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Dave MacKENZIE

Subscription Service

Publisher / Editor Working hard towards Canadas best Transport Magazine. dave@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

It seems the magazine is a hit with you folks, as we have a lot of inquiries about getting subscription service. When we informed these folks that the magazine was free, they responded that they wanted to ensure they received a copy, and wanted to have a copy mailed to their home address.

Drew Thornson Journalist on the Road or BB (Big Brother) Sharing his many Years of Stories drew@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

Angie Dola Client Services (The person that does all the hard stuff we don’t want to!) angie@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

Patti Blackmore Graphic Designer Call (204) 888-8423 for your print layouts today!

Publications Mail Agreement No. 41859012

Contact Info: P/O Box 204 Dugald, MB R0E0K0 Telephone is (204) 997 8876 Fax is (204) 755 2641

So, after much discussion and research, we determined that we can indeed comply with your request. For more information contact customer services at subscribe@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca www.canadiantruckingmagazine.ca All advertisements, and/or editorials are ccepted, and published by Canadian Trucking Magazine on the representation that the advertiser, its advertising company, and/or the supplier of the editorials are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The advertiser, its advertising company, and/or the supplier of the editorials will defend, indemnify and hold Canadian Trucking Magazine harmless from and against any loss, expense, or other liability resulting from any claims, or suits, violation of privacy, plagiarism, copyright or trademark infringement and other claims that may rise out of publication of such advertisement and/or editorials. Press releases are expressly covered within the definition of editorials.

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Dave MacKENZIE Publisher / Editor Dave@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca Dave brings to the magazine 32 years of transport and managment experience. Dave has driven as a company driver to owner operator from recruiting and retention to executive positions, on the road in every condition driving big truck, and in enforement and compliance.

Ever over heard a Silver back say, “I will quit trucking when they take my cold body from the truck!”. Peter Buckley passed away doing the job he loved most, trucking. Peter was a good friend a loyal reader and contributor to CTM. You will be missed Pete. Friends of Pete that have pictures and stories, please submit to me so we can do a memorial page to our friend next issue. I hope it is not true and size matters a great deal. This month your CTM is 32 pages from the 64 you have grown use to. Part of this reduction can be blamed on this economy. In order to print and deliver this fine magazine to you, it takes advertisers. Ads in CTM pay the bills so I can place this each month in your hands free. So I will work harder to bring you a 64 page magazine back for the New Year, and you too can poke advertisers to place an Ad in your favorite magazine. Drop a copy on your recruiter’s desk and let them

know CTM is the magazine you pick up, read and keep in the truck. Positions have moved around here at CTM as well, making it so not only is I your Publisher but also you’re Editor for the time being. Seems everyone involved with bringing this to you was ill in the last month. Carl has stepped back for while, but I have a feeling we will be hearing more from him in the future. Vanessa is still around but going almost full time to university to chase her dreams. Angie will be taking over a lot of the sales work she was doing. Big Brother Drew was also under the weather last month but has sprung back to life. I always look forward to his articles and input into CTM. Most important is you the reader that I get to chat with as I wheel around the country delivering CTM. Your input and support has made CTM the most read magazine in transportation, so I am continually told. 3


Next Month December is our 1st year anniversary edition, so it will be one worth keeping. So keep those suggestions coming and let’s keep growing CTM to a magazine worth reading and keeping. Speaking of friends, Grumpy aka Bill met up with the crew at Wells Grey Inn for their famous milkshake and pizza. Can’t mention Wells Grey Inn enough each month as it is one of my best stops along the magazine run. Now is the time with winter on our heels to use Hwy 5 to avoid closed roads and landslides. Drop into Wells Grey Inn in Clearwater, BC and tell them Dave sent you. If I am there, coffee is on me. Other magazines print just 10 times a year, some every two months, CTM has been printed monthly every month for you. The Question is for you the reader should we take a December break and bring out a special January New Years Anniversary edition or printing typically a slow month in our industry? Please let me know you opinion at: Dave@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

Happy Trails, Dave

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Summary of Life GREAT TRUTHS THAT LITTLE CHILDREN HAVE LEARNED: 1) No matter how hard you try, you can't baptize cats.. 2) When your Mum is mad at your Dad, don't let her brush your hair. 3) If your sister hits you, don't hit her back. They always catch the second person. 4) Never ask your 3-year old brother to hold a tomato. 5) You can't trust dogs to watch your food. 6) Don't sneeze when someone is cutting your hair. 7) Never hold a Dust-Buster and a cat at the same time. 8) You can't hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk. 9) Don't wear polka-dot underwear under white shorts. 10) The best place to be when you're sad is Grandma's lap. GREAT TRUTHS THAT ADULTS HAVE LEARNED: 1) Raising teenagers is like nailing jelly to a tree. 2) Wrinkles don't hurt. 3) Families are like fudge...mostly sweet, with a few nuts 4) Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.. 5) Laughing is good exercise. It's like jogging on the inside. 6) Middle age is when you choose your cereal for the fiber, not the toy. GREAT TRUTHS ABOUT GROWING OLD 1) Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.. 2) Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get. 3) When you fall down, you wonder what else you can do while you're down there. 4) You're getting old when you get the same sensation from a rocking chair that you once got from a roller coaster. 5) It's frustrating when you know all the answers but nobody bothers to ask you the questions. 6) Time may be a great healer, but it's a lousy beautician 7) Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone. SUCCESS: At age 4 success is . . . . not piddling in your pants. At age 12 success is . . . having friends. At age 17 success is . . having a driver's license. At age 35 success is . . . ..having money. At age 50 success is . . . having money. At age 70 success is . . . having a drivers license. At age 75 success is . . . having friends. At age 80 success is ... . . not piddling in your pants. 8


Peter Buckley 1954 to 2009 Our good friend and fellow driver passed away Doing what he loved most on the road. Gone but never forgotten.


Summary of Life GREAT TRUTHS THAT LITTLE CHILDREN HAVE LEARNED: 1) No matter how hard you try, you can't baptize cats.. 2) When your Mum is mad at your Dad, don't let her brush your hair. 3) If your sister hits you, don't hit her back. They always catch the second person. 4) Never ask your 3-year old brother to hold a tomato. 5) You can't trust dogs to watch your food. 6) Don't sneeze when someone is cutting your hair. 7) Never hold a Dust-Buster and a cat at the same time. 8) You can't hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk. 9) Don't wear polka-dot underwear under white shorts. 10) The best place to be when you're sad is Grandma's lap. GREAT TRUTHS THAT ADULTS HAVE LEARNED: 1) Raising teenagers is like nailing jelly to a tree. 2) Wrinkles don't hurt. 3) Families are like fudge...mostly sweet, with a few nuts 4) Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.. 5) Laughing is good exercise. It's like jogging on the inside. 6) Middle age is when you choose your cereal for the fiber, not the toy. GREAT TRUTHS ABOUT GROWING OLD 1) Growing old is mandatory; growing up is optional.. 2) Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get. 3) When you fall down, you wonder what else you can do while you're down there. 4) You're getting old when you get the same sensation from a rocking chair that you once got from a roller coaster. 5) It's frustrating when you know all the answers but nobody bothers to ask you the questions. 6) Time may be a great healer, but it's a lousy beautician 7) Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone. SUCCESS: At age 4 success is . . . . not piddling in your pants. At age 12 success is . . . having friends. At age 17 success is . . having a driver's license. At age 35 success is . . . ..having money. At age 50 success is . . . having money. At age 70 success is . . . having a drivers license. At age 75 success is . . . having friends. At age 80 success is ... . . not piddling in your pants. 8


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Down The Road By Drew Thornson The shape of things? Hi folks, I hope everyone is enjoying the summer weather finally! It seems lately that most everyone is talking about the economy! Now I’ve been through a few recessions in the past, as we all have. I sure didn’t think that this one could have lasted as long, and gone so low as it has. In the trucking industry, we’ve watched as the volume of freight dropped. I see so many trucks “up against the fence”, and look at how the rates have been hit too! Scary stuff to say the least! There’s no problem finding a good parking spot at your favorite truck stops these days! We’ve watched as some of the major fleets have reduced in size, and some even closed the doors. And the stories of Owner Ops that have sold or lost their equipment to the banks, are just too many! Now we all know that things will eventually turn around and get better.

The big question is when? Most of the folks I’ve been talking to lately seem to think that we are looking at another 6 months to a year before we all see our economy getting back to normal. I’m starting to think that they might not be far off the mark. In the last few months, I’ve been seeing more miles, and a better “bottom line” each statement. Still not as much as I’d like to see, bet a darn sight better than this time last year! I’m starting to think it might even be a good time to upgrade some equipment! Right now, pricing is still really good, and interest rates are very competitive! Now those of you that know me, also know that I’m a Volvo guy, since I bought my first WIA back in 97’. The folks over at Beaver Volvo here in Winnipeg have always taken very good care of me! From all the guys in sales, (and I’ve known John Oades since my sand box days!), to Howie, and all his guys in the service department and on the shop floor, and even the guys in the parts department, that have always gone out of their way to answer all my questions! And when you see the owner Barry, expect him to say hello, and greet you with a smile and a handshake! All in all a great bunch of folks, with some great products!

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Driver to Driver Dave MacKENZIE Publisher / Editor Dave@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca Dave brings to the magazine 32 years of transport and managment experience. Dave has driven as a company driver to owner operator from recruiting and retention to executive positions, on the road in every condition driving big truck, and in enforement and compliance.

The CTM front page is special to me This month. As a person who served in the Military and Police in uniform has been overseas in the Middle east and the former Yugoslavia to name a few, I realized the sacrifice of someone’s son. daughter. father, mother, brothers and sisters that have falling. Politics is of no concern to a person in uniform, just doing thier job. If you see a person of uniform infront of you in the coffee shop, thank them and buy them that coffee. The CTM Girl page looks like an indorsement of Beaver Truck Sales. That is just background and thank you for the use of the truck and the great deals they give us on trucks. Buyers market right now.Don’t be surprised if you see me buying one and wraping it with CTM. I enjoy indorsing products I believe in and having them advertise in my magazine. Deer season my friends, are you ready for those furry friends to be dashing acrosss those dark highways? At CTM we try to advertise and promote items we use and can say without doubt you should have. If you have read my past driver to driver you have already seen the respect I have for grill protection and PathFindIR Cameras.

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You know that white knuckle twisting stomach feeling you get when dusk comes. I never had that as my truck I spent the few dollars to have a grill guard. I speak to drivers with a Herd on the front of the truck who share stories of downtime and accidents prevented. If I was on the road I can tell you my power unit would not be without a PathFindIR from our friends at Cruisercam. I took this unit on a demo in the van on a magazine run. I could see an animal ahead un total dark. Again no more white knuckle, as before I incure an animal strike I cantake defensive measures. I remember once a big buck jumped out infront of me in total darkness and I whacked him with my grill guard, he flipped around took out my airlines. I belive I would have seen him from way back with a PathFindIR. They cost around 3900$, but driver what does a strike cost in the middle of ON on the 11. Towing, down time, deductible, stress. They even have a lease program or if you are buying a new or used truck, add one and a HERD to the lease. Protect your investment and drive carefree those dark highways. If you have a PathFindIR or are buying one, drop me an email so I can do an article on you and your trucking. Happy Trails!


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MANITOBA TRUCKING ASSOCIATION NEWS RELEASES Industry Leader Recognized for Service to Industry Winnipeg, MB – October 30, 2009 – The Manitoba Trucking Association (MTA) announced Clayton Gording of YRC Reimer as the recipient of the 2009 RBC Royal Bank / MTA Service to Industry award, at their annual awards dinner Thursday night. Gordon is truly deserving of this award, having dedicated his working career to the trucking industry. Gording was born in rural Western Canada and was raised in a farming community, a fact he is proud of. His career in trucking began after he graduated from post-secondary studies and began in an entry level clerical position. He showcased his skills and his career flourished, first getting promoted to Sales Representative, and eventually Terminal Manager. His successes in that position led to him to larger terminals, and he settled into a 16 year career as Terminal manager at the company’s largest terminal in the country. In 2001, he assumed responsibility for terminal operations, line haul operations, vehicle purchasing and company-wide vehicle maintenance as Vice President of Terminal Operations for the Western Region. Two years ago, to culminate his career, Gordon was promoted to the position of President at YRC Reimer, a position he still holds today. Within the industry he has been a strong supporter of industry associations. He and his firm have supported the MTA for many years in the forms of time, resources and financial support. He ensures his staff commits to the industry as well, providing time and opportunities to support industry organizations across Canada. Gording is committed to the advancement of human resource issues which is demonstrate by his firm’s on-going participation in the numerous Canadian Trucking Human Resources Council (CTHRC) steering committees and working groups. He led his firm to become one of the earliest recognized and respected for establishing a standard for commercial driver training in Manitoba. The MTA congratulates Gording and is proud to call him this year’s recipient of this award. He sincerely exemplifies the conduct that garners the esteem and respect of his peers in not only Manitoba, but Canada’s trucking industry. The RBC Royal Bank / MTA “Service to Industry” award is presented to a deserving MTA member on an annual basis. Recipients are nominated by the membership of the MTA. Nominees must be MTA members in good standing of the association or an official of a member company, having conducted themselves in such a manner as to have gained the esteem of their fellow members and brought credit to the trucking industry through their contributions.

Manitoba Trucking Association Honours Devoted Associate Winnipeg, MB, October 30, 2009 – The Manitoba Trucking Association (MTA) is happy to announce Roger Gagne of Grote Industries as the recipient of the 2009 Payne Transportation LP / MTA Associate of the Year award. Gagne was not only born in Manitoba, but has also spent his entire working career in Manitoba, mainly in the trucking industry. He entered the industry with a position in shipping and receiving. Due to his skill and abilities, he was promoted to into sales and eventually worked his way to an outside sales position. After changing employers and position a few times he found a position he was born to embark on – Accounts Manager. Gagne has been a long time member of the MTA. The MTA Associated Trades Division is lucky to have someone as involved as Gagne; during his tenure he has served over eight years on the Associated Trades Division Executive Committee, he is known for his profound and sincere concern for the well-being of the Associated Trades Division and the MTA. Over the years, he has served on a numerous committees and has participated as an exhibitor at the truck shows and the Vehicle Maintenance Council (VMC) mini trade shows. He has further shown his support by volunteering to assist with the re-organization of the VMC and has provided his mentorship in assisting and guiding them in organizing its educational and social events. Gagne is well-known for being “fun spirited” and has successfully co-chaired golf tournaments and numerous MTA events dinners. His efforts go beyond his contributions to the MTA and the Associated Trades Division; has spent nine years as Chairman of the St. Vital Fourth Scouts where he supported the troops, organized events, and fundraising efforts. Roger is happily married and they have three grown children, Mike, Matthew and Marissa and now a new granddaughter. The MTA congratulates Gagne, who is a worthy recipient of the Associate of the Year award, being an active and committed member of the MTA and the VMC. The Payne Transportation LP / MTA “Associate of the Year” award is presented to a deserving MTA Associated Trades Division member on an annual basis. A nominee must be an Associated Trades Division member in good standing of the Association or an official of an Associated Trades member company, having conducted himself in such a manner as to have gained the esteem of their fellow members and having made a positive contribution to the programs or have contributed to the development of the Association.

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MANITOBA TRUCKING ASSOCIATION NEWS RELEASES Dispatcher’s Dedication Keeps Things Moving Winnipeg, MB – October 30, 2009 – A very deserving dispatcher from Winnipeg was presented with the Shaw Tracking / MTA Manitoba Dispatcher of the Year award. Dale Bjorklund, from Payne Transportation L.P., received his award at the Manitoba Trucking Association’s (MTA) annual awards dinner that took place on October 29. The MTA was overwhelmed with letters in support of Bjorklund’s nomination, including ones from his co-workers, customers, and even one from the president of Payne Transportation L.P., Tom Payne Jr. Has been employed at Payne Transportation L.P. for six years. Payne describes Bjorklund as having a “gregarious personality” and “very well-liked among his co-workers and contacts”. One of his co-workers says “Dale excels in all of the areas a driver expects of an efficient dispatcher.” Customer service is his top priority; he goes above and beyond what is required on a daily basis to make both drivers and customers happy, a trait that can be a challenge in the world of dispatching. Not only does Bjorklund excel at his job, he is also a driving force behind the charity drives at Payne Transportation L.P. He is very involved on their social committee, planning events to raise money for charity runs, organizing Christmas hampers, or company barbeques. A dedicated employee, and a pleasurable co-worker who gives back to the community, Bjorklund is an excellent example of what the Shaw Tracking / MTA Manitoba Dispatcher of the Year award aims to honour. Dispatchers play a critical role in the trucking industry. They are responsible for coordinating loads, pick-up and delivery times, drivers and equipment. In each case, the dispatcher must ensure that the trailer is suitable for loading and carrying the load and scheduling logistics to ensure the drivers have enough time to get the load to its destination, and that all the necessary licensing and endorsement requirements are met. They play an extremely important role in making sure that a trucking company is efficient and effective. In many cases, dispatchers deal directly with existing or new customers, and drivers, therefore exceptional customer service and communication skills are required. The Dispatcher of the Year Award, presented by Shaw Tracking in partnership with the Manitoba Trucking Association, is presented to the dispatcher who has demonstrated outstanding commitment to customer service, safety, driver well being, courtesy, team work, problem-solving and community and/or volunteer work.

Dennis Barkman Named Manitoba’s 2009 Driver of the Year Winnipeg, MB – October 30, 2009 - Dennis Barkman, a long-time employee of Penner International Inc, was recently awarded top honours at the 2009 Manitoba Trucking Association’s annual awards dinner. With his 27 years of driving experience, safety record, and community involvement, Barkman was an easy choice for the selection committee. Barkman’s experience in the trucking industry is wide-ranging. He grew up on a farm in rural Manitoba. After he left the family farm as a young man, he drove a cement mixer truck, feed truck, worked as a city driver, and hauled lumber from northern Manitoba over the course of a number of years. He did return to farming, but trucking was in his blood by this time, and he became a long-haul highway driver. He hasn’t looked back since becoming a long-haul driver, having driven for well over 20 years since he returned to the trucking industry. Barkman’s clear abstract and safety record is also enviable. He has taken driver training courses with Penner International and Reimer Express Lines. He has received numerous “Compliments of Driving Skill and Courtesy” nods from DriverCheck. He has also taken defensive driving courses for driving school buses. According to Jac Doerksen ,Driver Relations and O/O Business Development Manager at Penner International Inc, Barkman “continues to strive for excellence with safe and on-time delivery. He consistently maintains a great attitude. We are lucky to have him as part of our team.” His practical experience and classroom knowledge have both led Dennis to create something of a legacy in the trucking industry: he has taught his own son how to drive a long-haul tractor as well. Finally, Dennis is committed to his community. He has worked as a Sunday school department leader and was involved with a children’s camp for ten years (for four of those years, he was the camp director). His hobbies include woodworking, photography, and being able to spend quality time with this family. The Manitoba Driver of the Year Award is presented annually to one of the award winners from the previous year’s Driver of the Month competition. These awards are given based on commitment to industry, safety, outstanding acts, and customer service. From the Driver of the Month award winners, onerecipient emerges to win the Manitoba Driver of the Year Award. This award is sponsored by Volvo Trucks Canada. The Manitoba Trucking Association would like to take this opportunity to congratulate Dennis Barkman for his outstanding contributions to the trucking industry. It is as a result of drivers like Mr. Barkman that our industry is able to be safe, customer-service-oriented, and successful.

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Date Last Seen: May 21st, 1983 Place Last Seen: Highway 13 near Lougheed, Alberta File# 84-0073

27 Years old at time of disappearance Height: 183 cm; 6’0” Weight: 66 kg; 146 lbs Hair Colour: Brown Eye Colour: Blue

Desmond RUNSTEDLER

Date Last Seen: February 22, 2009 Place Last Seen: Grande Prairie, Alberta File# 2009209242 Agency: RCMP Grande Prairie Detachment (780-830-5700)

33 Years old at time of disappearance Height: 165 cm; 5’5” Weight: 64 kg; 140 lbs Hair Colour: Blonde Eye Colour: Blue

Jody Rae HOCKETT

www.albertamissingpersons.ca


www.albertamissingpersons.ca

If you have any information in regards to any missing person you are asked to please call the investigating agency at the numbers provided or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222TIPS (8477).

Date Last Seen: August 25th 2008 Place Last Seen: Edmonton, Alberta File# CA09048334 Agency: Edmonton Police Service (780-423-4567)

40 Years old at time of disappearance Height: 170 cm; 5’7” Weight: 66 kg; 146 lbs Hair Colour: Black Eye Colour: Brown

Annette HOLYWHITEMAN

Date Last Seen: March 7th, 2004 Place Last Seen: Eden Valley Reserve, Alberta File# 2004-0429 Agency: RCMP Turner Valley Detachment (403-933-4262)

36 Years old at time of disappearance Height: 178 cm; 5’10” Weight: 85 kg; 185 lbs Hair Colour: Black Eye Colour: Brown

David Robert GULLEY

Agency: RCMP Killam Forestburg Detachment (780 385 3502)


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Hugh Laurie - the star of the t.v. show “House” directs the field to “Start Your Engines!”


CTM GIRL LEANNE can’t wait for her photo shoot at NASCAR


SU-DO-KU RATING: MEDIUM

Complete the grid so that each row of nine square, each column, and each section of nine (three squares by three) contains the numbers 1 through 9 in any order. There is only one possible solution to each puzzle.

Hey driver, do you know who these are? Turn to page 30 to find out! 18


SU-DO-KU RATING: MEDIUM

Complete the grid so that each row of nine square, each column, and each section of nine (three squares by three) contains the numbers 1 through 9 in any order. There is only one possible solution to each puzzle.

Hey driver, do you know who these are? Turn to page 30 to find out! 18


Freedom of the Road Sandy Long For over 30 years, I have heard drivers speak of the freedom of the road and drivers likened to the old time cowboy. Asking one of those drivers to tell me what he/she was talking about, I would hear, “it is about working in the wide open spaces” or “I don’t have anyone looking over my shoulder.” I didn’t think too much about it, but never fully understood what they meant. Recently while working out my twoweek notice, I got talking to a driver for a company I was interested in. When he asked me why I was leaving the company I was with, I told him I didn’t like being micromanaged. I was an experienced driver and didn’t need dispatch holding my hand, and I just wanted to be told where to pick up the load, where and when to deliver it, and then be left alone to do my job. He got a phone call and I had an epiphany, I finally understood. The concept of freedom of the road means different things to different people depending on when they started trucking. "Liberty is not merely a privilege to be conferred; it is a habit to be acquired." - David Lloyd George. To a driver who started in the industry in the last 15 years or so, freedom of the road means living with satellite communications, no daily phone call

to dispatch and even on board computers that tell the driver when he/she needs to stop for the day. The computer monitors their speed, their location, gives them their dispatch, routes them and tells them where to fuel and how many gallons to put on. To these drivers, freedom of the road is freedom from having to really think about the run or do much more than get the load picked up and delivered safely and on time. Old hand drivers have a very different concept of freedom of the road, and yes, some like me don’t really understand that freedom until we lose it. Our freedom of the road consisted of being told where to pick up a load, where to take it and what time to be there, and then left alone other than a daily check call to dispatch and perhaps the broker. We were treated like professionals who knew how to route ourselves, figure out for ourselves where to stop to fuel within the company policies, when we needed to stop to take a nap, and we got the job done without being constantly monitored. Understanding the differences between the different concepts of freedom of the road helped me to understand why old time truckers have been likened to the old time cowboy. The old time cowboy was told by his boss to go check fence or round up cattle, and then he went out and did it without being checked on to see if he actuSandy’s article continue on pg 28… 27


Freedom of the Road from pg 27… ally did the job. The cowboy’s boss just knew he would do the job and do it well; it was a point of cowboy honor. They didn’t have to be monitored constantly just like truckers didn’t used to be monitored; it was a point of trucker‘s honor. Is there one freedom of the road concept better than the other concept? Perhaps not, but it depends on your perspective. To me, with my more liberal concept of freedom of the road, trying to adapt into a company who monitors their drivers constantly makes me feel smothered and off balance, while to a newer driver they would feel protected and free. “When an American says that he loves his country, he means not only that he loves the New England hills, the prairies glistening in the sun, the wide and rising plains, the great mountains, and the sea. He means that he loves an inner air, an inner light in which freedom lives and in which a man can draw a breath of self-respect.” - Adlai Stevenson Freedom of the road is how one perceives one’s self and how one looks at life. To me, freedom of the road is how I do my job to the best of my ability without total supervision, and in that lays my self-respect and my downfall.

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With the epiphany came the realization that I do not fit easily into the new concept of freedom of the road the newer drivers have and the companies now define. In trying to do so, I lost my inner light where freedom lives, my self-respect and my joy in trucking became dim. Guard your concept of freedom of the road; revel in it, enjoy it, love it, never let it go. It is who you are and what you do. It is the foundation of your career as a driver and a person; it is why you drive truck. “Free people, remember this maxim: We may acquire liberty, but it is never recovered if it is once lost." Jean Jacques Rousseau Ya’ll be safe out there! Sandy Long is a long time truck driver who is also very active within the trucking industry. She is a freelance writer for layover.com, a life member of OOIDA, member of the WIT and owner of two websites: Trailer Truckin’ Tech , a yahoo group dedicated to the education of new and prospective truck drivers and www.satinandsteelsisterhood.com for women in non traditional jobs. Sandy welcomes comments at ladygodiva1953@yahoo.com www. satin and steel sisterhood.com Do not cuss a trucker or a farmer with your mouth full!


Date Last Seen: August 31, 2000 Place Last Seen: Edmonton, Alberta File# 00-093632

27 Years old at time of disappearance Height: 178 cm; 5’10” Weight: 66 kg; 146 lbs Hair Colour: Brown Eye Colour: Blue

Jutta Anna BENTZ

Date Last Seen: September 17, 1995 Place Last Seen: Airdrie, Alberta File# 1995-4331 Agency: RCMP Airdrie Detachment (403-945-7267)

23 Years old at time of disappearance Height: 175 cm; 5’9” Weight: 61 kg; 135 lbs Hair Colour: Brown Eye Colour: Blue

Jason Arthur MISURKO

HAVE YOU SEEN ANY OF THESE PEOPLE?


If you have any information in regards to any missing person you are asked to please call the investigating agency at the numbers provided or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477). www.albertamissingpersons.ca

Date Last Seen: January 18, 2008 Place Last Seen: King Henry Pub, Calgary, Alberta File# 2008029409 Agency: Calgary Police Service (403-266-1234)

27 Years old at time of disappearance Height: 183 cm; 6’0” Weight: 82 kg; 180 lbs Hair Colour: Brown Eye Colour: Brown

Bradley Michael WOROBECK

Date Last Seen: April 1, 2001 Place Last Seen: Blood Indian Reserve, Alberta File# 1999-7145 Agency: Blood Tribe Police Service (403-737-3800)

34 Years old at time of disappearance Height: 183 cm; 6’0” Weight: 77 kg; 169 lbs Hair Colour: Black Eye Colour: Brown

John Derek OLD SHOES

Agency: Edmonton Police Service (780-423-4567)


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You’ve heard about the south side of Chicago and a guy named Leroy Brown. Well, on the north side of St. Louis, Leroy had a counterpart named Joe Willyard. Born in the inner city, Joe was raised by a step-father who didn’t work out any better than the father who’d left soon after his birth. No one taught him to play baseball or took him hunting. There was no father image in his young life and no guidance – just a hole called loneliness. At the tender age of 13 Joe had a full time interest in alcohol, was an alcoholic by age 14 and was mainlining drugs by 17. After a short hitch in the army, he celebrated a lonely nineteenth birthday in prison. Joe came out harder and wilder. He was mean to the core and carried an attitude. Appropriately, he found employment as a nightclub bouncer. During this period in his life, his girl-

friend’s brother was killed in a drug deal. Always the protector, Joe agreed to set up the killer for the murdered boy’s father to avenge. When he went to a bar to finger the triggerman, the word of his mission had already gotten around. When he walked out the door, he was the one who got shot. But that was child’s play compared to an episode a few months later. In the bar where he worked, a guy gave a waitress a hard time and Joe called the loudmouth outside to fight. Joe had just taken his fighting stance when he noticed the man pull a gun. The shot exploded into his chest, penetrating his right lung. But before Joe hit the ground, he pulled out his own gun and shot his assailant three times, completely blowing away his stomach. Only plea-bargaining kept him out of prison again. Just like in the old westerns, everyone wanted to take on the bad bouncer. So Joe decided to move. In the following years, he experienced one continual bout of drinking and drugs, until he found himself panhandling on the streets of Boston to get enough money for another cheap bottle of white port wine to drink alone.


Joe had been driving a truck on and off since he got out of prison and had been married three times. Ultimately he found himself in a detox center trying to get off booze. He wanted to be free from the bottle but was continually set off by things that drove him back to it. That’s why on December 26, 1976 he awoke one morning in a mental ward in Milan, Illinois. He was closely guarded because they were afraid that Joe had become as suicidal as he was homicidal. Joe Willard decided at that moment that he’d taken his last drink, and he’s been dry ever since. But he was still a lost man. Sober but lost. His mother had sent him to Sunday school and church when he was young. He had a head full of facts about God, but his heart was empty. Although he quit drinking, he was still doing pills and snorting coke. Right up until May 19, 1984. On that day, a driving rainstorm caused Joe to shut down one night in Bartons, Oklahoma, where he got an overwhelming urge to go to church. “I walked into that little Pentecostal church alone. And when the pastor gave the call to surrender my life to Jesus Christ, I did. There was no hokey stuff about it. I meant business. I prayed, ‘Lord, show me where to go, what to do and I will obey.” The saving, cleansing presence of Jesus Christ took up residence in the empty heart of the tough guy from the north side of St. Louis. When he walked back to his truck, he noticed that he was conveniently parked right next to a dumpster. There he dumped the last of his drugs. He might be alone from time to time, but he’d never be lonely again. Since that time, Joe Willyard’s iden-

tity has been caught up in the person of Jesus Christ. His passion has become introducing others to his Lord. You may have seen Joe Willyard’s Peterbilt somewhere on the road. It’s the one with the gorgeous mural of the sunset over the ocean painted on the side. On the hood’s painted, “Jesus is my Pilot.” Ont he back’s the decal, “Get right with God or get left.” Looking back on his own troubled, lonely childhood, Joe urges truckers to commit their lives to the Lord and “train up a child in the way he should go.” He knows that youth cannot get involved in the things of God too early. The Bible verse that drives him most is found in Luke 14:23: “Go out to the roads…and make them come in” (pg. 87). Truckers have given their hearts to the Lord under the illumination of the big spotlight on Joe’s truck. “A constant problem facing truckers is loneliness,” says Joe. “The temptation of prostitution lies mainly in just wanting to be with someone, even if it’s just for a few minutes. A woman’s voice on the CB sounds like heaven. It can be a lonely life.” “Becoming a follower of Jesus means that Satan is taken out and Christ comes in. The lonely spot in all of us is filled with the Son of God. Christ can give all the peace and companionship a man seeks.”


Russ and Pat from the HUSKY in Lloydminister!

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NOVEMBER 2009 WEB MAGAZINE