fantastical characters, architectural and urban landscapes, — with techniques ranging from analogue and mixed media collage, digital illustration, to rendering and digital hand-sculpting, to create their posters.

In a truly interdisciplinary collaboration, we have paired each image-maker with jewellery that fits their overall aesthetic, speaks the same language, or touches upon same themes.These glossy universes can be found wrapped around and folded into the Paper. 3 CURRENT OBSESSION CONTENT — our traditional CO Paper features commissioned articles and interviews with artists, think pieces, and advertorials to give you a scoop of not only what is happening in Munich right now, but also in the bigger Contemporary Jewellery world. 4 A collaboration with CRUCIBLE — a platform curated by a collective of African, Caribbean and Asian heritage womxn artists Finchittida Finch, Kalkidan Hoex and Roxanne Simone — is the one we are particularly proud of. Crucible features work by individuals and communities that identify as black, brown, people of colour women/ womxn artists, thinkers, community groups, collectives, jewellers, writers, experiencers, academics, philosophers, storytellers and truth-seekers — all full of creative agency and free self-expression.

Crucible as a space was developed in response to the urgency for dialogue surrounding unheard voices and becomes a vessel for exploring the nuances of intersectional identities by empowering those who come together here. For everyone: As we tried our best to keep this paper diverse, relevant and entertaining, we hope that we have given you enough creative ways to read it and engage with it. It is a tangible, embodied content, and that was of the utmost importance for us. We are obsessed with the idea of seeing these pages hanging on your studio walls, pasted on your mood boards, collaged and mixed with what­ever it is you are doing! So, we ask you to show us the way you read your Paper, take a picture of what you end up doing with it and post it. Don’t forget to add #HOWIREADMYPAPER, so we can repost! xoxo CO Team

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS Adi Farber, Adriana Almeida Meza, Agathe Saint Girons, Aimee Petkus, Aişegül Telli, Alejandra Campos Taylor, Aliona Pazdniakova, Alison Macleod, Ana Escobar, Ana Margarida Carvalho, Ana Nadjar, Anat Aboucaya, Andrea Silva Olavarría, Andrea Wagner, Anina Löwe, Anna Davern, Anna Lewis, Anna Ray, Anna Storck, Anna-Cara Keim, Annie Huang, Annika Ingelaere, Annora Poppe, Ariel Lavian, Arielle Brackett, Ashley Nettye Pollack, Attua Aparicio, Áurea Praga, Barbora Opátová, Batami Kober, Beiya Yang, Bin Dixon-Ward , Birgit Thalaub, Blanche Tilden, Bo Zhang, Bridget Kennedy, Burcu Buyukunal, Burcu Sulek, Camilla Andreani, Camilla Luihn, Canan Durukal, Carlie Barrett, Carlos Silva, Carolin Denter, Carolina Donoso, Caroline Bach, Casey Newberg, Cassondra Justine, Catalina Brenes, Catherine Truman, Cecilia Roccatagliata, Charlotte Vanhoubroeck, Chloe Rose Taylor, Chloe Valorso, Claire McArdle, Claire Webb, Clarisa Menteguiaga, Constanza Bielsa, Cruceru Silvia, Daniela Rivera, Daria Borovkova, Dawoon Jeong, Deniz Turan, Ela Bauer, Ela Cindoruk, Ella Fearon-Low, Ella Heidi Sand, Ellen Sisti, Emily Cobb, Emma Fielden, Erika Jordán, Ester Sposato-Friedrich, Esther Heite, Eva van Kempen, Ezgi Okur, Faye Hall, Feyzal Başkurt, Filiz Ates, Floor Mommersteeg, Franziska Lusser, Fulya Oberascher, Funlola Coker, Gabriella Goldsmith, Gésine Hackenberg, Gina Melosi, Gina Myungji Cheun, Gina Nadine Müller, Gözde Erdogan, Grace Lillian Lee, Greg Scheirlinckx, Gulnur Ozdaglar, Hakan Aktug, Heather Woof, Helena Bogucki, Hilde Dramstad, Hillary Davenport, Hyun-Seok Sim, Inari Kiuru, Inga Tomilina, Işıl Özçam, Jaesun Won, James Betts, Jana Machatova, Jantje Fleischhut, Jasmin Schlesiger, Jean Lin, Jeannette Jansen, Jekaterina Smirnova, Jenny Kåberg, Jeongwon Lee, Jess Dare , Jessica Joy Esparon, Ji Young Kim, Jihye Kang, Jillian Moore, Jiun-You Ou, Jivan Astfalck, John Sullivan, Joo-hyun Lee, Joohee Han, Josef Friedrich, Josh Bass, Joyce Marin, Julia Obermaier, Julie Blyfield, Jun Suk Min, Junmin Bae, Karen Kriegel, Karin Herwegh, Katarina Thorstensson, Katia Rabey, Keren Gispan, Ko Lim, Kristin Beeler, Kun Zhang, Kyeok Kim, Lada Klats, Laura Stachon, Lavinia Rossetti, Leslie D. Boyd, Levan Jishkariani, Leyla Taranto, Liam Benson , Liliana Ojeda, Lina Peterson, Lindsey Fontijn, Lingjie Wang, Lisa Kraushaar, Lisa Scherebnenko, Lital Goldenberg, Lola Greeno, Loreto Fernández, Luci Jockel, Madeli Viljoen, Mallory Weston, Mando Bee, Manfred Bischoff, Manon van Kouswijk, Maree Clarke, Margherita Berselli, Margherita Bersel, Margherita Potenza, Margo Orlovik, Marguerite Bones, Maria Eife, Maria Konschake, Maria Walker, Marie Therese Wolf, Marta Costa Reis, Martin Carreño, Matilde Mozzanega, Melanie Bilenker, Melanie McPherson, Melina Rapimán, Melissa Chen,

Mia Copikova, Michal Bar -On Shaish, Michelle Currie, Mies Nobis, Mila Wielusinska, Milena Djukanovic, Mira Kim, Mónica Díaz, Monica Perez, Monica Rodriguez Heyer, Monique Lecouna, Mor Hirsch, Morgane de Klerk, Namkyung Lee, Nanette Pengelley, Nanna Obel. Natascha Frechen, Natalia Saldias, Nazan Pak, Nga Ching Ko, Nina Lima, Noa Liran, Noelle Labharte, Oblik Atelier, Oles Tsura, Oliver Mauerhofer, Pamela De La Fuente, Pascale Durandin, Patricia Iglesias, Paul Derrez, Paulina Latorre, Pei Wu, Pennie Jagiello, Peter Dvorak, Peter Hassenpflug, Peter Machata, Pía Walker, Putte Helene Dal, Q Hisashi Shibata, Rachel Darbourne, Rita Soto, Rivkah Procaccia, Ruth Leslie, Ruudt Peters, Samantha Dennis, Sarah Montagnoli, Sarah Rachel Brown, Satomi Kawai, Sayara Montemurro, Sehee Um, Selen Ozus, Senay Akın, Setareh Shojaee, Seulki Lee, Shadi Lolaki, Sharareh Aghaei, Sharon Stampfer, Shin-Ryeong Kim, Sian Edwards, Sibille Santucci, Silke Spitzer, Silvia Bellia, Silvia Weidenbach, Simon Marsiglia, Simón Mazuera, Snem Yildirim, Sofia Hallik, Sofia Zakharova, Soh Ri Yi, Soizig Carey, Soledad Avila, Sonja Keppler, Soohyun Chou, Sophia le Roux, Stav Bozaglo, Stefania Piccoli, Stephanie O’Brien, Stephie Morawetz, Susan Macleod, Tamar Paley, Tanel Veenre, Tengely Nóra, Thea Tolsma, Tianyi Tia Liang, Tiffany Parbs, Tzu-Yun Hung, Typhaine Le Monnier, Ute Eitzenhöfe , Valentina Michaelis, Valeria Martinez, Valérie Wagner, Vanessa Zöller, Vania Ruiz, Vendula Fabiánová, Vicki Mason, Victor Hahner, Viktoria Schumann, Viviana Arévalo, Vivien Bedwell, Vesal Bahmaninik, Wensi Huang, Yael Olave, Yann Ceuleers, Yasmin Vinograd, Yongjin Chung, Yookyung Song, Yoonjung Choi, Yotam Bahat, Youjin Um, Youngim Lee, Yuye Zhang, Zoe Brand, Zoe Robertson, Zoë Veness INSTITUTIONS AND GALLERIES Australian Design Centre, Baltimore Jewelry Center (Shane Prada and Lydia Martin), Brooklyn Metal Works, Estonia Academy of Arts, Galerie Beyond, Galerie Elsa Vanier, Gilded Pear Gallery, Hochschule Trier Campus Idar-Oberstein, House on Mars gallery, Incorporation of Goldsmiths, Local Heroes, London College of Fashion, New Paltz MFA Metal Program, ORFÈVRE, Periscope Design & Neo Craft Gallery, PXL-MAD School of Arts, Quittenbaum Gallery, School of Design | Pforzheim University Germany, Tyler School of Art and Architecture CURATORS Anneleen Swillen, Avi Vinograd, Darja Popolitova, Illaria Ruggiero, Katherina Perlongo, Mala Siamptani, Sarah Darro

Cover image by Théophile Bartz

Hi, welcome to Munich Jewellery Week!


2 1 Keyhole, necklace, titanium and glass beads 2 Driving me round in circles, mobile ring, titanium 3 Resistance, bracelet, titanium

1 Each jewellery piece takes its name from the following text by Agathe:

AGATHE SAINT GIRONS

…Unbelievable…. What A Rabble in this Gilded Cage… I am on a learning journey, flabbergasted, stunned at the hurricane generated by the advent of these Two Wonders who have been Piggybacking on my back for fifteen years and Driving me round in circles just for some pieces of Sugar Candy. Constantly around, they maliciously spy in on everything with their Eye of Moscow pressed up to the Keyhole.

www.elsa-vanier.fr www.astg.org

@galerie_elsavanier @agathesaintgirons_paris

No more privacy, no more secrets in this Merry Maze, except at night where the Silence, essential to my artistic production, meets no Resistance… But, for My Little Pippins, I want to be a Rock and mend all their little scratches with Magic Bandaids. Under Pressure, your Once a Mother, always a Delight cannot bear to live without you. This exhibition, aimed at travelling and reinventing oneself as sales progress, was first shown in November 2019 at the Elsa Vanier gallery in Paris. It featured exorcism-like creations that fight against the impediment of being an artist when you are viscerally a wife and foster mother.

between concept and matter and are inspired by human relationships in all their aspects, intimate, family, friendly, social, civilized or conflicting.

Agathe Saint Girons exhibited at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (Exhibition MEDUSA), as well as at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs at the exhibition Dans la ligne de Mire - Scènes du bijou contemporain en France. Her creations have been acquired by several important collections.

Fluctuating between humour and causticity, the pieces’ names are either keywords or a play on words in order to defuse the influence of the subject. Bracelet Resistance, for example, evokes both the opposition and the constancy necessary for raising children, the ring Driving me round in circles or the necklaces Keyhole make it possible to turn the annoyances of everyday life into sweetness and laughter.

Agathe Saint Girons trained in metal and glass techniques with international jewellery designers and artists such as Ramon Puig Cuyas, Esther Brinkmann, Gilles Jonemann, Lino Tagliapietra…

In her beautiful workshop overlooking the Marne river, in the countryside near Paris, Agathe has been breathing a Provencal exuberance into her creations for over 25 years. Her one-of-a-kind contemporary jewellery pieces arise from an on-going dialogue

Behind the apparent flightiness of the words that French mothers shout day in, day out Dinnnner’s readyyy! - is the name of an exhibition in which Agathe Saint Girons introduces us to her vision of the of influence of her family life on her artistic career. As the jeweller says: Before naming the pieces that make up this exhibition, I immersed myself in a deep reflection on my feelings of impatience, amazement, losing myself… I pondered on everyone’s place in the family and addressed my doubts on how to design my own family journey...

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DINNNER’S READY!!

Or the learning of the mother tongue


@melaniegeorgacopoulos www.melaniegeorgacopoulos.com The pearls used throughout the collection are natural Hippopus pearls from Indonesia. The collection uses recycled 18K gold throughout in white, yellow and rose hues to complement the colour of the diamonds.

CARATS

MELANIE GEORGACOPOULOS Creative direction by @charlottehealdesign Photo shot by @marksandersstudio

2020 marks the ten-year anniversary of Melanie’s eponymous brand. To celebrate this landmark year, Melanie launches Carats, a special group of one-off pieces using diamonds and natural pearls for the very first time. Unlike cultured pearls, both diamonds and natural pearls are measured in carat weight, hence the collection’s name. An incredible amount of care and focus has been put into the design and manufacturing of this diverse group of pieces. These uniquely desirable earrings, bangles and rings feature many different styles of diamonds with multiple shapes, cuts, colours, settings and sizes. Melanie states that 'this is not a traditional collection, nor is it a set of matching pieces with the same style, colour or technique.' She describes it instead as 'an ongoing body of work featuring one-of-a-kind jewels which complement one another'. The pieces will be released in small drops over the remainder of the year. This intentional decision to show them as they are finished, as well as to not follow one single narrative or aesthetic, allows Melanie to embrace a freedom of pace and expression for each individual jewel. It is also a conscious decision to accept and embrace the current Covid-19 situation which has, of course, hindered production, but also highlighted the importance of consuming less but better. Melanie has chosen to make fewer pieces this year in an attempt to acknowledge this new reality and give herself time to reflect on what the future might look like. One design feature which threads throughout Carats is the ‘embedded’ technique, where diamonds or pearls appear to be pushed into the MOP creating a cushion-like effect. Melanie wanted the nacre to really look like it had been spontaneously pressed into, so as to highlight the softness of the MOP, especially in contrast to the hard diamonds. The feeling of not being able to entirely control everything, such as the position of the most precious elements, felt appropriate to Melanie during this time.


Fascinated by the ways society has sought to explain and order the phenomena of life, Samantha Dennis navigates themes found in natural history museums. As her childhood ambitions were torn between a career in natural sciences or the visual arts, her practice now bridges these two passions. Her current work examines human relations to insects, juxtaposing tropes of preciousness and desire against typical reactions of repulsion and fear. This approach considers how jewellery can act as a filter to mediate the relationship between humans and animals, and questions how implication of function, value and intimacy can be used to alter the way we experience insects and their environments.

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Coleoptera series, 2019, various dimensions, porcelain glaze oxidized SS, photo by Mel de Ruyter Coleoptera series, 2019, porcelain glaze oxidized, photo by Mel de Ruyter

COLEOPTERA

Coleoptera series, 2019, porcelain glaze oxidized, photo by Mel de Ruyter Coleoptera series, 2019, porcelain glaze oxidized, photo by Mel de Ruyter

@smd_tasmania www.samanthadennis.com.au

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This body of work was developed across residencies at the University of Tasmania and Don College, through the support of Arts Tasmania.

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SAMANTHA DENNIS

Coleoptera is an exhibition that reimagines entomology practices by displaying a series of detailed brooches in the mode of hybrid, imagined and hyperbolic beetles. This work is born from a fascination with biology and taxonomy; the evolving methodologies with which Western society has sought to explain and order the phenomena of life throughout history. By adopting the aesthetics of natural history collections, Dennis aims to provoke the viewer’s curiosity and mimic the ways that museums can subvert your experience of the natural world with a dislocated yet uncanny intimacy.


The continuous hardening of the metal leads to consistent change in its surface and creates an intimacy that unites the artist with the responsive material in a delicate, mutual transformation. Some of the objects appear to be rising and blooming from secret depths and others resemble life forms that have evolved in arid, challenging conditions. The garden of works that unfolds in the space looks like an amalgamation of botanical species emerging from secret worlds that were previously visible to the eye, but can now enter the heart. Every movement requires its right time (Tao Te Ching - Lao Tzu)

www.ariellavian.com

DEPTHS OF HEAVEN

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Just as in foldforming where the starting point is a clear and smooth sheet of metal, Lavian himself has opened a new and intriguing sheet. The social critique that emanated from his earlier work is now directed inward; Lavian has conducted a rigorous interrogation of himself in order to hone his intentions and create objects that give precise, tangible expression to his personal responses. He clears away unnecessary background noise and chooses to delve into metal­working; a narrowing in that leads him to a plenitude of ideas and forms that hold a closer dialogue with the world of classical jewellery making. This current series offers lucidity and spaciousness.

ARIEL LAVIAN

Periscope Design & Neo Craft Gallery Ben Yehudas st 176, Tel Aviv

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4 3 Depths of Heaven, brooch, 2020, copper Depths of Heaven, brooch, 2020. copper, sterling silver, stainless steel 3 4 1 Depths of Heaven, ring, 2020, copper, sterling silver, enamel, epoxy 2 Depths of Heaven, ring, 2020, copper, sterling silver, fine silver

The pandemic urged Ariel Lavian to take a step back, close up the shutters facing outward and focus on creating a new series which unfurls a new branch of his work. In his solo exhibition at Periscope Gallery, Lavian presents jewellery and other objects made of copper and silver. The technique he uses, foldforming, is based on the folding, refolding and hammering of thin metal foil. As with paper, the creasing and uncoiling give the sheets strength and three-dimensionality, while hammering them works the metals plasticity and reinforces it.


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DIALOGUE OF FORMS

Brooch, silver, pink quartz and 3d printed nylon Earrings, 3d printed nylon, looking like circles drawn in the air, doodle earrings are offering different perspectives from different angles Earrings, silver, pink quartz and 3d printed nylon

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IŞIL ÖZÇAM

In the Sketches collection, pieces are created with 3D printed nylon, silver and coloured stones. Large designs that would be quite heavy if they were completely metal weigh around 1,5 grams, and are also very durable and resistant. The lines that look improvised are actually planned to hold each other at certain points, allowing them to be attached to silver parts which carry the stones or touch the skin of the wearer.

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@dialogue_of_forms www.dialogueofforms.com

The work of Istanbul-based designer Işıl Özçam is an attempt to find a medium between the contemporary and the traditional. Combining computer aided design and manufacturing with silversmithing techniques, she aims to create sculptural, yet functional jewellery. Her approach to design is experimental in the sense that it pushes the boundaries of material and production possi­bilities. She draws inspiration from the graphical effects created by irregular lines and random forms. Her design process starts with drawings on paper, proceeds with digital models on the computer, continues with 3D printing and concludes with hands-on processes.


The exhibition includes around forty works from the artist's estate, which is in the care of curator Rike Bartels. Many works trace the artist’s early career and quest. Bischoff was open-minded; he took up trends from pop culture, art and politics, and experimented with simple materials, such as photography, wire, Duropor and plastic. By the late-1980s when he was living in Italy, he had found his unmistakable design language, which include coral: 'While I was working with these poor materials, I realised that the only material to express my thoughts was gold — my ideas were very deep and superficial at the same time.'

www.quittenbaumgallery.com

MANFRED BISCHOFF

11.03. — 17.04.2021

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Many works include a drawing on which words play an important role in a peculiar script and on which rings, brooches or earrings can find their place. As in the case of AGITATOR, a brooch consisting of two thin arms and a large mouth that is wide open, so that one literally believes they can hear loud slogans coming out of it. The drawing 'can help or confuse’ both are good, says Bischoff. These sketches, made with a few dynamic strokes, emphasise the lively radiance of the jewellery pieces and at the same time give them a protective frame in Bischoff's cosmos of references to literature, art history and existential questions of life.

Quittenbaum Gallery Theresienstr. 58, 80333 Munich

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2 3 Brooch (1985), silver, shell Brooch (1984), nickel silver, dispersion paint, pencil 3 4 'SOLOMANN', ring with drawing (1997–99/2021), gold, coral 'LOST OF DON QUICHOTE’, brooch (1996), silver, gold 1 2

Manfred Bischoff (1947 – 2015) was one of the most important and innovative jewellery artists of our time and one of the few who dared to tell stories with their jewellery. Bischoff searched for a long time for the right materials to express his thoughts and feelings.


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Detail – Companion neckpiece, (2019), sterling, silk Digital photograph and companion neckpiece photographed on embossed vellum, (2016 – 2020), sterling, silk, aluminum, cotton vellum Digital photograph and companion brooch photographed on embossed vellum, (2016 – 2020), sterling, mother of pearl, iron, aluminum, cotton vellum

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Worn and Reverse – Companion brooch photographed on the body and inside view, (2019 – 2020), sterling, mother of pearl, iron, cotton vellum Digital photograph and companion garment, photographed on embossed vellum, (2016 – 2020), tyvec with cotton embroidery, aluminum, cotton vellum Companion brooch photographed on embossed vellum scar map, (2019-2020), sterling, mother of pearl, iron, cotton vellum

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INTEGUMENTUM BALTIMORE JEWELRY CENTER

KRISTIN BEELER

Kristin Beeler is Professor of Art and Coordinator of Jewelry and Metalwork at Long Beach City College in the Los Angeles area. Her Master of Fine Arts in Jewellery from the University of Arizona was followed by postgraduate studies at Alchimia Jewellery School in Florence and Atelier Rudee, Bangkok. Established in 2013, the Baltimore Jewelry Center is a 501c3 educational nonprofit building a vibrant creative community for the study and practice of jewellery and metalworking for new and established artists. The Baltimore Jewelry Center is the preeminent independent jewellery and metalsmithing program in the US Mid-Atlantic.

Kristin Beeler’s practice includes contemporary jewellery, photographing and object-making. Archive of Rag and Bone is iterative, multimedia portraiture drawn from the repair marks of traumatic scarring. Beeler’s intention is that the work will lead audiences to complex conversations about compassion. Within the exhibition, body narratives are told through photographs, embroidered Tyvek garments, book folios in vellum and dimensional nature-morte: materials chosen to contrast polarities. Her structures are drawn from local flora, wind maps and navigational charts.

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The exhibition is on view physically at the Baltimore Jewelry Center from February 19 through April 3, 2021, with the following events happening online via Zoom and Instagram: Friday, February 19: Opening Event Friday, March 12: MJW Event Exhibition online

baltimorejewelrycenter.orgkristin-beeler-integumentum @baltimorejewelrycenter

We live in a time when memory is one of our most precious natural resources and when openness to the suffering of others is the one of the most important conversations we can have. 'New' occurs at an unprecedented rate as we search for ways to contextualize current events. Knowing how to map memory is a powerful tool for personal and cultural wayfinding. Investment in a more profound understanding of compassion may be a necessary safety net for our deeply polarised world.


The Jocale presented here reveals an elephant's head: a reference to the painting Swans Reflecting Elephants by Salvador Dalí. I chose the name Jocale, a Latin term meaning 'plaything', possibly related to the etymology of 'jewellery', to emphasise the dimension of fun and joy I associate both with wearing jewels and affirming our uniqueness. Jocale is the latest creation of Josef Friedrich (2021), part of an ongoing project premiered exclusively for Munich Jewellery Week on JF DAS ATELIER´s social media in the form of an interview and video.

JOCALE

The geometrical design of the Jocale Necklace takes its shape from an image distortion that only the cuff´s reflecting surface will reveal. The essence of the object and its appearance are blended in a contortion that defines its aesthetic, concealing the personal, emotional values. Each Jocale is personalised to literally reflect something relevant to the owner, leaving it up to him/her to unveil it.

JOSEF FRIEDRICH

@jf_das_atelier www.jf-dasatelier.de/ munichjewelleryweek

REFLECTIONS OF IDENTITY Josef Friedrich graduated from the 'Städtische Meisterschule für das Gold- und Silberschmiedehandwerk' in Munich in 2002 and proceeded to apprentice with established goldsmiths. In 2005 he won the prize 'Made' by MTV realizing his first jewellery exhibition 'Spunti di fuga – vanishing points' in Genoa, Italy. In 2010 he opened Atelier für Schmuck, now called JF DAS ATELIER since 2018.

Although I enjoy every aspect of it, from the thoughtful selection of stones to the primordial power of melting and forging metals, the focus of my aesthetic and artistic research is the relationship people have with jewellery. I have created for and with my clients for almost twenty years, melting my artistic identity with their requests. It fascinates me how jewels, since the dawn of time, empower personality and borne emotional meaning: they are symbols, messages, memories, promises, secrets or talismans. The self-expressive custom­ isation of my pieces reinforces those aspects. I believe that instilling the owner's identity gives the objects a soul, reversing the common course of meaning transfer: it is the owner's identity to be affirmed by the jewel and not the jewel that gives the owner an identity/status.


Silvia graduated from the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Bucharest, also having taken several courses of initiation in jewellery at the Assamblage Contemporary Jewellery School.

EVANESSENCE

1 2 3 Earrings, 2019, bronze, brass, pearl Ring, 2019, silver, brass, gold plated Ring, 2019, bronze, silver, gold plated

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COLLECTION: Cruceru Silvia

Motto: “Poetically Man Dwells”

The collection is a visual deconstruction of natured intended to remind the contemporary man from the crowded city of the poetry, ephemerality and precariousness of the world. @contemplativjewellery

For me, a piece of jewelelry is not worn. You wear it to let yourself be carried into its world. It is more than just an accessory which enhances a fashion context. It is a sign, having its own message and creating unexpected relationships: between an idea which has just discovered a new means of expression and shape, uniquely articulated by the juxtaposition of materials – like silver or brass, or precarious materials encountered accidentally, like pieces of wood, paper. The jewelelry becomes an unconventional collage, a metamorphosis of the initial purpose of the materials, and also of the bearer who is in touch with it. My brand, Contemplative, is an attitude. An attitude of stopping once in a while from our everyday race in order to learn to look again towards ourselves and everything that surrounds us, beyond stereotypes, power of habit, the fast-paced life of the contemporary man who is lacking time more and more. It is a way of life, of searching and creatively discovering poetry in the precariousness and impermanence in the world itself.

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'Coaxing a distinct material vibrancy from her pieces, which borders on a style of object-based storytelling, Taylor works across a range of artistic mediums to pursue her intuitive instincts for texture, colour and form. Taking shape as a collection of wearable pieces, furniture objects, and photographic images, Taylor’s sensibility thus manifests in accumulative menageries; single-settings in which the textures and taxonomies she establishes all speak, or perhaps squeak, as one cosmic whole.' - Elle Loui August

Chloe Rose Taylor is a multidisciplinary artist from New Zealand, currently living and working in Hong Kong. She graduated in 2013 with a Bachelor of Applied Arts from Whitireia New Zealand Faculty of Arts majoring in contemporary jewellery. Since, she’s been actively involved in self-organised artist projects and her work has been included in solo and group exhibitions throughout Aotearoa New Zealand.

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JUST PUPPIES brings together all of my making elements, and speaks of playful, boundless puppy energy. My large purpose built table Dolmen is intended to be placed centrally within a space so the viewer can walk all the way around it. Three detailed objects and the Bad Seed vase are intended to be placed on top of the table giving them a beautiful large surface for display and visibility; the vase holding fresh apricot coloured roses.

The series of four Still Life photographs are framed in matching blue, and hung in a row a close distance from the table. Each photograph includes a pair of my 'cave drawing' earrings which are also hung in a r ow on an opposite wall to the photographs. Space around my works is important. I don't like a feeling of clutter - I like to allow room for each work to tell its own story within the overall narrative of the show.

1 'Valued Member', Object, (2017), leather, cotton, freshwater, pearls, silver, stuffing 2 'Bad Seed', Object/Vase, (2019), leather, cotton, glass, silver

JUST PUPPIES

1 CHLOE ROSE TAYLOR

@chloe_rose_taylor www.chloerosetaylor.com

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3 Object, (2019), Equestrian, glass beads, satin canvas, plastic, silver 4 'Please Refer To Hathor', Object, (2018), leather, cotton, mixed precious stones, silver, stuffed with rabbit fur


1 Kissing Herring Necklace, (2019), made of 18 gold, dendritic agate and Akoya pearls 2 Octopus Ink Brooch, (2020), made of 18k gold, dendritic agate and moonstone 3 Ocean Bubbles Earrings, (2020), made of 18k gold and dendritic agate 4 Ocean Fragments Earrings, (2020), made of 18k gold and dendritic agate and Akoya pearls

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LUNAR RAIN

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FULL FATHOM FIVE

MELISSA CHEN

The Full Fathom Five permanent collection is inspired by sunken treasure and the sea and is named after a quote from Shakespeare’s The Tempest. I began designing this collection in 2018 while completing my master’s in painting at the Royal College of Art. It was my last term at the Royal College and painting could not express some of the

ideas that were coming to me at the time. I had always dabbled in sculpture and had wax working and foundry experience from my BFA in Chicago, but had never fully pursued working in metal despite my love for jewellery that began as a teen. I eventually felt that I had to do something definite about it, thus Lunar Rain was born. The Full Fathom Five Collection incorpo­rates my love of dendritic agates, which are often compared to the sea and fingerprints because of the oneof-a-kind the patterns on each stone. The result: schools of colourful fish with bellies full of seaweed, lively octopuses squirting ink, intricate seahorses and dancing starfish.

The works shown here were all made between 2018 and 2021.

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@lunarrainjewellery www.lunarrain.com

Lunar Rain is a new fine jewellery brand designed by Canadian artist Melissa Chen and inspired by nature with a touch of surrealism, art nouveau and ancient Greek and Roman aesthetics. Tendrils of seaweed and kelp, tall trees and misty mountains can be found in the dendritic agate that is used in many of the designs. Occasionally, the mineral inclusions in the agate look uncannily like fragments of nature caught in stone or like magical miniature paintings. This show focuses on our Full Fathom Five Collection.


@midorjewels www.midorj.com

MIDORJ IS GREEN

CAMILLA ANDREANI

MIDORJ JEWELS & DESIGN SRLS Camilla Andreani is an Italian jeweller who founded the handcrafted jewellery brand Midorj (the word for green in Japanese), all made up of handmade, unique pieces. Midorj’s first collection of pendants utilised very small 'bugs', or electronic components no longer used, floating in resin. Other collections of rings, bracelets and necklaces utilised electric cables, in which each jewel was customizable. Midorj is a small and independent brand 100% made in Italy. Pendants – ring – earrings – necklaces – bracelets handmade in Italy – all unique pieces Materials: bronze – epoxy resin – electronic components – electric wire

Green, recycle, circular, economy; these are the keywords of this project. Everything 'comes to an end' – every Midorj jewel recreates a vicious circle, the founding element of the whole creative process. Special electric and electronic waste (RAEE in Italy) is submerged and locked in resin which stops the ageing process, creating a virtuous project of circular economy. Born in a century where new technologies are predominant, but with an eye on sustainable development, the environment and creative recycling, Midorj centers everything at the importance of handmade craftmanship, giving the client a huge chance of having a custom-made product. STRENGTH | LONGEVITY | NOBILITY | MEMORY, Every Midorj Jewel also has its own character, like a contemporary bug stuck in amber. Bronze is a very shiny metal, strong and vivid, which responds to climate and to the natural PH of the skin. Architect/designer Camilla Andreani intuitively combines her knowledge of techniques and material uses, high quality craftsmanship and a consistency in research and development.


Photo by @kertinvasser Model @christopherlilleorg Make-up @marilykapp

NEW WORLD

Sofia Hallik is a future-oriented jewellery artist, designer and PhD researcher at the Estonian Academy of Arts. In her doctoral thesis, Sofia examines the impact of digital technology on jewellery making, one of the most ancient arts and crafts. Sofia’s philosophy is based on the idea of blending craft traditions with digital technologies. At the junction of these two concepts there arises something truly attractive that is actually a taste of our reality.

SOFIA HALLIK, SOMA

Everyone knows the fact that humanity is on the verge of a sixth mass extinction, but what if we missed the point when it was still possible to stop the destruction of the biosphere? We will need a Plan B, where the highest form of artificial intelligence will allow humans to live in harmony with the planet, and we will need a new planet, a New World. The concept of the New World is based on a utopian scenario, where humanity discovered the ninth Planet, which is located on the other side of the Sun and moves synchronously in the same orbit as the Earth. In the course of self-improvement cycles, each new generation of artificial intelligence emerged faster and faster, generating a kind of ‘intellectual explosion.’ Ultimately, a planet endowed with super-intelligence, superior to that of all mankind, appeared. The basis of life in the New World lies in the understanding that the Planet and mankind must coexist in harmony. The ninth Planet, endowed with artificial intelligence which is able to prevent and eliminate mankind errors, helps us to cope with this task. Thus, a man is not able to harm the Planet. This is a utopia formed from the symbiosis of humanity and AI without the threat of environmental and man-made disasters. The amorphous form of the Planet, flowing from one to another shape, is reflected in the jewellery from the collection. Genderfluid jewellery from New World collection is 3D printed from recycled sterling silver and imitates the shape that the Planet takes at each moment. To achieve this form, the author uses a Cinema 4D software – a plugin called RealFlow, which is essentially fluids & multiphysics simulation software.

www.somajewellery.com @somajewellery

RealFlow plugin is responsible for creating the shape of the jewellery - it allows the algorithm to independently create a 3D model using simulation. If craft is 'any profession that requires the use of the hands, and is limited to a certain number of mechanical operations to produce the piece of work' (McCullough,1998, p.12), then digital craft is a process that requires the use of the hands and/or the machine, and is also limited to a certain number of operations to produce the piece of work. The New World collection reflects the idea of digital craft. The software does not play the role of a servant in the process of the creation, not simplifying the author's work, but it takes upon itself the role of a creator.


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@ tylermetals tyler.temple.edu/programs/ metals-jewelry-cad-cam

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Mirrored reflections, like the digital matrices we increasingly reside in, use a self-reflexive technology of absolute feedback. These visual and psycho-social echo-chambers refract a composited view of ‘self’ back to us. Driven by deep-learning algorithms and reflective surfaces alike, these spaces allow us to observe ourselves in the manner in which we typically observe others. In Rosalind Krauss’s essay 'The Aesthetics of Narcissism,' she writes of the mirrorreflection as an apparatus of 'self-encapsulation — the body or psyche as its own surround.' The encapsulation of ‘self’ in these reverberant spaces is profound, particularly in the midst of a plague year which has necessitated ‘filter bubbles’ of self-containment and mounting reliance on the digital grid for connection and self-recognition. From the convex mirrors of vanitas paintings to the eternally scrolling ‘For You’ pages of social media platforms, reflection is a historical through-line of the human need to visualise ‘self’ — no matter how distorted or fractured the reflection may be. Situated within this reflective echo-chamber is Hard Copy, an exhibition of seven cerebral contemporary jewellers whose work engages with conceptual projects of self-reflexivity: from works that embody their own 3D-printed conception, like Ellen Sisti’s Detritus Bangle II, to works of tactile resistance, in which brooches become blind tigers for touch and play, like Sarah Montagnoli’s Red Velvet.

The objects in Hard Copy each occupy a mirrored chamber whose warped reflections imitate their aesthetic strategies. Works about accumulation are multiplied and expanded by their reflections, while works that interrogate their own digital nature gaze into the reflective matrix introspectively. Each piece becomes encapsulated within its own surround. The kaleidoscopic, refractive quality of the display is further embodied by the exhibition’s images, which are composites of photographs and digital renderings by the artists. Yuye Zhang’s Infinity 002 is a buildable brooch that can be reconfigured indefinitely, composed of interlocking, digitally-modeled units and adherent electrode backings. Similarly focused on accumulation, James Betts’ undulating Manifestation of Growth II brooch is built from the accretion of metal particles in electroforming. Ellen Sisti’s works are iteratively built from the detritus of her 3D printing process. Vestigial supports that are typically cast off become central to her forms – cast in silver, scanned and re-modeled. Wensi Huang appropriates the visual language of digital modelling, framing her delicate interior forms with silver scaffolding that represents emotional support. Casey Newberg’s Deflated brooch series sandwiches emoji condolence balloons between acrylic and handwrought metal backings, forever preserving a moment of eager comfort with the deflation of bad news. Sharon Stampfer’s The Feelings in My Throat, similarly preserves a gesture of care and compression by electroforming the cast of a hand pressing against the throat to soothe constriction.

HARD COPY

JAMES BETTS, WENSI HUANG, SARAH MONTAGNOLI, CASEY NEWBERG, ELLEN SISTI, SHARON STAMPFER, YUYE ZHANG

technologies, and processes in jewellery. At the leading-edge since the program’s inception, computer-aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and electroforming were all pioneered for use in metals and jewellery at Tyler. Located in Philadelphia, this cohort is connected to an extensive regional and national metal community. TYLER SCHOOL OF ART AND ARCHITECTURE’S METALS/JEWELELRY/CAD-CAM graduate cohort is composed of seven emerging artists — a dynamic group working across media and technique. They are dedicated to the study of time-honored techniques, yet transcend tradition through the latest technologies. Led by program head, Doug Bucci, and assistant professor, Mallory Weston, Tyler’s MJCC program has pioneered new aesthetics, attitudes,

All images digital composition by Paul Romano and Photography/CAD by Tyler MJCC Graduate Cohort Detritus Bangle II, (2020), Ellen Sisti , Discarded 3D print support, nylon, silver Red Velvet, (2020), Sarah Montagnoli , copper, brass, powder coat, felt, flock, sterling silver, stainless steel pin stem The Feelings in my Throat, (2020), Sharon Stampfer, electroformed copper Manifestation of Growth II, (2020), James Betts, copper, titanium, silver, powder coat Support IV, (2020), Wensi Huang , stainless steel wire, nylon Wensi Huang, dental impression tray, silicone, stainless steel wire Deflated (02), (2020), Casey Newberg, Readymade Emoji, Balloon encapsulated in laser etched acrylic, screen printing ink, powdercoated copper, stainless steel Cleaved, (2020), Ellen Sisti, Photopolymer, stainless steel, computer generated supports 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

An exhibition-in-print showcasing seven emerging contemporary jewelers – James Betts, Wensi Huang, Sarah Montagnoli, Casey Newberg, Ellen Sisti, Sharon Stampfer, and Yuye Zhang.


HARD COPY

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Emily Cobb, Brace Yourself, (2021), pearls, steel, elastomeric bands. Adolescence: the sour taste of resin on your tongue, the cutting pain of steel in your mouth Sarah Rachel Brown, A Ring With A Promise, (2021) – Ongoing, Digital Photo, mp3; Beginning with her own experience, Sarah shares stories about rings given and received with a promise. Individuals speak to those formative years where in the midst of roaming the halls of high school we are discovering our identities and for some, falling in love for the first time. A Ring With A Promise celebrates and ques tions the culture of promise rings and asks what became of these adolescent tokens of commitment. Maria Eife, oLDeR aNd gOLdEr, (2021), 10ct gold. A recreation of my favorite chain necklace purchased from the dELiA*s catalog in 1995, made with gold from my partners class ring and other family jewels Melanie Bilenker, Brunette to Blonde Friendship Pin, (2021), Artist’s half-bleached teenage hair on paper, gold, silver, mineral, glass. Take this heart with a lock of my hair to remember me, you can pin it to your laces. Luci Jockel, Hives, (2021), honey bee wings, archival glue A tattoo choker memento for those fragile but fleeting years filled with mortification and body modifications. Leslie D. Boyd, Still Skeptical, (2021), Silver, digital photo Arcade tickets traded in for a pewter evil eye pendant (at the time much preferable to the silver cornicello given to me by my Italian grandmother). Mallory Weston, 1 for $3, 2 for $5, (2021), Anodized Titanium, Leather, Cotton. Hemp necklaces were the gateway drug to my life in jewellery

In response to their Fall 2020 curatorial project In-School Suspension, members of JV Collective dredged up their own feelings of nostalgia and angst for a time in life that is often messy and transformative: High School. Each member reflected on those formative years and the items that once adorned their bodies. This series of work, Homeroom, is a snapshot of adolescence and will make its virtual debut during Munich Jewellery Week 2021 at www.jv-collective.com.

JV Collective was founded in 2016. They are a group of seven art jewellers anchored in Philadelphia but national in scope. They are friends, makers, mothers, facilitators and educators. Their home studio is located in the former Edward Bok Vocational High School in South Philadelphia which was decommissioned in 2013. Years later, the building has taken on a new life as a space for artists, small businesses, non-profits and the like. This location was the inspiration for In-School Suspension.

HOMEROOM

1 MELANIE BILENKER, LESLIE D. BOYD, SARAH RACHEL BROWN, EMILY COBB, MARIA EIFE, LUCI JOCKEL, MALLORY WESTON

@jv_collective www.jv-collective.com

All photo credits to the artists except Sarah Rachel Brown: Photo Credit: Sam Oberter


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GINA MYUNGJI CHEUN views jewellery as emotional objects that hold memories, connections and personal stories. Inspired by soft

MATILDE MOZZANEGA’S work sits within the context of contemporary jewellery & sustainability. This collection consists of playful, contemporary necklaces made out of Swarovski crystals and flowers, vacuum sealed within recyclable plastic pouches; a commentary on the current and urgent issue related to packaging plastic waste.

London-based jewellery designer and maker Shadi Lolaki believes in special powers of jewellery, her design approach starts from a very wearable point of view — pieces for every day, each with a personal story. Her work is inspired by precious historical pieces, mythology, heirlooms and nature.

MARGO ORLOVIK usually finds herself inhabiting borderline spaces and appreciating the endless complexity of everything. Her favourite answer to all questions is: 'It depends' and it makes her sad every time the boy downstairs cries. Margo investigates personal narratives through deconstruction and renegotiation of meanings.

ELLA FEARON-LOW plunders the visual larder of the past to create delicious contemporary treasures in mixed materials. Influenced by decorative and domestic objects her original shapes are layered from influences as varied as 17th century glassware, postmodern architectural detailing and Roman jewellery.

ANNA-CARA KEIM is a writer, photographer, curator and designer with a lifelong fascination for architecture. Her inspiration comes from travelling, nature, meeting interesting people and the human interactions with the built environment.

SUSAN MACLEOD creates jewellery inspired by the beauty in our natural surroundings, from delicate petal structures to bold sea coloured opals. She likes to work with precious metals through an intuitive and playful process to create unique and personal jewellery for its wearer.

sculpture and modernism, Gina connects her design talent with the sustainability challenges that the world faces today.

House of Flowers Jewellery for the Eye and the Soul

So glamorous it's unreal. So devoted it's dangerous. My world is shrinking, my visions are expanding. Beauty, splendour, bloom. Love, loyalty, blood. I'm you, you're me, you're mine. I'll always be there to protect you. You're so beautiful, I love you. You're so free, I hate you.

Margo Orlovik 2021

Flowers are beautiful, they add colour to our lives and bring us joy. They also function as markers of life, accompanying all important events: births, weddings, celebrations and also death. In the Victorian era, all flowers were attributed a meaning, ranging from red tulips which signified passion, to chrysanthemum signifying wisdom, to lavender meaning distrust. Essentially, all flowers are a celebration of life’s facets: its drama, beauty, glamour, ugliness, ups, downs, blossom and decay.

This exhibition is also a homage to all its artists; exhibitions are like celebrations, something that we really need in times like this. That we could somehow make this happen despite the restrictions is a testament to our extraordinary creativity and fantastic improvisation skills. We invite you to join the show and dive into a house full of glamour, fun, colours, and explosions with some serious, bittersweet undertones. Let your eyes feast and your soul dance...

HOUSE OF FLOWERS

1 GINA MYUNGJI CHEUN, ELLA FEARON-LOW, ANNACARA KEIM, SHADI LOLAKI, MATILDE MOZZANEGA, SUSAN MACLEOD, MARGO ORLOVIK

www.houseoflowersjewellery.com

Lunch time talk about House of Flowers Online 13:00 ­—13:30 UK time, Online exhibition live 8.03-14.03.2021

JEWELLERY FOR THE EYE AND THE SOUL

1 Anna-Cara Keim, 'Vidas Paralelas', sterling silver, wood, watercolour, paper 2 Gina Myungji Cheun, 'Twisted Fluid Rings', 18ct gold vermeil. Photo Credit - Allitsforms 3 Ella Fearon-Low – Laminae I & II, Brooch, (2021), (Cream and gold), oxidised white metal, steel, hand carved wood, paint; Laminae II Brooch/neck piece 2021 (Red and gold), oxidised white metal, steel, hand carved wood, paint, Photo credit – Jocelyn Low 4 Susan Macleod, 'Wild Crawler' 18ct gold, oxidised silver, with reticulated elements 5 Matilde Mozzanega, 'Transparent Waste', Vacuum sealed Swarovski crystals & flowers within recycled plastic bags, recycled plastic chains and brass chain links 6 Shadi Lolalaki, Rose Chain Earrings 7 Margo Orlovik, 'LOYALTY – FAMILY', 18ct gold, black rhodium plate, emeralds, pyrope garnets.


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VICTOR HAHNER explores how we can make the invisible visible and the visible audible through the perception and combination of our senses. The aim is to return a little bit closer to the sensory combination that we lose in early childhood. During the last months we have had time to make many things visible that we couldn‘t see or learned to look where no one wanted to look for a long time. His work invites you to pause, to listen to yourself, to find your 'inner sound', to perceive it and to pay attention. The project consists of five objects, each one made from a single piece of wood and with its own inner sound. The surfaces have different textures, cracks and natural patterns. By interacting playfully with the object and ourselves, we experience various combinations of our individual sensory perception. Haptically, acoustically and visually. Burning incense is still a tradition in numerous cultures – not only in sacred rituals, but also in the everyday. The olfactory effect and the constantly moving and dissipating forms of smoke fascinate us. Combining the material and immaterial, the subject of smoke and object deals with the sensual and the aesthetic. SONJA KEPPLER‘S sculptures were created close to nature, organic in their shape and structure. The material forms interact with the immaterial shapes of the smoke. Fire plays a role in the choice of materials as well.

VALENTINA MICHAELIS deals with the sorting of mental disorder and the process of resolving confusing situations. Due to social demands and personal expectations, people often face tasks that are difficult to reconcile. The focus of exploration is on what she calls, intermediate noise,' a moment of reflection on external and internal circumstances. It acts as a point of decision and helps to direct energies towards positive directions. Thus it is a necessary state in order to bring about a general problem solving. The jewellery series deals with the inner struggle and the process of resolution. The result is a series of brooch-like pieces which, through a change of posture or through conscious activity, undergo a transformation from an apparent chaos to something more structured and flowing. VIKTORIA SCHUMANN‘S work consists of the results of four different, repeated actions. Her mood influenced not only the repetition, but also vice versa, captured in the variance between the individual objects. Repetition can lend a certain strength to something inconspicuous. From drawing lines on paper to casting different metals and rolling them to the limits inherent to the material, she created structure in her daily life. The repetitions in their entirety themselves resulted in a new set of rules. Each one conditioned the following one and at the same time built on the previous one. This intertwines past, present and future and has the consequence that a repetition can only be accurately recognized after the last one has been completed and that individual repetitions are not complete without the others, making all repetitions equal. 'Means to an end' is a phenomenon we encounter every day. It is an instrument with which one can reach a goal in a focused way. Often it plays only a secondary role and receives less attention than the goal that is ultimately to be achieved. Man‘s original purpose of survival is an early testament to this principle. With time, increasing intelligence, as well as accumulated knowledge, the means to an end become more and more complex. Beginning with a Covid-19 contingent isolation and the accompanying restrictions in possibilities and the choice of materials, „means to an end“ influences the language of form and design in ANINA LÖWE-EPP‘S work. Even the actual function of the lamp, to give light, is based on this theme. The light objects reflect the process of means to an end – a sequence which is constantly repeated, improved and finally leading to a suitable result.

Misappropriate sees itself as a method dedicated to the ordinariness of life, in order to create absurd and uncanny images of reality from it. The work focuses on the alienation of the door handle, which is an essential part of our everyday life. However, because of its ordinariness, it is less noticed. Here it appears isolated, without a clear function, seeking a different relationship with the body, guided by intuition. The door handle appears as a fragment of the body, like fingers that take on a life of their own. Human qualities have been breathed into this banal form, which we reach for unconsciously every day, and it suddenly seems more familiar and at the same time less familiar than ever. Through an invisible force, the door handles can connect with each other and finally reach for the hand. The ordinary shape of the object in combination with the elasticity of the material causes an irritation which can lead to a heightened awareness and new body movement. In the process of experimenting and creating the pieces, LINGJIE WANG explored the hidden power of the conscious and unconscious. Hidden power is a power of transformation, capable of transforming a 2nd dimension into a 3rd dimension, the abstract into the concrete, waste into treasure. The connections between things, such as materials and environment, thoughts and forms, jewellery and the wearer, are reconstructed by hidden power. It is a pulling force that connects the separate front and back sides of jewellery and allows the objects to be attached to clothing and become jewellery. Hidden power is also a power of integration. Causality, as a means of connection, includes not only regularity, but also indeterminacy, randomness and non-repeatability. With the cooperation of the materials themselves and the environment, water and heat, the works are transformed. The properties of the material itself and the textual information of the word inherent to each piece, unite to create a new surface texture. The main material in BO ZHANG’S graduate work are discarded stockings, which transform into unique forms through heat. Working with fire on the one hand represents destruction while on the other hand symbolizes new life. It can destroy everything and give the object a new look and colour. Different materials were melted in initial experiments. The effect seems to be best with polyamide. Various flame strengths were used in order to work with different colours and thicknesses of polyamide. The final pieces show how artificial materials can imitate natural materials in an amazing way. Chameleons can adapt to their environment through camouflage. In nature they are considered to be masters of imitation. Not only animals, but also humans have always had the desire and the habit to imitate nature - art is always the first reaction by humans to nature.

JESSICA JOY ESPARON, VICTOR HAHNER, TZU-YUN HUNG, SONJA KEPPLER, LADA KLATS, ANINA LÖWE, VALENTINA MICHAELIS, FULYA OBERASCHER, VIKTORIA SCHUMANN, LAURA STACHON, LINGJIE WANG, BO ZHANG

The graduate works can be seen online: designpf.hs-pforzheim.de/ba_s/abschlussarbeiten/ abschlussarbeiten_ss_2020 They will be displayed in the exhibition INSIGHT at the Kollmar & Jourdan Haus, Pforzheim from 15.02-25-02-2021 TZU-YUN HUNG has dealt in her graduation project with questions about her own identity as a Taiwanese woman living in Germany. The creation of the jewellery series was preceded by an investigation into questions of life in linguistic and habitat foreign communities. To what extent can one change and adapt one‘s own identity? And what kind of consequences may adaptation have for one‘s own self? Tzu-Yun collected materials from her home region in Taiwan and her new home in Germany, transformed them and connected them with each other. The results are objects for the body whose homogeneous surfaces reveal nothing about the diverse origin of their parts.

In addition to mass consumption and our throwaway society, which are responsible for growing mountains of plastic garbage on our planet, there is a hidden aspect to our use of plastic that we are not so aware of. LADA KLATS highlights that consumption takes place not only externally but also internally. Products that have been in close contact with plastics are consumed on a daily basis. Few are aware of the fact that this results in loosened plastic particles ultimately ending up in our bodies. This project sheds light on how people voluntarily and carelessly tolerate plastics in their lives and bodies.

FULYA OBERASCHER deals with the issue of birth gifts: their meaning, purpose and objective for the mother. The birth of a first child is a decisive experience and a challenge in many ways, including dealing with the gifts received for the baby. Fulya is interested in building a bridge between the western tradition of wearing a knot talisman and oriental rites in which gold is gifted as protection against evil spirits. The focus is on birth gifts for the mother and modernizing them. The result is a jewellery collection of individual pieces, which can be combined in different constellations and worn for various occasions.

INSIGHT

Fire and clay play an integral part in archaic jewellery and object forming technologies. Every June students, workshop masters and professors spend 8-10 days at 1400 meters in the Swiss alpine village of Sufers, experimenting and working with three fire techniques: ashanti lost wax casting, ceramic

Fire and clay play an integral part in archaic jewellery and object forming technologies. These are explored during a weeklong workshop in the Swiss alps – lots of work, good eating, drinking, hikes and swimming. An exhibition at the end shares the results and invites discussion with everyone in the village.

'JENASTYCA' deals with the current image of women in Germany, exposing patriarchal structures and inviting us to rebel against them. The atypical material choice for jewellery – earthrelated clay – is a counterpoint to the conventional view of jewellery, which often serves the purpose of increasing the value of its wearer in association with its precious materials. Women do not need enhancement, but rather a reminder of their innate value. The wearers are encouraged to internalize the positive declarations that have been integrated into the jewellery through repeated touching, so they become strengthened from within. 'jenastyca' is a plea for self-love and attentiveness and is intended to encourage women in particular to set themselves apart and stand up for themselves.

Ceramic and bronze achieve their final forms through fire and have a long history in the design of incense burners. One can burn large incense candles in the sculptures, or use fresh and self-made incense directly on charcoal.

JEWELLERY PFORZHEIM UNIVERSITY — BA DEGREE SHOW 2020

Lada Klats, intertwined, 2020 Photography: Philip Vogt Lingjie Wang, Verborgene Kraft, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke Tzu-Yun Hung, Identity, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke Fulya Oberascher, Preciosity, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke, Model: Yana Beniyaminova Viktoria Schumann, Repetiv, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke + Viktoria Schumann Victor Hahner, The Peter and the Wolf Principle, 2020 Film still: Victor Hahner, Models: D. Baumann, J. Heilig 7 8 9 10 11 12 Laura Stachon, Misappropriate, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke, Model: Celine O‘Neal Jessica Joy Esparon, jenastyca, 2020 Photography: Jessica Joy Esparon, Models: Katharina Weil, Svenja Weil Valentina Michaelis, Zwischenlärm, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke, Model: Vivian Manzardo Sonja Keppler, Kapnós, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke Anina Löwe-Epp, Mittel zum Zweck, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke Bo Zhang, Chameleon, 2020 Photography: Petra Jaschke, Model: Lena Hetzel 1 2 3 4 5 6 wood-firing and raku. A clay-like body mixed with local horse dung creates the casting shells for the lost wax method, which are then heated to casting temperature in drums filled with smoldering charcoal. The ash of the burning wood placed directly inside the wood fire kiln creates organic glazes and effects on the surface of clay objects fired up to 1300°C. In the raku process, the shock of setting red hot fired clay into combustible natural materials results in the typical cracklé glaze and smoke characteristics, as well as entices metallic effects out of the glazes and the clay bodies. The days are filled with work, good eating and drinking, with the occasional hike or swimming at 2000m. We cap the week off with an exhibition of all the results for the village – this has become a tradition for them as well as for us.

JEWELLERY PFORZHEIM UNIVERSITY SUFERS FIRE WORKSHOP

This past year has been a time of introspection, of realizing that what we think of as normal no longer is; that what we take for granted can suddenly change and take on new meaning, that we exist as individuals while gaining emotional sustenance from contact with others. The themes these twelve designers have chosen to deal with in their graduation works reflect this introspection while seeking proximity to others. The final pieces convey these personal focus points, inviting us to engage while simultaneously expanding on the definitions of what jewellery and objects can be.


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DARJA POPOLITOVA is a designer and researcher based in Tallin. She is currently doing a PhD at Estonian Academy of Arts. Darja’s practise includes contemporary jewellery, video art, performance, and digital craft. She has participated in exhibitions at many international museums and galleries.

Lecturer MALA SIAMPTANI is a London-based jewellery design researcher and practitioner currently conducting her PhD research on the use of digital technology and its influences on creativity. Her work attempts to connect traditional craft with digital technology. As an insider researcher, she conducts studies on experimental processes and the future of material culture.

Estonian Academy of Arts is the only institution in Estonia that educates professionals in the jewellery and blacksmithing fields at the BA and MA levels. The department aims to provide the students with a general knowledge in the humanities; to develop their abilities in the visual arts; and their self-expression skills in the jewellery and blacksmithing arts.

The BA (hons) Fashion Jewellery at London College of Fashion (UAL) is founded on four key principles: craft and technology, sustainable practice, performance, and identity. This is the only jewellery course embedded in a fashion-dedicated college, which allows for cross-pollination and collaboration that mimics industry practice and the collaborative nature of the fashion industry.

The current situation and our decision to move jewellery activities online provides us with both unprecedented challenges and also new opportunities. Designers and researchers Mala Siamptani and Darja Popolitova have set up a collaborative student project as a response to the current climate, using their creative skills to explore these issues and to design beyond physical products in order to create new possibilities for jewellery design.

Let’s get digital, is a collaborative project between staff and students at London College of Fashion and Estonia Academy of Arts, focused on an experimental approach to investigate contemporary jewellery in a digital/non-physical form. This digital exhibition-oriented project deals with learning about digital possibilities in the context of contemporary jewellery and it's digital wearability. The aim was to encourage students to start developing pieces related to their personal projects in order to subvert conventional design and manufacturing approaches. The students were invited to reflect on a more intuitive and free approach implementing digital technologies and were asked to analyse new product design interactions using Augmented Reality (AR) as a tool. The project began with a series of theoretical lectures on digital design and practical lectures on 3D-modelling and AR software. Examples of digitally produced jewellery and other artworks were then considered and discussed with the students. Thereafter, students produced digital designs based on their own concepts, introducing their research and ideas; the final outcome consisting of a digital presentation using augmented reality to interact with the audience.

This project uses technology and social platforms to explore new relationships with the wearer and the designer. Through these outcomes, we demonstrate both the use and need for digital experience research and its acknowledgment of experiential knowledge to advance jewellery design thinking and practice.

LET’S GET DIGITAL

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1 Photographer: Shine Sha  Filter Design: Shine Sha  @sshine_tag 2 Model: Giulia Lanza  Photographer: Giulia Lanza  Filter designer: Giulia Lanza  @giulialanzastudio    3 Model: Mandy Dai  Photographer: Mandy Dai  Filter designer: Mandy Dai  @mandyok_jewellery  4 Model: Synee Sha  Photographer: Shine Sha  Filter Design: Shine Sha  @sshine_tag

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Students from Ba and Ma in Jewellery and blacksmithing at Estonia Academy of Arts (EKA)

PARTICIPANTS: Students from Ba Fashion Jewellery at London College of Fashion (UAL).

CURATORS: MALA SIAMPTANI, DARJA POPOLITOVA

5 Model: Maria Hadjisavva   Photographer: Maria Hadjisavva   Filter designer: Maria Hadjisavva   @mhs.jewellery  6 Photographer: Katrin-Maria Terras   Filter designer: Katrin-Maria Terras   @ kterras  7 Model: Taavi Teevet  Photographer: Taavi Teevet  Filter design: Tavvi Teevet  @taavetteevet  8 Model: Mala Siamptani   Photographer: Mala Siamptani   Filter designer: Mala Siamptani   @malasiamptani

www.artun.ee/en/curricula/jewellery-andblacksmithing/

www.arts.ac.uk/subjects/accessories-­ foowear-andjewellery/undergraduate/ ba-hons-fashion-jewellery­-lcf#courseoverview

@letsgetdigital2021

Online exhibition 08.03 — 22.03.2021

Model: Ulrika Paemurru  Photographer: Ulrika Paemurru  Filter designer: Ulrika Paemurru  @mesikatk    Model: Mandy Dai  Photographer: Mandy Dai  Filter designer: Mandy Dai  @mandyok_jewellery


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Milena Djukanovic is the Montenegrin 3D-printing jewellery designer behind the brand MiDju. By vocation she is an electronic engineer and Assistant Professor at the University of Montenegro, where she teaches additive manufacturing, but she is completely intoxicated by art. She presented her 3D-printed jewellery for the first time at XXIII Fitems Fashion Connection in Montenegro in 2019. Later on, with Montenegrin designer Andjela Popovic, she created 3D-printed bow ties inspired by Montenegrin history using recyclable filaments and zero-waste textiles. Bow Ties were supported through the Creative Montenegro project by the Ministry of Culture in Montenegro.

POP ART

The Pop Art collection of earrings are made entirely of PLA filaments. The collection is inspired by Pop and Op Art and features four colours–pink, orange, green and blue–which can be mixed and matched into many different colour combinations. The fresh, jolly collection is perfect for spring and summer. There are four different designs: Stripes, One Dot, All Dots, and Home. The earrings are asymmetric and if you buy two pairs with two alike colour combos, you can experience six extraordinary combinations. MILENA DJUKANOVIC MIDJU

POP ART COLLECTION

Djukanovic designed the Linea collection of bracelets and earrings inspired by Pop and Op Art culture, especially Victor Vasarely. This innovative project has been supported by the Ministry of Science in Montenegro. Milena knows that 3D-printing is a powerful tool and with her research team she designed a bracelet that changes colour if the person wearing it has a high temperature, which could be used in the fight against Covid-19. Currently, she is designing a jewellery collection inspired by Montenegrin princesses from the Petrovic dynasty.

@madebymian


Silke Spitzer doesn’t fit in a rigid category or specific archetype. Spitzer's drive to create arises from an internal need, processing the material in an almost manic way. She takes an adventurous path by pushing boundaries and challenging disciplines by creating artwork that oscillates somewhere between art jewellery, sculptural objects and wall ornaments.

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Silke Spitzer doesn’t fit in a rigid category or specific archetype. Spitzer's drive to create arises from an internal need, processing the material in an almost manic way. The artist (originally trained as a goldsmith) lives near Berlin and her work has been showcased in well known galleries and exhibitions internationally. After receiving her Masters degree at the University of Arts and Crafts, Pforzheim, Germany, she took a more adventurous path than more traditional silver and goldsmiths. Silke pushes boundaries and challenges disciplines by creating artwork that oscillates somewhere between art jewelry, sculptural objects and wall ornaments. The 'on - paper' exhibition TALISMANIA showcases a collection of pieces the artist has created over the past three years. The title of this collection refers to Spitzer’s attraction to talismans, those objects and mementos to which a magical, auspicious effect is attributed. Talismans tend to be small objects, and are kept hidden under the clothes or in a pocket, where they secretly unfold their strength. In contrast, Spitzer chooses to unveil and create talismans that are oversized pieces of jewelry; self evident, almost too immense in presence to be called a jewel. The shapes of her pieces grow from her own personal semiotic language. She draws impressions and colors from her immediate environment. These take roots in her conscious and ultimately the objects link her inner imagery and imagination to her work. Regardless of whether the pieces that come into being manifest as collars, shields, or wall pieces, they are all credited embodying a magical “talismanical” effect.

1 2 3 Blue summer, (2018), braided necklace, cotton yarn, silver Heart amulet, (2020), amulet, layered cardboard, ink, silver Yellow leaves necklace, (2020),

TALISMANIA

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I am fascinated by the thought of creating a kind of unsullied armor. A mane of grace, possessing power rather than symbolizing aggression. Shields both tribal and contemporary - both sheltering and protecting. Talismans filled with sympathy and good to protect from the evil eye. Like powerful animals that embrace the wild but remain pure. The delicate dance between peace and harm. (Silke Spitzer, 2020)

pendants, corc, paint, yarn Red middle, (2020), bottle cap necklace, bottle caps, aluminum, yarn Corc leaves necklace, salmon, (2020), necklace, corc, paint, yarn

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In the yarn pieces, Spitzer braids countless strands into cotton braids with a sense of love and passion. The process both relates and connects to the long tradition of textile wall art pieces. The braids join a harmonic play of color that makes us think of warm autumn days, blue summers and spring meadows. Made to be worn or displayed, these braids unfold to create a powerful decorative impact. When worn on the body, the braided object transforms into a beautifully soft collar that envelopes the shoulders and chest like a cape. It creates the magnificent mane of a lion, framing the head of the wearer. The repetitive act of braiding lets the artist reproduce mesmerizing ancestral gestures - as she describes it - “maternal love”. A motherly gesture that has been done over centuries in many culture of our world.

CURATED BY KATHERINA PERLONGO

SILKE SPITZER All photos by Eric Tschernow, Berlin

Simple and direct, her tradition of making necklaces also includes work from various other materials. These pieces are equally powerful. Some begin as wild and disconnected but eventually find order. Oval, round and irregular shapes of painted cork find their proper place, and connect with a natural colored yarn. By working the surfaces and carving lines and edges into the surface of the cork, the artist creates patterns that add a graphic quality. In other works, Spitzer, who considered studying painting as a young woman, uses cardboard pendants as her canvas. On these cardboard planes, playful shapes of color find their home. For the artist, this pieces in this series are intended to be shields against the evil, as she refers to them as “eamulets”. The aluminum necklaces in the series also seem to embody a magical vigorous energy. Each pendant is framed by a vibrant-colored bottle cap. As seen in previous works, the artist is questioning the value of materials by rethinking materials from common daily products. The matt colored plastic is a sharp contrast to the gleaming metal, whose structure also reminds us of a lunar landscape, both precious and mysterious.

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If I was to plant the moon, what seedlings would I carry, what colors would I choose? What presents could I offer and what pictures would I show from home? What kind of shapes would I bring and will they start to bloom? (Silke Spitzer, 2019)

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THE FAR SIDE

JANTJE FLEISCHHUT

www.jantjefleischhut.com @jantjefleischhut

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2 manufacturing processes. Fleischhut has always been fascinated by infinite heavens–overwhelmingly beautiful, irrationally ominous, forever in motion. Jantje Fleischhut combines her knowledge of the pure 'form follows function' from her time in Hamburg with the artistic and conceptual content-based thinking developed in her studies in The Netherlands. Her research interest lies in the fusion of digital and analogue techniques, as well as material usage and 3 gravel worn by Isabel gravel_a, brooch: steel, aluminium, resin, pig ment; gravel_b, pin: silver, seel, found plastic, resin; gravel_c (not in the picture), brooch: silver rhodium-plated, steel, mineral from Switzerland; gravel_d, pin: 14 ct gold, precious stone; 1 echo worn by Regina echo_a, brooch: copper, steel, resin; echo_b, brooch: silver rhodium-plated, steel, resin; echo_c, brooch: silver rosegold-plated, found plastic; 2 gleam worn by Regina gleam_a, brooch: silver, steel, resin; gleam_b, pin: silver rhodium-plated, steel, brass mesh; gleam_c, pin: 14 ct gold, amethyst;

Jantje Fleischhut's artistic work is firmly based in her fascination with the infinite universe and everything that flashes, floats, rotates and hangs in it. The cloudy information of the back of the Moon intrigues her and constitutes the basis for the new jewellery collection The Far Side. The 5° incline of the lunar orbit and its elliptical shape leave 41% of the Moon's surface hidden from the earth. It is precisely these 41% moon shadows that excite Jantje Fleischhut to visualise the invisible. It was only on October 7th 1959 that the Russian probe 'Luna 3' took the first photo from the back of the Moon. The recording is not spectacular; the resolution is poor. The new pictures in the beginning of 2019 taken by Chinas Rover 'Yutu 2’ and their space probe 'Chang’e 4’ are astonishing, but left her unimpressed. The back side of the Moon had already taken shape for her, her translations take the form of clear, fine constellations of material; a multitude of small elements grouped together. Like collected minerals, the finds are sorted, kept and exposed in special transparent boxes. At every moment of wearing, the user can decide for themselves how the elements should be related to one another. They become becomes creator of their constellations. The image of the back of the Moon lingers in motion.


Collection: Concrete Rocks! Photography: @elenakstudio Model: @ievaseskute Hair and make-up: @francescaangelone Marie Wolf was born and raised in Vienna, Austria. She moved to Tokyo in her late teens to study Japanese and continued her studies in England where she received Masters degrees in interactive design and business administration. She has worked in internet and telecommunications companies in various countries across Europe and Asia. Leaving the world of technology for jewellery design meant a complete change of profession but not of interests: Marie has had an affinity for design and has collected jewellery since childhood. She draws inspiration from multicultural experiences and then employs innovation in materials, designs and processes to make each piece simple, modern and fresh. The recurring concepts in Marie’s work include clarity, fluidity and transformability. Marie passionately

THE FOG IS LIFTING

@mariewolf_jewels

The artist has created 'fog' using Japanese paper. In the first image, the model, Ieva, is deep in the fog. Progressively, her hands start to appear out of the fog, at certain points wearing more and more white Rock Rings. The silhouette of her body is visible, but obscured by the fog. Ieva’s face eventually starts to peek through, displaying a Moonscape ring-pendant, until her entire form is revealed with multiple Moonscape rings on her fingers.

experiments with materials, especially urban remnants: electrical wire, plexiglass, sand, cement, glass and plastic. Her pieces are big and bold. They scream rather than whisper. They never cause indifference.

MARIE THERESE WOLF

With The Fog is Lifting, the artist seeks to create a setting of revelation overtaking haziness. Initially, the fog obscures the visitors’ view, creating mystery. But then the fog lifts. This is the moment that philosophers such as F. Schelling compare to the feeling of ‘finding a rational explanation’. For Marie, the Fog Lifting is a spiritual moment.


Pero me pareció interesante la idea de incluir a mis amigos y familiares, a sus amigos y famiiares en este Proyecto, solicitándo de ellos un ‘selfie’ en el que aparecen soplando una bomba de chicle. En el tiempo que vivimos, marcado por una suerte de ‘fast forward’ permanente, hacer una bomba de chicle por encomienda para un Proyecto nos lleva, primero a detenernos, y seguramente a recorder algo que hicimos en el pasado de nuestra infancia, a recorder cuando no éramos aún “adultos”. En el gesto de soplar una bomba de chicle -que generalmente hacemos solos y para ‘matar el tiempo’- aparece entonces una comunidad de afectos.

THE GESTURE OF BLOWING A BUBBLE My interest in masks and faces with colorful spheres, that look like bubble gum bubbles, is basically formal: a compositional challenge that evokes multiple cultures and times. However the exploration expanded with the idea of asking friends and relatives to take selfies blowing bubbles and become part of the project. We live in a ‘fast forward’ time and blowing bubbles offers us an opportunity to stop and take a breath. This moment summons memories from childhood - from a time when we were not yet 'adults'. The gesture of blowing a bubble - generally made in solitude and while 'killing time' – now becomes a connection to a larger community that is held with great affection. Samuel Guillén

@specific_gravity @brooklynmetalworks

SAMUEL GUILLEN

Mi interés por la mascara cuya faz muestra la forma de un volúmen redondo y coloreado, como una bomba de chicle, es puramente formal: un desafío de composición y una evocación de otras culturas y otros tiempos.

SAMUEL GUILLEN

The pieces were made at Brooklyn Metal Works in 2020 and are on view at Specific Gravity

BROOKLYN METAL WORKS

EL GESTO DE SOPLAR


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ORFÈVRE

ESTHER HEITE, ring 'Monolith 2', stainless steel, 2020 PETER HASSENPFLUG, Tension jewellerypiece; two pieces, 21ct gold and sterlingsilver; the curved silver double shape lies under the fabric and is held in place by the gold clip, (1979) 3 LISA SCHEREBNENKO, earrings, pearl, amethysts, 18ct whitegold, (2020); photo by Timothy Schaumburg

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PETER HASSENPFLUG LISA SCHEREBNENKO ESTHER HEITE Orfevre Gallery Bastionstr. 35 40213 Düsseldorf

orfevre.de @orfevregallery

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In 1969 on May 9th, Germany’s first gallery for jewellery was opened on Düsseldorf’ss Königsallee with the participation of almost 400 guests. The founder, ten German jewellery artists, knew each other from school and had already organized several exhibitions in a small groups. There were several reasons for the need of a salespoint in the form of a gallery. All of them were young, dared to do something and could make jewellery better than selling it. All of them were the type of goldsmith that had developed their own line. Due to their 'newness', the pieces were generally too 'modern' for the local audience, because they had no role model. The young jewellery artists were searching for a place with an new audience that was looking for new jewellery. They quickly agreed to try their luck in Düsseldorf. From the beginning, ORFÈVRE had organized exhibitions and through this it gave a broad public an impression of the liveliness of the current jewellery scene. 'Bijoux de braque' was opened in the spring of 1970. Exhibitions with jewellery from Holland, Sweden, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Spain, England, Italy, Switzerland and the USA followed. In the first ten years there were many changes within the group, so that in 1975 Peter and Marie Hassenpflug continued to run the gallery as a sole proprietorship. In the following years, the gallery acquired well-known and young permanent exhibitors (Paul Preston, Helfried Kodré, Hubertus von Skal, Christa Lühtje, Gerd Rothmann, and many more). The location of the gallery was also moved from Königs­allee to the old town near the Rhine, where it is based ever since. In 2014 Marie Hassenpflug died and Peter Hassenpflug was faced with the decision to continue ORFÈVRE or to close it down. He continued to run the gallery until he was very happy to find a young succes­sor in Lisa Scherebnenko in 2020. Lisa Scherebnenko graduated in February 2020 from the Peter Behrens School of Arts , Department Applied Art and Design in Düsseldorf under Hermann Hermsen and Jantje Fleischhut and is determined to pursue the idea of a ​​ jewellery gallery. The tradition will be continued. Both, renowned and young jewellery artists will be shown at ORFÈVRE in the future. With the takeover, Lisa Scherebnenko renovated the space and gave the gallery a new face. Other exhibitors in the last 50 years were: Bruno Martinazzi, Michael Kunze, Anton Cepka, Ulla + Martin Kaufmann, Hermann Jünger, Daniel Kruger, Thomas und Elise Dawo, Friedrich Becker, Otto Künzli, Giampaolo Babetto and many more.


FILIZ ATES ‘A favourite material of construction sites, often used disastrously to fix poor workmanship, I found it more disgusting than inspiring. But it offered interesting possibilities. The process of getting familiar and making peace with this intriguing

EZGI OKUR She studied jewellery design and jewellery technologies in Turkey and graduated in 2010. Her ambition for innovation and creativity led her to establish her own brand. She established her own brand DEGLATION with Görken Kızılçağlayan in 2013 where she creates unique jewels using conventional materials as well as acetate, sequin, glass, steel.

ELA CINDORUK As a jewellery maker and designer Ela Cindoruk, received the Red Dot Design Award Honorable Mention and Jewellery Designer of the Year Elle Style Award in the year 2012. Participates both national and international exhibitions and her work is showcased at galleries and publications throughout the world.

DENIZ TURAN ‘It is an invaluable source of inspiration for me that every single moment of our lives and all that we come across is open to interpretation and to re-creation in different forms. As for the contemporary jewellery, it is an area where I have the freedom of working regarding materials, subjects, techniques and interpretation.’

CANAN DURKAL Along side with architectural studies, Canan designs and makes contempo­rary jewellery. She is very much inspired by nature and her work reflects an abstraction of natures’ forms and textures. She attended several joint exbitions. In 2019 Autor Contemporary Jewellery Fair, shewas awared by Assamblage School of Jewellery.

BURCU SULEK Born and based in Istanbul, Burcu Sulek is a Turkish designer and maker concentrated in contemporary jewellery. She is enjoying the newfound freedom to express herself through her own contemporary jewellery line that grants her infinite flexibility to create whatever she desires.

BURCU BÜYÜKÜNAL ‘Stacked drinking straws in magical colours in front of a shop window I came across one day became my main material and they were accompanied by plexiglass and sterling silver. Believing that it is still contemporary today, I added bolder pieces which reveal the hidden beauty in drinking straws to the collection that made my working process even more meditative in a new chapter of my life as a mother.’

AIŞEGÜL TELLI Luxury Diet is a humorous approach to the attainability of jewellery. Cutlery as an expressive material says a lot about an individual`s life such as his/her  prosperity, culture, taste, health etc.

Lockdowns and curfews due to the Covid-19 pandemic made it difficult for Jewelry Links members to go to their studios to produce new work. However, the members never stopped loving their past designs and decided to turn this difficulty into a unique collection opportunity. They chose ‘the Brooch’ as the unifying theme. Each Jewelry Links member selected one brooch from their past designs to create this collection, '16 Brooches.’

ŞENAY AKIN ‘My In There collection represents the secret realm that I used to travel to quite often in my childhood. A place where the gemstones would shine in ravishing colours and goodhearted fairies would reveal many secrets to the friendly visitor.’

SELEN ÖZUS Selen was born in 1983 in Istanbul, where she continues to live and work. She teaches at the MadenContemporary Jewellery Studio, she co-founded with Burcu Büyükünal.

NAZAN PAK Nazan is current partner of ‘elacindoruknazanpak’ jewellery workshop and gallery in Istanbul, which she co-founded in 1993.  As well as making and designing jewellery she participated in many solo and collective exhibitions as a jewellery artist. She has also designed products and lectured at Istanbul Technical University on metalsmithing techniques.

LEYLA TARANTO In 2006, Taranto established her own studio,toz design. Using mainly traditional jewellery making techniques she likes experimenting with non-traditional alternative materials and -combining the two for unique pieces.

HAKAN AKTUG ‘It fascinated me in different ways when I started to work with foam. The froth expands, transforms and hardens.  It creates texture conflict when carved. The final form of the foam is unique and unpredictable! I took that structural ambiguity in a good way. Because, it makes pieces unique and adds more character.’

GÜLNUR ÖZDAĞLAR Gülnur is an architect who has also worked on graphic design and particularly on digital art after a decade of heavy architectural practice. After many years of creating on computer, she began to seek experience on making with her hands. Her experiments on transforming plastics led her developing her own technique on the basis of upcycling plastic bottles, melting them into unique ethereal shapes.

GÖZDE ERDOĞAN ‘I call my work as “soul in...” — as the world of things, objects and signs recalls and transforms our emotions in memories, carrying an intense interaction in between. This pure existential fact encloses my work’s essence. Producing, forming and exposing numerous “pieces” impulsively, compose the prelude of my creation. Through a ceaseless transforming process, materials and technics act as efficient tools to capture and solidify the images that come out instinctively.’

material and creating my own textures and forms has been a challenging, but at the same time a liberating experience. Moody Vistas Collection is the outcome of this love-hate relationship.’ 1 Aişegül Telli, Luxury Diet, Brooch, (2017), Oxidised silver,  zircon gemstone 2 Gozde Erdogan, (2020), ETHEREAL, brooch, silver, acrylic, lacquer    3 Burcu Büyükünal, Hidden Brooch, (201), Drinking straws, Plexiglas, silver and stainless steel  4 Filiz Ates, Happy Vista, (2017), Brooch, Expanding foam, acrylic paint, magnet, thread

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JEWELRY LINKS

Jewelry Links is a four-year-old collective created by sixteen Turkish contemporary jewellery designers. Over the years, the collective has introduced contemporary Turkish jewellery to an ever-growing audience by participating in numerous exhibitions at home and abroad. Members of the creative collaboration add contemporary dimension to the traditional concept of jewelry by working with unconventional materials.

10 Gülnur Özdağlar, Alien Flower Brooch , Plastic bottle, silicone, monofilament, steel     11 Deniz Turan, HARD AS COTTON, Brooch, (2020), cotton, piment, hardener, sterling silver, stainless steel     12 Leyla Taranto, Remains Collection, (2019), brooch, Leftover wooden picture frames, paint, silver 13 Nazan Pak, (2019), Mixed Up, brooch, vitreous enamel on silver

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@ jewelry_links

Canan Durukal, 2020 – Fractures – Parchment, steel, plexiglass    Hakan Aktug, Unpredictable, brooch, (2016), Polyurethane, turquoise beads, silver, paint, resin    Ela Cindoruk, Doodle, brooch, (2018), silver, paint

AIŞEGÜL TELLI, BURCU BUYUKUNAL, BURCU SULEK, CANAN DURUKAL, DENIZ TURAN, ELA CINDORUK, EZGI OKUR, FEYZAL BAŞKURT, FILIZ ATES, GÖZDE ERDOGAN, GULNUR OZDAGLAR, HAKAN AKTUG, LEYLA TARANTO, NAZAN PAK, SELEN OZUS, SENAY AKIN

TURKISH CONTEMPORARY JEWELRY COLLECTIVE

Feyzal Baykut, Flow(er), (2020), Heat shrink tubes, steel  Senay Akin, (2018), In There, brooch, dendrite, agate, du mortierite, 18ct gold, 925 silver, wood, pigments  Burcu Sulek, Bliss Brooch, (2018)   Selen Özus, Hi!, 2020, porcelain, silver     Ezgi Okur, HOPE Brooch, (2020), Resin, sequin, oxidized 925 silver, stainless steel


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Phenomenological and performative approach to the body: This group includes artists who possess a transversal and intimate sensitivity, which could be defined organic and performative through the use of symbols. Margherita Potenza explores the body in its theoretical and metaphysical meaning while staging a symbolic mapping that has the appearance of a ritual to reunite the disintegration of being. Anna Lewis continues her research around the idea of the corset being a tool of both constriction and mani­pulation. Tanel Veenre creates a series of carved gemstone nipples, an ancient emblem of fertility. Maria Ignacia Walker presents a body of work that speaks of time and its cyclical nature, organically represented in the act of weaving, as in the most ancient archetypes of the densest mytho­logies. With the title Emotional Body, Satomi Kawai develops a series of jewels that incorporate tactile qualities and organic elements, to stage the sensuality and delicacy of the female body. Ethnicity and racism: Nina Lima continues her research in the forms of oppression and less and less openly depressed by society, expressed through the format of the cameo. Ana Carolina Escobar is interested in rituals that commemorate life and death and contemplates them through concepts of nomadism, containment and migration. Monique Lecouna choses the silhouette of the most iconic Bulgari necklace to question social values and who defines them today, also expressed as response to racism as a global issue and Black bodies dying at the hands of police. Social and civil habits and customs: Eva van Kempen finds inspiration in medical achievements and the impact of human intervention on species control and regulation. Snem Yildirim questions how education systems transform us into individuals who are obedient to authority. Vivien Bedwell continues her investigation of the treatment of people with health conditions, illness or impairment and their functionality in public spaces. Lavinia Rossetti presents a body of work consisting of 157 pairs of disposable chopsticks; her intuitive analysis of China and its flavors, a very fast digestion of all the visual inputs that she experienced during her time spent their as a foreigner. Lieta Marziali closes the presentation in her catalo­gue essay that highlights the nudity of the human body – at its most physical, spatial and experiential form.

www.adornment-jewelry.com

On March 10th at 6.30 pm (CET) a public conference will be held on ZOOM to present the project and the artists included.

NUDA VITA

Historical and Political Narrative: Daria Borovkova’s body of work, Relatives, continues her investigation on the role of Russian women in the early twentieth century. The Stigma series by Peter Machata repre­sents a set of palms, with a round cut and pure white colour which contains symbols and icons of our time. The Frauen-Fleiss series by Jana Machatova is inspired by old postcards and newspapers, focusing on portraying women's life and crafts and developing a sentimental work on memory. Nanna Obel also focuses her personal artistic research on the role of women in contemporary society and on the public and private perception of their bodies, especially in relation to intimate and delicate experiences.

VIVIEN BEDWELL, DARIA BOROVKOVA, ANA ESCOBAR, SATOMI KAWAI, MONIQUE LECOUNA, ANNA LEWIS, NINA LIMA, PETER MACHATA, JANA MACHATOVA, NANNA OBEL, MARGHERITA POTENZA, LAVINIA ROSSETTI, EVA VAN KEMPEN, TANEL VEENRE, MARIA WALKER, SNEM YILDIRIM.

Nuda Vita, which will take place virtually on the main channels of both Adornment and Nuda Vita platforms from March 8 to 14. 2021.

In this edition, sixteen artists were invited to explore different aspects of nudity, as an ideological and existential condition that humanity experiences when free from constraints, rules, obligations and norms, in order to develop a personal artistic resistance action. The goal is to compare the most varied experiences and to broaden social and political awareness.

NUDA VITA The practice of collective and political body II and III chapters A/DORNMENT - CURATED BY ILLARIA RUGGIERO

14 Jana Machatova, Portrait of lady    15 Nina Lima    16 Monique Lecouna, Racism is a Global Issue Daria Borovkova, relative no2     Nanna Obel, Middle Age Skin     Ana Escobar, Inclusion #1, brooch, photo Matthieu Gauchet Peter Machata, Stigma    10 11 12 13 6 Satomi KawaiI, Ring 2, Her Black Hair  7 Tanel Veenre, Papilla   8 Snem Yildirim, sense and sensation     9 Lavinia Rossetti, Safe food, neighbour hood sharing    Margherita Potenza, Chest tile Maria Walker, mask, ALL ABOUT TIME    Vivien Bedwell, Muted Touch on Body Eva van Kempen, LadyLiberty Anna Lewis, Touch 1 2 3 4 5

This initiative explores the value and role of the public, collective and political body, taking as its starting point the expression 'Nuda Vita', coined by Walter Benjamin and then developed by the philo­sopher Giorgio Agamben, as an impossible condition, an indes­cribable concept and artistic action.


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combining them in new and playful forms; diamonds and sugar, plastic engagement rings, fake gold, fake gems, fake everything. She critiques the medium through form itself. Darby is an artist, and jewellery is both the medium, and the subject. She is the founder of Darby Studios, an interdisciplinary studio that delivers events, creative, and a jewellery and streetwear line. She is also the Co-creator of Frend of a Frend, a digital community for independent artists, and creative entrepreneurs, and the curator behind The Jewelry Phone.

THE JEWELRY PHONE

ALEX DARBY is a speculative jeweller, creative producer, organisational strategist, and entrepreneur. Trained as a traditional craft practitioner through the formalist lens of jewellery design, Darby’s speculative jewellery practice critiques notions of value through material explorations and marriages uncommon to the logic of form and permanence of traditional jewellery making. Her work blurs lines between traditional and non traditional materials,

THE JEWELRY PHONE is a speculative jewellery platform, curating unlikely exhibitions.

CURATOR: ALEX DARBY

WHAT ARE U WEARING?

www.callthejewelryphone.com @thejewelryphone


Artists: Breana Ferrara Claire Webb Hattie Eshleman Jackie Andrews James Betts MANDO BEE Sarah Montagnoli Sera Park Choi

Curated by Alex Darby

THE JEWELRY PHONE

call.thejewelryphone.com

This text-based exhibition is accompanied by the original web-based exhibition which can be experienced on browser and mobile at:

A text-based exhibition of jewelry poems, highlighting the beauty of form, detail, materiality, and process in jewelry and removing the visual from our experience entirely. what are u wearing is the second in a series of performative works of jewelry by The Jewelry Phone, a speculative jewelry platform curating unlikely exhibitions.


Photography by Ceri Davies and styling by Katie Phillips

BEYOND TYPOLOGY

Titled Beyond Typology, the gallery’s showcase will consist of an array of materials, formats and textures, based around the human need for comfort and self-expression. Vanja Bazdulj explains: ‘the showcase is about reimagining and reinventing our environment and our body as more humane and curious places, where we can feel safe and relaxed.’ ATTUA APARICIO, glass - ANA MARGARIDA CARVALHO, metal - ELA BAUER, plastics - FAYE HALL, textiles and multimedia - KARIN HERWEGH, wood - LINA PETERSON, wood - ANNA RAY, textile - ZOE ROBERTSON, plastics

HOUSE ON MARS GALLERY BEYOND TYPOLOGY: WEARABLE ART EDIT

@houseonmarsgallery www.houseonmars.net/

House on Mars gallery Unit 30 Sunbury Workshops, E2 7LF, London


BEYOND TYPOLOGY


www.youtube.com/watch?v=8V6wHjxJCzs& feature=youtu.be

Pureun Culture Foundation 4th fl. Pureun Building, Gangnam daero 581 Seochoku, Seoul, Korea 06530

Lee Eugean Gallery, 17 Apgujeong-ro 77 Gil Cheongdam-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul, South Korea @absolutelyabstractkorea

In the wake of the prolonged Coronavirus outbreak of 2020, it is a pity that the fields of culture and the arts has been shrinking significantly. Art is more likely to fall behind than other economic activities essential to survival. Still, difficult times are precisely when culture and arts are needed to comfort and heal our isolated and hardened hearts. Following the prior exhibitions Sagabowol (2018) and Nest in a Garden (2019), the Pureun Cultural Foundation proudly presents Absolutely Abstract. In terms of the etymology of the word abstract, ‘abs’ represents the meaning of ‘away,’ and ‘tract’ refers to the word ‘draw.’ In other words, abstraction speaks to the process of not reproducing a subject precisely and realistically from an object, but of geometrically and structurally constructing a fine form-factor, or expressing one's thoughts or inner feelings through the matching of colours. There are cold abstractions, like geometric patterns, that consist of fine formative elements. Simultaneously, there are hot abstracts that express the inner world freely and symbolically based on the artist's subjective feelings and intuition. Wilhelm Worringer said that there is ‘abstraction will’ in human aesthetic sensibilities. Artists turn their eyes from specific objects to their minds and reconstruct them into their own symbolism and characters to express the inner world and to pursue purity, creating a place for the audience to experience new things through the art of 'meaning' rather than merely 'reproduction.' This year, many craft artists with this theme have won awards in the leading international competitions, raising the status of Korean crafts, which makes it more meaningful. While appreciating the world’s leading Korean craft artists’ works of art, I hope you find yourself able to relax your tired body and mind. December, 2020 Chairman of Pureun Cultural Foundation Koo Hae Won

ABSOLUTELY ABSTRACT

JUNMIN BAE, YOONJUNG CHOI, SOOHYUN CHOU, YONGJIN CHUNG, JOOHEE HAN, JIHYE KANG, JI YOUNG KIM, KYEOK KIM, SHIN-RYEONG KIM, JEONGWON LEE, JOO-HYUN LEE, NAMKYUNG LEE, SEULKI LEE,YOUNGIM LEE, YOUNGJOO LEE, JUN SUK MIN, HYUN-SEOK SIM, YOOKYUNG SONG, SEHEE UM, YOUJIN UM, JAESUN WON, SOH RI YI

Offline 17.12.2020 to 09.01.2021 Online 08.03.2021 to 12.03.2021 Joohee Han, Dancing Rectangle, eggshell, silicone, stainless steel   Sehee Um, A Series of Accidents, (2020), stainless steel, lacquer, jesmonite     Jeongwon Lee, Re-formed Linear series, (2020), white porcelain, pigment, 1280°C oxidation firing  1 2 3

Yookyung Song, Where am I, (2020), stainless steel, silver, aluminium, magnet Yoonjung Choi, Breath Series Reflection, (2020), special plastic, sterling silver    Junmin Bae, Microcosmos 22, (2020), polymer clay, plastic film, sterling silver

4 Youngjoo Lee, Kanon 2020 #B001, (2020), 925 silver, stainless steel 5 Shin-Ryeong Kim, B.F. no 13, (2018), sterling silver, nickel silver 6 Jaesun Won, Accumulated Time B5, (2020), sterling silver, stainless steel, thread

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1 Camilla Luihn, Recent events, green necklace, (2020), repurposed copper, enamel, handwoven linen. When life suddenly changes, new energy gets released. I try to channel this energy into a new bodyof work. Based on recent events I have decided to visualize the constant battle inside me, betweendarkness and color. And this time letting the colors win.This is one of my secrets. 2 Ella Heidi Sand, Eavesdrops, necklace, (2020), oxidized silver, precious and non precious chains. A secret overheard, not meant for your ears.    3 Putte H.Dal, The Burden of a Secret, necklace, (2020), found coconut, piece of a branch,leather string. A secret carried through life as a knapsack, aged and wrinkly with the traces of lived life. 4 Putte H.Dal, Lack of insight,necklace, (2020), Modified door peephole, wood part from a spinning wheel, steel screws, found metal chain. 5 Stills from video Aliona Pazdniakova 6 Stills from video Aliona Pazdniakova

A Collection of Secrets Reflect on the number of secrets and stories we carry with us. Take, for example, what is passed on from one generation to the next; family secrets, stories and memories we keep to ourselves. Your and my thoughts, what we don’t share and what we may never talk about. Stories only a few know. Shame, guilt, emotions. Anxiety and joy. Could you share everything? And would you like to know everyone else's secrets? There is power in having secrets and power in knowing others, while something is too heavy to bear or too difficult to tell. Secrets can be treasures or curses. Burdens or joys. Certain things are forgotten, others forever remembered.

The ARCHIVE processes some of these secrets and presents them as a collection and as an exhibition. From each artistic and human standpoint, secrets are visualised or told and each of the artists has their own technique, symbolism and personal experience to draw from. At the same time, they share a common fascination and interest in communication through contemporary art jewellery. The works alternate between the intimate, self-exposing and the grand and historical.

ARKIVET collective consists of four jewellery artists, all living and working in Norway: Putte H. Dal, Hilde Dramstad, Camilla Luihn and Ella Heidi Sand. ARKIVET started as a collaboration seeking to inspire each member in their artistic development and to share knowledge within the medium of Jewellery & Objects. As a dynamic group, they create exhibitions that illuminate and clarify themes they set as focus points. Each project they develop consists of a new topic and a new related body of work. Projects are developed through discussion and research with a common wish to bring jewellery as an artistic expression into contemporary

ARKIVET

1 ELLA HEIDI SAND, CAMILLA LUIHN, PUTTE HELENE DAL, ALIONA PAZDNIAKOVA, HILDE DRAMSTAD

A COLLECTION OF SECRETS

society. The exhibition spaces will not only be presented as a showroom for the jewels and objects, but also as a resource for the exhibition. For some projects they invite a guest artist working with another media to put another angle of the theme. For this project ARKIVET has invited the artist Aliona Pazdniakova to participate. Pazdnniakova is a visual artist and philosopher. She uses media of photography and film as well as text form. Her main field as a photographer is jewellery, arts and crafts, working both with personal art projects and commercially as Pazdniakova Photography & Design.

@arkivet_kunst www.arkivet.info


ARKIVET

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Visit the webpage to discover the participating artists and their works. www.artificialintelligems.com @artificial_intelligems

talks on AI technology and jewellery will contextualise the project and offer insights into the research. Furthermore, the aim is to collectively reflect on topics that play a central role in jewellery and are challenged through this project (such as wearability, authorship, making processes and materiality). These informal conversations encourage sharing perspectives and learning from each other. Feel free to join us for a vivid interactive dialogue or just to drop in and listen. The program and weblinks for the dreaming sessions and talks will be announced via our webpage and IG.

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGEMS

ONLINE EVENT consisting of ‘live dreaming sessions’ and ‘Artificial Intelligems talks imagining jewellery through AI technology’. March 11-14th 2021. Program and links to be announced via webpage 11.03 — 14.03.2021

Artificial Intelligems will be presented through an online event consisting of live dreaming sessions and a series of reflective talks. During these live dreaming sessions, the algorithm envisions a flow of constantly transforming, blending, glowing jewellery based upon the images – submitted by more than a hundred jewellery makers! – it was trained with. Ever-changing ‘ornamutations’ are generated in real-time. The collectively created, living, multidimensional jewellery will be shown for the first time. Join us for this premiere! Hypnotised by the algorithm we indulge in speculative reflections. A series of


ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGEMS


Birthdays place milestones in a person's life, from the day they are born to the end of their journey, some of which accompanied by festive ceremonies. Celebrated once a year, they call for a brief respite from the daily craft of life, evoke introspection, and give rise to questions of identity, belonging, and meaning. Three goldsmiths – Noa Liran, Yasmin Vinograd, and Mor Hirsch, joined together and tried to decipher, each in their own way, the personal points of contact with this concept. Weekly Zoom sessions were accompanied by curator Avi Vinograd, and eventually yielded a series of objects. Noa Liran wishes to overcome her shyness. Like the cyclamen flower bowing its head, she wishes to lift her head up and dare. Mor Hirsch believes we are all born equal, and wishes everyone to find their true selves. Yasmin Vinograd desires to soar over the existential difficulties and enjoy lightness like a cloud in the sky. The necklaces, pins, and birthday wreaths they’ve created have matured into this exhibition.

klimt02.net/jewellers/yasmin-vinograd www.facebook.com/yasmin.vinograd.jewelry

BIRTHDAY WISHES

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www.instagram.com/yasminvinograd/ www.noaliran.com www.yasminv.net

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CURATOR: AVI VINOGRAD PARTICIPANTS: MOR HIRSCH NOA LIRAN YASMIN VINOGRAD

Yasmin Vinograd, Brass, Plexiglas with a mirror finish, (2020) Noa Liran, silver, silk' resin, stainless steel, (2020)    Mor Hirsch, brass, laurel leaves, (2020) Yasmin Vinograd, necklace, silver, silk' resin, stainless steel, (2020) Noa Liran, brooch, silver 925, parchment paper treated and self-painted, (2020) Mor Hirsch, necklace, brass sawn by hand, acrylic paint, (2020) Mor Hirsch, brooch, brass, sawn by hand, acrylic paint, (2020)  Noa Liran, brooch, silver 925, parchment paper treated, (2020) Noa Liran, brooch, silver 925, parchment paper treated, (2020) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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NEW PALTZ METAL is an active area of study that engages a wide variety of ideas, objects, images, and modes of making toward critical and dynamic outcomes. Students and faculty form a community of inquiry that seeks to expand the field’s discourse.

The rigorous curriculum provides opportunities to explore the technical, aesthetic, and conceptual aspects of contemporary jewellery and metalsmithing in a state-of-the-art facility with teachers who are actively engaged artists and who exhibit and lecture internationally. The program faculty include Myra MimlitschGray, Lynn Batchelder, and Amelia Toelke.

Denizen presents a dynamic group of artists creating seemingly divergent works. Through this potent visual and virtual platform, we collectively reflect upon emerging thematic threads and shared experiences. By pinpointing these core questions and curiosities, we confront the urgent concerns of our current moment. Selected work provokes conversation surrounding important and timely subjects including political action, environmentalism, mental health, virtual communication, identity and place, and the search for meaning and wonder.

Seizing the potential of a digital format, Denizen experiments with shifting scale, context, and presents the work as simultaneously physical and digital. These playful compositions present new opportunities for collaboration and prompt questions about agency and authorship. Through unexpected juxtapositions, the virtual site proposes objects as intersecting points of collective inquiry, inspiring critical discussion and revealing universal themes.

DENIZEN

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1 Pictured Piece: Homebody by Nora Papageorgantis, Background Image: Compression by John Sullivan 2 Pictured Piece: Depressive Weight No.2 by John Sullivan Background Image: iNT3RG4L4CTiC LUNCHB0X by Mando Bee    3 Pictured Piece: iNT3RG4L4CTiC LUNCHB0X by Mando Bee Background Image: Sample #1 by Funlola Coker 4 Pictured Piece: RBY_123_AEA by Erin Underhill Background Images (Left to Right): Peeling Rock by Eighteen Yuan, Meld #2 by Renee Ricci 5 Pictured Pieces (Left to Right): I-you 00, I-you 02, I-you 01 by Beiya Yang, Background Image: The Real Unreal by Lisa Kraushaar

MANDO BEE, FUNLOLA COKER, DAWOON JEONG, LISA KRAUSHAAR, ASHLEY NETTYE POLLACK, JOHN SULLIVAN, CLAIRE WEBB, BEIYA YANG

NEW PALTZ MFA METAL PROGRAM

@newpaltzmetal www.newpaltzmetal.com

6 Pictured Pieces (Top to Bottom): Untitled II, Untitled I by Claire Webb, Background Image: Pick Up Your Memories by Eighteen Yuan 7 Pictured Piece: Living Specimen II by Dawoon Jeong Background Image: Sample #3 by Funlola Coker  8 Pictured Pieces (Left to Right): Reprieve II by Ashley Nettye Pollack, Compression by John Sullivan, Background Image: Sample #2 by Funlola Coker 9 Pictured Piece: My Honour/My Shame by Funlola Coker Background Image: Compression by John Sullivan 10 Pictured Piece: Instrument001 by Meixian Li Background Image: Living Specimen I by Dawoon Jeong


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@karenkriegel www.kriegelkaren.com

This chain is a collaborative effort among 19 artists and makers from across the world. It is four meters long, allowing it to be worn by two people while still remaining two meters apart. As we continue living in this strange new reality that requires keeping such distances from others, this project was a sigh of relief and inspiration for us. It gave us a chance to share ourselves and connect with new creators again. As we saw our chain grow in size and strength, we were reminded that we were creating not only a piece of jewellery, but a truly tangible metaphor for the power of community and connection through art – a feeling we’ve all dearly missed through these difficult times. As we share this piece with new viewers, we hope that they, too, feel inspired and invited to join this exercise; to become another link in our collective journey. To feel once again that they are a part of something larger. We live for the moments to gather again but hold ourselves together in this moment through our unique links.

LINKED CONNECTION

Models: Dave Colton and Melanie McPherson Materials: Sterling silver, brass, copper, plexiglass,

JOSH BASS, KO LIM, CAROLINE BACH, FUNLOLA COKER, STEPHANIE O’BRIEN, TENGELY NÓRA, CASSONDRA JUSTINE, AIMEE PETKUS, MELANIE MCPHERSON, ARIELLE BRACKETT, JOHN SULLIVAN, HILLARY DAVENPORT, MONICA RODRIGUEZ HEYER, CARLIE BARRETT, RIVKAH PROCACCIA, NANETTE PENGELLEY, RT PETERS, KAREN KRIEGEL, OBLIK ATELIER

wood, glass, enamel paint, polymer clay, resin stones, borax crystals, moldable thermoplastic, steel, felted wool, acrylic, bronze, sweet water pearls, plastic straws, Repurposed mesh packaging, srgentium silver, nylon thread, stainless steel, pine, length: 4 meters, 2021 Photographer: Gianna Sergovich Copywriter: Cynthia Osborn

the globe, while others made theirs just across the other side of town – some of us even managed to meet face to face. In the end, we were all able to bring our links together to create one collaborative piece. We are 19 artists and makers from different corners of the world. We didn’t all originally know each other, but through multiple connections, and introductions, we all found a way to come together to bring this idea to life. Some applicants made their links across

Throughout last year, we connected with fellow artists by sharing our techniques and practices with one another. This year, we wanted to reconnect in a more powerful way; by combining our methods and signature talents to create something new.


LINKED CONNECTION


Celebrating diversity and inclusivity, the exhibition includes the work of 22 artists working in contemporary jewellery in Australia today. You may be surprised by some of the things in this exhibition – they do not all immediately occur as jewellery – but rest assured the definition of contemporary jewellery is broad and encompasses many things that evoke a sense of the personal and the memorable along with the melange of human emotions swirling within all of us. The works in Made/Worn: Australian Contemporary Jewellery explores the act of making and how jewellery is worn on the body, telling stories that start with the artist and continue through the life of the object worn or experienced, creating new resonances with owners into the future. In her essay for the project Everything and nothing – jewellery beyond adornment Melinda Young writes: 'As a maker, a wearer and a viewer of contemporary jewellery I am interested in jewellery beyond its life as adornment, as a significant, charged object to be worn. This extends to the processes that engender that object, the actions that describe making and the notion that to ‘wear’ or be adorned with jewellery does not necessarily mean that it is in a traditionally recognisable form.' Contemporary jewellery practice sits at the crossroads of craft, design, and art, it positions ‘the human body as a general working area’. Contemporary jewellery not only sees the making of recognisable forms of adornment using ‘known’ materials, it also has an ‘open attitude to methods and material’, questioning and pushing against ideas of what traditional jewellery can (or could) be. The materiality and value of jewellery is questioned; sites of adornment and the process of making interrogated. The scale and scope of adornment comes into play as does a (re)consideration of what we consider the jewel or precious object to be. Alongside the tour, the Made/Worn project includes a suite of workshops and events that will engage people in the art and craft of contemporary jewellery to deepen an understanding of wearable art as a vehicle for personal expression, the technique and skill involved in the making and how these skills are used in contemporary practice. We hope that this project inspires people to make and wear contemporary jewellery that speaks to who they are and what they believe in while, at the same time, bringing joy to all who experience the remarkable creativity of these Australian artists.

@australiandesigncentre australiandesigncentre.com/ madeworncontemporaryjewellery

MADE/WORN

The project includes performative or interactive elements, including workshops and public programs that give audiences the opportunity for creative participation. Jewellery is an act of art, craft and design that also lives and breathes on the bodies of those who wear it.

AUSTRALIAN DESIGN CENTRE, LIAM BENSON, HELENA BOGUCKI, JULIE BLYFIELD, ZOE BRAND, MAREE CLARKE, JESS DARE, ANNA DAVERN, BIN DIXON-WARD, SIAN EDWARDS, EMMA FIELDEN, LOLA GREENO. PENNIE JAGIELLO, BRIDGET KENNEDY, INARI KIURU, GRACE LILLIAN LEE, VICKI MASON, CLAIRE MCARDLE, TIFFANY PARBS, BLANCHE TILDEN, CATHERINE TRUMAN, MANON VAN KOUSWIJK, ZOË VENESS

13.02 — 02.05.2021 101-115 William Street, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, 2010 Made/Worn: Australian Contemporary Jewellery is curated by Australian Design Centre, designed by Garbett Design and supported by the Australia Council for the Arts.

From intimate pieces to large scale works spanning a wide rage of materials, techniques and meanings, the pieces on display are playful, intricate, conceptual, personal and political. The artists also engage with themes of place, sustainability in materials and identity.

MADE/WORN: AUSTRALIAN CONTEMPORARY JEWELLERY

7 Grace Lillian Lee, White Corals double beaded weave, 2019, Photo Felicity Brading  8 Julie Blyfield, Rock Neckpiece, 2020, Photo Grant Hancock 9 Bridget Kennedy, Fragile days, fragile ways – the long hot summer_Pendant (reversible), 2013 10 Maree Clarke, River reed necklace, 2014, Photo courtesy of the artist and Vivien Anderson Gallery  1 Jess Dare, Banjo Bottlebrush, Gumnut, 2019, Photo Grant Hancock 2 Helena Bogucki, We gathered bone and ash, 2019, Photo Marnie Richardson    3 Zoë Veness, Return Loop Double Loop 4 Blanche Tilden, Arc, 2017, Photo by Grant Hancock 5 Liam Benson, Coat of Arms 6 Pennie Jagiello, What we leave behind heirlooms of the Anthropocene 4 and what we leave behind heirlooms of the Anthropocene 5, 2019-2020, Photo by Bewley Shaylor Wagga Wagga Art Gallery, NSW 17 July - 5 September 2021 JamFactory, SA 9 December 2021 - 13 February 2022 Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, TAS 3 March – 15 May 2022 Bundoora Homestead Art Centre, VIC 4 June – 27 August 2022

VARIOUS TOUR DATES: National Tour Itinerary Glasshouse Regional Gallery, Port Macquarie, NSW 30 June - 16 August 2020 Artisan, QLD 28 August - 10 October 2020 Cairns Art Gallery, QLD 23 October 2020 - 31 January 2021 Maitland Regional Art Gallery, NSW 13 February - 2 May 2021 Australian Design Centre, NSW 20 May - 7 July 2021

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Embodying the self-destruction we inflict upon ourselves: TAMAR PALEY (fig. 6) describes how the constant need to please, satisfy, and perfect ultimately suppress the well­ being of oneself.

Even though the show was envisioned almost a year prior to MJW 2020, when no one could have anticipated what was yet to come, it seems that now the subject of self-destruction is more relevant than ever. With the global pandemic forcing us to re-examine life as we once knew it - the exhibition presented on these pages offers an opportunity to revisit the existing works in a new light.

With every piece, we discover just how much the topics expressed have become even more correlated with the issues we face today on a personal and global level, from stress-eating and emotional overload to over-consumption and the environmental crisis - each of these subjects gets a new spin in the year 2020.

Pendant silver 925, stones, thread 7 Anat Aboucaya, I Am My Memento Mori, (2020), Necklace silver, lucite, steel, natural hair, pearl, hematite 8 Adi Farber, Marking Place, (2019) ,Mask Kombucha fungus (Bacterial cellulose), tulle, cotton thread, hot glue 9 Stav Bozaglo, Will You, (2019), Rings stone, zircon 10 Lital Goldenberg, The Gap Between, (2018), Rings, silver, plastic bags 11 Sofia Zakharova, Essence, (2019), Object Glass

TAMAR PALEY, KATIA RABEY, KEREN GISPAN, YOTAM BAHAT, SOFIA ZAKHAROVA, MICHAL BAR -ON SHAISH, LITAL GOLDENBERG, BATAMI KOBER, STAV BOZAGLO, ANAT ABOUCAYA, ADI FARBER

OVERREACTING: JEWELLERY SPEAKS SELF-DESTRUCTION. ONE YEAR LATER

1 Michal Bar-On Shaish, It Is Not There Yet!, (2020), Wall piece oxidized fine silver, smoky quartz 2 Katia Rabey, Flat Stomach, (2019), Pendant stainless steel, cord 3 Yotam Bahat, The Scale of Choice Between Pleasure and Destruction, (2019), Ring Silver, copper 4 Keren Gispan, The Misconception of Control, (2020), brooches, corian, wood, silver 925 5 Batami Kober, In An Attempt To Connect, (2020), brooch, paper, silver, string, glue 6 Tamar Paley, I Carry The Weight, (2020),

OVERREACTING

Photo Credit: Kinhouse Creative

This project was curated by Tamar Paley, Keren Gispan and Katia Rabey and supported by the Jewellery Design Department at Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art, Israel.

LITAL GOLDENBERG (fig. 10) also reacts to ethical issues of overconsumption and waste, using plastic bags to create delicate transparent shells - as if they were precious gems. SOFIA ZAKHAROVA (fig. 11) shows a more literal approach by recreating tools that are used to build and destroy, instead casting them out of famously fragile material: glass.

Exhibiting our societal entrapment in constant contradictions: STAV BOZAGLO (fig. 9) presents a critical take on the classic solitaire engagement ring which at this point is almost completely detached from what it fundamentally represents - the commitment between two people.

YOTAM BAHAT (fig. 3) contemplates the other side of self-destructive acts. As he sees it, all acts of self-destruction will always be supported by a positive action or outcome. The good and bad come hand in hand in the act of destruction. Questioning our home environments and intimate circles: KEREN GISPAN (fig. 4) strives to express the difference between the sterile spaces we live in: clean of dirt and filth, to the natural surroundings in which they are built. BATAMI KOBER (fig. 5), reflects on the home as an emotional domain where she attempts to connect people to create a whole, sometimes even at the expense of losing parts of one’s self.

ANAT ABOUCAYA (fig. 7) reacts to social expectations that are put on women especially as they age. Anat’s works combine materials that represent time, relics of the past that are given new life and function: they will never be what they used to be. ADI FARBER (fig. 8) addresses the body by creating organic skins from Kombucha, tea fungi. She sews tulle garments which she then lays in this substance that grows and spreads upon them.

How much is too much?: MICHAL BAR-ON SHAISH (fig. 1) references the Dr. Seuss story of Gertrude McFuzz, a greedy one-feathered bird whose uncontrollable desire for more feathers ultimately results in her inability to fly. KATIA RABEY (fig. 2) touches on issues of stress-eating and body image, creating illustrative works that although embody a humoristic approach show painful insights into personal harmful habits.

As jewellery enthusiasts from around the globe prepare for another Munich Jewellery Week in 2020, so does ‘OVERREACTING’ - an experimental jewellery project that aims to showcase current voices from the Israeli contemporary jewellery field. After a successful show in 2019, OVERREACTING: Jewelry Speaks Feminism and Gender, a group of eleven artists plans to return to Munich with a new show. It explores the subject of self-destruction, when suddenly 2020 hits hard, canceling all plans and bringing new depth and meaning to this concept, almost as if it were a self-fulfilling prophecy. @overreacting_jewelry


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Kawai carries minimalistic aesthetics, derived from Japanese traditional art practices: flower arrangement, tea ceremony, and calligraphy. She focuses on layers of personal femininity and environment to generate a response to the question, 'what does it mean to be a woman?' Integral to the process of discovering a true answer to the inquiry, Satomi invites comments from diverse communities to participate. All responses, personal and collected, inform her unique works.

SATOMI KAWAI, born in Wakayama, Japan, is a contemporary visual artist who creates adornments, drawings, printings, and performances. She has been living in Iowa City, IA, USA since 1999, where she started an academic art education and earned a MFA at the University of Iowa in 2006. Kawai has been exhibiting her art nationally and internationally.

Through our own physical reflection, we are presented with a flipped perspective on a familiar and known image. This type of mirroring can be observed in the paired styles of the artists’ works: glossy, amorphous, and prismatic; matte, achromatic, and structured. The same characteristics however remain integral and constant: repetitive pattern, arduous detail and the uncanny attraction to something that looks memorable.

The collective, Polyphonous, was founded by Professor Jivan Astfalck, Rachel Darbourne and Laura Bradshaw-Heap, loosely grouped through connections at the School of Jewellery in Birmingham, England, but members are from multiple countries- including U.S. based artists Satomi Kawai and Jillian Moore. Established in 2018 , Polyphonous was formed in collaboration with Studio Gabi Green in Munich’s West End with the intent to drive visitors to a localized hive during Munich Jewellery Week. The current pandemic era has offered the opportunity to safely connect with the most renowned European jewellery events from across the globe, online, and in print. This exhibition effectively serves as an in-person experience for the residents of the American Midwest and links virtually to other physical and virtual celebrations around the world.

1 Jilian Moore, Gemmer Rings, (various), 2018-2020, polymer clay, fabricated brass, resin, paint, microbeads, found acrylic 2 Jillian Moore, Galactic Toast Earrings, (2021), wood, resin, paint, found acrylic, glitter, stainless steel 3 Jillian Moore, Glitter Pebble Studs (various), (2020-2021), polymer clay, resin, glitter, stainless steel 4 YJillian Moore, Buttermint Studs, (2020), wood, resin, paint, found acrylic, stainless steel 5 Satomi Kawai, New Spring: Earrings 7, (2021), resin over oxidised copper, silver, stainless steel 6 Satomi Kawai, New Spring: Necklace 1, resin over oxidised copper, hematite beads, silk thread, silkworm cocoon 7 Satomi Kawai, New Spring: Brooch 13, (2020), resin over oxidised copper, silver, mild steel

POLYPHONOUS 2021/ MIMETIC LIVES II

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Her work is inspired by forms in the natural world, bent by a bonkers sense of humor, and amplified by an interest in the fantastical. Operating with a background in metalsmithing and a foreground in experimental resins and other 'new materials', Moore's work is executed with the obsessive, monomaniacal approach of her craft discipline training tempered with a casual disregard for material or disciplinary hierarchies.

JILLIAN MOORE is a full time artist and some time writer based in Iowa City, working primarily in the field of contemporary jewellery and small sculpture. Moore received a BFA in Metalsmithing and Jewellery Making from Western Illinois University in 2004, and an MFA in Jewellery and Metal Arts from the University of Iowa in 2008. Moore’s work has been exhibited in the US as well as abroad.

This project marks a 15th anniversary for Satomi Kawai and Jillian Moore, and reunites them in an exclusively shared exhibition for the first time in more than a decade. 'Mimetic Lives II' portrays the artists’ unique parallels in jewellery fashion form. Mimesis (meaning to mimic or imitate), is a perfect one-word summary of their creative inspirations and helps define the conversation between their work over the years. The individual lines of work stand alone with clear material polarity. They however borrow certain motifs inherent to their abstracted ideations rooted in biology and natural elements. SATOMI KAWAI JILLIAN MOORE

(Polyphonous has a Youtube channel titled Polyphonous: Jewellery Exhibitions)

@gildedpeargallery www.gildedpeargallery.com www.youtube.com/channel/ UCcePtXgGFWBB3jhhiZzINjg

Email gildedpeargallery@gmail.com to receive the ZOOM link or schedule an in-person appointment.

Virtual reception 12.03.2021 18:00 CET


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POLYPHONOUS 2021/ MIMETIC LIVES II

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THE INCORPORATION OF GOLDSMITHS of the City of Edinburgh is a non-profit organisation set up by Royal Charter in 1687. Today it is the oldest consumer protection group in Scotland and it is believed to be the oldest continuously existing business of any kind in the country. The Incorporation operates two charities, “Silver of the Stars” and “The Scottish Goldsmiths’ Trust”, and administers the Edinburgh Assay Office. The Incorporation has also created the Ethical Making Programme,part of a strategy to promote and support the uptake of ethical making practices in the trade in Scotland.

LOCAL HEROES is a curatorial studio led by Stacey Hunter that connects audiences with contemporary Scottish design and craft. Known for being design obsessives, Local Heroes pioneer new formats for exhibitions and events and develop projects with partners in the cultural and commercial sectors. We use unconventional and inventive sites and spaces to bring the work of designers and makers to a wider public. Our mission has always been to sustain and catalyse opportunities for designers and put design from Scotland on an international stage.

SILVIA WEIDENBACH explores form, complexity and colour to develop an entirely new aesthetic for jewellery in the 21st century. A leading exponent of new techniques, Silvia has pioneered the use of 3D printing and haptic devices.

RUTH LESLIE works in a variety of metals including silver, gold and titanium, and creates contemporary pieces that are both inspired by the subtle details within fabrics as well as the structural forms within textile machinery.

SOIZIG CAREY’S jewellery practice is rooted in slow design and making, and she is conscious of the impact her work has on people and the environment. She is drawn to creating modernist and long-lasting pieces.

GABRIELA SILVEIRA is a Brazilian born, Scottish based photographer. Through her personal bodies of work, flower and flesh are used as symbolic starting points to explore ideas and ideals of love, sex, beauty and death.

Still Lifes offers a glimpse of what’s new and fresh about contemporary jewellery from Scotland. Curated by Local Heroes, the exhibition has been conceived of and styled by Stacey Hunter using a selection of plaster and gypsum objects and photographed by Gabriela Silveira.

Our curatorial vision was to create a composition that captured the stillness and richness of a traditional oil painting. Just like a physical exhibition might do, we wanted to give people a reason for pause in a fast-paced world, and to encourage them to appreciate craftsmanship and precision. Our six exhibitors responded to an open call for work using ethically sourced materials, selected by an expert panel of industry leaders. This exhibition is supported by the National Lottery through Creative Scotland. Created by Local Heroes in partnership with the Incorporation of Goldsmiths, the exhibition has been conceived and styled by Stacey Hunter and photographed by Gabriela Silveira.

HEATHER WOOF'S signature style is characterised by understated simplicity and effortless movement, reflecting a pared back aesthetic that is integral to her work. Through a methodical process, Heather explores themes of pattern and rhythm to create pieces with intricate structures.

ALISON MACLEOD makes delicately patterned fine jewellery inspired by antique treasures and the stories they tell as heirlooms passed through generations. Her signature technique of layering builds sometimes hundreds of tiny disks to make a pattern reminiscent of the spring Catkin flower.

MICHELLE CURRIE’S work is a celebration of her love of the interconnected realms of science and art. Through her exploration of ferromagnetic materials containing iron particles and magnetic forces, Michelle creates stunning visual examples of the physical laws that govern the beauty of physics.

STILL LIFES

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Styled by Stacey Hunter Photographed by Gabriela Silveira 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

SOIZIG CAREY, MICHELLE CURRIE, RUTH LESLIE, ALISON MACLEOD, SILVIA WEIDENBACH, HEATHER WOOF

Ruth Leslie Alison Macleod Michelle Currie Ruth Leslie Soizig Carey Heather Woof Silvia Weidenbach

www.localheroes.design www.localheroes.design/nycjw20


STILL LIFES

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Silversmith JENNY KÅBERG and glass artist KATARINA THORSTENSSON have been collaborating since early 2020, creating original work while putting their imagination and craftsmanship to the test. Extraordinary jewellery for

the curious people! Måns Jensen, to capture the bold and adventurous side of the jewellery project. Photography by Måns Jensen

THE MISCHIEVOUS COCKTAIL PARTY

The mischievous cocktail party— a glitch in the social calendar. Loud music playing from the mixed-up playlist, colourful cocktails served while painting nails and just having some plain old fun. SILVERSMITH JENNY KÅBERG GLASS ARTIST KATARINA THORSTENSSON

www.themixedupproject.com www.mansjensenphotography. tumblr.com

@themixedupproject, @mansjensenpics

THE MISCHIEVOUS COCKTAIL PARTY — A GLITCH IN THE SOCIAL CALENDAR


THE MISCHIEVOUS COCKTAIL PARTY


JOYABRAVA was founded in 2010 with the idea of developing and disseminating contemporary Chilean jewellery, adding voices and views from our local scene to be heard everywhere. Our members share experiences of collective creation, and organize relevant encounters, seminars, and group exhibitions. During these 10 years, 70 artists have been part of the organization. Today we are a group of 27 active members, all women. Our formal organization as a Contemporary Jeweller’s Guild has given us access

to important governmental funding institutions to carry out ambitious projects otherwise unaffordable, leading us to fulfil the mission of positioning Chilean artists in the contemporary jewelelry scene. A decade after its foundation, the term “contemporary jewellery” is no longer something unknown in Chile. We believe we have contributed to the construction of a vision of contemporary Chilean jewellery as a means of expression and development of South American artistic critical thinking.

'Una Decada Brava (A Joya Brava Decade) is a virtual reality documentary about the ten years of the first Chilean Contemporary Jewellery Association, Joya Brava. It intertwines the intimate memory of their members about their growth as a group, their achievements, and the revelation of their artistic work through a retrospective of their pieces shown in 360° … and that shows the wide diversity of their materiality and techniques', says Tatiana Lorca, the film Director. The documentary offers a spherical view of the relevant places in the history of Joya Brava, as well as spaces related to the inspiration of the creators. In addition, for the jewellery pieces to be appreciated in all their details and angles, they were photographed in specialized studios, both in Santiago and Barcelona. The animated sequences of these pieces were then integrated into the documentary. There is also a pdf catalogue with the original selection of pieces curated by Miriam Pappalardo and Renata Porto. There is also a section including recorded zoom Dialogues held during December 2020 with local and international guests, covering topics such as street art and social unrest in Chile, identity and contemporary practices, creativity during pandemic, and art and gender, among others.

Chile is not an industrialized country and our work is characterized by a laborious hand crafting work with little high-tech resources. It is in our nature to promote our local crafts. Some partners have researched traditional crafts like micro basketry and filigree to reinvent them in their work by learning the craft themselves. Others are moved by practices like knitting, stitching, flower arrangements and interior decoration, materials and techniques typically seen in popular Chilean aesthetics. When it comes to metals there is a preference for the white and red of silver and copper. We live in a territory that has large mining activity. Our ancestors in America worked these metals way before they were colonized. But we also ventured out with other materials such as horsehair, fabrics, ceramics, paper, paint, wool, seaweed, rubber, resin, found and recycled objects, etc.

The pieces shown in this edition belong to our current active members and include works from 2011 to 2019, all part of our past group exhibitions.

ANA NADJAR, ANDREA SILVA OLAVARRÍA, CAROLINA DONOSO, CECILIA ROCCATAGLIATA, CLARISA MENTEGUIAGA, CONSTANZA BIELSA, DANIELA RIVERA, JOYCE MARIN, LILIANA OJEDA, LORETO FERNÁNDEZ, MELINA RAPIMÁN, MÓNICA DÍAZ, MONICA PEREZ, NATALIA SALDIAS, NOELLE LABHARTE, PAMELA DE LA FUENTE, PASCALE DURANDIN, PATRICIA IGLESIAS, PAULINA LATORRE, PÍA WALKER, RITA SOTO, SOLEDAD AVILA, STEFANIA PICCOLI, VALERIA MARTINEZ, VANIA RUIZ, VIVIANA ARÉVALO, YAEL OLAVE

@joyabravachile www.joyabrava.cl

Loreto Fernández, Darned II, necklace, acrylic lace and waxed thread, (2017) Ana Nadjar, Orange-Black, Ring, orange peel, plastic, gearing, seaweed, aluminum, copper, (2017) Yael Olave, Cor atribolat II, brooch, nasal cannulas for oxygen, silicone thread, stainles, electric cables copper three and sheet, (2018) Patricia Iglesias, Memory of Silence, necklace, found wood, bronze, jute, cotton, embroidery thread, dyes, (2018) 4 WE PURSUE Image composition by Vania Ruiz Work by Vania Ruiz, The navigator, ring, Resin, fabric, paint, plastic, (2018) Constanza Bielza, Organic Layers, necklace, wood, recycled laser-cut, textile, natural dyes, (curry-beetroot), bronze, cotton, (2018) Pía Walker, Who believes in being cordial?, brooch, leather, gauze, thread, silver, stainless steel, (2018) Pascale Durandin, Jesus Rose, ring and crown, silver, copper, (2013) 5 Liliana Ojeda, Hemaphrodite Fantasy, necklace, (2014) 6 Soledad Avila, In Suspense, Head piece, (2014) 7 Pamela De La Fuente, Pull me, two Necklaces, silver, rubies and two antique shooters, (2014) 8 Natalia Saldias, Sunday, necklace, (2017)

A JOYA BRAVA DECADE

1 WE GROW Image composition by Vania Ruiz; Work by Cecilia Roccatagliatta, Eje de la vida, necklace, Silver, bones, guitar strings, waxed thread, (2011) Mónica Pérez-Monoco, Animagraphy, brooch, Copper, silver, bronze, silver, solder, steel, thread, (2018) Noelle Labarthe, My imaginary garden, object, Fossile, siver,copper, (2014) Carola Donos, Strolls, brooch, Silk gauze, used cotton fabric, threads,18ct gold plated copper, steel, (2018) Stefania Piccoli, Stellar, brooch, oxidized silver, 18ct gold, steel, (2014) 2 WE STAND Image composition by Vania Ruiz Work by Viviana Arévalo, Sedated Slowness, brooch, amigurumi crochet and beading, (2018) Clarisa Menteguiaga, Bite the Dust, brooch, porcelain, bone, alpaca, alpaca, (2018) Daniela Rivera, Counterpoint, necklace, natural fiber, nylon, copper, (2018) Joyce Marín, Shots, brooch, bullets, resin, cotton, steel, (2017) Rita Soto, Parasite Amoeba I, brooch, horse hair, tampico fiber, paint, silver patina, stainless steel, (2018) Andrea Silva, brooch, Frayed burlap, linen, silver, steel, (2018) 3 WE FLOW Image composition by Vania Ruiz

UNA DÉCADA BRAVA

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JIVAN ASTFALCK is a visual artist, jeweller and academic. Born in Berlin, where she trained as a goldsmith, she has been living in London for more than 30 years. She obtained her MA in the History and Theory of Modern Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design, and her PhD in Fine Art at the University of the Arts London. Dr Astfalck is Professor at the Faculty of the Arts, Design & Media (ADM), Birmingham City University (BCU). She combines her studio practice, which she exhibits internationally, with leading Contextual Studies on the BA Jewellery & Objects, and as Visiting Professor at the most relevant art institutions in China. www.jivanastfalck.academia.edu

RACHEL DARBOURNE is a mixed media jeweller and academic. She gained her BA in Jewellery from Middlesex University and her MA in Jewellery, Silversmithing and Related Products from the School of Jewellery at Birmingham City University (BCU). Rachel was born in London and now lives in the South West of the UK, her time is divided between her studio practice, which she exhibits world-wide and teaching on the BA for 3D Design Crafts and MA (jewellerysubject tutor) at Plymouth College of Art (PCA). www.racheldarbourne.co.uk

We choose this poem instead of writing artists’ statements because we believe that it expresses much more distinctly what Whispers & Cries is all about versus something we could have word-smithed…

GLITTERING-MINDED DEATHLESS APHRODITE by Sappho

Glittering-Minded deathless Aphrodite, I beg you, Zeus’s daughter, weaver of snares, Don’t shatter my heart with fierce Pain, goddess,

But come now, if ever before You heard my voice, far off, and listened, And left your father’s golden house, And came,

Yoking your chariot. Lovely the swift Sparrows that brought you over black earth A whirring of wings through mid-air Down the sky. They came. And you, sacred one, Smiling with deathless face, asking What now, while I suffer: why now I cry out to you, again:

What now I desire above all in my Mad heart. ‘Whom now, shall I persuade To admit you again to her love, Sappho, who wrongs you now?

If she runs now she’ll follow later, If she refuses gifts she’ll give them. If she loves not, now, she’ll soon Love against her will.’

Come to me now, then, free me From aching care, and win me All my heart longs to win. You, Be my friend

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JIVAN ASTFALCK, RACHEL DARBOURNE

Rachel Darbourne, Pearls and Latex, necklace, fresh water pearls, 14K gold, latex, silk Rachel Darbourne, Vagiphant and Peniphant, brooches, Two grey elephants and ruthenium plated copper Rachel Darbourne, Pearls and Latex collar, neckpiece, Found imitation pearl necklace, latex, ribbon Lickables party-Trashed (with tea towels for the clean up) Jivan Astfalck, 2-piece assemblage, brooch, pure gold, sterling, silver, agate, Chinese snuff-bottle, early 20th Century

WHISPERS AND CRIES

1 @whispersandcries jivanastfalck.academia.edu www.racheldarbourne.co.uk www.kittenhair.co.uk

12-03­— 14-03-2021 via Youtube Polyphonous: jewellery exhibitions


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WHISPERS AND CRIES

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1 Annika Ingelaere, Sulfurous from the series Zooming In, Zooming Out 2 Maria Konschake, 41°54'08.5''N 12°27'14.1''E from the series About space and Identity - Prägung 3 Yann Ceuleers, Red Toolbox from the series Movement by Hinges 4 N° 163 from the series Stilled Sentiments by Charlotte Vanhoubroeck (©Simon Debbaut-L’Ecluse) 5 Madeli Viljoen, Praerigidus Album from the series Cutis et Ossium 6 Ashoka Tano and Robocop talking about something from the series Past Visions from the Future and Other Stories by Sophia le Roux (© Sophia le Roux) 7 Dull Sex from the series Floating Steps by Simón Mazuera (© Simón Mazuera)

Seven PXL-MAD School of Arts, Hasselt (BE) alumni honour MAD's tradition a second time. From Belgium, Colombia, Germany and South-Africa they reunite and present work that has mastered last year's MADness. Various jewellery objects uncover new realities that deal with illusory movement, the lost sentiments of a queen and a weirdly attractive curiosity cabinet. Realities that make us reflect on the estranging beauty of pollution and the meaning(s) of cultural identity. Realities that tell us future stories from the past, and that eventually make us see how fear can, sometimes, make us flourish.

MADLY MASTERED

1 YANN CEULEERS, ANNIKA INGELAERE, MARIA KONSCHAKE, SOPHIA LE ROUX, SIMÓN MAZUERA, CHARLOTTE VANHOUBROECK, MADELI VILJOEN

pxl-mad.be/en/jewellery-design-gold-and-silversmithing

@pxlmad


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Photography by Grace Butler @gracev.butler Set Design / Art Direction by Mila Wielusinska @objectsalive Production by AA-Collected @aacollected

Day 1 Gina Melosi //SHATTEREDfragments// Teardrop Pendant in EcoSilver and amethyst Gina Melosi, brokenPROMISES, Nail, Midi Ring in Eco Silver and oxide Gina Melosi, brokenPROMISES, Pinky, Midi Ring in Eco Silver, oxide and garnet Day 2 Sibilla Santucci 'Prometheus Aurum ring' 24K gold plated brass Sibilla Santucci 'Gold plated earrings' 925 Silver gold plated Day 3 Milanova Studio 'Mermaid & The Waves' Earrings, 825 Silver, Flameball Pearl Day 4 Mies Nobis ‘Jardin Ring’, 18K Gold Vermeil Mies Nobis ‘Linea Ring’ 18K Gold Vermeil & Pave Pink Tourmaline Day 5 Mies Nobis ‘Bahar Ring’, Oxidised sterling silver, Milanova Studio 'Medusa' Clips, 925 Silver, Vintage sweet water pearl Milanova Studio 'Trix Ring' 925 Silver

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We are a designer-run and independent design focused showroom and agency with an in-house jewellery studio based in Kreuzberg Berlin, hosting a team of designers as well as a wider network of artists, fashion, accessory + jewellery designers. Our predominant focus is on contemporary jewellery but we also showcase women and men's fashion, object, accessories and beauty products, as well as hosting art, photography, jewellery exhibitions, and retail pop-up events.

1 3 Home Still Home - A Digital Exhibition

The most present items in our pandemic lives, captured in an unconventional, treacherous set, showing a compiling or contrasting perceptible story for each designer's jewellery piece. The idea is based on finding uncommon/unexpected visual pleasure in everyday objects in an experimental way; combining different, mostly non-artistic mediums. Inspiration refers to Salvador Dali's unique and humorous approach to art, reflecting the surreal time of the challenging year 2020. As team of jewellery designers from AA-Collected, we try to open up a creative territory that illustrates the characteristics of nowadays life of arts & craft, showing how much it is ‘still life – alive’.

AA-COLLECTED MIES NOBIS, GINA MELOSI, MILANOVA STUDIO, SIBILLE SANTUCCI

Day 6 Sibilla Santucci "Merope Ring", Sterling silver 925, Sapphires Gina Melosi ‘SILVER LINING’ Ring Necklace #4 in 100% recycled silver and pewter, 925 silver chain, fine gold-plated brass chain, oxide Mies Nobis ‘Claavi Ring’ 18K Gold Vermeil & Pave Pink Tourmaline Day 7 Gina Melosi ‘SILVER LINING’ Ring Necklace #9 in 100% recycled silver and pewter, oxide, 925 silver chain, rose-gold plated brass chain, fine goldplated brass chain Mies Nobis ‘Derre Ring’ 18K Gold Vermeil & Faceted Opal Day 8 Mies Nobis ’Solmu Ring’, Oxidised Sterling Silver & Red Garnet Gina Melosi ‘SILVER LINING’ Ring #6 in 100% recycled silver and bronze, oxide Day 9 Sibilla Santucci "T Ring", 925 silver gold plated, ruby Sibilla Santucci "Minimal Silver Necklace" 925 Silver Mies Nobis ‘Densa Ring’ Oxidised sterling silver & Faceted Labradorite Mies Nobis ‘Derre Ring’ Sterling Silver & Faceted Peridot

HOME STILL HOME

2 @aacollected @miesnobis @ginamelosijewellery @milanovastudio @sibillasantucci_jewellery aa-collected.com


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ÁUREA PRAGA - My jewellery journey started around 2008, years after working as a communication designer and illustrator, which is my college degree field. I finished my Post-graduation in Jewellery Design, at ESAD

MARTA COSTA REIS - I started studying jewellery in 2004, while pursuing other professional activities. I chose to dedicate myself fully to this work in 2014. I completed the Jewellery course and the Advanced Course in Visual Arts at Arco, in Lisbon. Besides my work as an artist-jeweler I teach jewellery history, I write occasionally about jewellery and I curate jewellery exhibitions. I exhibit regularly in Portugal and abroad and have work in some of the great contemporary jewellery collections. I am a Board Member of Art Jewelry Forum.

Is the 2020 pandemic the ending of our dystopian scares?

Years of nightmare stuff turning into reality need to be followed by a time when dreams come true, and for that we must start to dream again and put colour back in the picture. Some cultures around the world have the tradition of sleeping together to dream together. People gather in a big house and at night, if you wake up, you can listen to the common, synchronized breathing of all those souls, gathered in the dreamtime. Our works present a starting point of our dream for the future: the dream of being a good ancestor, the dream of guns ready to shoot life from water, the dream of fluffy snowy candy clouds that good dreams are made of...

It’s just a start, a fantasy... but it is solidly real.

CARLOS SILVA - Lives and works in Estoril, Portugal. Graduated in jewellery at Ar.Co – Centro de Arte e Comunicação Visual in Lisbon Portugal. Portuguese Ambassador of Art Jewelry Forum (AJF) Curator and producer of international exhibitions, workshops and lectures with national and international guests. Regularly participates in exhibitions, symposiums and national and international workshops.

(Superior School of Arts and Design) in 2010 and my Masters in 2012, also at ESAD. I taught classes to the BA at ESAD and was Head of the Jewellery department until 2019. Since then I've been developing work in the contemporary genre of jewellery, having my work featured in national and international exhibitions and galleries. 1 2 3

Ãurea Praga, Loaded, necklaces, (2020), water gun, sugar, rose quartz, plastic sealer, paint, plastic string Marta Costa Reis, Neolithic Collection, necklaces, (2017), acrylic, polyester cord Carlos Silva, Fragments, brooches, (2017), plaster, acrylic paint, oxidized copper

PANDEMIC DREAMS

1 @aureapraga, @carlos.silva_pt, @martacostareis_jewellery www.martacostareis.pt www.etsy.com/shop/TheGoldenPlague

MARTA COSTA REIS, CARLOS SILVA, ÁUREA PRAGA


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GALERIE BEYOND THE SPACE IN BETWEEN RUUDT PETERS JANTJE FLEISSCHUT

The space in between refers to the silence between the words, the breathing between the singing, the area between the molecules. A place between wake and sleep, between light and dark and where dreams arise. An ethereal field where the earth meets the sky, where nothing is predestined and all possibilities remain open. Ruudt Peters' new piece 'BARA Pectus' is about silent and hidden spaces, about what you cannot see right away, a black hole, infinity, the afterlife, the space in between. The eye that is sucked into space, with it also the fear of the unknown, death and infinity. Peters uses jewellery as a metaphor to capture our mental and physical experiences of the duality between the cosmos and earth’s core. Jantje Fleischhut's ORB, tells us about her fascination for the infinite universe and the cloudy information of the back of the moon. The 5° inclined lunar orbit and its elliptical shape leave 41 percent of the moon's surface hidden from the earth. For Jantje Fleischhut, this is where the 41% conception in the shade begins. The results are clear and very fine constellations in material, a variety of jewellery elements that meet in a set of 4 pieces. All elements can be positioned differently by the wearer. The image of the back of the moon is in motion.

The space in between It is the space between my words the spacebar you don’t see nor hear The emptiness between stars between the end and the start of drawn lines between notes of a masters composition between your heart and mine The colors you can’t see but imagine The blackness after a film no credits follow the event The scariness of weightlessness before you hit the ground The tumbling down into a crack in the tiles

JANTJE FLEISCHHUT - ORB - Set of brooches - Silver rhodium-plated, steel, alu, resin, found plastic - 2020

It is the ineffable question mark to which we can’t assign a number It is the thin space between blood and vein between a lie and a fact between religion and sect it is the closing of an eye just before it winks

Photo by Victor Darmont

When words come short they are covered by the space in between the shadows of a circle where Nemo resides before his ship disappears into the unsettling deep where nothing is done and done over again again until it rains in the room the cellar of the mind because the space in between is like the back of the moon It’s okay, don’t be afraid by Jasper Coremans

Photo by Victor Darmont

RUUDT PETERS - BARA “Pectus” – brooch - Silver, graphite, gold - 2020


Brooch by Ruudt Peters - Photo by Victor Darmont - Model Jasper Coremans

Set of brooches by Jantje Fleischhut - Photo by Victor Darmont - Model Anastasiya Slanko


stable

weight

Campus Idar-Oberstein Erica Jordan, MFA 2020

Levan Jishkariani, MFA 2020

destructive

heavy Nikita Kavryzhkin, MFA student

upright

Margherita Berselli, MFA 2020

Valérie Wagner, MFA 2020

rough

mystery

The range of courses offered by the university in Idar-Oberstein is unique worldwide. Due to its special location, the material gemstone is of particular importance in the study programme. Precious stone and jewellery design can be studied here at Bachelor and Master level. This offer attracts a group of particularly motivated and determined students, who, in their research, deal with the topic of gemstones as a basis for artistic work and jewellery. The approximately 50 students come from about 20 different countries, so that all students and teachers at the university are constantly surrounded by a wide range of opinions and by different cultural, political, social and artistic points of view. This diversity makes it possible to see things and behaviour from a completely different, often completely new perspective. One of the most important principles of design, the abolition of boundaries, becomes a natural part of everyday life through the coming together of students from all over the world and ultimately becomes visible in the artistic decisions of the students.

jewel

Vanessa Zöller, MFA 2020

www.hochschule-trier.de/io

Natascha Frechen, MFA student

Carolin Denter, BFA 2017

Jiun-You Ou, MFA 2018

Trier University of Applied Sciences | Department of Gemstones and Jewellery Nga Ching Ko, MFA student

Vollmersbachstr. 53 a | 55743 Idar-Oberstein | www.hochschule-trier.de/io


density

rock

Setareh Shojaee, BFA 2020

Mira Kim, MFA 2019

pressure

Oliver Mauerhofer, MFA 2018

hole

fracture

Vesal Bahmaninik , MFA 2018

fissure Typhaine Le Monnier, MFA 2015

Catalina Brenes, MFA 2016

Mia Copikova, MFA 2018

silky

drill Kun Zhang, MFA 2018

rough Peter Dvorak, MFA 2018

Trier University of Applied Sciences | Department of Gemstones and Jewellery Vollmersbachstr. 53 a | 55743 Idar-Oberstein | www.hochschule-trier.de/io


DIVE

My source of inspiration is the hybrid reality in which we live, material and immaterial are intertwined. The interaction of my body-interface with the extensions of technology allowed me to give life to my works in the digital world and materialize them in the tangible world. I oppened a dialog between the two realities.

LOOK AT US WE ENTER THE EXIT

Silvia Bellia

INTO

Piece of Self, 2021 Necklace Rose quartz, silver, PVC 18,5 x 19 x 4 cm Weight: 533 g

COLOURFUL

Martín Carreño Coyuntura, 2021 Necklace Basalt, shibuichi 4,5 x 22 x 22 cm Weight: 590 g In material explorations, I find the media to articulate avoided speeches. My work explores the transformations that the body undergoes after the trauma of recurrent violence. Repeatedly breaking, abrading and reconstructing enduring stone, the passage of time is recorded.

WORLDS

Tianyi Tia Liang

Questioning the origins and value of my earlier works, I examine what happens if they are drastically reduced to one neutral and pale materiality. At first, the overwriting of my past makes me feel deceived and lost. As I go on, I discover that they still echo the anterior ones and that the contained void may be approached with the suggestion for another filling.

WWW.ENTERTHEEXIT.ART

26.03.2021

._ring (Oval), 2021 Ring Aluminium, silver, copper, gold, tin 5,7 x 4 x 4,5 cm Weight: 49,7 g

ONLINE EXHIBITION

DETAILS,

Birgit Thalau

Guides, 2020 Ring Oxidized silver, 18K gold 3,3 x 2,9 x 4 cm Weight: 40 g

BY

/ ENTERTHEXIT

I always focus on my subtle feelings about the phenomena of human relationships. My growth period accompanied and witnessed the growth and the rapid development of China. Throughout my jewellery, I want to record my own opinion and try to start a conversation with the viewer.

ATTRACTED

Follow our social media and website to find the link to our live stream

ARE

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The diversity within our group showed, how much we need others. How important it is to maintain interest in the human spirit.

Therefore, we attempt to draw our presentation into new, unexpected interactions with our public. Manifested in the combining of selected jewellery pieces, which are frozen into one image, the symbolic combinations of our personal thesis work with another one stand for the human relationships we value.

CRAFTS.

WE INVITE YOU TO OUR ONLINE EXHIBITION:

The presented works examine the intimate and universal through personal themes, with emotional intensity and gestural marking, expressed in the medium of contemporary jewellery.

AND

Each of us tells a story, following the questions that are moving us, daring to communicate them, leaving us torn between the desire to make and see someone wearing our final works.

We like the idea of letting our hands talk for us, still staying connected to our concerns.

ART

EXIT: This period had to come to an end. At this moment in time, the 13 are becoming a group, like family members living a specific time lap together.

Traveling together through our worlds and for our jewellery projects, we want to share our journey and stories with others. This, developed in a

making process that repeatedly went back and forth, until there was a “fitting” or at least “growing” into the direction which felt right.

ABOUT

We gathered as a group, getting to know each other in Idar-Oberstein, coming from very diverse backgrounds. Some of us have explored the world of stones and have been working with jewellery for many years; others come from different paths, still fascinated by science, craft, and art. Paths we have crossed to meet similar expectations.

PASSIONATE

ENTER: We are the 2020/2021 group of graduates from the study programs in Jewellery and Gemstones from the Trier University of Applied Sciences, Idar-Oberstein campus. Alejandra, Birgit, Erika, Inga, Jasmin, Jean, Levan, Martín, Oles, Silvia, Tia, Valérie, Vendula... 13 names that when reading them, might give hints to different origins, nationalities, cultures.


Series Title: Ruler, 2020 Necklace Beech wood, agate, stainless steel, foam 20 x 28 x 6 cm Weight: 500 g

Valérie Wagner

THE

L'instant vert, 2020 Necklace Chalcedony, citrine, cotton thread 4,5 x 22 x 22 cm Weight: 180 g

WHISPERS

OUR CONCEPTS OUR QUESTIONINGS

TEXT is the result and cognition of human behavior, it is not just the text and the language itself, but the actions the body has given protection to accept our environment of people in nature. To collect the definition of human unconscious reaction or personal habits even the trace from first intuition.

Levan Jishkariani

TEXTURES,

Behaviour

STORIES

Put it at the Side, 2020 Brooch Eggshell, stainless steel, aluminium, phosphor 5,5 x 3 x 25 cm Weight: 82 g

OUR

Jean Lin

TO

Menschenhaken I (Human Hook I), 2021 Brooch Aquamarine, wood 10,6 x 19,3 x 3,4 cm Weight: 77 g

Which social rules have shaped me, which ones have I adapted to? What changes us?... The transformation of thought manifests into the material. The hardness, the functions, the connections, surfaces of matter, inner and outer, soft and hard, meeting points on human bodies.

THE

Oles Tsura

FEEL

LISTEN

ANGLING. I consider my jewellery like a lure that tricks and seduces, similar to when a fish encounters the bait. The notion of curiosity inspired me... Human behaviour to be tempted and play with “hook up” tools. Each of my pieces reflects on these metaphors.

No matter if the stories are true or fictive, jewellery bears witness to many aspects that allow us to understand the links that unite characters... Sometimes stories even make us fall into a fantastic universe, where a piece of jewellery can carry a curse or contain magic powers.

OF

Vendula Fabiánová Dark Time Exit, 2020 Brooch Ebony wood, silver, stainless steel 13 x 4 x 4,8 cm Weight: 85,9 g

Alejandra Campos Taylor

The perception of space is supported in particular by the ability of implicit perception, this involves our subconscious and allows us to recognize things that are not yet perceptible with the senses.

Jasmin Schlesiger

Inga Tomilina

Erika Jordán

Even if denial is a our spirit to carry times, still.. when playing hide & seek

Pixel Portrait, 2020 Brooch Agate, resin, silver, steel 9,3 x 0,4 x 13 cm Weight: 60 g

/ ENTERTHEXIT

WWW.ENTERTHEEXIT.ART

safety belt, allowing on throughout terrible is it time to stop with the loss?

26.03.2021

Loss, 2021 Necklace Steel 30 x 33 x 6 cm Weight: 447 g

Where one can see simple dots others can see an insect, a landscape, or a face... Faces play an important role in my work as well as in our lives.

ONLINE EXHIBITION

Raum_Relevanz III, 2021 Brooch Lime wood, brass, pigment, stainless steel 10 x 14 x 5 cm Weight: 22 g

//

Brutal, 2020 Ring Silver 950 4,3 x 4 x 5,8 cm Weight: 55,1 g

SOULS

Jewellery draws a very intimate relationship between humans and objects. Machines, industry, inhospitable architecture can be soulless, a world so foreign to our warm bodies... Both so necessary for our contemporary lives and so simultaneously rejected. I believe I share new types of pleasure, in small details and unexpected places.

OUR

I am exploring the synergy between body and object. My pieces were made to be touched and experienced in connection with the body, entities in a dialog of tactility and feeling.


Ute Eitzenhöfer

subtext

With the collection presented here, Ute Eitzenhöfer has opened up a new stage in her oeuvre, which at first glance ties in with the political and artistic issues of her previous works: The 29 brooches and necklaces, divided into three groups of works, reflect current and relevant social phenomena. At the same time, they also question the social function of jewellery beyond its significance as a personal object of an individual. In their stylistically decisive manner, the new works display a formal rigour hitherto unknown in Eitzenhöfer‘s work, which is already evident in the concentration on a handful of materials, almost exclusively of black colouring. This artistic strategy of stylistic evolution seeks lasting fulfilment and „eternity“ alongside and beyond all reference to the current issues of the day - no matter how crisis-ridden and future-relevant they may be. At issue is more than „merely“ the declamation of a political position against the exploitation of nature by man. Nor is it about ostentatious consumption or even the display of a „doomsday mood“ that quickly treats itself to a double sip from the champagne bottle - according to fashionable convenience dressed in black. Finally, it would be misleading to assume that Eitzenhöfer‘s turn to the colour black is based on the motto „Black is always possible!“ - an often-used, usually opportunistic recourse to the long-standing trend colour for „timeless elegance“. Coco Chanel had helped this colour achieve a breakthrough with the invention of the „little black dress“ in 1926. So the artist rather positions herself with Marcel Proust: already in 1913, „avant la lettre“, he foresaw the ambiguity of this elegance in the robe of Dame Odette: „In black as always, because she was of the opinion that black was always right and always most distinguished, she had a very reddened face, as she always got after dinner“. Black thus does not simply bring other colours to the attention, but also brings „truths“ to light. It is precisely this timeless ambiguity, indeed seemingly impenetrable indifference of black, which in many cosmologies denote the primordial state from which light emerges as the precondition of the world. Black thus denotes not only the primordial ground of the cosmos, but also, for example, in Egypt as in the ancient Near Eastern cultures, the fertile black earth of the floodplain and is therefore the colour of the generational goddesses there. According to Judeo-Christian belief, darkness inspired God to create everything. It is precisely this state before all time and space, feared by the ancient Greeks as „chaos“. The status „before every thing“, the visible and thus the recognisable, which closes itself off to all sensual access; which as darkness both frightens people and stimulates their imagination and the creation of myth. Since antiquity, black has been associated with the chthonic powers of darkness and thus the colour of death and horror.


Darkness exists, even if not as a phenomenon of Newtonian optics. Black – as a representative of darkness as a state that cannot be experienced – opens up a field with an infinite potential for subjective speculation. Black thus becomes the hue of the fictive. If, however, the fictive in the version of the „fake“ and the black-painting conspiracy theories is currently rightly seen as the political challenge of the Internet age, we should be warned against demonising fiction or daydreaming imagination: the fictive not only forms the core of utopian designs, but also the core of all art. Eitzenhöfer‘s current work refers to a self-reflexive artistic process on the social relevance of art beyond the day. Divided into three groups of works, which in their interrelatedness exhibit the unity of a cycle, the new works are to be understood as the prologue to a qualitatively new period of Eitzenhöfer‘s creative work. It is closed as a cycle without being completed - as can be seen from the three-stage sequence of the development of the groups of works. The first group of works entitled „Talk“ comprises twenty brooches, all made of blackened silver and onyx, and thematises the spread of monological declamation. The second group of five works, three brooches and two necklaces, is titled „Discourse“. The works, made of blackened silver and agate discs, discuss and visualise man‘s relationship to the invisible or the intangible and thus present the discursive strategy of artistic research work. In the theatre of imagination that Ute Eitzenhöfer has opened in third group “Circle”, ostensibly one person only plays the role of performer and viewer. Due to the work’s immanent “stage direction”, the familiar effect of the viewer’s hermetic self-reflection in the form of a projection of his or her own psychological processes hardly gets off the ground, since the indifference of the black and the formal framing offer no points of reference where fantastic digressions could take hold. It is precisely the recourse to the original state of darkness and the colour black representing it that leads to the sources of creation, namely to the origin of art. Wilhelm Lindemann (Excerpt from the catalogue “subtext” 2021)

subtext at galery MARZEE 31 january – 31 march 2021 www.marzee.nl subtext catalogue available at www.arnoldsche.com

photography © brooches: Michael Müller, necklace: Jekaterina Smirnova, backgrounds: public domain lay- out: T heo Smeets | © all rights reser ved by Ute Eitzenhöfer, 2021 | w w w. uteeitzenhoefer.de


With many thanks to Maaike Groeneveld for the interior photography and all the lovely friends inside their own bubble taking selfies for us.

So a p 1, 2 Pe n 02 d 1 Pol ant yam 2 i 0 d 21 e , la cqu er

S o a p Pen 2, 2 02 d 1 Alu ant mi de 20 21 Wi th Pen Seve nF d i Pol ant n ge r y s, 2 20 amid 02 2 e 1 1 , lac qu er

Stay Sane.

Not All dressed up. Shapes. 7 Fingers. Doing best.

Go Nowhere.

Locking down. In

Domestic Solace.

Jeannette Jansen, 2020/21 @themanyfold

From Home

Blue Grid Diamond, 2020/21 Brooch Rocaille beads, textile, silver, remanium Pink Grid Diamond, 2020/21 Brooch Glass beads, textile, silver, remanium Comfy Line, 2020 Brooch Silver purl thread, textile, silver, remanium Doodle, 2020 Brooch Purl thread, textile, silver, remanium

Gésine Hackenberg, 2020/21 @gesinehackenberg

Amusement slowly breeds a new collection.

domestic life, signs and patterns that give structure. The comfort of pillows and carpets. History surprises me with similarities to Cannetille jewellery from the past.

I amuse myself with needle work of beads and metal threads borrowed from gold embroidery. It allows me to stay close to my favourite materials and the microcosmos of a jeweller. These time-consuming techniques are comforting, they suit the situation. What comes to my mind are images of my everyday

beloved studio life. Private and working areas intermingle at the dining table.

universe of home. I find myself juggling between home-schooling and my own world of thoughts, pulled away from

It’s been a year of radical retreat in private spheres. The outside reality only seeps in through the digital port. As almost all external deadlines are cancelled, life slows down and centres around the intimate

Slowdown

feels. ‘From Home’ is a snapshot, reflecting on domestic yet unfamiliar sensations.

Translating ideas into refined shapes takes time just like finding the right words for how one

Working from home has many faces. The Lockdown came with a mandatory slowdown.

dealing with … ourselves.

In times of uncertainties and social life reduced to the bare minimum we found ourselves

Another collaboration of Gésine Hackenberg and Jeannette Jansen

Moving Things #3

Washing Hands.


* Photocredits: Maaike Groeneveld / www.maaikegroeneveld.nl

*

Gesine berg

Hacken

Jeannette Jansen

* *


Hi! We are Astonish, an international collective at the moment consisting of five female makers. We met in the misty and magical valley of Idar-Oberstein. Since its foundation Astonish has been a platform for artists from different backgrounds – from around ten different countries – but with the same language: jewelry.

Sharareh is wearing the Plagate, an earring set made out of plagate (plastic agate), silver and colored pearls from Stephie.

Stephie is wearing No Title earrings made out of shell, silver and epoxy resin from Gina.

Since this year our exhibition “Phases/Faces” at the IHM was cancelled we decided to go for a virtual exchange of our pieces and let them travel between Idar-Oberstein, Kempten and Vienna…

…and now your home, where ever in the world it might be.

We hope you enjoy the little glimpse into our world, let’s get Astonished!

Gina is wearing the ring Future Feminism made out of painted silver from Adri.

What is driving us to expose and spread our ideas about jewelry and adornment is our passion for making. To make is to transform, to evolve, and within the world’s context of this last year, new phases emerged from our engagement with our work. Some members decided to take new directions which allowed new faces to step into the collective to move on to a new phase altogether.

Adri is wearing the necklace Shroud made in silver, zirconia and graphite from Julia.

Julia is wearing the bracelet Conflict made of metal net, synthetic sapphire, cement, and epoxy resin from Sharareh.


Gina Nadine Müller is a German jeweler. After her professional training as a goldsmith in Düsseldorf, she decided to study Gemstone and Jewelry at the Trier University of Applied Sciences in Idar-Oberstein. There, she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in 2019 and is currently enrolled in the Master‘s program.

Stephie Morawetz is a Jeweler from Austria. She graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Modisterei at the Art University Linz in 2010. Furthermore, she successfully completed her Bachelor of Fine Arts studies in 2014 at the Trier University of Applied Sciences, Department of Gemstones and Jewelry in Idar-Oberstein, Germany. From 2015 to 2017 she did her master studies at Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art in Tel Aviv, Israel. Founded in 2016, together with Laura Jack, the non-profit organization NOD – Not Only Decoration. Lives and works in Vienna, Austria.

With my work I am seeking to start a discussion about qualifications of the human body. Categories such as “perfect” and “beautiful”, as well as their opposites might degrade and shame people on the basis of their bodies for how they are: natural, vulnerable, fragile, changing, aging… How boring would it be if everybody looked the same, if every body was matching what is labelled “perfect”, if there were no signs of age, heritage or being alive and living? I aim to raise acceptance and contribute to a definition of “normal” as diversity of any kind and constant change. How do you feel wearing one of my pieces? I invite you to reflect on your own ideals.

In my work I am rethinking the definition of luxury. Luxury has a close relationship to rareness and material. Since the beginning of humankind, we have considered materials like diamonds, gold or pearls as luxury goods. We treat them as items of preciousness because of their difficult accessibility and their inessentiality for life. But our world and our society are changing, because of reasons like global warming, pollution, globalization or careless use of resources. Luxury, values and preciousness will change because our rules will be different. In my pieces I am creating concepts of luxury from the future, to question our current values.

Adriana Almeida Meza is a Colombian Designer currently living in Idar-Oberstein. In 2010 she graduated as a Product Designer from Universidad de Los Andes in Bogotá. Then in 2011 she started learning goldsmithing techniques in a private jewelry studio. Between 2011 and 2015 she founded two different commercial jewelry brands but her desire to explore jewelry in a deeper context led her to pursue a master’s study in Gemstone and Jewelry Design in Germany founded by a DAAD scholarship and graduating in 2018 from the Hochschule Trier. After graduating she started working as a jewelry designer for a chain manufacturer. I am devoted to raising awareness of gender equality. Using my creativity as a function of the erotic, I make jewelry to praise womanhood. The erotic is feminine essence, power, strength. It is a conscious decision about living fully. Intuitively, I knew the erotic was more transcendental than the sexual connotation usually ascribed to it, and after a thorough research, I came to connect beauty and the erotic as an empowering expression of healing after trauma. Adding on, it is from the psyche of the erotic that I intend to start a conversation with a predominantly patriarchal society to provoke change.

Julia Obermaier is a Jeweler from Germany. After finishing her professional education as a goldsmith in 2012 in Kaufbeuren-Neugablonz, she graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts at the Trier University of Applied Sciences, Departement of Gemstones and Jewelry in Idar-Oberstein, Germany in 2016. In 2019 she successfully finished her Master of Advanced Design studies at University of Applied Sciences in Munich, Germany. Since 2016 she has her own atelier in Kempten, Germany. Gemstones are the force that drives me in my creative work. On the one hand, it is the exploration of the materiality and the approach to the limits and secrets of the stones. On the other hand, it is the semiotic charge, meaning and the use of gemstones - especially of diamonds - in our society. My playing hands are the tools for my ideas and thinking. Through them I feel and touch the surface and the outlines of the material. They are the medium, which connect my inner world with the outer world. They urge the mutual process of touching and grasping, changing my ideas and my perception.

Sharareh Aghaei was born in Tehran, Iran, lives and works in Idar-Oberstein, Germany. She started her academic education in Art University of Tehran, focused on Art and Handy craft. After her graduation of the BA, she started a personal goldsmith workshop and worked as a freelancer. From March 2013 she started her further education at Hochschule Trier, Edelstein and Schmuck in Idar-Oberstein. In September 2015 she had the opportunity to have an exchange semester in Alchimia Contemporary Jewelry School in Florence, Italy. In July 2017 she finished her MFA at Hochschule Trier, Campus Idar-Oberstein. After the graduation she works as a professional stone carver and sculptor. Weaving as a metaphor of identity and a national heritage from my country has been my greatest source of inspiration. I am twisting and connecting a group of strings together like old memories which lay imbedded within my mind. The individual fragments become a complex whole by intersecting each other. Dusty and rusty layers of concrete bind them together and structure and strengthen the fragile body of the work.