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Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Acknowledgements The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 was developed in close consultation with Council staff and particularly staff linked to the following teams: • • • • • • • • •

Recreation and Leisure Services Strategic Planning Community Services Environmental Assets Parks Operations Parks Assets Civil Assets Arts and Culture Community Engagement.

The project was managed by Felicity VanDerHeul of the Recreation and Leisure Services team on behalf of the City of Tea Tree Gully.

Open space is integral to the character of the City of Tea Tree Gully and the quality of lifestyle experienced by the community. Open space has substantial social, cultural, environmental and economic value, and contributes to the health and well being of all age groups.

The research, analysis, reports and mapping were undertaken by Sue Suter of Suter Planners and Warwick Keates and Mark Jackson of WAX Design. The consultant team input was managed by Suzanne Suter. Suter Planners PO Box 158 Glenside SA 5065 08 8379 7768 0412 016 506

WAX Design Suite 12/154 Fullarton Road Rose Park SA 5067 08 8463 0886 0405 806 577


Contents Background.............................................................................................1 About the Open Space Strategy.....................................................1 Link to Council’s Strategic and Master Plans...............................2 The Planning Process.......................................................................8 The Reports.......................................................................................9 Strategy Framework............................................................................ 10 Strategy Approach......................................................................... 10 Open Space Themes..................................................................... 11 Planning Precincts......................................................................... 14 Open Space Vision............................................................................. 16 Theme Directions and Strategies...................................................... 17 Theme Directions.......................................................................... 17 Open Space Strategies................................................................... 20 Priority Directions.............................................................................. 40 Theme Priorities............................................................................ 40 Planning Precinct Priorities.......................................................... 43 Priority Precincts........................................................................... 57 Implementation................................................................................... 58 Approach to Implementation...................................................... 58 Resource Implications and Opportunities................................. 61 Review and Evaluation................................................................. 62 Appendices........................................................................................... 63 Appendix 1: Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide...... 63 City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Background About the Open Space Strategy The City of Tea Tree Gully Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 is a strategic document that will guide the provision, development and management of open space across the City over the next 20 years. The Strategy responds to the needs of the community and highlights the opportunities and priorities for enhancing and managing open space. Open space is integral to the character of the City of Tea Tree Gully and the quality of lifestyle experienced by the community. Open space has substantial social, cultural, environmental and economic value and contributes to the health and well being of all age groups. It supports physical activity, play, relaxation, social interaction and a sense of well being. Open space also counter-balances the man made nature of urban development through the provision of natural spaces for trees, and habitats for wildlife. As shown on Map 1 on page 7, the City of Tea Tree Gully is endowed with an excellent provision of open space. A large amount of open space is spread across the City. These include significant tracts of linear open space known as ‘green spines’, large parks and reserves, which each provide ideal locations for activity nodes. Inherently there is a strong visual

connection with the Hills Face and the Adelaide Plains. As a consequence the quality, design, function and management issues exist that could be addressed over time to strengthen the value of the open space. The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 aims to address the issues and strategically guide the revitalisation and management of open space, to achieve a balanced provision of quality open space that is well used and valued by the community. The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 relates to all aspects of open space planning, design and management of places, putting a strong emphasis on recreation, culture, landscape amenity, biodiversity and sustainability. The Strategy provides directions for all types of open space and related facilities. This includes directions for Planning Precincts and reserves, as well as strategic directions for the whole City of Tea Tree Gully. The open space identified throughout this report is based on the existing supply at the time of developing the open space strategy. Being a 20-year plan, opportunities may arise which Council needs to respond to in order to apply responsible and strategic management to strengthen the value of the open space for the community.

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Strategy

During the timeframe that the Open space Strategy 2011– 2030 was developed, Council also reviewed its Strategic Plan 2011–2015 and developed a City Master Plan 2011–2040. The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 is connected to and consistent with these higher level plans.

Strategic Plan

Strategies, policies and initiatives, incl. City Master Plan 2011-2040

Action plans

Delivery

Link to Council’s Strategic and Master Plans

Department business plans

In particular, as shown in adjacent diagram. The directions in the Strategic Plan and City Master Plan have been taken into consideration when developing directions and strategies in the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030.

Internal work plans

The findings and suggested strategies in the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 have

influenced the overriding directions in the Strategic Plan and City Master Plan.

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Reserves

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 2

Gold Reserve Browning Reserve Pine Park Brightlands Reserve Brassington Reserve Gunda Reserve

Taworri Reserve Birkdale Reserve Tarni Reserve Fairview Park Reserve Hartog Reserve Nagle Reserve

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Golf Reserve Cotton Reserve Player Reserve Shannon Reserve Huon Reserve Butler Reserve


19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 27. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52.

Banksia Park Sport Area Marsha Reserve Jasper Reserve Oleander Reserve Browning Courts Tay Reserve Tea Tree Gully Institute Haines Memorial Park Leslie Reserve Angove Reserve Tea Tree Gully Sports White Reserve Callitris Reserve Mistletoe Reserve Bellvue Reserve Vista Reserve Carmel Reserve Roder Reserve Amber Reserve North Goodes Reserve Kinnaird Reserve Tilley Recreation Park Greenwood Reserve Illyarrie Reserve Vine Reserve Wyndham Reserve Mallett Reserve Jubilee Reserve Cronulla Reserve Eva Reserve Cedric Reserve

53. Lokan Reserve 54. Sunhaven Reserve 55. Sherwood Park Reserve 56. Brae Reserve 57. Riverside Reserve 58. Stevens Reserve 59. Modbury Sports Area 60. Heather Reserve 61. Zealand Reserve 62. Jordan Reserve 63. Dale Reserve 64. Lumsden Reserve 65. Chinner Reserve 66. Whinnen Reserve 67. Grant Reserve 68. Ridgehaven Reserve 69. Dewer Reserve 70. Kennedy Reserve 71. Whiting Reserve 72. Grand Junction Screen 73. Dalaston Reserve 74. Macmahon Reserve 75. Kingfisher Reserve 77. Radar Reserve 78. Avago Reserve 79. St Agnes Recreation Area 80. Sandalwood Reserve 81. Doxiadis Reserve 82. Kaplan Reserve 83. Mumford Reserve 84. Abercrombie Reserve

85. Canopus Reserve 86. Tolley Reserve 87. Barracks Reserve 88. Gifford Reserve 89. Australia Reserve 91. Apalie Reserve 93. McIntosh Reserve 94. Mariners Reserve 95. Gilbert Reserve 96. O-Bahn Linear Park North 99. Anders Reserve 100. Roberts Reserve 101. Barmera Reserve 102. Berri Reserve 103. Kingston Reserve 104. Deakin Reserve 105. Armbuster Reserve 106. Pegasi Reserve 107. Pantowora Reserve 108. Hope Valley Cemetery 110. Hope Valley Sports Area 111. Boronia Reserve 112. Korong Reserve 113. Honeysuckle Reserve 114. Amethyst Reserve 115. Beckman Reserve 116. Amber Reserve South 117. Bell Reserve 118. Wicks Reserve 119. Mitchell Reserve 120. Kara Road Closure

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121. 122. 123. 124. 125. 126. 127. 128. 129. 130. 131. 132. 133. 135. 136. 137. 138. 139. 140. 141. 142. 143. 144. 145. 148. 150. 151. 152. 153. 155. 156. 4

Coulls Reserve Historic Reserve Turramurra Barns Reserve Almerta Reserve Teal Reserve Lake View Reserve River Torrens Linear Park Silverlake Reserve Michigan Reserve Observation Reserve Farnham Reserve Karri Reserve Milton Rserve Karingal Reserve Balmoral Reserve Romney Reserve Moule Reserve Lyons Reserve Tristania Rserve Stuart Reserve Jenny Reserve Marwick Reserve Bentley Reserve Corella Plantation Tea Tree Gully Hill Neimeyer Reserve Crestview Reserve Morawa Reserve Millbank Reserve Tasman Reserve

157. 158. 160. 161. 162. 163. 165. 166. 167. 169. 170. 171. 172. 174. 175. 176. 177. 178. 179. 180. 181. 182. 183. 184. 185. 186. 187. 189. 190. 191. 192.

Gilles Reserve Brenda Reserve Vaucluse Reserve Valley View Reserve Houston Reserve Dawson Reserve Bendigo Reserve Sir Frank Berryman Pardoo Plantation Apollo Reserve Gagarin Reserve Saturn Reserve Shepherd Reserve Burragah Recreation Amarillo Reserve Rosemary Reserve Neville Reserve Texas Reserve Fairleigh Reserve Hutt Reserve Oratanga Reserve Coolabah Reserve Drumminor Reserve Ladywood Reserve Apex Reserve Kimberley Reserve Minerva North Reserve Hinkler Reserve Hargrave Reserve Noya Reserve Billabong Reserve

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

193. 194. 195. 196. 197. 198. 199. 200. 201. 202. 203. 204. 205. 206. 207. 208. 209. 210. 211. 212. 213. 214. 215. 216. 217. 218. 219. 220. 221. 222. 223.

Conygham Reserve Para Hills Reserve Roebling Reserve Maxlay Reserve Horama Reserve Littla Para Reserve Courtyard Reserve Vulcan Reserve Johinke Reserve Axiom Reserve Namatjira Reserve Lasscocks Reserve Loch Lomond Reserve Shrublands Reserve Anstey Stone Reserve Isabella Reserve Hazel Reserve Kestrel Reserve Currawong Reserve Warne Reserve Wye Reserve The Spinney Edinburgh Reserve Robertson Reserve Palomino Reserve Solandra Reserve Possingham Reserve Lydia Reserve Spinney Plantation Civic Park Brunswick Reserve


225. 226. 228. 230. 231. 232. 233. 235. 236. 237. 238. 239. 240. 241. 242. 245. 248. 250. 251. 252. 253. 254. 255. 256. 257. 258. 259. 260. 261. 262. 263.

Alvis Reserve O-Bahn Linear Park Strathisla Reserve Highgrove Plantation Oakwood Reserve Grenache Reserve Greenwith Reserve Pro Hart Reserve Tanya Reserve Dearman Reserve Kirk Reserve Thornton Plantation Beeanbee Reserve Hopelands Reserve Mowbray Reserve Emma Reserve Sputnik Reserve Vostok Reserve Moorhen Reserve Greenfinch Reserve Xavier Reserve Pedare Village Park North East Road Urana Reserve Austin Reserve Freshford Reserve Famechon Reserve Minerva South Reserve Colombard reserve Bellbird Reserve Chelsea Reserve

264. 265. 267. 271. 273. 274. 276. 277. 278. 279. 283. 285. 286. 287. 288. 290. 291. 292. 293. 294. 296. 297. 299. 300. 302. 303. 305. 306. 307. 310. 311.

Swan Reserve Dresden Reserve Alicante Reserve Summer Hill Reserve Egret Reserve Gannet Reserve Veronica Reserve Eaglehawk West Reserve Eaglehawk East Reserve Immanuel Reserve Denton Reserve Summit Reserve Zephyr Reserve Old Hope Valley Primary Waterford Reserve Miller Plantation Milne Reserve Nadia Reserve Baldwin Reserve Fernilee Reserve Elliston Reserve Dotterel Reserve Red Wattle Reserve Linwood Reserve Kempson Reserve Richardson Oval Prince of Wales Supply Reserve Wynn Vale Recreation Trefoil Reserve Verdant Reserve

313. 316. 321. 322. 326. 327. 329. 331. 332. 333. 335. 337. 341. 342. 345. 346. 347. 354. 356. 359. 360. 364. 367. 372. 373. 375. 377. 379. 380. 382. 383.

Mawson Plantation Friendship Reserve Bennelong Reserve Landrien Reserve Caroline Reserve Wentworth Reserve The Golden Way Majestic Plantation Golden Grove Einstein Reserve Underwood Reserve Sutherland Reserve Garden Court Addolorata Reserve Declivity Reserve Harpers Field Cobbler Access Janlyn Reserve Allan Reserve Atlantis Reserve Ultra Reserve Grosvenor Reserve Hyde Park Reserve Golden Fields Britten Reserver Tamdhu Reserve Marengo Reserve Lyn Plantation Madeline Plantation Howell Reserve Austerlitz Reserve

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384. 388. 389. 390. 391. 393. 394. 396. 399. 400. 402. 404. 405. 408. 409. 410. 412. 416. 421. 422. 428. 430. 433. 440. 441. 442. 448. 452. 453.

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Olympiad Reserve Roycroft Reserve Strickland Reserve Lukin Reserve Taeuber Reserve Bernacchi Reserve Debenham Reserve Mackay Reserve Campbell Plantation Donovan Reserve Bushmills Reserve Pendeen Reserve Cobbler Creek East Lemon Gum Reserve Anare Plantation Coconut Reserve Cobbler Creek West Goodwin Reserve Golden Grove Rec Gilchrist Plantation Greenwith Sports Park Pinewood Reserve Corsican Plantation McArdle Reserve Rochester Walkway Springhill Plantation Lochleven Plantation Sir Joseph Banks Reserve Blair Access Reserve

455. 456. 459. 461. 463. 465. 466. 467. 469. 471. 474. 475. 479. 483. 484. 487. 488. 489. 495. 501. 502. 505. 506. 517. 520. 521. 522. 525. 531.

Willowwood Reserve Martindale Reserve Old Tea Tree Gully Pineridge Reserve Elysium Reserve McKinley Reserve Edmund Reserve Lang Reserve Green Pine Reserve Martindale Plantation Castle Eaton Reserve Hannover Reserve LakeMiranda Reserve Manchester Reserve Chestnut Reserve Dowton Reserve Trenoweth Reserve Chamberlain Reserve Hedgerow Reserve Featherstone Reserve Burlington Reserve John Ramsay Reserve Pedare Reserve Kunzea Reserve Waterfield Reserve Lake Eyre Reserve Millswood Reserve Raunsley Reserve Marlock Reserve

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

533. 534. 537. 541. 542. 544. 545. 546. 547. 557. 566. 573. 574. 575. 576. 577. 578. 579. 582. 583. 584. 585. 587. 596. 599. 603. 604. 605. 606.

Silcock Reserve Bloomsbury Reserve Horsgate Reserve Edison Reserve Crowhurst Road Closure Braeburn Reserve Rokewood Reserve Lady Williams Reserve Bartlett Reserve Allingtons Reserve Jonathan Reserve Whitehead Reserve Gransden Reserve Silveracre Reserve Hastings Reserve Avoca Screening Reserve Ross Reserve Bellchambers Reserve Valleyline Reserve Cobbler Creek Recreation Angove Conservation Park Anstey Hill Sapphire Crescent Wellington Reserve Orkney Reserve Kotara Reserve Oregan Reserve Tea Tree Gully Memorial Slate Road Reserve


The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

Map 1 Open Space Provision

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The Planning Process The development of the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 has primarily involved:

Stage 1: Project background Meetings, review studies, identify planning precincts

• Understanding community demand • Understanding the existing supply of open space

Stage 2: Inventory Review and further develop inventory

• Identifying issues and opportunities associated with open space • Developing directions and strategies that respond to the issues and opportunities • The directions and strategies reflect the analysis of demand and supply • A consultative approach has been adopted with Council staff and previous community consultations have been considered to ensure the Strategy responds to Council and community issues and expectations.

Specific tasks linked to project stages are summarised as follows.

Stage 3: Supply analysis Review information and mapping open space site visits, analysis of findings

Stage 4: Demand analysis Broad trends, demographics, participation analysis, facility use, requirements

Stage 5: Strategies and priorities Analyse findings, develop vision, directions, strategies, principles and guidelines Stage 6: Report and implementation Develop reports and implementation guide

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


The reports The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 comprises two volumes: • Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 • Background and Analysis Report The purpose and main components of each report: Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Background and Analysis Report

Purpose

Purpose

Provide directions and strategies that respond to the issues and opportunities and provide a clear direction forward.

Provide background information on the demand and supply analysis to substantiate the strategies and guide future actions.

Main components

Main components

• Strategy Framework

• City Character

• Open Space Vision

• Council Directions

• Theme Strategies

• State Level Planning

• Priorities

• Supply Findings

• Implementation

• Demand and Supply in Planning Precincts

• Summary of Background Findings

• Demand vs Supply Analysis

In addition, an Action Plan that includes actions, a works plan and an implementation guide has been provide to guide Council staff at the operational level over the next five years.

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Strategy Framework Strategy approach The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 provides directions and strategies that aim to guide the future provision, development and management of open space in the City of Tea Tree Gully. The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 is based on the demand and supply findings outlined in the Background and Analysis Report (internal document). The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 includes: Open Space Vision A vision that reflects Council’s future commitment to open space provision and enhancement. Theme Directions Overriding Directions for Open Space Themes.

Theme Strategies Strategies that respond to the specific issues and opportunities. Priorities Priorities for themes and planning precincts that indicate the most important items for implementation.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Quality informal recreation destinations provided in other local government areas across Australia are highly valued by communities and well used for diverse recreation and cultural activities.


Open Space Themes Five Open Space Themes have been identified for the City of Tea Tree Gully Open Space Strategy 2011–2030, where a Theme is a ‘topic’ of priority for the City. The Themes aim to collectively address the issues and opportunities relating to open space provision, development and management that are important for the City of Tea Tree Gully. The Themes and the rationale for their selection are outlined below. Theme Theme 1: Informal Recreation Destinations

Theme Focus Considers the potential for quality informal recreation destinations with unique settings and activity and cultural opportunities that draw people from a wide catchment.

Rationale for the Theme • Whilst the City currently lacks formalised informal recreation destinations, it has a number of excellent reserves (from a size, location and character perspective) that could meet this need. • Quality informal recreation destinations provided in other local government areas across Australia are highly valued by communities and well used for diverse recreation and cultural activities (including events and activities that contribute to economic development). Informal recreation destinations also provide the opportunity to promote cultural diversity and community integration. • There is potentially strong demand for informal recreation destinations in areas that have larger proportions of children and families (such as the northern areas).

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Theme Theme 2: Connections and Walkability

Theme Focus Considers the potential to build on the excellent provision of linear open space in the City and strengthen the physical connection of open space places and buildings, and related activity opportunities.

Rationale for the Theme • The City has an excellent open space structure with a number of ‘green spines’ that are ideal for linear open space. • Quality shared-use pathways are required to support walking and cycling along the linear open space and link places and buildings. • Pathways and trails provide opportunities to strengthen the cultural connections in an area, including through interpretive trails and links to art and cultural landscapes. • State and Federal Governments place a strong emphasis (through funding programs and guidelines) on creating pedestrian and cycle friendly urban environments that support physical activity and reduce the reliance on motor vehicles.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Theme Theme 3: Sports Hierarchy and Hubs

Theme 4: Sustainable Environments

Theme Focus Considers the appropriate hierarchy of sports facilities and the potential to establish quality sports hubs to support an active community, whilst improving efficiency.

Considers the potential to strengthen and enhance the quality, value and sustainability of the environment, biodiversity and landscapes through various ‘green’ initiatives.

Rationale for the Theme • Sport is an important aspect of open space provision, with strong demand for junior sports and the need to support all age groups to remain active, healthy and socially connected. • A number of sports programs in the City of Tea Tree Gully require upgrade including improved facilities, landscapes, entry statements and signage. A strategic approach to achieving this is required. • The State Government supports the establishment of quality sports hubs that draw from wide catchments. • The natural environment and biodiversity are existing high priorities for the City of Tea Tree Gully (Council and communities). • The City has a large provision of natural landscapes that require strategic management. • Water management and adaptive landscapes are a national priority as part of the country’s response to climate change.

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Theme Theme 5: Strategic Management

Theme Focus Considers opportunities for adopting a strategic approach to management and achieving quality outcomes and the effective management of resources.

Rationale for the Theme • Due to the large amount of open space and the range of issues and opportunities identified through the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 a strategic approach to enhancing open space is required. • It is not possible for all open space to be the same high quality due to financial and resource limitations. Strategic management through the allocation of hierarchy and priorities is therefore required.

Planning Precincts

The Planning Precincts are referred to as:

The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 has identified five Planning Precincts as shown in Map 2 on the following page.

• Planning Precinct 1: North

The Planning Precincts have drawn together similar suburbs linked to main roads and also connect to Australian Bureau of Statistic demographic suburbs. Strategies and priorities are considered for each Planning Precinct in the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030.

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• Planning Precinct 2: Central East • Planning Precinct 3: Central West • Planning Precinct 4: South West • Planning Precinct 5: South The main characteristics of each Planning Precinct are outlined in the Background and Analysis Report.

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

Map 2 Planning Precincts

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Open Space Vision A vision can be defined as a prediction, a forecast or a prophecy. It reflects what an organisation or community hopes to achieve in the future.

A vision can be defined as a prediction, a forecast or a prophecy. It reflects what an organisation or community hopes to achieve in the future. The City of Tea Tree Gully Strategic Plan 2011–2015 and City Master Plan 2011–2040 include a vision for the City and a vision for Leisure and Play.

The Open Space Strategy vision is consistent with the vision and direction in the Strategic Plan 2011–2015 and particularly the ‘Our Leisure and Play’ objectives (specifically 9.1) in the Plan. Taking this vision and the opportunities for open space into account the 20-year vision for open space is

‘Quality places and landscapes for active and integrated communities: a legacy for the future’. The Open Space vision will require a particular commitment to: • Quality • Diversity • Accessibility. 16

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Theme Directions and Strategies Theme Directions An overriding direction has been developed for each Open Space theme. These directions provide a structure for the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 and a framework for specific strategies and priorities. Theme Theme 1: Informal Recreation Destinations

Theme 2: Connections and Walkability

Theme 3: Sports Hierarchy and Hubs

Overriding Direcrtions Establish quality regional and district parks across the City that provide distinctive destinations for informal recreation and cultural activities, and support future urban development.

Direction Rationale The City has a number of good sized and well located reserves that have the potential to be quality informal recreation destinations. As it is not realistic for all parks to be high quality, a targeted hierarchical approach is recommended. Establish an integrated network of The City has an excellent structure of pathways to access and explore the well connected open space that provides open space, in order to strengthen opportunities for pathway connections, physical and cultural connections including a major ‘spine’ along Dry across the City, while supporting Creek. However, pathways are often physical activity. lacking or in need of upgrade, including those within recreation open spaces and those required to access it. Improve the quality and provision Demand for sport in the City is high of sports fields and facilities and a range of fields and facilities are through a sports hub. Employ required. A sports hub and hierarchy a hierarchal approach for the approach, including the use of school selection of the facility location fields, is a realistic way of providing for and the access to school facilities. the needs.

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Theme Theme 4: Sustainable Environments

Theme 5: Strategic Management

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Overriding Direcrtions Enhance the quality and sustainability of natural environments and landscapes across the City, with particular focus on biodiversity and water management.

Direction Rationale The natural environment and treed landscape is a major feature of the City that should be protected and managed. This includes the appropriate management of water and adaptation to climate change (a local, national and international priority). Strategically develop and manage Given the large amount and diversity of open space through defined open space across the City, a strategic management approaches, and the approach to management and resource appropriate allocation of resources. allocation is essential.

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Considerations The suggested hierarchy for open space in the City of Tea Tree Gully is outlined and defined below. The definition is catchment based, linked to Planning Precincts and relates to all topes of open space (sports ground, recreation open space, natural area, community). Regional High quality and significant open space with characteristics, facilities or activity opportunities that have the potential to benefit or draw people from across and beyond the City of Tea Tree Gully.

District Quality open space with characteristics, facilities or activity opportunities that have the potential to benefit or draw people from two or more Planning Precincts (a District) in the City of Tea Tree Gully.

Neighbourhood Appealing open space with good spaces and facilities that primarily benefit or attract people from across a Planning Precinct in the City of Tea Tree Gully.

Local Open space that primarily benefits or is used by people from one or two suburbs in the City of Tea Tree Gully (due to its small size or limited facilities and activity opportunities).

The Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide is further discussed in Appendix 1 of this report.

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Open Space Strategies

Tea Tree Gully.

Strategic consideration has been given to specific opportunities for the City that have been developed for each Theme. Twenty-two strategies have been developed that collectively aim to guide the future provision, development and management of open space in the City of

The Theme strategies together with a rationale for each are outlined below. Items for consideration and definitions are also provided to assist with the interpretation of the strategies where appropriate.

Theme 1: Informal Recreation Destinations No. 1.1

Topic Regional Recreation Destinations

Strategies Establish significant regional informal recreation destinations, these should contain distinctive and innovative features and family friendly facilities with activity opportunities, which attract people from across and beyond the City of Tea Tree Gully. Three regional destinations strategically located across the City and linked to existing significant open space are suggested (refer Map 3). The open space could include high quality play, youth, exercise, picnic, event, walking, cycling and other activity innovations along with signage and interpretation.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Rationale The City of Tea Tree Gully is lacking high quality destinations and attractions for informal recreation. A spread of regional destinations will result in a core of accessible quality places that provide a focus for community activity and civic function within the City.


No. 1.2

1.3

Topic District and Neighbourhood Recreation Destinations

Place Making in Destinations

Strategies Establish one or two district or neighbourhood informal recreation destinations in each Planning Precinct to provide quality ‘local places’ for community activity.

Rationale Not all people have the capacity to travel to regional destinations and good quality ‘local places’ are also required.

However, Council does not have District and neighbourhood the resources to upgrade all district destinations could include quality and neighbourhood parks and play, picnic, exercise, walking, cycling as such a targeted ‘destination’ and other activity innovations. approach linked to a hierarchy is suggested. Integrate unique design features, Place making through art, culture entry statements, art works, cultural and unique design will enhance the landscapes and interpretation to character and appeal of informal achieve place making within informal recreation destinations. This will recreation destinations. contribute to expressing cultural diversity and innovation across the City.

Considerations • A Recreation Destination refers to open spaces that include high quality and innovative recreation features, facilities, cultural innovations and activity opportunities , which draw people to the open space (from across the City, District or Neighbourhood depending on the size and profile of the open space, level of quality and range of activity opportunities). • The hierarchy of a Recreation Destination

relates to catchment (how far people might travel) which is influenced by location and access, size and character of the open space, open space design and quality, facility components and activity opportunities. • Potential locations for the regional, district and neighbourhood informal recreation destinations are highlighted on the following page on Map 3 for future assessment. • Detailed planning will be required as a ‘next step’ to determine whether these locations

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are appropriate and consider the specific improvements and facilities within each recreation open space. • In designing each recreation open space, consideration should be given to profile, access, quality, function, diversity and landscape, as well as potential impacts on surrounding residents and existing users (e.g. locating car parking and lighting). • Future medium and higher density urban development should be connected to regional and district informal recreation destinations (as highlighted on Map 3).

The City has an excellent structure of open space that provides opportunities for pathway connections. However, pathways are often lacking or in need of upgrade.

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The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

Map 3 Potential Informal Recreation Destinations

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Theme 2: Connections and 'Walkability' No. 2.1

Topic Linear Pathways and Connections

Strategies Establish linear pathways (pedestrian, cycle, shared-use, interpretative) along creek lines and corridors to connect open space, connect people to community facilities and commercial areas, and also connect future urban development areas to open space and other communities.

A hierarchy of Level 1 to Level 3 is suggested and shown on Map 4.

Rationale The City of Tea Tree Gully has a number of key creeklines and corridors that are lacking quality pathway networks. Shared-use and single purpose linear pathways are highly valuable for supporting and encouraging walking, cycling and healthy communities in general. Interpretation linked to trails strengthens the cultural connection to places and broadens activity and educational opportunities.

As the Council would not have the resources to establish pathways along all creeklines, a targeted approach linked to hierarchy is suggested. Improve the position, quality and A large proportion of recreation connections of pathways within open open spaces and reserves lack space and reserves in accordance pathways, or have poor quality or with hierarchy and priority (with the poorly located pathways. As the greater emphasis being on regional cost of addressing the issue would and district open space, accessibility be high, consideration of hierarchy and safety). and priority will be necessary.

2.2

Pathways in Open Spaces

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


No. 2.3

Topic Footpaths

Strategies Continue to develop and implement a strategic footpath network that includes pedestrian and shareduse foopaths in streets and along parkways, with connections to key open space, regional and neighbourhood commercial centres, and existing and future community buildings.

Considerations

provided.

• The suggested Level 1 to Level 3 linear connection hierarchy is defined as follows:

Level 3

Level 1 Linear connections generally relate to regional and district open space and could include 2.5m to 3m hard surface, shared-use pathways with a link to recreation nodes, interpretation, art and cultural landscapes. Level 2 Linear connections generally relate to district and neighbourhood open space and may or may not include a shared-use pathway. However, a defined hard surface pathway that is at least 2m in width would generally be

Rationale Footpaths are often lacking in streets, including areas with undulating land such as Highbury. Strategically located footpaths are required to improve the accessibility and safety of neighbourhoods. Footpaths are essential for safety guiding people to key open space such as the River Torrens Linear Park, and community and commercial centres.

Linear connections generally relate to neighbourhood and local open space and could focus more on walking than bike riding. Level 3 linear connections may include a natural surface pathway or not justify a pathway at all. • The design and positioning of pathways should consider design and function guidelines and legislation requirements, including Disability Discrimination Act 1992, the Disability Discrimination and Other Human Rights Legislation Amendment Act 2009, Heart Foundation Healthy by Design

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Guidelines and other relevant guidelines. • Pathways should be designed to be inclusive and cater for people with a disability including people with Electric Mobility Scooters (Gophers) and people with young children and prams, as well as walkers, bike riders and recreation activities like rollerblading. • Principles relating to the design and development of pathways and related facilities for each connection level are provided in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guidelines in Appendix 1.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Place making through art, culture and unique design will enhance the character and appeal of informal recreation destinations. This will contribute to expressing cultural diversity and innovation across the City.


The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

Map 4 Potential Connections and Walkability

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Theme 3: Sports Hierarchy and Hubs No. 3.1

Topic Outdoor Sports Hubs

Strategies Establish key outdoor sports hubs across the City (regional and major district) of high quality, which cater for a number of sports through integrated and shared-use facilities.

Rationale The City of Tea Tree Gully has a relatively low provision of sports grounds for the population size and potential demand. The provision of a number of quality sports hubs may help compensate for this gap.

The City has a number of strategically located large sports grounds that either are, or have the potential to excellent sports hubs. Maintain second level sports grounds Due to the relatively low provision (minor district and neighbourhood) of sports grounds in the City there to a safe and appealing level. This is a risk that the smaller sports includes providing base facilities grounds will become overused and suitable for the size and use of the degraded. Managing these sports sports ground and managing use in grounds to a safe and appealing accordance with capacity. standard as a minimum will be important.

3.2

Second Level Sports Grounds

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


No. 3.3

Topic School Connections

3.4

Sports Lighting

3.5

Indoor Sport Connection

Strategies Strengthen the connections with schools through negotiated access to school ovals and contributions by schools to Council facilities (in accordance with current industry negotiations with Department of Education and Children’s Services).

Rationale A number of Council sports grounds are in poor condition whilst nearby school ovals receive limited use. Opportunities to access school facilities should be investigated to increase the availability of sports fields for community use and help address the gap in sports groundprovision.

Where schools use Council ovals and facilities there should be an appropriate contribution by the school to achieve higher quality grounds. Maintain and improve lighting for Quality lighting supports safe night time use, particularly where training and night activities and facilities are linked to the Sports strengthens the value and use of Hubs. Sports Hubs and secondary sports grounds. Connect future indoor sport facilities Indoor and outdoor sporting with the outdoor sports hubs facilities can be linked to achieve (particularly the regional and major higher profile facilities, economies district sports hubs). in management and broader activity opportunities.

Considerations • As defined by the Office of Recreation and Sport a Sports Hub refers to ‘A local, regional, or state level centre of sport and recreation activities that optimises the shared use of location City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

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and facilities to meet the needs of the communities it serves. In serving this purpose, the hub must strive to be sustainable, multi-purpose, accessible, safe, inclusive, relevant to its communities and connected to the principles of community building.’ (Office for Recreation and Sport 2010. • The definition of District outlined in ‘Theme Directions’ is broadened to include Major District and Minor District for sports grounds. This is because no sports ground is considered to be Local due to the nature of sport and some District sports grounds justify being a higher quality than others due to their size and diversity of activities.

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• Potential Sports Hubs and a suggested hierarchy of sports grounds are outlined on Map 5 on the following page. • Land is currently not available to establish additional sports grounds or increase the size of existing sports grounds in the City of Tea Tree Gully. A strategic approach to improving the flexibility and function of existing sports grounds is required, along with opportunities for using school playing fields. • The management of sports grounds and the need for Council to have increased control over the use and management of playing fields is also a priority. This item is addressed under Theme 5: Strategic Management.

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

Map 5 Potential Sports Hubs and Hierarchy

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Theme 4: Sustainable Environments No. 4.1

Topic Quality Natural Environment

Strategies Enhance the quality and biodiversity of the natural environment within the open space network, including the management of creek lines, woodlands, Hills Face and habitat ‘hot spots’, to create a robust mosaic of natural landscapes (in accordance with Council’s Ecological mapping).

4.2

Fire Management

Develop and manage natural areas and landscapes in accordance with the City of Tea Tree Gully Fire Management Strategy.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Rationale It is difficult to appropriately manage the large amount of natural area in the City of Tea Tree Gully. As a result there are significant issues relating to weeds, overgrown vegetation, creating and maintaining habitat for wildlife and vegetation suitability, and creating and maintaining habitat for wildlife. A response to addressing these issues is required. Council is committed to enhancing biodiversity through its Biodiversity planning and Ecological mapping. Fire safety and risk is a priority for the City given the major emphasis on natural areas and Eucalypt trees, and the proximity to the Hills Face.


No. 4.3

Topic Landscape Sustainability

Strategies Improve the sustainability, longevity and adaptability of landscapes through the development of a Landscape Master Plan, to respond to changing environmental, climate, technological and social demands, particularly in Precinct 1.

4.4

Productive Landscapes

Consider opportunities to establish productive landscapes and community gardens, particularly linked to higher density urban development and community and school projects.

4.5

Water Management

Continue to develop and implement sustainable water usage and management systems linked to open space, including implementing Waterproofing the North and Waterproofing the East plans, water capture and re-use (linked to buildings and open spaces) and ‘purple pipeline’ connections.

Rationale Some past plantings have given limited consideration to climate change and the need for drought tolerant landscapes. The Golden Grove area is particularly unsustainable due to the large amount of ornamental and introduced plantings (although Council is addressing this over time). Productive landscapes and community gardens can have a social, health and economic benefit. With increased urban density they become of greater value, and require appropriate planning and management. A number of existing constructed water bodies in the Council area are ornamental with limited environmental, storage or reuse value. Additional and improved water bodies are required that contribute to sustainable landscapes and support the collection and re-use of water. Previous planning legislation will inform the specific commitments and projects.

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Considerations • The City of Tea Tree Gully has developed plans and undertaken a number of initiatives relating to the natural environment and landscapes. The intention of the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 is to reinforce and build on the directions and priorities defined in the previous planning and projects. • In accordance with statewide directions, the City of Tea Tree Gully has been closely involved in developing Waterproofing Northern Adelaide (WNA) and Waterproofing the East plans, and implementing water management initiatives. Council is committed to continuing this commitment to respond to climate change and manage water use. • A map identifying the potential biodiversity focus for the City, based on Council’s Ecological mapping, is included on the following page.

The sports hub must strive to be sustainable, multi-purpose, accessible, safe, inclusive, relevant to its communities and connected to the principles of community building.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

Map 6 Potential Biodiversity Focus

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Theme 5: Strategic Management No. Topic Strategies 5.1 Management Strategically develop and manage Framework open space and related facilities in accordance with frameworks and guidelines. This includes establishing open space category and hierarchy guidelines (refer to Appendix 1), and appropriately developing, maintaining and using open space.

5.2

Open Space Review

Review the provision of local and neighbourhood open space to determine whether land rationalisation or acquisition should be considered.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Rationale Hierarchy and development guidelines are valuable for determining the appropriate level of development of open space and the priorities, particularly where so much open space requires upgrade as is the case for the City of Tea Tree Gully. Communities require open space that is safe, appealing and accessible as a minimum. Strategies that address these issues and achieve this base provision are essential. Some areas have a high provision of open space with small parks located near each other, whilst other areas have less open space. A review of the smaller land parcels could be appropriate if resources obtained through the sale of any land are allocated to improving other more valuable open space.


No. 5.3

Topic Management of Sports Grounds

5.4

Management of Buildings

5.5

Community Engagement

5.6

Funding and Resources

Strategies Review management arrangements with sports (lease versus licence arrangements) and the use of sports fields, taking capacity into consideration.

Rationale Currently many sports have full control over the management and use of sports grounds (through a lease arrangement). As a result there is a risk of over use or under use and less incentive for sports to work together to achieve appropriately used multi-functional sports grounds. Maintain buildings linked to open Buildings with open space can space to a good quality and in impact on the quality of the accordance with hierarchy (with a open space and its value to the particular focus on amenities and community. Some amenities and clubrooms, recreation centres and community buildings in the City community centres). are in need of upgrade, or are currently under upgrade. Engage the community and other A coordinated partnership partners in the development, use and approach will be required to management of open space. achieve the opportunities for enhancement in the City of Tea Tree Gully. Strategically source and allocate The strategic use of funding and funding and resources to achieve resources and obtaining additional a balanced provision of quality funding will be essential to open space and facilities. This could achieving the Open Space Strategy include obtaining grant funding and 2011–2030. The suggested other funding innovations. enhancements are considerably greater than the available Council funding. City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

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Considerations • A suggested hierarchy framework has been developed as part of the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 and this is included as Appendix 1. A potential open space hierarchy is mapped on the following page (Map 7).

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

Map 7 Potential Open Space Hierarchy

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Priority Directions Theme Priorities Each Theme in the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 is considered to be equally important. Informal recreation destinations, linear connections, sports hubs, sustainable environments and a strategic approach to management are all essential to create a quality environment that respond to community needs. However, some strategies within the Themes are more important than others as they will have a greater impact on the quality and sustainability of open space and be of greater benefit to the community. The highest priority strategy for each Theme and the basis for the priority are outlined below. Theme Informal Recreation Destinations

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Overriding Direcrtions Establish regional informal recreation destinations.

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Direction Rationale Regional destinations that include picnic settings, quality and innovative play, event spaces and other activity opportunities provide an important social and activity focus for all age groups and particularly families. The City of Tea Tree Gully has large proportions of families and the City is currently lacking such quality destinations.


Theme Connections and ‘Walkability’

Sports Hierarchy and Hubs

Overriding Direcrtions Establish linear pathways and connections along creek lines and corridors.

Direction Rationale Walking, bike riding and jogging are high participation activities that significantly contribute to the health Level 1 connections are a particular and well-being of communities. Off road linear tracks and pathways provide priority. a safe and appealing location for these activities and there is potential for improved linear pathways along the main corridors. Establish key sports hubs. The City of Tea Tree Gully has a Regional and major district sports number of large sports grounds that lend themselves to becoming regional or hubs are a particular priority. major district sports hubs. The sports hub concept involves the provision of higher quality shared-use buildings and enables economies in the management of playing fields and buildings. Sport and community groups can benefit from the higher quality facilities and the Council can benefit from cost savings. As the City has a shortfall in sports grounds and high demand for them, the provision of sports hubs with higher quality facilities is justified to help compensate for the gaps.

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Theme Sustainable Environments

Overriding Direcrtions Enhance the quality and biodiversity of the natural environment (in accordance with Council’s Ecological mapping).

Strategic Management

Strategically develop and manage open space.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Direction Rationale The City of Tea Tree Gully has a large amount of natural area that defines the character of the City. However, some recreation open spaces are in poor condition with weed infestation and declining habitat quality. Council has identified biodiversity as a priority through its Biodiversity planning and Ecological mapping, and opportunities to enhance natural areas should be pursued accordingly. A strategic approach to developing and managing open space is essential given the large amount of open space in the City of Tea Tree Gully and the need for upgrade. Council is unlikely to have the resources to upgrade all open space and as such frameworks that strategically guide improvements and decisions are vital.


Planning Precinct Priorities This section summarises and maps the key strategies within each Planning Precinct in order of priority. The priorities are based on the directions and strategies outlined in the previous section, and draw together a number of related strategies. Planning Precinct 1: North Theme Sustainable Environments

Overriding Direcrtions Modify the landscape in Planning Precinct 1 to improve sustainability and reduce maintenance. This includes:

Direction Rationale Planning Precinct 1 is dominated by ornamental landscapes and water bodies which are no longer sustainable due to changing climatic conditions.

• Establish landscapes that are adaptable

In addition, ornamental landscapes require high maintenance and this creates an equity issue for Council (with additional resources being required for the Precinct).

• Establish sustainable water bodies

Connections and Walkability Sustainable Environments Strategic Management

• Increase indigenous and native trees. Improve the functionality of the open space. This includes: • Develop pathways along creeklines, parkways, recreation open spaces • Increase the landscape and connection value of parkways and plantations

Whilst Planning Precinct 1 has a large amount of open space, a good proportion of the open space lacks facilities and pathways and has poor function. This is a key issue given the size of the population and the need for activity opportunities and quality spaces for families and children.

• Improve the provision of facilities in recreation open spaces. City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

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Theme Informal Recreation Destinations Outdoor Sports Hubs

Overriding Direcrtions Establish some higher quality regional, district and neighbourhood recreation and sport reserves that provide a destination for recreation, sport and community activity for the Planning Precinct and the wider area.

Direction Rationale Some higher quality reserves are required to provide a focus for recreation and sport activity. As it is not feasible to develop all reserves to a high standard, a targeted approach is suggested.

Potential reserves and opportunities for Planning Precinct 1 (North Area) are highlighted on Map 8 on the following page, to assist with future planning.

Regional destinations that include picnic settings, quality and innovative play, event spaces and other activity opportunities provide an important social and activity focus for all age groups and particuarly families. 44

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1. Map 8 Potential Opportunities for Planning Precinct 1

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Planning Precinct 2: Central East Theme Sustainable Environments Strategic Management Informal Recreation Destinations

Connections and Walkability

Informal Recreation Destinations

Overriding Direcrtions Improve the quality of the open space in Planning Precinct 2. This includes:

Direction Rationale The quality of the open space along the creeklines and in neighbourhood and local open spaces is quite poor, which reduces its value and potential use.

• Upgrade open space along the creeklines • Improve facilities in open spaces • Encourage enhancement of the Hills Face, including Anstey Hill Recreation Park upgrade. Strengthen the open space The creeklines in Planning Precinct 2 connections. This includes: have been built out compared to the other Planning Precincts. Ideally linear • Acquire land along creeklines where required to create linear open space would be established along these creeklines to enable linear path open space • Establish and upgrade pathways networks over time. along the linear open space • Strengthen links to Anstey Hill Recreation Park Enhance the recreation facilities within sports grounds in Planning Precinct 2 to provide integrated sport and informal recreation destinations.

The sports grounds are the main parcels of usable open space in Planning Precinct 2 and should provide a focus for recreation as well as sport. The recreation provision at the sports grounds is relatively moderate.

Potential reserves and opportunities for Planning Precinct 2 (Central East Area) are highlighted on Map 9 on the following page, to assist with future planning. 46

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Map 9 Potential Opportunities for Planning Precinct 2 Map 9 Potential Opportunities for Planning Precinct 2

The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

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Planning Precinct 3: Central West Theme Sustainable Environments Strategic Management Sports Hierarchy and Hubs

Connections and Walkability

Overriding Direcrtions Improve the quality of the open space in Planning Precinct 3. This includes: • Upgrade open space along the creeklines • Improve the quality and provision of facilities in open spaces • Improve the quality of the sports grounds. Strengthen the open space connections. This includes: • Establish and upgrade pathways along the creeklines (particularly the main creeklines).

Sports Hierarchy and Hubs Informal Recreation Destinations

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Direction Rationale The open space quality in Planning Precinct 3 is quite poor and the community is in need of higher quality spaces for recreation and sport.

Establish a major sports hub in the Precinct through a Master Planning process, giving priority to the Modbury Sports Area.

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

Planning Precinct 3 has an excellent provision of linear open space that can potentially connect communities and support physical activity. However, pathways are often poor quality or lacking and this reduces the value of the open space. The Modbury Sports Area is a major parcel of open space that is centrally located and has the potential to draw from a regional catchment. However, the quality and design of the reserve requires substantial improvement.


Theme Informal Recreation Destinations

Overriding Direcrtions Establish and further enhance some higher quality district and neighbourhood informal recreation destinations with links to TODs (Transport Oriented Development).

Direction Rationale Some quality reserves are required to provide a spread of accessible informal recreation destinations. As it is not feasible to develop all reserves to a high standard, a targeted approach is suggested.

Potential reserves and opportunities for Planning Precinct 3 (Central West Area) are highlighted on Map 10 on the following page, to assist with future planning.

Ideally linear open space would be established along these creeklines to enable linear path networks over time.

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Map 10 Potential Opportunities for Planning Precinct 3

Map 10 Potential Opportunities for Planning Precinct 3

The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1. 50

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Planning Precinct 4: South West Theme Strategic Management Sustainable Environments

Connections and Walkability

Sports Hierarchy and Hubs

Overriding Direcrtions Improve the quality of the open space in Planning Precinct 4. This includes:

Direction Rationale A large proportion of the open space in Planning Precinct 4 is in need of upgrade or lacking facilities.

• Upgrade open spaces to improve appeal, safety and accessibility • Upgrade open space along the creeklines Strengthen the open space connections. This includes:

Whilst Planning Precinct 4 has excellent linear open space, pathways are often • Establish and upgrade pathways lacking or poor quality. The true potential of the open space is not along the creeklines realized in the absence of adequate connectivity. Improve the quality of the existing Sports facilities are significantly lacking sports provision in Planning in Planning Precincts 4 and 5. The Precinct 4. This includes: Hope Valley Sports Area should be high quality to help compensate for this and • Undertake a Master Plan other opportunities for sport should be process to establish the Hope considered. Valley Sports Area as a quality major district sports ground • Consider opportunities to provide additional sports facilities (including access to schools).

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Theme Informal Recreation Destinations

Overriding Direcrtions Establish and further enhance some higher quality district and neighbourhood informal recreation destinations.

Direction Rationale Some quality reserves are required to provide informal recreation destinations and compensate for the lower open space provision in the area. As it is not feasible to develop all reserves to a high standard, a targeted hierarchical approach is suggested.

Potential reserves and opportunities for Planning Precinct 4 (South West Area) are highlighted on Map 11 on the following page, to assist with future planning.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Map 11 Potential Opportunities for Planning Precinct 4

The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1. City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

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Planning Precinct 5: South Theme Connections and Walkability

Informal Recreation Destinations

Informal Recreation Destinations

Overriding Direcrtions Strengthen the connections to the River Torrens Linear Park (RTLP) including the provision of footpaths in streets than link to the RTLP. Establish a regional recreation destination along the RTLP that provides a focus for activity and a 'stop off' point for the linear trail users.

Direction Rationale Access points to the RTLP are limited and footpaths that provide safe connections to the RTLP are particularly lacking in the Highbury area. Recreation facilities and amenities are lacking along the RTLP to support recreation activity and provide a 'stop off' point.

The recreation destination will strengthen the regional value of the RTLP. Establish and further enhance Some quality reserves are required some higher quality district and to provide informal recreation neighbourhood informal recreation destinations. As it is not feasible to destinations. develop all reserves to a high standard, a targeted hierarchal approach is suggested.

Potential reserves and opportunities for Planning Precinct 5 (South Area) are highlighted on Map 12 on the following page, to assist with future planning.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


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The definition of open space types is included in the Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide in Appendix 1.

Map 12 Potential Opportunities for Planning Precinct 5


Priority Precincts Each Planning Precinct is important. However, in relation to improving the quality and value of open space to the community, the greatest priorities are likely to be: • Planning Precinct 3 • Planning Precinct 4. Open space in these areas is generally poorer quality and the justification for improving open space is greater as communities tend to be higher need with lower incomes, less access to motor vehicles, and a mix of older people and young families.

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City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Implementation Approach to Implementation The City of Tea Tree Gully Open Space Strategy will require support and endorsement from Council and a commitment to implement over the next five years and beyond. Key components of the Open Space Strategy that will require support or implementation include: • The overriding themes, vision and directions • The strategies that have been developed for each theme • The suggested priorities for themes and Planning Precincts • Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide (refer to Appendix 1). The first step to implementation is for Council to endorse the structure of the Open Space Strategy and the overriding directions outlined for each theme. The directions provide the framework for the Strategy. The specific strategies and priorities will require ‘in principle’ support from Council on the basis that they could change over time. Whilst there should be a general sense of comfort with the strategies and priorities, there should be flexibility in the implementation as responses will depend on the availability of resources and priorities could change over time.

The recommended approach to Council endorsing the various components is summarised in the diagram on the following page. To achieve the Open Space Strategy, it will be necessary to: • Allocate people resources to guide or undertake specific strategies (this may require additional staff) • Reflect strategies and related actions in Council Work Budgets • Investigate opportunities for grant funding and partnerships The implementation of the Open Space Strategy will require a staged and targeted approach. This will involve giving consideration to the priority and timing of Theme Strategies and related actions to guide the implementation. To assist Council with implementation, a Draft Action and Works Plan has been developed as part of this study and for further development by Council staff. The document will evolve over time and is therefore provided as an internal document for staff use rather than a component of the Open Space Strategy. The Draft Action and Works Plan includes an indication of costs for works that could be implemented over the next five years.

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An across Council approach to implementation will be essential given the Open Space Strategy relates to various management areas. Ideally a Strategy Implementation Group would be established within Council to enable a cooperative and coordinated approach to implementation. The role of the Group could be to confirm strategies, further develop specific actions and identify potential works (building on the Draft Action and Works Plan), agree on priorities and timing, allocate responsibilities and advise Council and the community on appropriate responses. Whilst implementation of the Open Space Strategy is recommended, it is important to note that the Open Space Strategy does not

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commit Council, other levels of Government, community groups or any other body to fund or implement a strategy or related actions and works. The Open Space Strategy is provided as a guide that will assist Council and other bodies to achieve directions and commit to strategies as resources become available. The Open Space Strategy will require an ongoing review to update the directions and strategies and this could be undertaken by the Strategy Implementation Group. A general review of strategies and priorities should be undertaken at least annually and a detailed analysis of the Open Space Strategy could be undertaken every five years.

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


Suggest Approach to Endorsement

Vision and Themes Provide an overriding structure that indicates what is most important regarding open space.

Overriding Directions Provides directions and a framework for the strategies.

Strategies Proposes strategies that aim to respond to specific issues and opportunities.

Suggested Priorities Recommends priorities based on the Strategy analysis.

Council Endorsement On the basis that Council will commit to the vision, themes and directions over the following 20 years.

Council Support On the basis that the strategies and priorities could be modified in the future according to resource availability and changing priorities.

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Resource Implications and Opportunities Funding The Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 recommends strategies that will require a substantial contribution of funds and resources over the next 20 years. To achieve the strategies, consideration may need to be given to non traditional methods of raising funds such as: • Open space development or biodiversity levy • The disposal of some parcels of open space (where value is limited and communities are otherwise well catered for) and the use of these funds to upgrade other open space • Community events and programs that generate funds to contribute to reserve improvements • Increases in user fees and charges • Funding opportunities through other levels of government should also be sought. Opportunities could include: • Department of Planning and Local Government grant funding linked to key recreation open space • Office for Recreation and Sport grant funding for sporting facilities 60

• Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts grant funding for various projects • Australia Council for the Arts grant funding for creative projects. The Department of Planning and Local Government funding currently only relates to recreation open space and not sports grounds. The Office for Recreation and Sport facilities grant funding is currently between $20,000 and $500,000 and requires a 50 percent contribution by the applicant. Partnerships The establishment and further development of partnerships will also be vital to achieving the strategies and priorities in the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030. This could include partnerships with: • Sporting groups to improve sports facilities and management practices • Community groups and volunteers to contribute to projects • Schools and other service providers to broaden the provision of sport and recreation facilities • State and Federal governments to contribute funding and resources to facilities and projects

City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030


• Staff across Council to ensure a coordinated and consistent approach to responding to the strategies and priorities.

schedule could be maintained to record the implementation of strategies and guide any future changes.

Open space planning, development and management relates to a diversity of community groups, Council work areas and government agencies. Strong partnerships and a coordinated commitment to implementation will therefore be the key to achieving the Open Space Strategy 2011–2030 and meeting the needs of the current and future communities.

• After five years, a more detailed assessment of community needs and issues should be undertaken and information updated. A replacement or updated Strategy may be required with new directions and strategies that reflect community and Council needs, priorities and broader directions.

Review and Evaluation Whilst the City of Tea Tree Gully Open Space Strategy aims to provide a strategic direction for the next 20 years, the Strategy will require an ongoing review to reflect changing community needs, Council priorities and the availability of resources. It may be appropriate for some directions and strategies to be modified over time and it will be important to update background information such as community demands, demographic data and the provision of open space and facilities (supply). The ongoing review could be undertaken by the proposed Council Strategy Implementation Group as follows: • Every 12 months the group should collectively assess the relevance and status of suggested directions and strategies. A status City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

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Appendices Appendix 1: Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide The Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide aims to assist the City of Tea Tree Gully to appropriately plan for, develop and manage its open space. The guide includes:

• Linear Park (without watercourse)

• Definitions for open space categories

• Parkway

• Management considerations for open space categories

• Plantation

• Hierarchy definitions

• Sports ground

• Potential standards linked to hierarchy

• Undeveloped.

• Guidelines for open space development linked to hierarchy

Potential standards and guidelines for development and maintenance have been provided for the main open space including:

• Guidelines for open space maintenance linked to hierarchy. The Open Space Category and Hierarchy Guide has built on previous guidelines developed by Suter Planners and Wax Design, including the City of Rockdale, City of Campbelltown, City of Victor Harbor, City of Charles Sturt and City of Port Adelaide Enfield. The open space categories proposed for the City of Tea Tree Gully include: • Community • Drainage • Linear Busway

• Linear RTLP (River Torrens Linear Park) • Natural Area (Biodiversity)

• Recreation Open space

• Sports grounds • Recreation Open Space • Linear Open Spaces • Natural Areas (Biodiversity). Open Space Category Suggested categories of open space and related definitions and management approaches are provided below in alphabetical order. The categories aim to reflect the character of open space in the City of Tea Tree Gully and consider approaches used in other local government areas.

• Linear Creekline 62

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Category Definitions Category

Category Definitions

Community

The open space is predominantly used for community buildings such as community centre, aquatic centre or indoor sports centre.

Drainage

The main function of the open space is stormwater detention and there is generally less emphasis on natural settings.

Linear Busway

The open space is connected along the O-Bahn busway. The main character of the open space is likely to be undeveloped with native vegetation, open grasslands, water bodies and pathways.

Linear Creekline

The open space is connected along a creekline. The main character of the open space is likely to be natural and undeveloped, with emphasis on native vegetation and riparian systems.

Linear Park

The open space is connected to create a linear parcel of land that could support walking or bike riding but is not linked to a creekline, the River Torrens Linear Park or the O-Bahn.

Linear RTLP

The open space is connected along the River Torrens to create the River Torrens Linear Park. The River Torrens Linear Park has an integrated natural and formal landscape character.

Natural Area (Biodiversity)

The open space is dominated by natural landscapes and habitats with an emphasis on protecting the natural environment and supporting biodiversity.

Parkway

Parkway open space refers to a connected strip of open space that can be functional as a walkway or connected plantation, including a verge or linear walkway.

Plantation

The primary focus of the open space is the landscape, e.g. a planted verge or median strip. City of Tea Tree Gully – Open Space Strategy 2011–2030

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Recreation Open Space

The open space primarily caters for informal recreation activity through grassed areas, play spaces, seating, pathways, picnic facilities and activity areas.

Sports ground

Primarily caters for sport and organised activities through playing fields and other structures, e.g. cricket pitch, hockey field, tenis courts. Could also include recreation features such as a play space or picnic setting.

Undeveloped

The land is undeveloped (no landscape, pathways or infrastructure).

Category Management Considerations Category

Management Considerations

Community

Community open space is generally developed with buildings and car parking. However, there is potential to connect the open space to surrounds through landscaping, pathways and integrated spaces.

Drainage

Whilst some drainage areas are undeveloped, there is potential to integrate natural features including wetlands and native vegetation in drainage areas.

Linear Busway

The open space along the O-Bahn busway is not easily accessible due to fencing and topography. However, there is potential to improve connections and enhance the landscape.

Linear Creekline

Linear creekline open space provides an opportunity to connect places and people and support physical activity through walking and bike riding. There is potential to significantly improve the connections and the quality and appeal of the open space.

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Linear Park

Linear Park open space is not connected to a water body or the O-Bahn and therefore may only be local or neighbourhood value. As such, development could be moderate and a formalised pathway may not be justified.

Linear RTLP

Any improvements and projects relating to the River Torrens Linear Park should be consistent with the Management Plan for the RTLP and regional approaches.

Natural Area

Natural areas require protection and management giving consideration to biodiversity, fire management and managed access. Sport will generally not be appropriate and recreation should be consistent with environmental objectives.

Parkway

Parkways can be disconnected and difficult to manage and may justify a review in the future.

Plantation

Landscapes linked to plantations should be drought tolerant and sustainable.

Recreation Open Space

Recreation Open Space requires a commitment to quality and the provision of facilities to support activities. However, a hierarchy approach is required as it is not feasible to develop all Recreation Open Space to the same level.

Sports ground

Sports grounds will generally be major facilities of district or regional value. Sports grounds are not considered to be local due to the catchment potential of sport. Sports grounds require a commitment to quality and facility provision in accordance with size, use and hierarchy.

Undeveloped

Undeveloped land will require a level of management to minimise the risks of snakes, fires and accidents.

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The Open Space Inventory in the Open Space Strategy Background Report (internal document) includes a suggested open space type for each parcel of open space based on an analysis of supply and site visits. Open Space Hierarchy Open space hierarchy is linked to geographical catchments using the City and Planning Precincts as a basis. Suggested definitions that are relevant to all categories of open space are provided below. Hierarchy Definitions Hierarchy

Hierarchy Definitions

Regional

Regional open space has the capacity to attract or benefit people from across and beyond the City of Tea Tree Gully due to its location, size, uniqueness, quality (including environmental quality) or focus of activity, e.g. regional, State.

District

District open space attracts or benefits people from across more than one Planning Precinct in the City of Tea Tree Gully (i.e. two or three Planning Precincts) due to the size, quality (including environmental quality) or function of the open space.

Neighbourhood

Neighbourhood open space caters for or benefits people across a Planning Precinct due to its size (larger than a local reserve), neighbourhood connection or appeal.

Local

Local open space primarily caters for or benefits a local community and will generally not attract people from a wider catchment. A local area is generally one suburbs. Sports grounds, linear open space and natural areas will generally not have a Local Hierarchy. The competitive nature of sport attracts people from a wide catchment, linear open space supports movements within and beyond neighbourhoods and natural areas will generally have broad community benefit.

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Sports grounds have been further categorised into Major District and Minor District hierarchies to reflect the different character and quality of the District level sportsgrounds. Definitions are as follows: Major District Sports ground – Major District Sports grounds are high quality and larger sports grounds with a strong multi-functional focus and the potential to support a range of activities, users and community members. Minor District Sports ground – Minor District Sports grounds draw from a wide catchment and have a multi-functional focus but may not be as high quality as a Major District Sports ground due to their smaller size or the existence of other major sports grounds nearby. The Open Space Inventory in the Open Space Strategy Background Report (internal document) includes a suggested hierarchy for each parcel of open space based on an analysis of supply and site visits. Open Space Standards A suggested guide for the standard of sport, recreation, linear and natural open space is provided below taking category and hierarchy into consideration. This ‘standard guide’ should be used to influence development and maintenance. The standards are described after the table below. Standard Linked to Category and Hierarchy Category and Hierarchy Regional Sports ground District Sports ground Neighbourhood Sports ground

High Quality

Standard Levels Good Quality

Safe and Appealing Quality

  

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Category and Hierarchy

High Quality

Regional Recreation Open Space

Standard Levels Good Quality

Safe and Appealing Quality

District Recreation Open Space

Neighbourhood Recreation Open Space Local Recreation Open Space Regional Linear Open Space

  

District Linear Open Space Neighbourhood Linear Open Space Regional Natural Area

  

District Natural Area

Neighbourhood Natural Area

Local Natural Area

Description of Standards High Quality The open space and related facilities are of superior quality and provide a high level of service to users. Some examples could be: • Quality civic space and amenities • Regularly irrigated grassed area or fields • Quality structures, e.g. quality shelters and seating • Unique facilities, e.g. innovative playground • High protection of the natural environment (flora and fauna). In addition, the settings and facilities would be safe and have a high level of appeal. The term appeal can be defined as 'attraction, interest, enjoyment'. 68

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Good Quality The open space and related facilities are of good quality and provide an appropriate level of service. Some examples could be: • Well maintained clubroom and amenities • Quality pathways and facilities to support recreation • Good sized playground with connected seating and shade • Regularly mown fields and maintained garden beds. In addition, the settings and facilities would be safe and appealing. Safe and Appealing Quality The open space and related facilities are of sound quality and are safe to use. In particular, the open space and facilities should: • Have appeal from a visual and user perspective, i.e. people will appreciate and where appropriate use the reserve or feature within a reserve • Meet statutory and/or Council health and safety and risk management requirements. Potential Development of Open Space Hierarchy A guide for developing open space category linked to hierarchy is provided below for sport, recreation, linear and natural open space. The guide lists facilities that could be considered for the main categories of open space in the City of Tea Tree Gully. Not all facilities would need to be provided and other facilities could be considered if there is demand and justification. The listing is a guide only.

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Sports grounds Open Space Type

Potential Development*

Regional Sports ground

• High standard ovals/fields (mown regularly and quality surface) • Irrigation and drainage • Specialised sports facilities, e.g. outdoor courts, lawn bowls, equestrian • Quality club room (ideally shared use and linked to broader community activities • Change rooms and toilets • Permanent or temporary fencing around the ground (for spectator control) • Support structures relating to the sport, e.g. cricket nets or training fields • Quality field lighting (generally for training but could be games standard) • Security lighting • Landscaping and shade • Pathways to and around the ground • Seating • Signage • On-site car parking (including parking with good disability access) • All buildings and pathways to be DDA compliant where possible with an emphasis on good disability access

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District Sports ground

• As for Regional Sports ground, although standards may not be as high, there could be fewer facilities, and spectator fencing should not be required. In particular: • Ovals and fields will generally be good standard instead of high standard (mown regularly and good surface) • A club room could be good standard and may not be as large or as high standard as a regional ground clubroom.

Neighbourhood Sports ground

• Ovals/fields that meet health and safety requirements if required for sport (e.g. level and well maintained) • Specialised sports facilities, e.g. outdoor courts • Toilet and change room facilities (minimum clubroom facilities, DDA compliant where possible) • Landscaping, shade, seating, signage • Off street car parking for safety (including disability parking)

*Could include a number of the items, but not necessarily all items. The main difference between sports grounds could relate more to the size and quality of development than the facilities provided.

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Recreation Open Space Open Space Type

Potential Development*

Regional Recreation Open Space

• Trees and landscaping (including gardens and shade trees) • Irrigated grassed areas (this could include sections of the park strategically irrigated) • Natural features including tall and shady trees (indigenous and native) • Civic and event spaces (distinctive paved areas, boardwalks) • Community art and cultural spaces • Picnic areas (including barbecue facilities) • Seating and tables • Shelters • Public toilet facilities • Walking tracks/pathways • Cycle tracks • High standard and innovative play space (including for children with a disability) • Outdoor courts (half court, community use courts) • Youth activity areas (e.g. skate, BMX) • Drinking fountains • Lighting (including security) • Signage and interpretation • Pathways to and within the park • On-site car parking (including disability car parking)

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• Links to other community facilities • Connection to cafes or restaurants (strategically located and designed to enhance the recreation value of the site and minimise impacts on the setting and environment) • Buildings, structures and pathways to be DDA compliant where possible with an emphasis on good disability access District Recreation Open Space

• Trees and landscaping • Irrigated grassed areas (this could include sections of the park strategically irrigated) • Picnic areas (including barbecue facilities) • Seating and tables • Shelters • Public toilet facilities • Walking tracks/pathways • Cycle tracks • Quality play space • Outdoor courts • Youth activity areas (e.g. skate, BMX) • Community arts • Water or natural features • Drinking fountains • Lighting (including security) • Signage and interpretation

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• Pathways to and within the park • On-site car parking (including disability car parking) • Links to other community facilities • Buildings, structures and pathways to be DDA compliant where possible with an emphasis on good disability access Whist a number of the facilities in regional open space could also be provided in district open space, the regional facilities would generally be higher quality, potentially larger in size and more unique or distinctive than facilities in a district setting. Neighbourhood Open Space

• Trees and landscaping • Irrigated grassed areas (this could be sections of the park strategically irrigated) • Seating • Walking tracks/pathways (wide enough for wheelchair access) • Play space (neighbourhood level). Generally a neighbouhood park will include a playground. • Youth activity areas (e.g. half court) • Drinking fountains • Security lighting • Signage • Pathways to and within the park (including disability access where possible)

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Local Open Space

• Trees and landscaping • Seating • Play space (local level), although a local park may not include a playground • Pathways to the park (including disability access where possible)

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Linear Open Space Open Space Type

Potential Development*

Regional Linear Open Space (Level 1 Connection)

• Trees and landscaping (including shady trees) • Shared use pathway (walking, cycling, jogging 3m width or 2.5m minimum, high quality surface, DDA compliant) • Irrigated grassed areas (this could include sections of the park strategically irrigated) • Natural features including trees, wetlands, native grasses, other native vegetation • Community art and cultural spaces • Picnic areas (including barbecue facilities) • Seating and tables • Shelters • Access to public toilet facilities • Quality play and youth spaces • Drinking fountains • Lighting (including security) • Signage and interpretation • Pathways to the linear park • Along street car parking (including disability car parking) • Buildings, structures and pathways to be DDA compliant where possible with an emphasis on good disability access

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District Linear Open Space (Level 2 Connection)

• Trees and landscaping (including shady trees) • Shared use pathway (walking, cycling, jogging 2.5m wide, 2m minimum, good quality surface, DDA compliant) • Natural features including trees, wetlands, native grasses, other native vegetation • Seating • Shelters • Access to public toilet facilities • Potential play and youth spaces • Drinking fountains • Signage and interpretation • Pathways to the linear park • Along street car parking • Buildings, structures and pathways to be DDA compliant where possible with an emphasis on good disability access

Neighbourhood Linear Open • Trees and landscaping (including shady trees) Space (Level 3 Connection) • Pathway (walking focus, 2m width, safe and appealing surface) • Seating • Signage • Pathways to the linear park (including disability access where possible) * Could include a number of the items, but not necessarily all items.

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Natural Area Open Space Open Space Type

Potential Development*

Regional Natural Area

• Native trees and vegetation • Walking tracks/pathways (generally natural surface) • Boardwalks • Potential water bodies (wetlands, creeklines, well managed) • Protection fencing or barriers • Seating • Shelter (sensitively developed) • Signage and interpretation

District Natural Area

• Native trees and vegetation • Walking tracks/pathways (generally natural surface) • Potential water bodies (wetlands, creeklines, well managed) • Seating • Shelter (sensitively developed) • Signage and interpretation

Neighbourhood Natural Area • Native trees and vegetation • Possibly seating • Possibly signage and interpretation * Could include a number of the items, but not necessarily all items. Maintenance Guidelines The 'Standards Guide' included in this Hierarchy Framework are relevant to maintenance as well as development. The suggested standards will result in regional and district open space being 78

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maintained to a higher standard than neighbourhood and local open space. However, all open space will be maintained to a safe and appealing standard as a minimum. Specific maintenance guidelines for the main characteristics of open space (sport, recreation, linear and natural) are provided below. These guidelines aim to connect to the Description of Standards on page 68. Sportsgrounds Open Space Type

Maintenance Guidelines

Regional Sports ground

• Ovals and fields mown on a regular basis and to a high standard (regularly to depend on growht conditions and user requirements • Surfaces of courts and other dedicated facilities to be maintained to a good standard • Buildings and amenities maintained to a good standard • Building surrounds and landscaping maintained to a good standard • Other structures such as pathways, seating, shelters and play equipment, to be maintained to a good standard and in accordance with Australian Standards and Disability Discrimination Act requirements

District Sports ground

• Ovals and fields mown on a regular basis and to a good standard (regularity to depend on growth conditions and user requirements) • Surfaces of courts and other dedicated facilities to be maintained to a good standard

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• Building surrounds and landscaping maintained to a safe and appealing standard • Other structures such as pathways, seating, shelters and play equipment, to be maintained to a safe and appealing standard and in accordance with Australian Standards and Disability Discrimination Act requirements Neighbourhood Sports ground

• Ovals and fields mown to a safe and appealing standard (regularity to depend on growth conditions) if required for sport • Buildings and amenities maintained to a safe and appealing standard • Building surrounds and landscaping maintained to a safe and appealing standard • Other structures such as pathways, seating, shelters and play equipment, to be maintained to a safe and appealing standard and in accordance with Australian Standards and Disability Discrimination Act requirements

Recreation Open Space Open Space Type

Maintenance Guidelines

Regional Open Space

• Irrigated areas to be mown on a regular basis and to a high standard (regularity to depend on growth conditions) • Garden beds to be maintained to a good standard • Non-irrigated areas to be maintained to a safe and appealing standard

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• Any structures or amenities, such as toilet facilities, picnic and barbecue areas, play spaces, seating, shelters and pathways to be maintained to a high standard and in accordance with Australin Standards and Disability Discrimination Act requirements District Open Space

• Irrigated areas to be mown on a regular basis and to a good standard (regularity to depend on growth conditions) • Garden beds to be maintained to a good standard • Non-irrigated areas to be maintained to a safe and appealing standard. • Any structures or amenities, such as toilet facilities, picnic and barbecue areas, play spaces, seating, shelters and pathways to be maintained to a high standard and in accordance with Australin Standards and Disability Discrimination Act requirements

Neighbourhood Open space

• Irrigated areas to be mown on a regular basis and to a safe and appealing standard (regularity to depend on growth conditions) • Non-irrigated areas to be maintained to a safe and appealing standard • Any structures or amenities, such as toilet facilities, picnic and barbecue areas, play spaces, seating, shelters and pathways to be maintained to a high standard and in accordance with Australin Standards and Disability Discrimination Act requirements

Local Open Space

• Irrigated areas to be mown to a safe and appealing standard (regularity to depend on growth conditions • Non-irrigated areas to be maintained to a safe and appealing standard

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City of Tea Tree Gully

571 Montague Road, Modbury SA 5092 PO Box 571, Modbury SA 5092 Telephone 08 8397 7444 www.teatreegully.sa.gov.au


Open Space Strategy 2011 - 2030  

Open Space Strategy 2011 - 2030

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