BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON issue #1

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FR EE

PREMIERE ISSUE

Explore

World Heritage

your key to The City . . .

must SEE must DO must EAT must SHOP must STAY



Minister’s Message United Nations Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) as a World Heritage Site. This meant that as a part of Barbados’ rich and unique historical legacy, Bridgetown and its Garrison was placed on the World Heritage List, having been attested as having “Outstanding Universal Value”.

It is an honour to have been asked to provide this message for this visitor’s guide to our historic city and its Garrison. I wish to congratulate Cube Publishing Ltd. on this initiative which seeks to provide visitors with such an important tool to navigate their way through the rich cultural and commercial offerings within this, our first World Heritage Property. It was on June 25, 2011, that “Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison” was inscribed by the

To be acclaimed as having “Outstanding Universal Value”, a site is deemed to have cultural and/or natural significance that is so exceptional that it transcends national boundaries and is therefore of common importance to present and future generations of all humanity. As a consequence, the inscription of Bridgetown and its Garrison as a World Heritage Site demonstrates the importance of its value not only to Barbados, but the rest of the world. The inscription of Bridgetown and its Garrison as a World Heritage Site brings alive the story of Barbados. It speaks to the interchange of human values over time in the cultural arena of this hemisphere; on developments in architecture, monumental arts and town planning. It bears a

unique testimony to a cultural tradition that has shaped our past and informed our present. It tangibly documents the evolution of our demographics, our livelihoods, our institutions and our culture. The journey, however, has not been without its obstacles, neither has the conversation always been conducted in pleasant tones. However, the inscription of Bridgetown and its Garrison celebrates a legacy that has many positive elements. It offers an avenue for healing and dialogue; an opportunity for social cohesion and inclusivity of all Barbadians; and an occasion to recognize all the builders of our nation. More importantly, it resolutely tells the story of what can be achieved when we minimize our differences and work together for the good of our nation. It suggests that unity gives us the strength as a nation to face of adversity and the confidence to overcome it. I have no doubt that this visitor’s guide will contribute to understanding the importance of our World Heritage Property to the heritage of all mankind.

The Honourable Stephen Lashley, Minister of Culture, Sports and Youth

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Hermina Charlery, Denyce Blackman, Damien Pinder, Mikul Elcock

Publisher Cube Publishing Ltd. Editor in Chief Hermina Charlery

Contributing Writers Professor Pedro L. V. Welch, William Gollop

Advertising Sales Hermina Charlery (246) 250-0826 advertise@cubepublishingltd.com

Photography Amery Butcher, Barbados Museum & Historical Society (BHMS), Barbara Sercher Greenidge, Raymond Maughan, Rasheed Boodhoo,

Design and Layout Jason Waithe Editorial Amanda Haynes,

Damien Pinder, Jaryd Niles-Morris, Hermina Charlery, William Cummins, Roslyn Russell, Cover Jaryd Niles-Morris (Photographer) Intern Amanda Haynes Map Lands and Surveys Dept. (Cartography) Jason Waithe (Design & Illustration) Amery Butcher (Cover Photo)

For daily Bridgetown and its Garrison intelligence: attractions, listings, exclusive deals, fun things to do and more . . . www.facebook.com/BridgetownGuide follow on twitter.com/BridgetownGuide www.pinterest.com/BridgetownGuide Let Us Serve You Better! We would love to hear about your experiences with this guide and how it may be improved to better serve you. Please send your comments and suggestions to helloeditor@cubepublishingltd.com. Thank you for your input! ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. No part of this publication may be reproduced without express permission in writing from the publisher. Requests for permission may be forwarded to hello@cubepublishingltd.com. Every effort was made to ensure correctness and accuracy of the information in this guide as of press time. However, information is subject to change without notice. We recommend that you call establishments to confirm dates and times or to obtain other current information before you travel. Cube Publishing Ltd, its agents and affiliates assume no responsibility for errors, changes or omissions. Published bi-annually by Cube Publishing Ltd, Barbados, W. I. Printed by Printweb Caribbean, Fontabelle, St. Michael, Barbados, W.I

sponsors & partners

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people

8. A Tribute to: Susannah Ostrehan

10. Changing of the Sentry

places 14. Exploring World Heritage

contents

18. Old Worlds, New City

pleasures 24. Other Heritage 26. A Shot of Heritage at the Mount Gay Visitors Centre 30. A Beach for Every Mood . . . and Occasion

must SEE must DO must EAT must SHOP must STAY

32. Jammin’ to Heaven 34. Discovering Barbados Blue 35. What A Boyceterous Cruise 36. Other Events and Nightlife 38. Food is Good: Authentic Tastes of History 40. Courting Asia 41. Tapas, A South Coast Affair 42. Lobster Alive 43. A Jazz Connection on the Frontage 44. Street Tales 46. Royal Shop 47. City Pleasures, Fine Treasures 51. Shamane’s at Canary Lane 52. Bajan Made 52. Shop for Sunshine 53. Medford Craft World 54. City Sleeps 56. Savannah Beach Hotel . . . Distinctively Different 58. Your Slice of Heaven

CITY KEYS (follow on map to find):

O­: Heritage aaaaa: Pleasures ― BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON

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events calendar*

For more up-to-the-minute information, find us on www.facebook.com/BridgetownGuide or twitter.com/BridgetownGuide

Ongoing Events Through October 31* Changing of the Sentry Wed. 11:45 a.m. The Main Guard, The Garrison OM/17, 17. b A Tour of the Garrison Historic Area Wed. 9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. George Washington House, The Garrison O L/17, 17. a Through December 31 BMHS 80TH Anniversary Exhibition Mon. – Sat 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sun. 2 to 6 p.m. BMHS, The Garrison O L/19, 17. f Through December 31 Jolly Roger Daily Tours Mon. – Fri. Carlisle House, Bridgetown E/4, 40

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Through December 31 Thursday Nights Live in The City Thurs. City open to 9 p.m. Through December 31 Mount Gay Rum Visitor Centre Daily Rum Tours Mon. – Fri. Spring Garden Highway, St Michael Through December 31 Scenic Sun. Bus Tours Sun. 2 p.m. Independence Square, Bridgetown F/6, 8

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Through December 31 Harbour Lights Dinner Show & Beach Extravaganza Mon. and Wed. 7 to 10:30 p.m. Bay Street, St Michael I/9, 41

Through December 31 Waterfront Café The Waterfront Quartet Thurs. 6 to 11 p.m. Jazz 3 Fri. 6 to 11 p.m. Panta Brown Sat. 6 to 10:30 p.m Cavans Lane, Bridgetown E/6, 46

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Through December 31 Savannah Hotel Dinner with Henderson Butcher Sat. 12 noon to 3 p.m. A Taste of the Caribbean Sun. 12 noon to 3 p.m. The Garrison O/18, 61

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Through December 31 Lobster Alive Roger Gittens Quartet Tues. 7 to 10 p.m. Lunch with Jazz Sun. 12 noon Bay Street G/7, 45

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october Multiple Dates

October 14,16,18, 20, 22, 24, 26 Cricket: Women’s Twenty20 Tri-Series Kensington Oval, Fontabelle, St. Michael A/1, 43

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October 24 ­to 27 Barbados Fashion Week 7 p.m. Independence Square, Bridgetown F/6, 8

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October 19 BMHS Ole Time Excursion 9:30 a.m to 5 p.m. BMHS, The Garrison O L/19, 17. f

Through December 31 Baxters Road Fish Fry Nightly and Weekends 7 p.m. Baxters Road Fish Fry Village, St Michael B/4

October 26 Landship Splash 11 a.m. Queen’s Park, Bridgetown D/8, 13

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October 26 Swim Festival Carlisle Bay, Bay Street, St. Michael K-J/15

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november Multiple Dates November 1­to 3 Sizzlin’ Sands Beach Volleyball Brandons Beach, Brighton, St Michael November 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 National Independence Festival of Creative Arts (NIFCA) 7 to 10 p.m. Frank Collymore Hall, Bridgetown D/7, 42

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November 2 to 4 CLOBI Cup International Masters Cricket Tournament Kensington Oval, Fontabelle A/1, 43

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November 1 Independence Lighting Ceremony & Bajan Brew 5:30 p.m. National Heroes Square, Bridgetown E/6, 1

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November 2 Rihanna Diamonds World Tour 7 p.m. Kensington Oval, Fontabelle A/1, 43

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November 23 Barbados Food & Wine And Rum Festival Cooking Demonstrations 1 with Anne Burrell 10 to 11 a.m. 2 with Mark McEwan 11:45 a.m. to 12: 45 p.m. 3 with Marcus Samuelsson 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. 4 with Jose Garces 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. Wine Seminars 1 with Josh Wesson 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. 2 with Josh Wesson 2:30 to 3:30 p.m.


Rum Cocktail Seminar with Chester Browne 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Hilton Barbados Resort, Needhams Point, N/14, 60

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Sizzle Street 1 to 8 p.m. Queens Park, Bridgetown D/8, 13

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November 30 Independence Day (National Holiday)

december December 7 The W.C. “Bill” Marshall DFC SCM Memorial 2 Year Old Creole Classic (BTC) Garrison Savannah, Garrison M/18, 17. c

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December 7 Run Barbados (10K & ICBL 3K) 4:30 & 4:35 p.m Bay St Esplanade, Bridgetown J/15

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December 8 Run Barbados (1/2 Marathon, 5K & DIGICEL 4G CEO Challenge) 4:30, 5 & 5:15 p.m. Bay St Esplanade, Bridgetown J/15

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December 14 Diamonds International Race Day (BTC) Garrison Savannah, Garrison M/18, 17. c

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December 22 HIKE Barbados (BNT) 6 a.m. or 3:30 p.m. Brandons Beach, St Michael December 25 Christmas Day (Public Holiday) December 26 Boxing Day (Public Holiday) December 26 Diamonds International & Victor Chandler Race Day (BTC) Garrison Savannah, Garrison M/18, 17. c

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BMHS: Barbados Museum and Historical Society BTC: Barbados Turf Club BNT: Barbados National Trust * Contact The Barbados Garrison Historical Consortium Inc. to confirm dates for November and December FIND MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THESE EVENTS ON: WWW.BARBADOS.ORG / WWW.VISITBARBADOS.ORG


people

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PEOPLE

Susannah Ostrehan A TRIBUTE TO:

The West India flower girl and two mulatto women

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Courtesy the Barbados Museum and Historical Society (BMHS)

By Pedro L. V. Welch, professor, UWI CAVE HILL


There were other contemporaries who hitherto were better known in the historical record: Rachael Pringle, Mary Bella Green, Caroline Lee and Nancy Clarke. All owned considerable property in Bridgetown, the chief port and capital town, and achieved some notoriety as owners of hotels and taverns. However, Susannah matched them all. Susannah was emancipated from slavery in the 1770s, but there is simply no record of her appearance in pre-emancipation Barbadian society until 1779. She appears rather suddenly as a landowner, owning a small property in back Church Street, valued at about £400 (BDS$1213). There is a slight possibility that she might have been the enslaved labourer on a property owned by Thomas

Ostrehan who owned property described as being in Crown Alley “on a street leading to Susannah in nearby Church Street. Ostrehan’s hotel”. Just five years later, in 1783, the levy (tax) books for St. Michael In addition to the hotel, Susannah parish list her as then owning also owned two chaises; “a other properties in George Street chaise, sometimes called chay and in Reed Street. Clearly, she or shay, is a light two or fourhad the business acumen to wheeled travelling or pleasure enlarge her property holdings in carriage, with a folding hood a society and economy in which or calash top for one or two women were second-class, if not people”. This reveals another third-class citizens, furthermore possible entrepreneurial activity in which free black and mulatto of this enterprising woman. She women faced the dual disabilities might well have been involved in of being non-white and being a pioneering “taxi” service. female. They were, thus, forced into activities that were largely We now know that some free shunned by white males and coloureds were owners of brothels and that some hotels were fronts females. for brothels. While we cannot In an inventory of her property say with certainty that she was that was done in 1809, her involved in such activity, we must holdings had increased to include acknowledge the possibility, while a house in Cumberland Street, refraining from imposing the valued at £1750 (BDS$5307) morality of a post-emancipation and another house valued at society on the realities of the pre£1100 (BDS$3336) which was emancipation era. located in Cheapside, where the elite had their town houses. The Perhaps such an acknowledgement confirmation of her occupation might be tempered by the turned up in a chance encounter fact that she was involved in a with a deed of conveyance, number of transactions that led detailing the sale of land from a to the manumission of slaves. Matthew King of Guadeloupe in For example, in 1801 a white 1816 to another free coloured merchant, Lawrence Mudie, sold a woman, Mary Nicchols. The “coloured” slave named Mary Ann parcel of land which was valued to Susannah. Shortly after, we read at £1000 (BDS$3033) was in a deed the following:

I, the undersigned Susannah Ostrehan, do hereby acknowledge that the sum of one hundred and fifty pounds mentioned in the within deed . . . or bill of slave to be paid by me for the purchase of the . . . mulatto woman named Mary Ann, thereby conveyed to me by Lawrence Mudie was the proper money of the said mulatto woman named Mary Ann and that no part was my money. And I do, hereby, acknowledge that I have no claim, or demand, whatsoever over the said mulatto woman named Mary Ann as a slave. Clearly, the very language of the deed suggests that this was a clever manipulation of the legal and financial codes of the time to effect the freedom of Mary Ann. In another deed of 1814, Sussanah was involved in the sale of a female slave to a merchant called Thomas Best. Later that year, Best issued and affidavit in London in which it was declared that he:

“ . . . forever discharge[d] from all manner of slavery and servitude my mulatto female slave named Polly, which slave is now resident in Barbados with Susannah Ostrehan”. Sussanah was involved in at least six other such arrangements. We applaud this towering symbol of proactive strength. ― BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON

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ccasionally, out of the murky past of the period of enslavement in Barbados and the rest of the Caribbean, an individual emerges whose presence in the historical record is striking. Such is the case of Susannah Ostrehan, a woman once enslaved herself, but with such spirit that she defies the odds, managing to place her signature on the struggle against oppression.


The Barbados Legion of retired soldiers re-enacting the Changing of the Sentry

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Amery Butcher

PEOPLE

PEOPLE

Changing Of The


Back when Barbados was the “gem” of the British colony, the Changing of the Sentry at the Main Guard — ­­ the internal security headquarters of Historic Bridgetown’s Garrison military complex — was an everyday routine. In the late 1700s the area served as a British military site for British troops in Barbados. Today, it is the Barbados Legion’s salute to the free and enslaved African peoples whose blood was shed alongside British soldiers’ in defence of the Britain’s Colonial Empire. For 15 minutes, visitors watch these retired members of military units exude the swagger of the West India Regiment. This battalion was the first British regiment of black soldiers, who provided 132 years of service under the British crown. Throughout the display, the expertise of the veterans is resplendent; shoulders erect,

hands and feet in sync, arms handled steady, proud. Shiny black boots march behind the Commander to three drum solos beneath brilliant white spats. Black pants with one gold stripe lead to a crisp white jacket and bright orange waistcoat. Twirling, yellow battle stripes run along the edge of its front clasps. A stiff red hat with white trim and a yellow tuft adorns each sentry’s head. This is the Zouave uniform Queen Victoria fell in love with. The drum corps re-enters; not a wink at the clapping and cheers of locals and visitors is allowed. Led by the drum major, hands perform an intricate stick display of acrobatic, beating rhythmic patterns. Similar to the sounds of the busking Banja Man, the Tuk Band and Barbados Landship, the display resurrects the unique folklore of Bajan popular culture. For knowing eyes, the stick display is also a stark reminder of the “deep, complicated, hurtful and profound history” the Garrison holds for all Barbadians. When two new sentries replace

Michael Stuart, Chairman of the Barbados Legion

Paul and Jillian Russell, Visitors from Portsmouth, U.K.

“We perform because we wanted to be in the uniform and doing something military again. The Barbados Defence Force couldn’t provide the {manpower] . . . . The legion consented to providing the manpower as long as we were assisted, that’s how it came about . . .”

“We thought it was absolutely brilliant; as military people ourselves, we were very impressed with the high standard of discipline and correct form for dress that’s on display here!”

the previous guards of the Main Guard, the stick display is memory. A declaration of the change of sentry and his orders on guard closes the show. Everyone is now welcome to take photos with the armed sentries, keepsakes to share the experience of a brief throwback to Barbados’ colonial barracks. By now, local and foreign spectators are all curious, questioning the sentries and expert hosts from the Barbados Garrison Historical Consortium: Mr. James Blades and Mr. Peter Stevens. And there’s a lot of laughing too — after the sentries become civilians again, the fun-loving vibe of the Barbados Legion of retired soldiers creates a lively, relaxed atmosphere. With the steelpan, DJ Mexican, and Bajan foods and drinks, the clocktower becomes home to a familyfriendly afternoon lime. The Changing of the Guard at the Garrison is a fun tribute to Bridgetown’s military community — and a powerful symbol of Europe’s game of thrones. Peter Stevens, Vice-President, The Barbados Garrison Historical Consortium Inc. “It’s the first of its kind at the Garrison in over a century . . .”

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t’s a bit like the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace but a lot less stiff and a lot more colourful.


places

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PLACES

Exploring World Bridgetown goes beyond Barbados. This port city’s charming town squares and stoic religious buildings share bittersweet glimpses of times past . . . Ready to explore? Grab your B&G Walking Map and go!

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Trafalgar Square

It was called Trafalgar Square, and was inaugurated in 1785. It was designed to frame the spouting dolphin in the Trafalgar Square Fountain. The now controversial bronze statue of pro-slavery British naval hero Lord Admiral Nelson stood in its centre. Unveiled in 1813, the bronze statue is famous for being erected over 25 years before its doppelganger in London’s Trafalgar Square.

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Barbara Secher Greenidge

Courtesy the BMHS

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PLACES

NATIONAL HEROES SQUARE

Lord Admiral Nelson statue, Independence Square

Home to many political processions and events, it is also a great place to relax in the shade, grab a sno-cone or a taxi on any weekday in town. The square was renamed National Heroes Square in 1999 to honour Barbados’ 10 national heroes. The Nelson statue is now to the northern end of the square, with the War Memorial (World War I, 1914-1918) in its centre. E/6, 1

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James Street Methodist c. 1900

Today, the church still standing tall

When Methodists arrived in Barbados in 1789, they were met with great hostility and viewed as anti-slavery antagonists by the plantocracy. In 1823 rioters destroyed the chapel and the Methodist Ministry. In 1848 the James Street Methodist Church was rebuilt.

Roslyn Russell

Courtesy the BMHS

JAMES STREET METHODIST CHURCH

Its bulls-eye window and Venetian-style portico make this classical place of worship a standout in Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison. National hero the Rt. Excellent Sarah Ann Gill, heroine of Methodism and freedom of religion, is buried in its graveyard. C/5, 2

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Roadside markets at Jubilee Gardens

The refurbished gardens

Across from The Old Town Hall, these gardens were created in 1887 to celebrate Queen Victoria’s Golden Jubilee of 1886. The area was also the hot spot for market activities of the enslaved urban community of the colonial era.

Rasheed Boodhoo

Courtesy the BMHS

JUBILEE GARDENS

Today, its gardens, fountain and seating create a relaxing oasis in the so-called “birthplace” of Bridgetown. Have you spotted the glass case yet? It shows a bit of the original cobblestone roadway laid by English settlers in the 1700s. D/3, 3

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Courtesy the BMHS

THEN

Rebuilt in 1899 on the original site

Named after Ireland’s patron saint St. Patrick, the building is testament to the evolution of a former religious minority in Bridgetown. Unlike the Quaker society, for example, the Roman Catholic Church managed to maintain a permanent place in the town. The 1848 structure was destroyed by fire in 1897 and rebuilt by 1899.

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19th century architectural style

Barbara Secher Greenidge

PLACES

ST. PATRICK’S ROMAN CATHOLIC CATHEDRAL

The building is an example of Barbadian Gothic architecture. Its combination of local coral limestone walls and the use of red Aberdeen granite in the interior is a flawless fusion. St. Patrick’s is another example of Barbados’ contribution to the popular medieval themes of 17th and 18th century architectural styles. H/9, 4

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Jewish Synagogue: formerly the centre for rabbinical scholarship in the 1600s

Inside the synagogue

In the time of the Holocaust, a community of Sephardic Jews fled to Barbados in order to escape persecution in north-eastern Brazil. By 1654, Kahal Kadosh Nidhe Israel was established and became the centre for rabbinical scholarship in this hemisphere. These groups also brought valuable knowledge and technology that propelled the sugar cane industry in Barbados. After the 1831 hurricane, the Jewish Synagogue (1833) was rebuilt on the foundations of the 1654 synagogue.

Amery Butcher

Courtesy the BMHS

THE NIDHE ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE AND MUSEUM

It is one of the more famous UNESCO protected properties in Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison. As one of the two oldest synagogues in the Americas, it is sacred in both the spiritual and cultural sense. Additions include its interactive museum and tour, led by Mr. Celso Brewster, which takes you on the journey of Barbados’ place in the history of Judaism. The site is also home to a 17th century mikvah, the oldest complete ritual bath in the Western Hemisphere. C/6, 5

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The magnificent Interior of St. Michael’s Cathedral

The grand interior today

Established by Sir William Tufton in 1629, it is the first Anglican Church in the parish of St. Michael. St. Michael’s Cathedral (1786) replaced the earlier parish church from 1665, after it was destroyed in the 1780 hurricane. Its spacious galleries and grand pews give a clue about the rigid class hierarchy of early plantation society. 16

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Barbara Secher Greenidge

Courtesy the BMHS

ST. MICHAEL’S CATHEDRAL

Surviving the notorious Bridgetown fires through the ages, St. Michael’s Cathedral is still standing tall. The placing of a chapel behind the High Altar in 1938 is the most contemporary feature of the building. The church remains an active place of worship and significant example of a grand architectural style. D/7, 6

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The churchyard

St. Mary’s Church is the other Anglican church of historic Bridgetown’s town centre. Built on one of the oldest consecrated grounds in the English Americas, it was a significant political and social site. It was also used as a burial ground for the town’s enslaved and free populations. National Hero the Rt. Excellent Samuel Jackman Prescod (1806-1871), the first non-white member of the House of Assembly, rests in the churchyard.

NOW Barbara Secher Greenidge

Courtesy the BMHS

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ST. MARY’S CHURCH

Front view of the church today

Sited on the old churchyard of the original St. Michael’s Church, St. Mary’s Church is a stunning example of Caribbean Georgian style. Its jalousied south porch and decorated baby-blue and white barrel-vaulted ceiling and elaborate front make it one of the most gorgeous features of contemporary Bridgetown. Its sprawling aged trees look onto Jubilee Gardens and the renovated Old Town Hall across the road. D/3, 7

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The Chamberlain Bridge

The Independence Arch

It’s the same area the Amerindians would’ve first built the bridges that inspired earlier versions of the city name. Back then, it would’ve been a riverbank. Into the 17th and 18th centuries, it became one of the busiest docks in the world. In place of benches would be large vessels leaned on a side, in a flurry of activity. The series of wheels running along the edge of the waterfront would’ve been wound with rope. It’s a reminder of the hard, mostly enslaved/ indentured labour that made Bridgetown, and ports such as Boston, metropolitan hubs of the Atlantic World.

Raymond Maughan

Courtesy the BMHS

INDEPENDENCE SQUARE

From here, notice the third-oldest Parliament Buildings in the Americas immediately ahead. The statue behind you is former Prime Minister the Hon. Errol Walton Barrow. To your left, find vendors galore at the top of the steps. Also see the Independence Arch stretched across Chamberlain Bridge, do you feel inclined to take a stroll along the Boardwalk? To your right is the Charles Duncan O’Neal Bridge, another tribute to a National Hero. Pleasure craft are bobbing in the Careenage. These sights, sounds and memories are pulled together by the mosaic of the national flag in the centre of the square. F/6, 8

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The former location of today’s prestigious Harrison College

The recently refurbished MasonicLodge

Until 1870, it was the original location of Harrison’s Free School, what is today the prestigious Harrison College Institution. Rachael Pringle-Polgreen’s (as on page 9, para. 2), father Lauder owned the property around her birth in 1753.

Barbara Secher Greenidge

Courtesy the BMHS

THE MASONIC LODGE AT SPRY STREET

With its recent facelift, this three-storey brick building with its glass stair tower is proof of the living legacy of Freemasonry in Barbados and the influence of the largest secret society in the Atlantic World. D/7, 9

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Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison is an outstanding example of British colonial architecture consisting of a well-preserved old town built in the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. — UNESCO World Heritage Committee

With its winding streets and busy sidewalks, checking out Bridgetown and its Garrison’s world renowned architecture could be a bit daunting. Use your B&G Walking Map to navigate the following selection of this City’s rare structures.

The Old Town Hall (Vestry) and Gaol

Front View of the Town Gaol and Courthouse

Old World:: It was infamous for being both the place of Assembly and a jail house in the 17th century. One of the only 18th century survivors of the great hurricanes and multiple fires that plagued Bridgetown, it was last used by the Assembly in 1874. Governor John Pope Hennessy closed the common gaol in 1876, due to its inhumane conditions. Its name was changed to “The Law Courts” in 1958, but was commonly referred to as the “Court House”. 18

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The Old Town Hall toda

y, from Jubilee Gard

ens

NEW CITY: An outstanding asset to historic Bridgetown, it is right next to the Jubilee Gardens (see page 15, para. 3) and on the opposite side of the street from St. Mary’s Church (as on page 17, para. 1). In 2003, the building was partially restored, to its former glory, with the original southern and eastern walls preserved. The architectural heritage of the building was maintained. It is now home to several businesses. D/3, 10

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Barbara Secher Greenidge

Courtesy the BMHS

Look for: A grand, Georgian building with a 19th century veranda


PLACES

The Mutual Building

Mutual Life Assurance Building

Old World: The Barbados Mutual Life Assurance Society was the oldest surviving Caribbean insurance company. It was also a symbol of the elitist, prejudiced colonial value system. Established in 1840 after emancipation, it was the meeting place of the ‘Bridgetown Club’, located on the upper floor. The building is said to be the target of the Clement Payne/Golden Square organised labour rebellion in 1937.

The Mutual Building on

Raymond Maughan

Courtesy the BMHS

Look for: Ornate cast-iron work and twin silver domes

Prince Henry Street

NEW CITY: A Victorian structure with three distinct silver domes and a large frieze to the front, this building is an architectural magnificence. The frieze features Britannia being borne by mythic-looking creatures. Now home to business establishments including First Citizens Bank and Western Union, it is also planned to house a new hall for the University of the West Indies Cave Hill Campus. E/6, 16

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The DaCosta Colonnade Building

DaCosta & Co and Colonnade Shop

Old World: Officials cite The DaCosta Colonnade Building as “testimony to the legacy of the relationship between island-based enterprise and regional trade networks in the late 19th century”. It was a sister building to the warehouses lining the western end of the Bridgetown wharf. In 1898, the DaCosta Colonnade was built to store molasses and sugar, to be exported worldwide.

Barbara Secher Greenidge

Courtesy the BMHS

Look for: A classic Victorian commercial building with ornate cast iron decoration and shaded colonnade

The Colonnade Mall on Broad Street

NEW CITY: The limestone structure is another architectural beauty found on Broad Street in historic Bridgetown. Formerly called DaCostas Mall, the new DaCosta Colonnade building is a popular and diverse shopping mall, and one of the Caribbean’s major duty-free outlets. It houses 40-plus shops, and offers shoppers a high standard of merchandise. E/5, 12

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Queen’s Park House/The Bandstand

Band Stand, Queen’s Park

Old World: Queen’s Park was originally known as King’s House during the Georgian era, and then Queen’s House until 1909. It was a residence for the future commanders-in-chief for the region, and two staff quarters for senior officers, called “The Pavilion” and “The Retreat”, were erected. After the withdrawal of British troops in 1905-1911, the Government of Barbados purchased Queen’s House and grounds in 1906. The Retreat was given to Harrison College, whereas the majority of the land was given to the St. Michael Vestry to convert to a public park. The area was opened as Queen’s Park in 1909, and owes its layout to Lady Gilbert Carter.

The gazebo, Queens Park

Barbara Secher Greenidge

Courtesy the BMHS

Look for: A fascinating combination of Colonial, Georgian and West Indian vernacular styles

NEW CITY: More than any other site in The City, the architectural pleasures of Queen’s Park are best discovered by spontaneous exploration. It is truly a national treasure, with expansive manicured grounds, a playground, gazebo, steel shed, a pool and fountain, and one of only two baobab trees on the island! It is the site for numerous cultural events, and the traditional Christmas Morning Service (see Calendar of Events on page 4, Dec. 25). A well-used thoroughfare for pedestrians, fitness enthusiasts and sportsmen, it’s also the perfect location for an al fresco lunch, relaxing with a book/newspaper or just sit and watch the world go by. D/8, 13

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Courtesy of the Barbados Tourism Investment Inc.

Courtesy the BMHS

The Careenage / The Constitution River

Careenage lighters off-loading boats in the Careenag e between current National Heroes Square and Independ ance Square

The projected site plan

Old World: The cultural atmosphere of The City revolved around Bridgetown’s status as a colonial trade and communications hub. Canoes and boats with various wares flowed from the Constitution River, to the bustling Bridgetown Careenage. Ships from all over the colonial world sailed into the Bridgetown Careenage and had their vessels lifted out of the water for repairs and to be cleaned in the exemplary facilities of this dock.

NEW CITY: The Independence Arch, the Chamberlain/Swing Bridge, the Charles Duncan O’Neal Bridge and pleasure craft are key features of the Careenage. Behind the Fairchild Street Bus Terminal and along the River Road Van Stand, the Constitution River is currently undergoing phase two of its refurbishment. By 2014, a beautiful roadside river with small vessels, will be flowing through The City. E/5-7, 14 | E/7-8, 15

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

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PLACES

The Parliament Buildings

The Parliament’s west wing on Trafalgar Street

Old World: Believe it or not, Barbados’ House of Assembly often met at different private houses and taverns. The current Parliament/Public Buildings were built in the early 1870s, in an area formerly known as the New Burnt District. They were erected to provide necessary accommodation for the Houses of Parliament and to centralise the main public offices.

The current Parliament

Amery Butcher

Courtesy the BMHS

Look for: A grand, neo-Gothic building with stories woven into its intricately crafted stained glass windows, cast iron railings and a stately clock-tower on the West Wing

Buildings

NEW CITY: Historic Bridgetown’s Parliament Buildings are home to the second oldest constitution in the Americas — Barbados’ parliamentary Government system dates to 1639. The Barbados Museum of Parliament & National Heroes Gallery is located on its grounds. Its prominent clock tower can be seen from several locations in Bridgetown. E/6, 16

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The Garrison Buildings

Raymond Maughan

Courtesy the BMHS

Look for: Large ballast Garrison brick buildings, Caribbean Georgian architectural style of George Washington House, the Main Guard/Clock Tower (with a Roman arched portico and pediment, octagonal domed tower), the rare artillery collection at the National Armoury, the Barbados Museum (formerly the Military Prison), the A and B Blocks

Savannah Club: The Old Clock Tower/Main Guard

St. Anne’s Fort, Garrison Savan

Old World: It started in 1605, by the 18th century this military complex was enclosed by walls, with the Garrison gate at a point just past the Government Information Service along Bay Street. Until the end of the 1800s, the complex was home to a garrisoning government, groundbreaking navigational/medical discoveries, grand expressions of empire and blatant psychological methods of social control exerted by the British state. This system was the source of a history of parody and contention throughout Barbadian folk culture, including the recent Barbados Landship.

NEW CITY: An increasing number of tours of the area introduce the textured history of “the most intact 18th-19th century British Colonial Garrison in the world”. [See the “Changing of the Sentry” story on page 10 to 11]. The largest green space in Barbados’ capital city, it is home to the Barbados Defence Force and the Barbados Legion of Retired Soldiers. It also boasts the oldest functioning savannah in the Americas. Recreational activities on its grounds range from world-class horse racing events to Easter holiday kite flying. L-N/16-20, 17 a-f

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pleasures

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―


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must SEE

OTHER

HERI TAGE Yes, there’s more. The museums dotting your B&G Walking Map offer unique takes on world heritage.

Learn about the legacy of Bridgetown’s Sephardic Jews at the Nidhe Israel Museum on Synagogue Lane. Visit the Cricket Legends of Barbados Museum near the Kensington Oval for a sportsman’s view. Discover Lance Bannister’s eclectic Outdoor Museum in Perry Gap for the link between medicine, art, drama and history. The architecture and history of the Barbados Museum of Parliament & National Heroes Gallery is also astounding. And, in the Garrison area, the Barbados Museum and Historical Society offers informed tales of old. Walking tours are also part of the heritage mix. Jolly Roger’s Walking Tour is one of the many interactive, historic tours of Bridgetown’s sights, sounds and memories. For now, we’re pulling the curtain on a few more sites all of the above may mention. Enjoy with eyes wide open!

The Old Screw Dock

The Old Screw Dock was built in 1887, the Screw Lifting mechanism was completed in 1893, the only Victorian screw lifting mechanism of its kind known to exist in the world. OF/5, 18

The Old Screw Dock today

The Warehouses, featuring Marshall Hall and The Old Spirit Bond Look for: Marshall Hall — a large Caribbean Georgian structure. Marshall’s Hall was built in 1861 and housed Marshall’s engineering workshop on the ground floor, and a popular entertainment hall on the upper floor. The Illustrated London News claimed it was “probably the largest room in the West Indies”.

Rasheed Boodhoo

The Old Spirit Bond — a large 18th century ballast brick construction overlooking the wharf.

The fully restored Old Spirit Bond now serving as a mall

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

Dating from the 18th century, The Old Spirit Bond was an old rum warehouse, convenient for boats docking along the wharf. OE/5, 19

Barbara Sercher Greenidge

Look for: A series of tall screws; think of a mechanism the Titanic could’ve rested on.


must SEE

The Houses, featuring the Chattel House and Norma Villa at River Road Look For: The Chattel House – a wooden house, built in the Caribbean Georgian style on an elevated foundation of coral blocks or sawn stone.

Norma Villa at River Road – an open gallery with turned wooden posts, elegantly carved wooden tracery under the eaves, and the “Barbadian parapet” separating the gallery roof from the gable behind. Town houses/villas developed due to the merchant-elite and rural plantation owners drawn to the centrality of town in the late 19th century.

A Chattel house with personalised decorative features

The Montefiore Monument

Raymond Maughan

Look for: A public monument of the late Victorian period, with a marble allegorical figure on each side, representing Fortitude, Temperance, Patience and Justice. It was given to the city by John Montefiore, businessman of Swan Street, in memory of his father. It was inaugurated on Monday, Nov. 2, 1864. OC/5, 20 The fountain in its present location on Coleridge Street

The Nicholls Building Look for: Dutch-influenced curvilinear gables, stone quoined brickwork, rare storage door on the fourth level. One of the oldest buildings in Bridgetown, it features images of Bridgetown that date as far back as Samuel Copen’s 1695 painting “A Prospect of Bridgetown, Barbados”. OD/5, 21

The oldest building in Bridgetown ― BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON

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Barbara Secher Greenidge

The chattel, or “movable”, house was the brainchild of the Barbadian labourer in the Post-Emancipation period.


must SEE

A Shot of

Heritage

At The Mount Gay Visitor Centre

There’s always a time and a place for rum in Barbados, but none quite like The Mount Gay Visitor Centre. Sheltered by palm trees on the outskirts of Bridgetown and its Garrison, this mecca is home to the illustrious legacy of the world’s oldest rum – Barbados’ Mount Gay. Here, the journey begins at the legendary birth of Mount Gay Rum in 1703.

Cap, Master Blender, Regattas, Mixologist, Bajan Cocktail, Rum Shop and Double Distillation become icons. The byproduct of Barbados’ sugar industry, molasses, and the pure coralfiltered water of the island play an integral role in the production of this fine spirit. The luxurious aromas found in every bottle of Mount Gay Rum reveal sacred secrets of the art of blending.

The tour guides are your rum connoisseurs, guiding you through the fascinating culture, art and craft of blending spirits. Terms such as Old Cask Selection, The Red

Along the way, the popular tasting session shares the cadence of today’s brands of Mount Gay Rum. In theory and practice, the Mount Gay Visitor Centre is a

discreet wonder of the world. After the journey, it’s up to you to peruse the Visitor Centre’s Rum Bar and Lounge, gaze at the coast while enjoying traditional Bajan cuisine paired with a Mount Gay cocktail crafted by our resident mixologist or simply treat yourself to a selection of local keepsakes at The Mount Gay Tour Gift Shop. With three tours to choose from — the family friendly Signature Rum Tour, the interactive Cocktail Tour or the Bajan Buffet Lunch Tour ­— anyone may indulge in the home of Mount Gay.

The Signature Tour

Day: Mon to Fri 9:30 A.M.-3:30 P.M. Sat (Seasonal) 10:30 A.M.-2:30 P.M. Feature: Tours every hour on the half hour. Children under 12 free. Cover: US$10

The Bajan Buffet Tour

Day: Tues and Thurs at 12:00 NOON. Feature: Traditional Bajan Lunch Buffet. Transportation Included. Children under 12 half-price. Cover: US$62

The Cocktail Tour

Day: Wed 2:00 P.M. Feature: Interactive Mount Gay Cocktail Session. Transportation Included. Adults only. Cover: US$50

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Raymond Maughan

must DO

A Beach for Every Mood… and Occasion

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Brandons, Spring Garden BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ― ―


At almost all of these beaches, there are beach chairs and umbrellas available to rent, perfect waters for swimming or snorkelling, lifeguards and shops within walking distance or on-site vendors. Jet-ski operators are also usually near.

Brandons and Brightons Beach

These white sand beauties line the popular Spring Garden Highway, a length of road with a venerable connection to Barbados’ Crop Over festivities. They are perfect for cruise ship passengers, who arrive just a short distance away at the Bridgetown Port. They are especially popular among locals on weekends. Find on: Spring Garden Highway, just minutes’ walk from the Bridgetown Port.

Adventure/Boatyard Pebbles Beach Children would enjoy Pebbles beach, Beach This beach is ideal for family fun and great for children because of its full indoor amenities along with its outdoor water-sports activities, available for a fee. During the day, there’s a seaside restaurant, the Boatyard, complete with shower and a pool table as well as an ocean trampoline, iceberg climb and rope swing. H/7

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Brownes Beach

Many scuba-divers and snorkellers indulge in the translucent waters found here, which are usually meek with no undertow. It is not a very private beach and becomes even more animated in the evening as joggers and sports groups practise on the beach. However, this beach is quite long and perfect for a stroll, featuring a number of seaside restaurants. For the more adventurous diver, historic Carlisle Bay is the king of underwater exhibition, offering not only shipwrecks – some from almost a century ago – but also rare underwater fauna. I-J/8,15

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which is part of Needham’s Point in Carlisle Bay. It accommodates a play area and spots for picnics, with a beach bar for the adults. There is also the possibility of an exciting sighting of a hawksbill turtle! There are also tasty Bajan “fish-cutters” for sale a few strides from the beach. L-M/15

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Drill Hall Beach

South-Coast surfers, boogieboarders and some windsurfers favour Drill Hall Beach, also in the Carlisle Bay area. This beach has neither beach facilities nor rentals, and its rocky seabed and intermittent undertow don’t make it ideal for children or swimming. Still, it proves to be a good picnic spot because of its wide, sheltering trees. O/15

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Visitors are encouraged not to touch any trees with red bands or warning signs, as they may be poisonous. As for our beautiful coral reefs which protect our coastlines from erosion, they are considered endangered, and swimmers or snorkellers are also warned against breaking pieces of the reefs for souvenirs.

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must DO

H

istoric Bridgetown and its Garrison and surrounding areas boast several beautiful beaches to explore at leisure – each with a different charm, but all with an island enchantment that has brought them international attention.


must DO

Jammin’ to Heav en

A Jammin’ voyage redefines excitement. To put it simply, heaven is yours aboard Jammin’ Catamaran Cruises. Enjoy dramatic coastal vistas by day with the daily five-anda-half-hour Sun Blast Cruise. Or, catch the stunning sunset on the three-and-a-half-hour Twilight Cruise, offered on Thursday and Saturday evenings.

The food is delicious . . .

The SunBlast cruise starts with a hearty breakfast filled with Bajan delicacies – try the fishcakes and Jammin’ rum punch for

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tasty Caribbean perfection! Sample the mouthwatering coleslaw, rice, macaroni pie, tasty cupcakes, muffins, and other culinary delights served at the sumptuous lunch or dinner buffet.

conga line of crew and fellow visitors, dancing about the cat to intoxicating Caribbean rhythms. For a more relaxed atmosphere, simply bask in the middle of the pristine Caribbean Sea . . . while the floating barman serves you drinks!

. . . but its Jammin’s exciting range of activities that really brings 63ft of fun to the fore! Must Do: Sip a glass of their A Jammin’ cruise offers many styles of adventure. Guests may snorkel with the turtles, feed them, be amazed by mysterious underwater shipwrecks and more. After revelling in our crystal waters, join the dancing

BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

signature Jammin’ Punch atop a floating mattress, a few hundred metres from the coast of Barbados. F/5, 36

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BTI Carpark, Cavans Lane 422-1152 www.jammincats.com


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must DO

Discovering Barbados Blue Have you ever traded secrets with a sea turtle over a meal? Or visited the haunted decks of a sunken Canadian Steam Merchant?

the boat, you’ll see shoals of fish eagerly darting around in a submarine city. Soon, you’ll be able to swim with the family of sea turtles that will arrive.

If you haven’t, your answer is Barbados Blue. Located on the pristine Carlisle Bay coastline, this water-sports adventure hub is an absolute must visit.

There’s also lots of fun to be had atop the water. From jet skiing to kayaking, a day with Barbados Blue will be one you remember.

If you are up to the challenge, you may disappear under the azure waters of the bay and visit sunken relics. Of course, newbies must first earn their stripes in a short pool session guided by the skilled dive shop instructors; safety first! Another amazing adventure is being ferried to the marine park. Here, the snorkel guide will assign you your gear and give a brief family history on the resident aquatic denizens. Disembarking 34

BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

PADI Courses Offered: Scuba Diver Open Water Diver Rescue Diver Divemaster On staff: 2 marine biologists with over 27 years of combined marine conservation work M/15, 51

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Hilton Hotel Complex, Needham’s Point 434-5764 www.divebarbadosblue.com


must DO

BoWhat a ycet er

ous

Cr

With three family-friendly cruises and the option to book this catamaran to host private functions the Boyceterous package isn’t one beauty of an ancient shipwreck. to pass up. Taking a dramatic dive from the Its snorkelling, morning or evening top deck is another Boyceterous West Coast cruises are great classic, with the crew challenging guests to a friendly competition. options for any fun seeker.

Of course, guests are also welcome to catch their breath. Imagine sailing along the luxurious Gold Coast of Barbados and enjoying a succulent buffet lunch, aboard the West Coast Tropical Morning Cruise or the West Coast At special stops, guests may snorkel Tropical Evening Cruise. with the turtles, have a go on the jet skis, or explore the bittersweet A Boyceterous Cruise is boisterous in all the right ways. Firstly, each cruise provides finger foods, beverages, music — and lots of dancing! The DJ’s sizzling selection of tunes transforms the Boyceterous Catamaran into a floating musical oasis.

uis

Come Enjoy:

e!

Snorkelling Adventure: Swim and take photos with the turtles and visit the shipwrecks at beautiful Carlisle Bay. West Coast Tropical Morning/Evening Cruise: Have a blast partying along the West Coast, viewing shipwrecks at Carlisle Bay and swimming with turtles . . . morning or evening! E/6, 38

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The Careenage, Bridgetown 256-7979 / 429-2228 www.boyceterouscruises.com

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must DO

& Nightlife Nightlife Other Events

R

ihanna’s Diamonds World Tour at Kensington Oval on November 1 will be the climax of Bridgetown’s fall calendar. Before then, The City features a charming mix of liming, arts, sporting and music events.

Championships at The Yacht Club and the Women’s Twenty20 Cricket Tri-Series at The Kensington Oval are other exciting options.

open mic features at most bars and cafés along the coast.

Independence Square at Christmas

A game of cricket at the Kensington oval

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ― ―

Hearty entertainment at the Habour Lights Dinner Show

Jazz at the Waterfront Café

Amery Butcher

Rasheed Boohdoo

William St. James Cummins

Special Events November offers several cultural By Night showcases, events and ceremonies T h r o u g h o u t t h e w e e k , including NIFCA at The Frank Collymore Bridgetown’s subtle nightlife offers Hall, as Barbados celebrates 44 the best in music and relaxation. years of Independence. Christmas By Day Even on Sunday nights, most morning will see families and friends There’s more to Bridgetown restaurants, hotels and beach bars come out in their best garb to enjoy than sun, sea, sand and world along Bay Street, Carlisle Bay and live entertainment provided by heritage. During October, catch its South Coast outskirts are ideal the Royal Barbados Police Force rare exhibitions at art hubs like for a music/bar crawl. Some of Band. Independence Square will Pelican Craft Centre. Saturdays the standouts include: Shakey’s be transformed into a Christmas and Sundays are usually the ideal Bar at the Boatyard, Baxters Road wonderland and makes a perfect spot time to witness a pop-up show Friday Night Fish Fry, the Hilton’s for family fun or a romantic stroll. On in Bridgetown malls such as succulent fish-frys and barbecues, New Years Eve, hotels, restaurants Cave Shepherd or the DaCosta Harbour Lights Dinner Show, jazz and clubs in the historic City and its Colonnade. Renowned sporting nights at Waterfront Café and environs will present several exciting events such as the National Dinghy Lobster Alive and Friday night activities to ring in the New Year.


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Amery Butcher

must EAT

Barbecued pig-tails

Cou-cou and flying fish

authentic ta ofE history Golden-apple juice

Rice and peas, marcaroni pie, fried flying fish and vegetables

Fish cakes

Food Is authentic tastes Good: of history by William Gollop, The Barbados National Trust

arlier this year, I was privileged to visit Charleston, South Carolina, where I experienced that historic BarbadosCarolina connection.

for Gwen Workman’s shop on Nelson Street. All in Bridgetown!

One evening, having been invited out to dine, I was taken to a restaurant simply called — F.I.G. Having an enquiring mind, I promptly asked the waiter serving my table whether there was any significance in the name and what the letters represented. I was simply told Food Is Good . . . and the food was good.

Of the eating places in central Bridgetown, Mustor’s still operates, catering to all strata of society. Visitors and locals alike may enjoy generous servings of traditional Bajan dishes; rice and stew, fried pork chops or chicken, cou cou and salt fish, peas and rice with stew and salt fish cakes. They offer all the best in Bajan cuisine during the day as has been customary from the 60s.

Back home, the same may be said for traditional establishments like Mustor’s on McGregor Street; for Enid’s, Pink Star and Johno’s on Baxters Road, Colucci’s in nearby New Orleans; for the Flying Fish Club at the top of Broad Street and

Between sunset and sunrise Baxters Road and Nelson Street come alive. After midnight, Baxters Road was and still is well known for its fish fried on coal pots in iron frying pans or buck pots filled with hot bubbling oil.

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

Back then, patrons lined the sidewalk with the smoke from the coal pots swirling around their heads, while waiting for their particular delicacy. At Enid’s fried chicken legs, wings and ribs were the order of the day. Eating in back rooms surrounded by men and women of all descriptions with patrons sometimes dancing to the only music available, the jukebox.

Moving on to the other side of town and into Nelson Street, Gwen Workman’s Shop was a must — for the best pork or liver cutter topped off with a “lead pipe” and a cold drink, preferably alcoholic. The atmosphere was eclectic and full of foreign accents; trade of all sorts being conducted. Today, the same delicacies may be found but will cost you just a bit more. The street never slept. The first rays of the sun would


find some diehards stumbling out of the doorways to make their weary way home! Take some time during visit to our historical City and indulge in the authentic tastes of our culture with at least one of these delicacies. Coucou and flying fish: Serving as Barbados’ national dish, the cou cou is made of cornmeal (corn flour) and okras. You’ll sometimes find it served with delicious fried plantains. Find at: Mustors (page 39) E/4, 23 Waterfront Café (page 47) E/6, 46

www.cropover.com

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Fishcakes: Fishcakes are found across the Caribbean but the recipes vary. Barbadians make their fishcakes with saltfish (salted cod), flour, baking powder and various fresh herbs. They may be served with a sauce or eaten between a salt bread, whch is referred to as a bread and two. Find at: Mustors (page 39) E/4, 23 Waterfront Café (page 47) E/6, 46

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astes


must EAT

Courting

Asia

Bayshore Complex proudly plays host to the city’s oasis of sensory seduction – Fusion Restaurant & Lounge. Situated on the ground floor, this Asian fusion restaurant is exquisitely decorated with lush palm clusters and presents an enthralling view of Carlisle Bay. Its opulent décor and oriental flavours are truly a sensual feast. Luxurious drapes adorn the seating in its openair exterior, with warm hues and a gently running waterfall creating a languid atmosphere. Coupled with the Buddha statue and panoramic view of the horizon, outdoor dining is a dramatic visual affair. Inside, seating is comfortably arranged to suit a choice number of diners, loungers and Fusion’s well-stocked bar. Most tantalizing of all, however, is this Restaurant & Lounge’s culinary offerings. Enjoy delicate Asian flavours complemented by drinks chosen to enhance your taste buds. Exotic dishes like Chicken Manchurian, Gyoza, Fusion Satay and an extensive sushi menu bottle the tastes of Japan and Thailand with a selection of Cantonese flavours. Fusion’s menu isn’t a love letter to Asia, it’s a ballad. On the drinks menu is a selection of alcoholic drinks and beverages, including traditional Japanese sake, colourful cocktails, and wistful wines to engage any palette. Escape to Fusion, and experience Barbados’ finest fusion cuisine . . . deliciously wrapped in an Asian state of mind. G/7, 44

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―


Step into Tapas, an intimate restaurant and wine bar overlooking Hastings Boardwalk and the lulling waters of the Caribbean Sea. You’ll be greeted with warm, elegant décor, fast service, and friendly staff.

must EAT

Tapas, a south coast affair irresistible options that are perfect for sharing.

Besides its eclectic selection of zesty tapas, the Tapas menu presents a delectable collection of main dishes, meat and seafood plus an array of This two-storey treasure has a salads and vegetables — something deserved reputation for its first-class for every palate. service and savoury cuisine, thanks in part to owners Alfredo and Franco. The wine list ensures a perfect accompaniment always, with an As head chef, Franco mans the extensive and fairly priced selection kitchen—where he marries refined from all over the world. With 70 Mediterranean aesthetics with feisty blends to pick from, the innovative and Caribbean flavours to create exquisite colourful cocktail menu will attract both dishes, served on quirky dishware — aficionados and virgin drinkers. while Alfredo manages the floor and day-to-day operations, charming Desserts are romantic and smilecustomers with his infectious joie de inducing. All made from scratch vivre. with a Tapas twist, the assortment of choices are finely presented and Guests are welcome to lounge on served in generous portions. the ground floor or indulge in the `a la carte menu and panoramic view of Chic, relaxed, contemporary. Day and the building’s upper level for lunch, night, Alfredo, Chef Franco and their dinner or tapas. A very reasonably lively staff ensure Tapas is a subtle priced menu is stocked with remix of tradition. Q/22, 58

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must EAT

Lobster Alive

A trip into a den of Caribbean spiny lobsters somehow doesn’t seem so bad when you’re jamming with the lively staff at Lobster Alive. Planted on the beautiful Bay Street beach, this restaurant is known for its succulent seafood menu and toe-tapping, sarong-swirling live jazz bands. The live crayfish, scarce within Barbadian shores, are flown via private plane from the Grenadine islands to a wholesale distribution tank inside of the restaurant; a grand attraction ­— and a bit of a tease — for hungry diners. Lunch or dinner patrons reeled into “LOBSTER ALIVE and all that jazz” by its musical pulses can expect an impressive wine list and well-rounded menu, which also caters to vegetarians and nonseafood eaters. In between courses, beach chairs and umbrellas — just a stroll away from the deck — offer a cool view of the beach and its jet-ski and watercraft activities. G/7, 45

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must EAT

A Jazz Connection

Jazz Jazz Jaz Jazz Jazz Jazz Jazz Jaz Jazz Jazz Jazz Jazz Jaz On the Frontage

Nestled dockside in the heart of Bridgetown is one of the Caribbean’s most renowned and respected jazz establishments.

The atmosphere will undoubtedly capture your heart . . . but the exotic Caribbean cuisine is what will please your tummy. There are light bites as well as hearty mains, and exquisite Started in the ‘80s by Sue Walcott desserts, all served in huge portions. — doyenne of the local jazz scene — Waterfront Café offers Buljol, Fish Melts, Cou-cou and an intimate setting of casually- Flying-fish, are all Bajan choices sophisticated dining, with a musical to try. There are safe and familiar menu of Barbados’ top jazz artists. options for the visiting palette too — chicken and milkshakes, Dine al fresco with an unsurpassed and excellent cuts of steak and view of Bridgetown’s Careenage, pork. The menu also includes or step into the interior, where dim sandwiches, coffee, tea, and a lighting and cozy bistro tables are fine selection of wines. reminiscent of an authentic Jazz Café. Talented bar staff mix great cocktails and, depending on what Near the entrance, exposed fruits are in season, you’ll find lush brick walls covered with photos local juices like guava, sour sop, of local and legendary jazz cats tamarind and golden apple. provide the backdrop for the live bands. Caribbean art-for-sale by Guests are invited to enjoy a casual, local artists dot other walls, and affordable lunch Monday to Saturday a colourful mural adorns another. from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Dinner is

served to the smooth sounds of local acts; Thursdays (VSOP Dixieland) and Fridays (Marlo Porchetta) from 8 to 11 p.m., and Saturdays (Bert Panta Brown) from 7:30 to10: 30 p.m.

These expert musicians play a variety of instruments — including bass, piano, trombone and banjo — delivering the superb sounds of classical and creole compositions. Good food, great music and a fantastic ambience make Waterfront Cafe a splendid experience to add to your Bridgetown checklist.

Treat to try: For a thrill, try Sue’s refined bread & butter pudding. It’s made with love, flair and a topsecret ingredient. E/6, 46

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The Careenage, Bridgetown 436-2622 www.waterfrontcafe.com.bb

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Courtesy the BMHS

“You might be walking or driving, looking at all these buildings on each side of me. You might be trying to decide if to follow them to Bridgetown, or up to the Garrison, or if to buy apparel or furniture, dive at Carlisle Bay or have fun at Adventure Beach near the Boatyard. But did you know my father was agricultural land? I wasn’t really born until the early 19th century, when somebody offered my father for housing sales in 1805 — 12 acres of land!” F/6 — ­ M/16­

street tales

Episode 1: Old-time Memories

BAY STREET

The Esplanade on Bay Street in past times

Courtesy the BMHS

must SHOP

What if streets could talk? Before you begin your Bridgetown shopping spree, check out these SoundBits of the roads you’re sure to travel . . .

Old ‘Jew Street’

SWAN STREET

“Can you spot my lovely semi-circle of swans? You might not. After all, I’m the most walked street in the city. I’m of the Montefiore lineage you know- the same one that donated the Monument at Coleridge Street. All the stores you see here used to be homes. In the 17th century, my nickname was “Jew Street”, because I was the key housing and business district of the urban Jewish population. “ D/5

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“My heart gets heavy when I think about it. Right there, where Mannings is on my upper section, was a Cage for “public detention” they called it. In 1688 the colonial government passed an Act that declared it was the spot to place and punish runway slaves . . . not even the sounds of the hucksters, town people, or banjos and singing from brams could drown it out. It was moved to Pierhead in 1818. Thank God it finally get shut down in 1838, right after emancipation.” D/4 — E/5

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Jatyd Niles-Morris

BROAD STREET

Broad Street, Bridgetown

FAIRCHILD STREEtT

“Long before this bus terminal was here, a mysterious death happened in one of the houses in my district. Then the deaths travelled up and across the island — people were dropping like flies. Turns out a strain of Asiatic Cholera hit the city in 1854 . . . the Board of Health had some serious cleaning up to do.” F/6 — F/7

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Fairchild Street Bus Terminal, Bridgetown

“Ships, ships, ships and all the people and things and blood that come with them were in The Careenage. A boardwalk would’ve been a joke then. But my father nearly caved in when all the people living along where I am today, in the 1600s, tried to build walkways leading to their houses — that the ground couldn’t support! I know it’s nostalgic, but I like to reflect on the days of the Amerindians, when my forefathers looked like beaches.” E/4 — E/6

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

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Raymond Maughan

THE WHARF ROAD

The Bridgetown Boardwalk along Wharf Road


Raymond Maughan

must SHOP Amery Butcher

Current Bay Street

Rasheed Boodhoo

The lovely semi-circle of swans

Courtesy the BMHS

Jaryd Niles-Morris

The stores on Broad Street

Wharf Road men loading lighters, Wharfside ― ― BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON

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must SHOP

The Royal Shop Established over 30 years ago, The Royal Shop has built a glittering reputation for its elegant jewellery and superior service. Local and family-owned, they carry an impressive collection of luxury watches and fine jewellery. The only official stockist of Rolex watches on the island, the shop boasts other sought-after brands such as Raymond Weil, Rado, Chopard, Maurice Lacroix, Longines, Movado, Guess, Tissot, Swiss Army, Esquire, Ice, Swatch, Seiko, Casio and Citizen.

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

Their exciting array of jewellery choices offer top-of-the-line collections from Marco Bicego, Chopard, Rebecca and io sĂŹ. Also available are elegant and sophisticated Italian necklaces, other precious and semiprecious stones and pearls.

location at The Cruise Terminal for the cruise ship visitor.

With knowledgeable staff who are happy to let customers browse in peace and are full of helpful suggestions when needed, The Royal Shop experience is a mustdo on a trip to Barbados. Stepping into their flagship store E/5, 48 on the historic Broad Street is an experience in itself. The decor #32 Broad Street, Bridgetown is exquisite and sparkling luxury 431-0296 pieces create a rippling dappled Cruise Terminal, Bridgetown Port glow in the room. For convenience, 431-0296 the jewellers also offer a take out www.theroyalshop-barbados.com

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must SHOP

City Pleasures, FineTreasures

Facets International Jewellers is one of Bridgetown’s premier owner-run jewellery boutiques. The treasure hub boasts one of the most eclectic collections of fine and fashionable jewellery to be found in Barbados.

Prices Starting at BDS$114 Duty Free

Exclusively At

Gr Flr, Mall 34, Broad Street, Bridgetown Tel: (246) 435-0129

Modish yet wearable art pieces made from a range of materials, including both precious and semi-precious metals, adorn the displays. With everything from classic platinum, gold and diamond rings, to cultured pearls, sea glass and fine silks, Facets’ one-of-a-kind selection is a magnet for the avid collector. Exquisite hand-made pieces are from all over the world; Venetian Murano and the colourful Bulgarian Ghost Galleon and Lalo Treasures lines are priced to make a statement without breaking the bank. Also established as bespoke jewellers, they design and hand-craft exclusive pieces for every occasion. Fine gold, diamonds or white pearls . . . whatever the desire, Facets International Jewellers is a treasure to behold! E/5, 49

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―


must SHOP

at Canary Lane Mall Shamane’s is vintage Coco Chanel mixed with the Marley’s, in a deep bowl of skilled Barbadian artistry . . . Coco Chanel Stepping inside the store, you immediately feel its old-school vintage aesthetic and chic reinvention of costume jewellery. Hunting for buried treasure is a norm, especially upstairs. Even a glimpse through the store window shows an eclectic jewellery selection lining its walls, with finishes ranging from varnish to a potpourri of hand-painted designs. Handcrafted statement pieces arranged to either stand out, or hide behind more everyday jewellery selections. Raw materials are local recyclables, including coconut shells, local woods, beach derived natural glass resins, and fish scales. Yes, there are coffee table bowls made by a lattice of fish-scales. A Shamane’s décor exclusive, these stunning bowls of iridescent pearl, sparkling aqua-blue, deep red and pretty pinks embody the blend of technical skill and organic use of colour characterising artisan Carl’s crafts. The Marley’s The store is also a supplier of chilled-out brands such as Cooyah, and a selection of rootsy clothing and accessories — including beach essentials for ladies and gents. Combined with the roots reggae sounds, select all natural/vegan products and personable staff, the vibe of Shamane’s is definitely irie. And, in the hot sun of Bridgetown, the AC is a plus. Verdict If you’re a designer, stylist, thrift hunter, herbalist or an avid jewellery lover, one trip to Shamane’s in Bridgetown will definitely inspire a few more. E/4, 53

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Shamane Craft & Art, 6 Canary Lane Warehouse, Hincks St., Bridgetown ︱ 426-6730

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must SHOP

Bajan Made

Like Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison, “Bajan Made” products unveil an enticing heritage.

United by the Barbados Manufacturers Association, Barbadian manufacturers, producers and world-class chefs craft luxurious tidbits of Barbadian life for all to enjoy. Their signature rums, wines, and award winning Banks Beer offer a taste of Barbados’ legendary role in the history of blending. Their preserves, chocolates and confectionaries feature the aromas of juicy indigenous fruit and sugar cane. Healthy alternative products, such as cassava flour, are nutritional treasures. ‘Bajan Made’ sampling at the island’s air and sea ports, immediately allows visitors to

indulge in authentic local items. Goods range from hand-crafted clothing, jewellery, pottery and furnishings, to daring foods and beverages. Now available prepackaged, even the experience of Barbados’ national dish, coucou, may be relived at your leisure. Due to classic packaging, smaller purchases are ideal gift items. And if you’re feeling extravagant, BMA producers will arrange those larger shipments back home. Sharing the pleasure of Barbadian manufacturing has never been so simple. D/1, 54 | E/5, 54

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Find in Bridgetown: Cave Shepherd, Broad St. | Pelican Village, Princess Alice Hwy.| BMA, Suite 201, Bldg #8, Habour Indl. Est. | 426-4474 | www.bma.bb

Shop for

Sunshine

Best of Barbados Gift Shops is a unique familyrun art and giftware company with a large choice of quality merchandise. They feature designs from founder Jill Walker and her daughter Sue Trew, complemented by imaginative work of talented Barbadians. A must experience; they look forward to welcoming you with a warm, friendly Bajan smile at their island-wide locations. E/5, 55

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Find in Bridgetown: Souvenirs Department, Cave Shepherd, Broad St ︱ 421-6900

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must SHOP

Medford

Craf t

World When thinking of things to do in Barbados a tour of Medford Craft World is a truly unique experience not to be missed. The fully interactive tour of Medford Craft World takes you from the raw wood on the ground, through the carving process, to the finished product.

Meet self-taught artist Reggie Medford, and hear the story of Barbados mahogany. Witness in live and living colour as Reggie and his personally tutored team of artisans transform the roots of the mahogany tree into the most beautiful works of art imaginable. Each Medford piece is individually hand crafted from Barbados mahogany using a unique sanding process developed by Reggie and his craft workers. Having graduated from school with advanced level certificates in biology and chemistry, Reggie rejected an academic career to take up handicraft. His artistic success has been seen in his exhibits throughout the Caribbean, U.S.A and Europe, and he has the distinction of being the youngest ever recipient of one of Barbados’ highest honours: the Barbados Centennial Honour. Reggie takes pride in offering his visitors the rare, up close and personal experience to observe an artist in his setting as he crafts totally Barbadian products. You will be amazed by the vast array of truly authentic Barbados souvenirs in our gift shop and Reggie is always happy to personally autograph your purchase. The team at Medford Craft World is proud that successive Barbadian Prime Ministers have made presentations of our mahogany creations to Heads of State in North and South America, The Far East, Africa and China. Our pieces have also been presented to noted international celebrities such as Nelson Mandela. If you are looking for a special Barbadian experience or the gift that will add charm to any home, you will find it at Medford Craft World. Whitehall Main Rd (10 minutes from Bridgetown), St. Michael ︱ 425-1919 ︱ www.medfordcraftworld.com

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must STAY

City

Raymond Maughan

Sleeps

The crowd enjoying the fireworks at the Hilton Hotel, from Pebbles beach

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To find available lodging in the calm of an island capital is ideal. For this spot to be part of an internationally-recognized historic site is a bonus. And for this accommodation to be planted along the warm sand of a soothing beach . . . now that is heaven. Dozens of these guest lodgings are in bloom along the coast road just a short trip from the shopping centre, Bridgetown. The hotels on this section of the south, as well as numerous guesthouses and beach apartments, spill onto familiar streets such as Hastings main road, home to Savannah Beach hotel and others. Bay Street offers Nautilus Beach Apartments and neighboring sea-


side spots which snake the popular Browne’s beach — one of the island’s largest beaches. Tales of Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison lie in wait at Hilton Barbados, which offers full beachfront views in Needhams Point. It is home to the largest local fort, Charles Fort, which is steeped in British Military history. The British Navy once used this base to ward off malicious foreign attacks and to protect Carlisle Bay. Originally called Needham’s Fort, the fort’s name was changed in 1660 when King Charles II regained the throne, after Charles I King of England was beheaded. Charles Fort:

ON/14, 24

A deluxe room at Savannah Beach Hotel Beach-side lounging at Nautilus Beach Apartments


must STAY

Savannah Beach Hotel…

Distinctively Different Just outside the UNESCO World Heritage site of Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison, is a unique gem of a property – the four-star Savannah Beach Hotel. Situated along the beautiful South Coast, it provides quick and easy access to the island’s capital, numerous beaches, and the Garrison – Barbados’ horse racing track. Many interesting locations and island-wide attractions are also readily accessible. Originally built in in the mid-1700s, the hotel served as a canteen for the British soldiers garrisoned in the area. From the early 1800s, the buildings which remain part of today’s hotel property became known as Sheriff’s House, and reopened as the Seaview Hotel in 1887. Remodelled extensively throughout the years, Savannah Beach Hotel’s distinctive design combines modern architecture

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with the historic building, which face the majestic Garrison area. The main building originally included two adjacent houses, but the easternmost building is the major architectural pleasure. Lavishly built, it boasts English ballast bricks with a central hallway and double balconies, exactly like the single houses of Charleston, North Carolina. Its ornate, North American castiron balconies are reminiscent of New Orleans, while the massive door hinges resemble the British Garrison buildings. Stepping into the lobby, the furniture reflects the signature understated grandeur of the old plantation Great House. The property also maintains several water features, including “drip-stones”, which facilitated clean and cool drinking water in old plantation homes. Within the hotel’s grounds, a stunning

central pool meanders down to a pristine beach, flanked by lush landscaping and contemporary, beautiful suites. Recently having earned a TripAdvisor Certificate of Excellence based on stellar traveller reviews, the property also features 92 beautifully appointed rooms, three restaurants and bars, banqueting and conference facilities, and an extensive kids and teen centre. Now a truly all-inclusive holiday resort, the property is one of the most idyllic destinations on the island. It makes an excellent choice for a relaxed Caribbean vacation, elegant wedding or honeymoon, a range of meetings and events, or simply enjoying fine dining in a beautiful setting. Savannah Beach Hotel is distinctly different, come experience the relaxed elegance and gracious hospitality of this idyllic gem. O/18, 61

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must STAY

heaven

Your Slice of

Nautilus Beach Apartments are set in scenic Carlisle Bay, on the outskirts of Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison. The coral-sand beach and calm turquoise waters, ideal for year-round swimming, offer a wide variety of water sporting activities within easy walking distance. The tranquil surroundings are ideal for families, and you can relax in a comfortable environment, away from the hustle and bustle of the rest of the island.

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BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

Step out onto a grand stretch of beachfront and shimmering blue Caribbean water, or relax on one of our private balconies or patios. There are a variety of fully equipped rooms from which to choose. We are also close to nightclubs and shopping, 20 minutes from the Grantley Adams International Airport, and 15 minutes away from the United States Embassy. K/16, 62

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Directory * OH: Opening Hours

Activities The Boatyard

Bay St., St. Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 436-2622 OH: Mon. - Sun. 9:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Page: 33 Map: G/7, 37

Jammin’ Catamaran Cruises

BTI Carpark, Cavans Lane, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 422-1152 OH: Mon. - Sun. 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Page: 32 Map: F/5, 36

Barbados Blue Watersports

Heritage Mount Gay RumTour and Gift Shop Spring Garden Highway, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 425-8757 OH: Mon. - Fri. 9:30 a.m to 3: 30 p.m. Page: 5, 26, 27

The Barbados National Trust

Headquarters Wildey Hse, Wildey, Barbados Tel: (246) 426-2421 OH: Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Page: 28

Barbados Museum & Historical Society

St. Ann’s Garrison, St. Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 427-0201 OH: Mon. - Sat. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sun. 2:00 to 6:00 p.m. Page: 28 Map: L/19, 17 f

Tiami Catamaran Cruises

The Shallow Draught, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 430-0900 OH: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. After Hours: 4:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Page: 29

Hilton, Needhams Point, St. Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 434-5764 OH: Mon. - Sun.9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Page: 34 Map: M/15, 51

Boyceterous Catamaran Cruises

Carlisle Bay, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 429-2228 or 256-7979 OH: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Page: 35 Map: E/6, 38

Dining Carlisle Bay Fish Fry & Food Village Bay St., St. Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 436-2622 OH: Fri. - Sat. 6:00 p.m. to 12:00 p.m. Page: 37 Map: G/7, 39

Mustor’s Harbour Bar & Restaurant McGregor St., Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 426-5175 OH: Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m to 3:45 p.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Page: 39 Map: E/4, 23

Fusion Restaurant & Lounge Inc.

Headquarters CWTS Complex, Lower Estate, St. George, Barbados Tel: (246) 434-8430 OH: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Sat & Sun 9:00 a.m to 5:00 p.m. Page: 29

Bayshore Complex, Bay St., Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 436-1538 OH: Mon. - Fri. 1:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. (Lunch) 6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. (Dinner) Sat. 6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Page: 40 Map: G/7, 44

Jolly Roger

Tapas

Suntours Barbados

Carlisle House, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 436-2885 OH: Mon. - Wed. Fri. Sat.- 7:30 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. Thurs. 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m Page: 24 Map: E/4, 40 60

BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―

Keswick Centre, Hastings Main Road, Christ Church, Barbados Tel: (246) 228-0704 OH: Mon. - Sun. 11:30 a.m to 10:30 p.m. Page: 41 Map: Q/22, 58


Lobster Alive & Limited

Wesley House, Bay St., St. Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 435-0305 OH: Mon. - Sun. (please call for hours) Page: 42 Map: G/7, 45

Waterfront Café

The Careenage, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 427-0093 OH: Mon. Tues. Wed. 10:00 a.m to 6:00 p.m. Thurs. Fri. Sat. 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Page: 43 Map: E/6, 46

Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sat. 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Page: 51 Map: E/4, 53

Barbados Manufacturers’ Association

Suite 201 Bldg, 8 Habour Industrial Estate, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 426-4474 OH: Mon. - Fri. 8:30 a.m to 4:30 p.m. Page: 39, 52 Map: D/1, 54 ︱ E/5, 54

Best of Barbados Gift Shops

Shopping

Headquarters Welches Plantation, St. Thomas, Barbados Tel: (246) 421-6900 OH: Mon. - Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Page: 52 Map: E/5, 55

The Royal Shop

Medford Craft World

32 Broad St., Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 429-7072 OH: Mon. - Thurs. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sat. 9:00 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Page: 46 Map: E/5, 48

Facets International Jewellers

Mall 34, Ground Floor, Broad Street, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 435-0129 OH: Mon. - Thurs. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sat. 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Page: 47 Map: E/5, 49

The Hub

Upper Bay Street, St. Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 436-2888 OH: Mon. - Fri. 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sat. 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Page: 48 Map: K/16, 59

Harmony

6 Swan Street, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 436-7485 OH: Mon. - Thurs. 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Page: 49 Map: D/5, 51

Pulze

Upstairs Galleria Mall, Broad Street, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 436-2792 or 261-9500 OH: Mon. - Thur. 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Fri. - Sat. 9:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Page: 50 Map: E/5, 52

Shamane Craft & Art

6 Canary Lane Mall, Hincks Street, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 426-6730 OH: Mon. - Thurs. 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

White Hall Main Road, St. Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 425-1919 OH: Mon. - Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sat: 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Page: 53

The Colonnade Mall (Previously DaCostas Mall) Broad Street, Bridgetown, Barbados Tel: (246) 431-0936 Email: wendy.regret@terracaribbean.com OH: Mon. – Thurs. 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m to 4:00 p.m Page: 19 Map: E/5, 12

Accommodation Hilton Barbados Resort

Needhams Point, St. Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 426-0200 Page: 55 Map: N/14, 60

Savannah Beach Hotel

Hastings, Christ Church, Barbados Tel: (246) 434-3800 Page: 56, 57 Map: O/18, 61

Nautilus Beach Apartments

Bay Street, St.Michael, Barbados Tel: (246) 426-3541 Page: 58 Map: K/16, 62

Information BarbadosTourism Authority

Port Of Bridgetown Office Tel: (246) 467-3600 Grantley Adams Airport Office Tel: (246) 428-7101 After Hours Tel: (246) 428-5570 Page: Inside Cover ― BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON

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PLEASED TO

SERVE YOU:

Meet

Randolf, the Villa-Cab Guy . . .

Take a relaxing ride about the town in Green Tours’ comfy villa-cab, compliments Mr. Randolf, your designated driver.

also offers Historic Tours, and is a great way to beat the sun while exploring the captivating history of historic Bridgetown.

You’ll find him stationed at the Bridgetown Port during week days, ready to provide an interactive journey to and from your shopping, sight-seeing and leisure destinations. Recently, the vehicle

As with cities throughout the world, chauffeured rides to ‘hotspots’ are popular. In this case, it’s the Bridgetown Boardwalk; myriad views of the Bridgetown cityscape, pleasure crafts and the picturesque

waters of the sparkling Caribbean Sea await you. The cab is an especially great option for cruise tourists, trying to interact with the people, places and pleasures of Bridgetown before the ship calls. Aiming to make your day in the city as comfy as can be, Randolf and Green Tours are at your service . . .

831-6338 | green_tours@yahoo.com | www.facebook.com/Green Tours & Rentals Barbados 62

BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON ―


Notes & To Do’s People Meet

The Barbados Legion of retired soldiers ____________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Notes: _________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

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Places Visit

The Mutual Building _____________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Notes: _________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

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Pleasures must SEE

Barbados Museum of Parliament and National Heroes Gallery _________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Notes: ________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

must DO

Dive at Barbados Blue __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ― BRIDGETOWN AND ITS GARRISON

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______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Notes: ________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

must EAT

Asian Pear Sake with your choice of sushi at Fusion Restaurant and Lounge _____________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Notes: ________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

must SHOP

Exotic and luxurious island prints from Pulze boutique ________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Notes: ________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

must STAY

Nautilus Beach Apartments ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ Notes: _________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ 64

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