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Canadian Trucking Magazine www.canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

Tiffany invites you to check out our NASCAR coverage inside


Alberta business is growing, Immediate need for Owner Operators for dedicated runs 10 O/O Teams required in Toronto to run South 5 O/O’s required in Vancouver to run to Calgary Turnpike Drivers required out of Calgary Dedicated Runs $350 Team Bonus on Produce Loads

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AB & SK REGION

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April 2009

Canadian Trucking Magazine


Canadian Trucking Magazine

April 2009

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Canadian Trucking Magazine www.canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

Carl Sveinson publisher/Editor

girl@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

Subscription Service

(The guy that goofs up the SudoKu, Dani!)

carl@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca Dave MacKenzie Director of Client Services Official sales guy/coffee shop bandit!

dave@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca Angie Dola Client Services (The person that does all the stuff we don’t want to!)

Angie@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

It seems the magazine is a hit with you folks, as we have a lot of inquiries about getting subscription service. When we informed these folks that the magazine was free, they responded that they wanted to ensure they received a copy, and wanted to have a copy mailed to their home address. So, after much discussion and research, we determined that we can indeed comply with your request. There is still no charge for the magazine, however minimal shipping and handling costs will be involved, as there is a financial burden involved with distributing the magazines through the mail system. For more information contact customer services at subscribe@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca

Harley Official CTM cat. Sparkles Official CTM dog. Contact info: P/O Box 6 Stn F Wpg Mb R2L 2A5 Telephone is (204) 997 8876 Fax is (204) 755 2641

CTM Girl of the Month If you know someone that would qualify for this spot, have them contact: ctm4

All advertisements, and/or editorials are accepted, and published by Canadian Trucking Magazine on the representation that the advertiser, its advertising company, and/or the supplier of the editorials are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The advertiser, its advertising company, and/or the supplier of the editorials will defend, indemnify and hold Canadian Trucking Magazine harmless from and against any loss, expense, or other liability resulting from any claims, or suits, violation of privacy, plagiarism, copyright or trademark infringement and other claims that may rise out of publication of such advertisement and/or editorials. Press releases are expressly covered within the definition of editorials.

April 2009

Canadian Trucking Magazine


Carl Sveinson Editor Canadian Trucking Magazine A Toast to the Silver-Backs! Hello brothers and sisters of the highway, as I sit back with my hands clasped behind my head, and contemplate the state of the industry, it occurs to me that I am out of coffee. Now my lovely wife Angela (not the Angela Dola listed in the company directory) understands my lust for good, fresh coffee, and ensures that we have a stock of coffee beans ready for grinding. My love of coffee developed during my driving days, which is unusual because back in the day finding a good cup of coffee on the road was like having more than ten minutes of dry weather in Northern Ontario in December. It didn’t happen often, but when it did you remembered the date and location. For the record, I don’t ever recall driving through Barrie without experiencing a snow squall. During my days as a trainee a sage old veteran named Art Orme (forgive me Art if I misspelled your last name) was providing me with my training. While stopped at a truck stop in Minnesota for breakfast he advised me not to have the third cup of coffee I was attempting to squeeze out the server. I looked at him with a quizzical look on my face; kind of like the one you would get from a youngster who was told he couldn’t have another cookie. Then he explained, “Junior, it’s a case of simple physics, what goes in, must come out, and I don’t want to be stopping every ten minCanadian Trucking Magazine

utes for bathroom breaks!” I would spend many hours drawing upon Art’s experience while I had the opportunity. I recognized that drivers like him were walking, or rather driving, libraries of information. They have driven down roads I had only seen on maps, and they have experienced driving conditions I have only seen in safety videos. So poor Art had this pup tugging on his pant leg for a couple months. To Art’s credit, he never complained, he would simply look at me from under his feather-rimmed cowboy hat, puff on his pipe, and pass more wisdom my way. Another fellow managed to teach me the ways of the Rock Pile, and how to gently caress the curves, and hills of this beautiful, but dangerous stretch of highway. This man was Walter Scott, who at the time wasn’t a grizzled veteran, but was on the cusp of receiving this title. A lot of the dialogue he utilized can’t be printed on these pages, but suffice it to say that he was a colorful individual that had a unique method of communicating. For a man who taught us green-backed rookies how to drive through the mountains, he had a HUGE level of patience, and a delightful sense of humor. Drivers like Art and Walter are true treasures. They have lived through the “good April 2009

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old days” of trucking, (which most of the guys say weren’t really that good), and would readily provide you a history lesson on the industry. I always loved encountering a group of the “grizzled” veterans while I was out on the road. I would sit back, shut my mouth, and listen to the stories they would relate. I realize that some, okay, most of the stories were embellished somewhat, but hey, why let the facts get in the way of a good story, right? These drivers new how to; fix a leaking airline with nothing but a shoelace and bubble gum, squeeze seventy-five hours of work into a seventy hour period, find a way to pass through Chicago in twenty minutes (and convince a DOT officer it could be done!), and convince a log auditor that he could drive from Calgary to Winnipeg in under 13 hours by taking the short cut, instead of the Trans Canada… .. Leaving the auditor scratching their head and scrambling for this “new and improved” road atlas the driver was talking about. Most importantly, they were willing to pass their knowledge on to the new drivers. Training a green driver is not what they had in mind when they started driving. Most drivers like the idea of having their privacy, not having to share the cramped quarters with a stranger. When you add the stress that comes with running a new driver through; the mountains, snow covered roads, freezing rain, and Houston traffic, you create a whole new role for them. Anybody that has been a trainer for more than one trainee deserves special recognition. So to the old timers like Art Orme, Walter Scott, and the many others who have served to educate us “newbies”, but go unnoticed, I raise my coffee cup to you! The 6

millions of miles that you have traveled, and the countless stories you have shared, contribute greatly to this industry. To you newer drivers I offer a word of advice. Whenever you happen to stumble upon a group of silver-backs sharing stories, pull up a chair, grab another cup of coffee, and listen carefully. Who knows, you may learn something! To all of the drivers, men and women, that have made these contributions……. Thank you. Drive safely!

WAiT!! I ain’t done yet! There is one more person I would like to pay a special homage to. It is the late, great, Odis Waters. Odie came to Canada from Mississippi, sometime back in the 70’s, and took up truck driving. Odie had an extremely difficult life, being predeceased by his own son, and having had several vicious battles with cancer. The amazing thing about him, was during the darkest times in his life, he would smile through it all. He would tow his oxygen bottle into the office to visit. He said he missed the comradery of the drivers and the office folks. Even though he was in great pain, and having difficulty, he was always smiling. No matter how bad he was feeling, he had a kind word for everyone. Odie, old friend, thank you for your inspiration, you will be remembered always by those who were fortunate enough to know you. Someday we will sit down for coffee and battered halibut, and tease the waitresses in the truck stop-up above. Cheers, Odie!

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Canadian Trucking Magazine


Driver to Driver Dave MacKenzie Director of Client Services Canadian Trucking Magazine How many of us have driven down the number 5 in BC through Clearwater, noticed the Wells Gray Inn, but never stopped. I stopped, and it was a great experience! They have a 24 Hr restaurant with home made food, priced right. Truck parking in behind In the back and down the road. But Driver please don’t idle behind the motel where people are sleeping. Great rooms and ask for the CTM discount! Of course behave yourself, or you will be shown the door. There are many great spots for drivers to stop and enjoy life on the road. My plan to is check out all my old haunts, and new ones, and report the great places to stop, and what makes these places great. If you disagree with me please send me an email telling me why. I will try to negotiate special CTM rates on rooms for all of us.

Whitewood SK is a great place to stop, eat, and spend some time on your coloring book. I like to stop there on the way West and on the way back. Always found it friendly and the food reasonably priced and good. Easy on/off access - not a paved lot, but loads of parking. The people at Whitewood has always treated the trucker fairly and friendly. This is important, as there are complaints that at some truck stops, some of the people there don’t realize the value of the Transport Driver. If you buy fuel it is to the tune of up to 6 or 7 hundred dollars. We always tip and try to be polite even after the hardest day on the road. The majority of us eat and spend money at these stops. The Horseshoe corner Diner in Gull Lake SK, Larry and Deb Baily own this fine eatery Great priced and home cooking again driver.

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Once again I can recommend the friendly atmosphere here.

Barb above looked after me with the special and apple crisp and her great friendly nature, Tip heavy drivers, she puts up with us. At the fuel desk Judy, Judy, Judy who is just the best. Makes that bad weather trip not so bad when you get greeted with a warm friendly smile and professionalism. Plus it means I made it down the hill. You can certainly see the large sized hot tub that sure feels good after miles of road.

The Road King earns it name when it comes to a great stop in Cowtown. Why, for me it is location, easy parking, Timmies and the people. I like the RoadKing as the fuel is priced right, the food isn’t out of line and it has everything right there. Not to mention the special pricing on a room if you mention Dave from CTM sent you. Clean large rooms Next on my list is Sicamous to the Husky for some Keno, and breakfast along with a great visit with Kathy who works the fuel counter. She has been there a few years, and before that at the Saskatoon Husky. Kathy knows a lot of us. And once Owners Jeff & Tanya run a very clean warm and driver friendly Husky. with big screen TVs and a hot shower. Also I get to chat with old friends and meet new ones, the readers of CTM. I don’t have to tell you about Calgary traffic in the last few years if you have been there. There are several easy fast moving truck routes in and out of the Roadking. Always happy to see the welcoming sight of the Golden Husky. Always happy to see the welcoming sight of the Golden Husky. Good people and great food. Good People you can see the example Owners Bruce & Janie Omelchuk set here. Clean friendly great parking and the specials are great. You have to try there home made apple crisp. 8

After I have lost some money and eaten some

good grub, it is off to Kelowna down to Osoyoos and up to Hope and Chilliwack. There I get a grand stay at the Best Western Rainbow Country Inn, right there in the center of all the truck stops.

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Canadian Trucking Magazine


If you are stuck in Chilliwack for the night, tell them Dave sent you for the CTM rate if available. Enjoy a big room, hot tub, pool, and all the amenities. I certainly kick back and enjoy this Inn. Of course Gloria’s Wells Grey Inn in Clearwater, BC , what a great place to stop.

This is great food 24 hours every day.dinner is a must in Chilliwack. If you have a drop in Edmonton and you’re early and looking for a great stop and meal with oversized parking just jump on the just jump on the 32 off the 16 north to White-

CTM. But remember if you enjoy the games remember gambling is just that. Take in fun money to have fun! The casino is there for amusement, and mental relaxation and if you hit big, great! You’re a winner enjoying one of their great meals. Edmonton has a lot of stops for me. I would

stay at the West Edmonton Truckland. When my drops or picks were on the west side of the city. Less traffic to fight, loads of parking. There is everything there! Drivers lounge several restaurants businesses and stores. The Super 8 Motel is modern, Clean and reasonably priced with the CTM discount. I check in and use this as my base for deliveries in North west Edmonton. In the morning if you grabbed a room there is a free breakfast. I headed off to the East side of Edmonton for a visit with Grumpy pulling for TransX. I grabbed a room at the RoadKing at Sherwood Park. They have quit a renovation going on there and I will be writing an article on that.

court. After take the 43 back down to the 16 to Edmonton and you have only taken an extra hour drive for some of the best food and entertainment at the Eagle River Casino & Travel Plaza. The back cover has a special offer for the Eagle River Casino & Travel Plaza from Canadian Trucking Magazine

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I have always found the RoadKing Clean friendly and very good shower facilities. The rooms are amazing and you receive a discount when you mention CTM. Now East bound and down back to Winterpeg. I drop along the 16 east with a coffee break at the Husky in Lloyd and a visit with an old friend Peter Buckley who has been on the road a long time. Russ at the Husky in Lloyd has been there over 40 years and 3 buildings and sure knows how to treat us right. Off for some pie at the New Highway 16 Truck Stop or as you recognize it the Payton Truck Stop right between Lloyd and the Battlefords. Liz was serving and looking after drivers as she has done for (blank) years. I want to print some of the stories she has, and if you are ever in there ask her about her April 1st pranks she has done on drivers. By the way the blank was on purpose not to get into trouble with Liz. One of my last coffee stops is Husky Mohawk Brandon with a warm welcome from owner Vic Falk and his family. I have been told a rumour that Bev who has served us there for over 20 years is retiring in the future. If you get past there drop in and thanks her for over 20 years of putting up with us. I thinking CTM has something special coming her way.

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There are so many good stops and great people at those stops. Never let a bad stop and inexperienced unappreciative employee goat you into a fight or ruin your day or drive. After 32 years on the road I have run into such a spot and if you have to, write me so we can let others know that there is an issue. I don’t think my articles should be all the great places, I think if there is a problem stop out there and I have received several emails or calls, it is time someone wrote about it. Selkirk Park Inn in Golden what a great place to lay your head. Special CTM room pricing an Ad in this magazine. Very friendly, clean and high speed internet. If you have left Edmonton to the beach or the beach eastbound 5, this is a great spot to stop, if for nothing more to eat and relax. So drivers keep your input coming, we have gone to 64 pages due to demand and plan a special July Fergus issue which will be available East and West. This magazine is for transport so send in your fave pet pictures to travelcompanion@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca. Get your stories printed at

downtheroad@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca . Drop me a line at Dave@Canadiantruckingmagazine.ca. Or feel free to call me at (204) 997 8876. Happy Trails from Dave!

April 2009

Canadian Trucking Magazine


CTM Pet Showcase

Introducing the lovely BELLA! She is modelling a lovely pink hoodie!

And also introducing HARLEY, the official cat of CTM! 11

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Canadian Trucking Magazine


CAlGARY

WiNNipEG

615 Macleod Trail S.E. Suite #100A Rocky Mountain plaza pH 403-262-1455 FAX 403-269-6410

386 Broadway Suite #810 pH 204-943-9494 FAX 204-943-4540

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Down the Road By Drew Thornson Choices to make A few days ago, I was having a chat with a couple of newer drivers over a coffee. We were gabbing about the trucking industry mostly. Pretty common stuff at most truck stops in North America, as we all know. The main thing we talked about was how they both had worked for different trucking companies, and how they had the same horror stories about going broke while working their butts off. They both had told me about running 12,000 miles and made way less than if they had been just company drivers. Now they both had only started driving a year or so ago. Well it turns out they had both gone into one of those “never, never” plans. It’s become a common place thing nowadays, where a carrier will offer a plan like this to their drivers. There are a number of advantages and dis-adCanadian Trucking Magazine

vantages to these types of plans. Unfortunately, most of us have heard the same story too many times. A driver gets into one of these plans without thinking the whole situation through. My usual response to a novice driver when they start talking about getting their own truck is to first get at least a few years experience before making that move. Those first few years are usually filled with “learning the ropes”, (and generally, more than one big mistake!) The next thing that I try to explain, is that owning (or leasing) a truck is a business. Most new drivers seem to look at being an owner operator as some form of a status symbol. I’ve seen too many rookies get those first few statements and think that they’ve hit it big! They forget that they are going to be faced with all the rest of the many joys that come with that ownership. Things like preventative maintenance, (oil changes, etc...), tires and breakdowns and god forbid accidents. The next thing, what about the company itself ? Ever since deregulation, there are so many trucking companies out there. I’d like to think that most are going to be fair with to their drivers and owner ops. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case. I usually suggest, do your homework. Check with some of the people working there. Find out how they April 2009

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feel they are treated by the company. Maybe contact the local trucking association? There’s nothing worse than going to work for a company, and then not getting paid for your work. And don’t kid yourself, it still happens! Last, if a deal sounds too good to be true, it usually is! A lot of the people looking to hire a driver, will generally give you their sales pitch, highlighting all the great things, and forget to

mention all that might be bad about the company. And, just remember to read all the “fine print” before getting into any contract.

su-do-ku

Hey Driver, do you know who this is? Go to page 59.

RATING: MEDIUM

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Complete the grid so that each row of nine squares, each column, and each section of nine(three squares by three) contains the numbers 1 through 9 in any order. There is only one possible solution to each puzzle. 14

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Canadian Trucking Magazine


Dawn Truell President Cross Border Services GlOBAl ECONOMY & ADViSORiES Our economy is suffering, we all can see that. Let us not lose sight of the truly important things in life, the reason that we work so hard every day, our families. When push comes to shove we need to pull together, as a family, a group, a community, and a Country. Changing perspective sometimes in life can make a difference. Certain things in life that happen tend to do just that. Recently one of my children fought through a medical emergency; thank God here in Canada we have a Health Care System. The International Monetary Fund says Canada is "better placed than many countries" but its economy will still likely suffer further in the near term amid "the rapid deterioration in Canadian Trucking Magazine

the global environment." "Real exports and output have fallen and are likely to decline further in coming months," stated Charles Kramer, head of a mission from the global economic stabilization agency that visited Canada in late February and early March. "Weakening global demand has prompted a retreat in commodity prices, with effects particularly on the western provinces. Global financial strains have also spilled over to Canada, although its financial system is faring better than many abroad." Canada will emerge from the global recession before any other country and in a stronger economic position than ever, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said. FAST CARD ISSUES: If you have questions or concerns about your FAST Card on the Canadian side of the border you can call: 1-800-8427647. If you feel that you are being denied your FAST Card by the U.S. Customs & Border Protection for any unjust reason or feel that you are being mistreated or being over examined at the U.S. Border points in Secondary Screening, there is a place that you can ask for help and file a complaint: Department of Homeland Security’s One-Stop Travelers’ Redress. http://www.dhs.gov/xtrvlsec/programs/gc_1169673653081.shtm PIP, C-TPAT & FAST - All Canadian and U.S. Companies are encouraged April 2009

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to actively participate in the PIP, CTPAT & FAST programs to ensure Trade continues throughout North America. Cross Border Services encourages all to comply ASAP. Recently Cross Border Services has joined forces with Susan Mulligan of Millbank Consultants, who can assist us with IFTA, IRP, FMCSA, and CVOR. The Government of Canada reminds Canadian citizens to apply for a passport. Starting June 1, 2009, you will be required to present a valid passport, a NEXUS or Free and Secure Trade (FAST) card, or an enhanced driver's licence/enhanced identification card when seeking to enter the United States. Canadian citizens 15 years of age or under will only require proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate or a Canadian citizenship card. For further information on any of the above please contact: crossborderservices@cogeco.net 905-973-9136.

* Hey Driver! Do you recognize these people? Turn to page 59 to find out! 16

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Words to .........live by?? A day without sunshine is......... night. 42.7 percent of all statistics are made up on the spot. 99 percent of lawyers give the rest a bad name. He who laughs last, thinks slowest. The early bird may get the worm, but the second mouse gets the cheese in the trap. Support bacteria. They're the only culture some people have. A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory. Change is inevitable, except from vending machines. if you think nobody cares, try missing a couple of payments. OK, so what's the speed of dark? When everything is coming your way, you're in the wrong lane. Hard work pays off in the future. laziness pays off now. How much deeper would the ocean be without sponges? Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines. What happens if you get scared half to death, twice? Why do psychics have to ask you your name? inside every older person is a younger person wondering, 'What the heck happened?' Just remember -- if the world didn't suck, we would all fall off. light travels faster than sound. That's why some people appear bright until you hear them speak. life isn't like a box of chocolates. it's more like a jar of jalapenos. What you do today, might burn your butt tomorrow. Canadian Trucking Magazine

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Mission: Women In Trucking was established to encourage the employment of women in the trucking industry, promote their accomplishments and minimize obstacles faced by women in trucking. The organization is an active group that finds opportunities to promote the accomplishments of women in the industry. This organization has been created for you, both men and women, who are either involved in the industry, or have a career interest in being a part of one of the largest networks of professionals in North America. Nearly one out of fourteen workers are already employed in jobs that support the transportation industry, but the need for drivers and other trucking professionals continues to increase. You can become a member of Women in Trucking by completing the application. Your support of this non-profit organization will help us provide the needed resources to encourage women to become employed in the trucking industry. Additionally, your dues will help us to motivate the transportation industry to look closely at any obstacles that might prevent women (and men) from considering a career in trucking. Our goal is to provide a greater understanding of some of the special challenges women face on the road. From restroom parity at loading docks, to ergonomically designed cabs in the trucks, women often find themselves faced with obstacles that might not be obvious to those who found them acceptable in the past. Thank you for your interest in Women In Trucking. We look forward to serving you and supporting your career in the transportation industry. Ellen Voie President/CEO Women In Trucking PO Box 400 Plover, WI 54467-0400 1-888-GO4-WITA (1.888.464.9482)

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people with similar interests or concerns who interact and remain in informal contact for mutual assistance or support.” Networking is different from many other relationships as the purpose of the interaction is “mutual assistance or support.” In other words, networking has a purpose.

Ellen Voie CAE President/CEO Women In Trucking, Inc The Value in Networking At a recent Women In Trucking reception, two drivers sitting next to each other discovered that they worked for the same carrier. As they left the event that evening, they vowed to stay in touch and maintain their newfound friendship. These two women knew that they could learn from each other and lean on each other; they knew the value of networking. For some women in the transportation industry, networking often meant looking for another female face in a crowd of trucking company executives. For female drivers spending their day in the cab of a truck, networking was even more difficult. With a ratio of 20 to one, whether in the truck or the corporate office, women were almost assured of being in the minority at industry events. The American Heritage Dictionary defines networking as “an extended group of Canadian Trucking Magazine

We can all use a little help these days. Whether we’re looking for advice, a career move or just someone who understands our perspective, it’s nice to have someone who is willing to offer that encouragement or guidance. That’s the value in networking. So, how can you become more connected? In his book, “Never Eat Alone,” Keith Ferrazzi offers his tips on how to utilize the power of relationships to further your career. As you can probably guess by the title, it’s not something that you do one occasion; it’s a way of life you adopt to make connections for a lifetime. How can you find value in networking? First, determine what you want from your interactions. What is your mission? Are you thinking about expanding your fleet, or are your sights set on climbing the corporate ladder? Write down your goal and identify who can help you reach that ambition and then start networking. Be aware of industry leaders and others who can help you become more successful in your career aspiration. Ferrazzi suggests that you expand your April 2009

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networking circle by looking for people he calls “connectors,” or those who can help you link you to “important” people. Connectors can be anyone, but are usually people who come in contact with large audiences, such as fundraisers, journalists and restaurant owners. Make sure that you provide value to others so that you have something to offer in the networking relationship. Be willing to share your knowledge, time and resources and people will be more than happy to reciprocate. Ferrazzi reminds us to never keep score, however, as you will develop relationships much more quickly if you aren’t expecting something each time you feel that you’ve given. This also means that you should reach out to others, even when you are not in need of their advice or assistance. You never know when your turn will come.

networking can occur when you least expect it. Learn how to chat with charm, as small talk is the way people create bonds and build trust. Watch the other person’s body language and learn to read non-verbal cues. Be interesting and credible, and let the other person know that you are willing to add value to their career by sharing your time and energy to help them become more successful. The two drivers who found that they worked for the same carrier learned that one of the benefits of being a member of an association, such as Women In Trucking, is the opportunity to network. Finding value in networking will help you become more successful in your career. Consider Ferrazzi’s advice look for people and opportunities to network, and remember, never eat alone.

Successful networking also means that you pay attention to details. Write down names so you can remember them and be sure to note something distinctive about that individual. Did they win an award, overcome a challenge or do they have an unusual hobby? Write it down and ask them when you meet, you’ll endear yourself and create more trust when you show an interest in your networking partner. Stay in touch and always follow up when you promise to get back to someone, as Ferrazzi calls follow up “the key to success.” Never eat alone, as the opportunity for 20

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Hey Driver, do you know who this is? Go to page 59. Canadian Trucking Magazine


scared of the rolled up newspaper, Boss.” Wow. Wyoming - Using a firearm to fish is strictly forbidden. - Now here I went and spent all this money on a shot gun and scuba gear for nothing! California - No vehicle without a driver may exceed 60 miles per hour. - Good call, beer fuel economy at 55 mph. Georgia - Though being forced to close your business is bad enough, Athens-Clarke County forces one to obtain a license before holding a Going-Out-Of-Business sale. Why not just sell your stuff really cheap, then close your doors? Don’t tell them I told you!

Wacky State Laws In Billings, Mont., it is illegal for anyone to sell, harbor or give away rats as pets or toys for any purpose other than to feed snakes or birds of prey. Scientists, however, can keep lab rats. - So, tell me.....where do scientist get them?

Maryland, Baltimore - It’s illegal to throw bales of hay from a second-story window within the city limits. - Thus kills the possibility of this becoming the next olympic sport....bale catching.

In Michigan, it is legal to kill a dog for aacking chickens, livestock or people, but you can't snuff the pooch in a high altitude decompression chamber or by electrocution. - Seriously! How many people in Michigan own these devices.... And why? Can you just walk into Ace Hardware and pick an electric chair off the shelf? Do you have to shave the dog’s head, and put a wet sponge Under the metal cap? Puts a whole new spin on the Green Mile movie.... ”Dead dog walking!” “I’m Canadian Trucking Magazine

Natchez Missouri - It shall be unlawful to provide beer or other intoxicants to elephants. - I agree! The thought of a drunk elephant peeing on my dumpster is disturbing. The Arkansas River can rise no higher than to the Main Street bridge in Lile Rock. Man 1 - Mother Nature 0. Carrizozo New Mexico - It’s forbidden for a female to appear unshaven in public. - Please enforce this!

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“Quotables� i have six locks on my door all in a row. When i go out, i lock every other one. i figure no matter how long somebody stands there picking the locks, they are always locking three. - Elayne Boosler i won't say ours was a tough school, but we had our own coroner. We used to write essays like: What i'm going to be if i grow up. - lenny Bruce Advice is like castor oil, easy enough to give, but dreadful uneasy to take. - Josh Billings i know a lot about cars, man. i can look at any car's headlights and tell you exactly which way it's coming. - Mitch Hedberg let us not look back in anger, nor forward in fear, but around in awareness. - James Thurber A doctor gave a man six months to live. The man couldn't pay his bill, so he gave him another six months. - Henny Youngman i drive way too fast to worry about cholesterol. - Steven Wright i never forget a face, but in your case i'll be glad to make an exception. - Groucho Marx it took me seventeen years to get three thousand hits in baseball. i did it in one afternoon on the golf course. - Hank Aaron 22

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Canadian Trucking Magazine


CRIMINAL RECORD? U.S. waivers for hassle-free border crossing Pardons to seal criminal record LUCY PERILLO

FAST PROGRAM Drivers that have obtained a pardon will likely be granted participation in this program. Anyone with an existing criminal record will be denied the FAST card.

Pardon Services Ent. Manitoba

(204) 453-0099 1-877-438-7020 103-B Scurfield Blvd., Winnipeg, MB R3Y 1M6 E-mail: pardons@mts.net Website: pardonservices.ca Canadian Trucking Magazine

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Jeff Gordon, driver of the No. 24 Dupont Chevrolet, plays with his daughter Ella Sofia Gordon prior to the start of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Shelby 427 at the las Vegas Motor Speedway. Gordon also hit a milestone during Sunday's race by leading his 20,000 lap. (photo Credit: John Harrelson/Getty images)


Kurt Busch, driver of the No. 2 Miller lite Dodge, and his wife Eva participate in prerace activities on pit road before the start of Sunday's NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Kobalt Tools 500 at the Atlanta Motor Speedway. (photo Credit: Kevin C. Cox/Getty images)


Ryan Newman, Jeff Burton, Juan Pablo Montoya and Marcos Ambrose completed the top 10. Ambrose had never finished better than 17th in a Cup race on an oval track.

Bristol You couldn't blame Kyle Busch for believing Bristol Motor Speedway owed him a win in NASCAR's Sprint Cup Series. After all, the driver of the No. 18 Toyota led 415 of 500 laps last August, only to finish second. Busch didn't wait for the .533-mile short track to take its time paying him back. Instead, he seized control of Sunday's Food City 500, leading 378 laps en route to his second victory of the season. Busch held off Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Denny Hamlin by .391 seconds in a greenwhite-checkered-flag finish that took the race to 503 laps, three beyond its scheduled distance. The win was Busch's 14th in the Cup series and his 10th since joining JGR to start the 2008 season. "It was just an overall great day," said Busch, whose second victory at Bristol broke a streak of 13 wins at 13 different racetracks. "This place probably owes me a few, but you can never ask the racetrack to pay you back. You've just got to go out there and keep working at it. ... Fortunately, we had a good enough car today." Jimmie Johnson ran third, matching his best result at Bristol (August 2004). Jeff Gordon expanded his lead in the points standings with a fourth-place finish, and Kasey Kahne ran fifth to collect the second Bristol top five of his career. Polesitter Mark Martin, front-row starter 26

Hamlin, who was second for a restart on Lap 502 after the engine of JGR teammate Joey Logano blew to cause the ninth and final caution, said Busch's ability to pull out to a significant lead on the short runs was the difference in the race. "We had a good car," said Hamlin, who gained six positions to eighth in the Cup standings. "It was extremely good on the long runs. It seemed like our car, we'd lose a little bit of ground to those guys—about a straightaway or so until about 100 laps. Then we'd come in. "When we had that caution with about 50 or 60 laps to go (Lap 442 for Kevin Harvick's brush with the Turn 4 wall), I knew it was going to be tough—unless we got off pit road first—to have anything for those guys. His car (Busch's) just takes off so well." The final pit stop under caution, after Harvick's accident, also cost Johnson any chance he might have had to win the race. After an abnormally slow stop, the No. 48 Chevrolet lost three positions in the pits and restarted fifth on Lap 450. "We had a problem, I think, getting the left rear (tire) on," Johnson said. "I'm not sure— I haven't talked to (crew chief) Chad (Knaus) about it, but it didn't sound to me like the jack went up high enough to get the left rear tire on." After another quick caution for David Stremme's spin, Johnson restarted fifth on Lap 460 and managed to pass Martin and Kahne before Logano's blown engine oiled the track and sent the race to overtime.

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Jimmie Johnson crosses the finish line to win the Goody's Fast pain Relief 500 at Martinsville Speedway, his fifth victory in the last six races at the track. (photo Credit: Nick laham/Getty images)


Distributor inquiries are welcome Please contact Ray Wellman at rwellm2007@sympatico.ca 28

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By Ray Wellman Bluelake Enterprises inc offers Maintenance Solutions for Diesel Fuel Systems & Tanks CONSEQUENCES OF GETTiNG SUlpHUR out of UlSD There is concern that by the change to ULSD, new issues may occur! While the new ultra-low sulphur diesel fuels requires the use of after treatment systems in the exhaust to reduce emissions, there is growing evidence that these new fuels may actually cause more deposits on the injectors in the engine These issues are:  ULSD tend to forms gums, varnishes, and carbon deposits more easily and quickly than LSD.  ULSD shows a tendency to deteriorate or oxidize more quickly than LSD.  ULSD is the result of a process of known as severe hydro-treating. This process shows a tendency to cause the fuel to be harder to treat for cold flow improvement. It may require more #1 fuel or more or different additives to meet cold weather needs.  ULSD is more hygroscopic than LSD has been. This tendency to hold more dissolved water will have negative effects on cold weather operations and will increase corrosion

ing on where they fill up. Unfortunately this varying fuel quality has a direct impact on vehicle performance. With the development of a premium diesel fuel enhancer, using this treatment could reduce the variability by creating a “premium diesel fuel”, thus a better return for the consumer. BEI’s most successful product to date is “Power D-Syl”, a premium diesel fuel enhancer. Research for Power D-Syl started to bridge the gap in the varying diesel fuel quality by increasing the properties of diesel fuel such as increasing combustion efficiency, lowering temperature performance, increasing cetane levels and adding lubricity. In essence, consumers have a premium diesel fuel when Power D-Syl is added to standard diesel fuel. Premium diesel fuels tend to have added advantages that often translate to reduced emissions, better performance and inherent fuel economy savings. The following paragraph is about some general industry information concerning the issues surrounding diesel fuels and the benefits of premium diesel fuels. Of course, the impact varies slightly with the quality of the fuels.

Consequences may be that since ULSD fuels will hold more dissolved water. This may lead to more corrosion, more gum, varnish, and carbon deposits in the fuel system and combustion chamber. This water will allow more bacterial and fungal growth in the fuel, it cause more cold weather problems with icing of tanks, fuel lines, fuel filters, and so on.

With the use of ULSD consumers may see some differences. In the winter of 2006 an article titled "ULSD on the Road" was published in an issue of “Fleet Owner” which states that the reduction of sulphur to 15ppm in the new ULSD fuel means the paraffin content is higher. Tom Weyenberg, said, "What causes diesel fuel to 'wax' or 'gel' at colder temperatures are paraffin molecules. As a result of the de-sulfurization process there are more paraffin’s in LSD compared to standard 500ppm diesel."

Many in the industry feel that the quality of diesel fuel in North America varies depend-

It is important to understand that the continuous improvement of fuel quality and engine

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improvement are two different things. Diesel engine designs strive to increase engine performance and have made great advancements in engine fuel delivery to the combustion chamber. Today's diesel engine is quieter, smoother, and more powerful, however today's diesel engine owners are overlooking one important factor; the quality of today's diesel fuel may not have advanced at the same rate. Power D-Syl Solution Power D-Syl is a world-class fully formulated product that transforms fuel into PREMIUM Diesel. You expect your motor oil to have all the ingredients for the best overall protection of your engine. Why accept anything less for your fuel system? Power D-Syl is formulated to cover ALL issues with engines such as cold start up, extra lubricity, increased cetane, clean-up performance and water handling which make up the optimized combination so your engine and fuel will operate at maximum performance. All this at one simple treatment rate with very competitively pricing. That is what a world-class fully formulated product is! That is what Power D-Syl is! Power D-Syl is designed to reverse many of the problems associated with loss of performance caused specifically by engine deposits. As diesel engine technology becomes more complex and tighter emissions standards are introduced, the use of diesel detergent additives is growing around the world. Diesel injector additives are common in Europe and have been for a number of years. In North America they are much less common but growing in popularity. Using Power D-Syl at the recommended dosage in the fuel can control or even remove these deposits, restore optimum combustion efficiency and associated 30

performance as well as reduce emissions. In the future, engines are more likely to have injector deposits and fuels are more likely to cause deposits, however as the European market has proven, the proper additives can make the difference. Bluelake Enterprises Inc. offers a variety of other products. An emerging problem is corrosion and sludge formation in fuel tanks. This is what many call premature corrosion issues and more sludge is a significant concern for many today. Bluelake Enterprises Inc. also offers unsurpassed fuel tank corrosion protection and sludge removal with a product called “Fuel Right�. With quarterly treatments you can stop corrosion in its tracks and slowly eliminate sludge. Fuel Right has proven to be very effective in Home Heating fuel tanks, Marine fuel tanks and of course commercial fuels tanks across North America For those customers, who do not drain their fuel tanks to remove water then we suggest to use Water Mag which effectively removes water with no special disposal issues. Bluelake Enterprises Inc. is pleased to offers these world class products as viable and economical solutions. For more information contact Ray Wellman at 1-613-395-3516 or send an email to Rwellm2007@sympatico.ca. Dealer inquiries are being accepted!

April 2009

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Stranger Than Fiction: The Truth About Oil prices

Steve Kroft showed that commodity

Ask the Expert

demand - were responsible for sharp

By: Jack Lee

climbs in fuel prices. The broadcast

traders - and not oil supply or market

was revealing and surprising. A couple of months ago we talked about the fluctuating world price of oil

Over a one year period the price of oil

and how it effects prices at the pump.

went from $69 per barrel to nearly

In that column we talked mostly about

$150 and then in just three months

supply and demand and mentioned

collapsed with the stock market. Kroft

how oil is traded as a commodity.

reports, “Many people believe it was a

Well there is a lot more to that story, a

speculative bubble, not unlike the one

whole lot more.

that caused the housing crisis, and that it had more to do with traders and

CBS-TV’s program “60 Minutes” has

speculators on Wall Street than with

been a reliable and informative show

oil company executives or sheiks in

for decades giving in-depth reports on

Saudi Arabia.”

a variety of topics. In a segment aired January 11/09 CBS correspondent 34

Kroft explains, “To understand what

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happened to the price of oil, you first have to understand the way it's traded. For years it has been bought and sold on something called the commodities futures market. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, it's traded alongside cotton and coffee, copper and steel by brokers who buy and sell contracts to deliver those goods at a certain price at some date in the future.�

About the same time, hedge fund manager Michael Masters reached the same conclusion. Masters' expertise is in tracking the flow of investments into and out of financial markets and he noticed huge amounts of money leaving stocks for commodities and oil futures, most of it going into index funds, betting the price of oil was going to go up.

Dan Gilligan is the president of the Petroleum Marketers Association who represents more than 8,000 retail and wholesale suppliers, everyone from home heating oil companies to gas station owners.

60 Minutes asked who was buying this "paper oil," Masters told Kroft, "The California pension fund. Harvard Endowment. Lots of large institutional investors. And, by the way, other investors, hedge funds, Wall Street trading desks were following right behind them, putting money - sovereign wealth funds were putting money in the futures markets as well. So you had all these investors putting money in the futures markets. And that was driving the price up."

When 60 Minutes talked to him last summer, Mr. Gilligan said his members were getting blamed for gouging the public, even though their costs had also gone through the roof. He told Kroft the problem was in the commodities markets, which had been invaded by a new breed of investor. Gilligan said these investors don't actually take delivery of the oil. "All they do is buy the paper, and hope that they can sell it for more than they paid for it. The volatility is being driven by the huge amounts of money and the huge amounts of leverage that is going into these markets." Canadian Trucking Magazine

27 barrels of crude were being traded for every 1 barrel of oil consumed‌ In a five-year period, Masters said the amount of money institutional investors, hedge funds, and the big Wall Street banks had placed in the commodities markets went from $13 billion to $300 billion. Last year, 27 barrels of crude were being traded April 2009

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every day on the New York Mercantile Exchange for every one barrel of oil that was actually being consumed in the United States. CBS News points out, “A recent report out of MIT, analyzing world oil production and consumption, also concluded that the basic fundamentals of supply and demand could not have been responsible for last year's run-up in oil prices. And Michael Masters says the U.S. Department of Energy's own statistics show that if the markets had been working properly, the price of oil should have been going down, not up. As an example, the price of oil jumped $25 in a single day. That day was Sept. 22. Michael Greenberger, a former director of trading for the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the federal agency that oversees oil futures, says there were no supply disruptions that could have justified such a big increase. "Everybody agrees supply-demand could not drive the price up $25, which was a record increase in the price of oil. The price of oil went from somewhere in the 60s to $147 in less than a year. And we were being told, on that run-up, 'It's supply-demand, Canadian Trucking Magazine

supply-demand, supply-demand,'" Greenberger said. "From quarter four of '07 until the second quarter of '08 the EIA, the Energy Information Administration, said that supply went up, worldwide supply went up. And worldwide demand went down. So you have supply going up and demand going down, which generally means the price is going down," Masters told Kroft. "So you had the largest price increase in history during a time when actual demand was going down and actual supply was going up during the same period. However, the only thing that makes sense that lifted the price was investor demand." Is there price manipulation by these huge investors? The Petroleum Marketers Association President Dan April 2009

37


Gilligan told Kroft, "I can't say. And the reason I can't say it, is because nobody knows. Our federal regulators don't have access to the data. They don't know who holds what positions…federal law doesn't give them the jurisdiction to find out." Kroft adds, “Most of the trading is now conducted in secret, with no public scrutiny or government oversight. Over time, the big Wall Street banks were allowed to buy and sell as many oil contracts as they wanted for their clients, circumventing regulations intended to limit speculation. And in 2000, Congress effectively deregulated the futures market, granting exemptions for complicated derivative investments called oil swaps, as well as electronic trading on private exchanges.” There is more to this story and for a complete transcript of the 60 Minutes Program, go to our website. (www.askthefuelexpert.com) As consumers, we can’t control the price of fuel, but we can control how we use and manage our fuel consumption. Many companies invest thousands of dollars each month using fuel – in fact it’s the highest cost of doing business after labour. Fuel Management gives you the tools necessary to control the cost of getting fuel and 38

using fuel. Will there be new regulations to protect consumers from price gouging? Who can say? But whether the price of oil is it at $50 per barrel or $150 per barrel it’s essential to minimize consumption and maximize your efficiency wherever possible. Fortunately, automated Fuel Management is available now to deliver on both. Jack Lee 4Refuel Inc. President/CEO Jack Lee is the President and CEO of 4Refuel Inc, The Leader in Fuel Management. If you have any questions or comments about this article Jack can be reached at (604) 513-0386 or on line: AskthefuelExpert@4refuel.com

April 2009

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Dave MacKenzie Moose Bumpers - Cow Catchers – Roo Bars The shiny, powerful grill guards you see every day. Do you need them ? You Bet you do ! Those who know me, or have run with me know that when I was an Owner Operator, I had a grill guard on my trucks. I am a great believer in the value in these magnificent creations. Because I my trucks were equipped with this protection, I never had to white knuckle drive. Instead, I enjoyed a great, relaxing drive down the road. I could listen to tunes, or talk radio, and focus on driving, without the worries of wildlife strikes. The statistics regarding wildlife strikes ar scary. In 2004, in Alberta alone, there were 12,609 wildlife strikes, worth more than $25 million in claims, and health-care costs. During the same time frame in Ontario, the annual number of wildlife-vehicle accidents reached 13,729. Meanwhile, Manitoba reported that wildlife was involved in 11,000 collisions, for yearly average payouts of $30 million dollars. In Saskatchewan it was reported that there were 11,193 vehicle collisions with deer in 2005. SGI paid out more than $28 million in claims last year alone. British Columbia reported that hits in 2005 totalled 9,800, with insurance payouts of $33 million dollars. 44

It is not only wildlife that presents a hazard. When I was parked on the hill, backed in at the North Bay Petro, one fine December evening, a truck fueling at the isle saw a hole open up beside me, and ran his tractor trailer up the hill to grab it. The driver was trying to beat the other weary warriors that were circling looking for an open spot. Unfortunately, in his haste, he slammed his trailer right into my front end, hard enough to move my loaded 80,000 pound truck, and toss me out of the bunk. His trailer was put out of service, but the next morning I was able to drive onward, with just war scratches on my bumper. Had I not had that bumper in place, I would have suffered major damages, and been shut down in Northern Ontario, thousands of miles from home, and waiting for my Truck to be repaired. In the mean time I would not have earned a cent. In fact, I would have lost money due to added road expenses while waiting for repairs to be completed. The same applies when you hit wildlife on the road. It is going to happen in the middle of nowhere, and at the worst possible time. I have had several wildlife incidents, and have never suffered a mark on my

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truck, or experienced damaged airlines from the animal. There have been times when I have even given my bumper a grateful hug. When the Deer whistles came out, I put them on too. I tried different ones, and had drivers tell me to move them here or there, but it didn’t matter, the bumper still was put into use time after time. I don’t know if the whistles worked, but I know the bumper did! Should you experience a wildlife strike, stop when, and where it is safe to do so, and check the vehicle for damage. Be sure to check under the front for fluid leaks, and do a full undercarriage inspection for possible damage to airlines, brake pots, and electrical components. A grill guard, in my opinion, is a vital safety feature that can save you thousands of dollars in down time. In the event of a strike with a larger animal, it will greatly

reduce the damage sustained, as well as reduce the chance of personal injury. I was given a tour of the HERD factory, and saw these magnificent integrated vehicle protection guards manufactured. These are quality and safe, and you are getting what you pay for. If you are going to make the investment HERD is my choice. If you have some great pictures and stories about how your grill guard saved your truck, send them to me at Dave@canadiantruckingmagazine.ca. If I print them I will send you a hat.

Hey Driver, do you know who this is? Go to page 59.

Reduce your risks of downtime, driver injury and lost profits with integrated vehicle protection by HERD.

1-888-543-4373 WWW.HERD.COM Canadian Trucking Magazine

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not limited to women. In fact, currently, twenty-one percent of our members are men. If you think about it, you don’t need to be a dog to join the humane society, do you? New Brunswick Features What do women want? The Arbor Day Foundation doesn’t require t h a t I you’re a am tree to support their efforts.

Ellen Voie CAE President/CEO Women In Trucking, Inc

Word Search

often asked to explain what issues women in the truckAugstine Mound ing industry have that are Bay of Fundy different from men. The Camp Gagetown answer is, “none.” Every Cape Enrage one of the concerns that Caraquet our members have affects Fort Howe both men and women. Fredericton Fundy Park So, why do women need Hartland Bridge their own association? Hopewell Rocks They don’t! Despite the

O u r members include anyone w h o s u p ports our mission; Women In Trucking was established to encourage the employment of Lobster women in trucking industry, promote Marco Polo their accomplishments and minimize Metepenagiag obstacles. Mikmaq Are thereMiramichi issues that are unique to Mount Carleton women? No, but there are issues that Oxbow affect women more than they affect Parleeare Beach men. These some of the conSackville cerns we are focusing our efforts on Saint and working to John alleviate. Let’s look

name, “Women In Trucking,” our membership is

at some of the top obstacles women face in the trucking industry.

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They don’t! Despite the name, “Women In Trucking,” our membership is not limited to women. In fact, currently, twenty-one percent of our members are men. If you think Nova Scotia Features about it, you don’t need to be a dog to join the h u mane society, do you? T h e Arbor D a y Fo u n dation doesn’t require What do women that you’re a tree to support their efforts. want?

Ellen Voie CAE President/CEO Women In Trucking, Inc

Word Search

Agriculture I am often asked to exAnnapolis River plain what issues women Bear River in the trucking industry Blue Nose have that are different Cabot Trail from men. The answer Cape Breton is, “none.” Every one of Chebucto the concerns Peninsula that our Cheticamp members have affects Cove bothFishermans men and women. Fort Edward

Grand Pre Our members include anyone who Halifax supports our mission; Women In Kejimkujik Trucking was established to encourage Louisbourg the employment of women in truckMahone Bay their accoming industry, promote Minas Basin obstacles. plishments and minimize Peggy Cove Royal Are therePort issues that are unique to Sable Island women? No, but there are issues that Sydney affect women more than they affect

So, why do women need their own association?

men. These are some of the concerns we are focusing our efforts on

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Kelly Anderson President Impact Transportation Solutions RElATiONSHip BUilDiNG “Building Relationships Quickly and Effectively” It’s easy to become jaded by the constant phone calls from drivers that don’t qualify. However, if we’re going to be successful in finding and hiring the best drivers we’ve got to treat drivers based on who they are not who someone else was. We’ve also got to keep in mind that we’re asking them to trust us with everything they have. We’re asking them to trust us with their ability to provide food, shelter, and transportation for their family. When you think about it in those terms you realize the only way you’re going to build that type of trust is through a relationship with the driver. Many recruiters don’t understand this so they’ve reduced their recruiting efforts to answering the phone, interrogating the driver, and broadcasting company benefits. As a result they end up going through the motions of taking recruiting calls with very few drivers ever getting hired. In this article I want to give you some techniques to help you build trust and commitment on the very first phone call. You can’t build a relationship or trust with someone you don’t know, and you don’t know someone until you know their name. I recommend asking for the driv50

ers name at the beginning of the call and using it naturally throughout the call. I coined this phrase last year to help make this point; No Name - No Trust No Trust – No Relationship No Relationship – No Hire The next tool in building a relationship with someone is to talk about them and what they’re interested in. This works well for us because that’s what we need to know. We need to know if they qualify for our company and if our company will meet their needs. The best way to get an applicant engaged in the conversation is to ask “bundled” open ended questions. What I mean by “bundled” is I ask more than one question at a time. For example, “Tell me a little about yourself, where have you been working – what have you been doing?” or “How long did you work there, what made you decide to leave.” By asking two questions it sounds more conversational and the driver will respond in a conversational tone. Then I ask appropriate follow up questions to obtain any additional information I need.

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As I identify the drivers’ needs I will take about 30 seconds to describe a benefit of working with our company that will meet that need. This builds the relationship and trust because I am showing a specific interest in them and talking about their interest. I also recommend you “SMILE”. A person can hear you smile a thousand miles away. People like to be around happy people. If you sound like you’ve been sucking on lemons and you’re having another bad day just because you knew you would – why should the applicant want to join you in your misery? Look for an opportunity to show sincere appreciation and/or congratulations. When an applicant tells me they served in the military I always take that opportunity to thank them for their service to our country. Many of them have served in the Gulf War and they always appreciate my “Thank You”. Lastly, you won’t be able to build a relationship if the applicant doesn’t think they can trust you. If you don’t know the answer to a question, I recommend conferencing someone that does onto the call. This will build trust in all the information you’ve given.

As a result of using these techniques you’ll engage the driver into a conversation wherein you are able to quickly build a relationship and commitment while simultaneously prequalifying the driver and identifying their individual needs. This will enable you to give 30-second descriptions of company benefits that address their needs. By limiting your explanation of how you can meet their needs to 30-second sounds bites you are able to keep the driver engaged in the conversation. When you go beyond 30seconds, you lose their attention. These techniques will also help you “close the sale” because you will know the driver is interested in what you’re offering. Since you’ll be talking about what they’re interested in they’ll give you feedback that lets you know they like what they’re hearing. For example, an applicant might say; “that sounds good”, “that works for me”, “that’s better than I’ve got now”. All of these comments let you know they like what you have to offer, so the next step is to show acceptance by giving a contingent offer of employment. For example, “Well John, based on what I’m seeing here, I don’t see any reason why I couldn’t hire/contract you” and then offer a proposed start date. We’ll talk more about this in future articles.

It’s Karen from the West End Esso in Lloydminster, Sk! Canadian Trucking Magazine

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By Alvis Violo Emergency Road Services Of Canada Inc. The Safety Tip Adviser Driving On Wet Roads With the winter having come to an end and the spring beginning, we find ourselves faced with having to drive on wet slippery roads more frequently. While most of us use caution while driving on wet roads, many drivers treat it as regular driving conditions. According to the National Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), every year nearly one million vehicle accidents occur on wet road conditions. While it is impossible to completely eliminate the risk of driving on wet roads, it is possible to reduce the factors that lead to such accidents. Here are some of the best safety tips available to reduce those risks. Slow down: It is better to drive slow and safe than fast and reckless. As you decrease your speed, your tires tread that contacts the road service increases. If at all possible, avoid trying to pass other vehicles as this could cause a reaction or over reaction. Maintain a safe distance: You should not stay too close to the vehicle in front of you when the roads are wet. It takes about three times longer to brake on wet roads than it does on dry roads. Keep at least eight sec52

onds of following distance between you and the vehicle in front of you during normal driving conditions, increase it when experiencing adverse driving conditions. Know how to recover from a skid: If your vehicle does skid, remember not to slam on the brakes. If you have an anti-lock braking system (ABS), do not pump the brakes. Instead, apply firm, steady pressure to the brakes and steer the vehicle in the direction of the skid. Properly maintain your tires: Improperly inflated tires not only adversely affect your gas mileage, they also affect your vehicle’s handling. Tires that are properly inflated and well maintained can cut through water and keep traction better than worn or bald tires. Check your tires condition and air pressure on a regular basis. Be careful at intersections: Accidents occur most frequently at intersections. When approaching an intersection, exercise caution during wet road conditions. Although you may be approaching slowly, other drivers around you may not be so cautious. Inter-

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sections are often made more dangerous by frequent oil spills making the stopping surface more slippery. Try to avoid aquaplaning: While driving in wet conditions, your tires must cut through the water to maintain contact with the road. If you are traveling too fast and there is too much water on the road, your vehicle may start to ride on top of the water which is a condition called aquaplaning or hydroplaning. You can avoid aquaplaning by keeping your tires properly inflated, maintaining deep tire treads, slowing down and driving on the tracks of the vehicle in front of you. As drivers, we all need to change our mindset and techniques when driving in wet road conditions. Wet roads lead to slipping, skidding and aquaplaning, all of which can cause vehicle damage, personal injury or even death. By taking a few precautions and by using wet road driving techniques, we can hopefully avoid ending up soaking wet on the shoulder of a highway waiting for a tow truck, or just like many other safety tips, this safety tip could save our lives. Drive safe, think positive and be prosperous. Alvis Violo is the C.E.O. of Emergency Road Services Of Canada Inc., a coast to coast national roadside assistance company dedicated to the trucking industry in Canada. For more information visit www.ersofcanada.com or call 1-877-3772262. Please send your questions, feedback or comments about this column to alvisviolo@ersofcanada.com. Canadian Trucking Magazine

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CTM Girl Of The Month - Laura “Hello wabbit!” The Easter Bunny was caught with her basket handing out goodies to this driver. Elmer Fudd seems to be wondering where he left his rabbit trap! - See the CTM Girls’ portfolios at www.canadiantruckingmagazine.ca


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permits, Road Conditions, and Weather Resources BC Road Conditions BC permits

1-800-550-4997 1-800-559-9688

Alberta Road Conditions Alberta permits

http://www.drivebc.ca/

http://www.transportation.alberta.ca/611.htm 1-800-662-7138

Saskatchewan Road Conditions http://www.highways.gov.sk.ca/road-conditions/ Saskatchewan permits 1-800-667-7575 Manitoba Road Conditions http://tgs.gov.mb.ca/roadinfo/Default.aspx?AreaID=100&ln=en-CA For access by telephone call (204) 945-3704 or 1-877-MBRoads (1-877-627-6237). Manitoba permits Phone: (204) 945-3961 Toll-Free: 1-877-812-0009 Ontario permits http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/trucks/oversize/index.html Head Office Tel: 416-246-7166 or 1-800-387-7736, Dept 4 Fax: 905-704-2545 Ontario Road Conditions http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/traveller/conditions/ Quebec permits 514 873-7620 in MontrĂŠal or 1 800 361-7620. http://www.mtq.gouv.qc.ca/portal/page/portal/accueil_en/faq/permis_speciaux Nova Scotia permits http://www.gov.ns.ca/snsmr/smp/ Phone: 1-800-898-7668 (Toll-free in NS) or (902) 424-5851 Nova Scotia Road Conditions http://www.gov.ns.ca/tran/winter/roadconditions.asp New Brunswick permits https://www.pxw1.snb.ca/snb7001/e/2000/2006e_1.asp New Brunswick Road Conditions http://www.gnb.ca/0113/roadcond/dist-map-e.asp 1-800-561-4063 Newfoundland Road Conditions http://www.roads.gov.nl.ca/cameras/default.stm pEi Road Conditions http://www.gov.pe.ca/roadconditions/index.php3?map=off NWT permits http://www.dot.gov.nt.ca/_live/pages/wpPages/services_commercial_permits.aspx NWT Road conditions http://www.dot.gov.nt.ca/_live/pages/wpPages/roadConditions.aspx Yukon Road conditions http://www.511yukon.ca/ Canada Weather http://weatheroffice.gc.ca/canada_e.html U.S. weather http://www.nws.noaa.gov/ 56

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Wells Gray Inn Dining lounge: - Fine dining specializing in steak and seafood - Offering monthly feature specials.

Bar & Grill: - Offering friendly fun, live entertainment and Karaoke.

Other Amenities: Cold Beer & Wine Store Banquet Facilities Hot Tub Massage parlor and Barber

Wells Gray inn 228 E Yellowhead Hwy Clearwater, British Columbia, Canada V0E1N0 phone: 250-674-2214 Fax: 250-674-3019 Email: wellsgrayinn@mercuryspeed.com 58

April 2009

Canadian Trucking Magazine


It’s Barb from the Whitecourt Petro Can!

It’s Kayla and Christine from the Whitewood Petro Can!

Jenn and Mike from the Redcliff Esso!

It’s Candace From West Edmonton Truckland!

It’s Judy from the Golden Husky! Canadian Trucking Magazine

April 2009

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April 2009

Canadian Trucking Magazine


CANADIAN HOURS OF SERVICE SUMMARY Driving/On-Duty Time

- A driver cannot drive after being on duty for 14 hours in a day, unless the driver is deferring off-duty time to the next day. - The driver also must not drive exceed 13 hours of drive time in a day. - The driver cannot drive after the 16 hour window has ex pired. - The driver may not start a new work shift unless 8 con secutive hours off-duty have been completed.

Off-Duty Time

- Drivers are required to take at least 10 hours off-duty time each day. - At least 8 consecutive hours of off-duty must be taken be fore commencing the driver’s work shift. The 2 additional hours of off-duty time can be taken in minimum 30 minute increments. A period of off-duty that is 15 minutes or less must be logged as on-duty.

Splitting the Sleeper Time - A single driver is allowed to split the sleeper berth time into two breaks, providing that the two breaks equal 10 hours, and that neither split is less than two hours in length. - Team drivers are allowed to split sleeper time into 2 breaks as well, but the total time taken must be at least 8 hours, The 2 breaks must each be 4 hours in length, and the additional 2 hours must be taken during the day in minimum 30 minute breaks. It is acceptable for the driv ers to take the breaks in the sleeper berth. 16 Hour window

- A driver may not drive after 16 hours after the work shift began. If the driver started a shift at 6:00 a.m., all driving, and other on-duty activities must be completed by 10:00 p.m.

Off-duty deferral

- Providing the driver has taken 8 consecutive hours of off-duty time, the 2 hour time remaining can be delayed until the next day. Total driving time for the 2 days must not exceed 26 hours, and total off-duty time must equal at least 20 hours.

Canadian Trucking Magazine

April 2009

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CTM Approved locations to find.....

Canadian Trucking Magazine Manitoba

Husky Truck Stop - Brandon Middleton Market Esso - Brandon Elie Esso Truck Stop - Elie Headingly Co-op - Headingly Husky Truck Stop - Headingly 18 Wheeler Truck Stop - Winnipeg Deacon’s Corner Petro Pass - Winnipeg Oak Point Restaurant - Winnipeg Oak Point Esso - Winnipeg Petro Pass Marion - Winnipeg Petro Pass Cardlock - Winnipeg Sun Valley Restaurant - Winnipeg Maple Inn - Richer Petro Pass - Deacon’s Corner

Alberta Petro Pass - Acheson Emme’s Esso - Bassano Rosie’s Roadside Grill - Bassano Petro Pass Travellers Oasis - Brooks Shell Truck Stop - Brooks Blackfoot Diner - Calgary Blackfoot Petro Pass - Calgary Calgary Fuel Stop - Calgary Esso Truck Stop - Calgary Husky Car/Truck Stop - Calgary Petro Pass Monument- Calgary Petro Pass Ogden - Calgary Petro Pass 61st Av - Calgary Petro Pass Freeport - Calgary Roadking Travel Center- Calgary Petro Canada - Cluny Chevron - Edmonton Esso Truck Stop - Edmonton UFA Fuelstop - Edmonton West Edmonton Truckland - Edmonton Greg’s Truck Stop - Innisfree Nisku Truck Stop - Leduc Husky Car/Truck Stop -Lloydminster Petro Pass - Lloydminster Husky Car/Truck Stop - Medicine Hat Petro Pass - Nisku Trans Canada Truck Stop Esso - Redcliff UFA - Red Deer Petro Pass - Red Deer Roadking Travel Center - Sherwood Park Husky Truck Stop - Spruce Grove Petro Pass - Strathmore Husky Car/Truck Stop - Strathmore

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Eagle River Husky Gas Bar - Whitecourt Petro Cananda - Whitecourt UFA - Whitecourt

Saskatchewan

Silver Dollar Restaurant - Chaplin 24 Seven travel Centre - Dafoe Davidson Shell Access Stop - Davidson Shell Riel Roadhouse - Davidson Petro Pass - Maidstone Esso - Moose Jaw Petro Pass - Moose Jaw Prairie Oasis - Moose Jaw Petro Pass - North Battleford Paynton Place Truck Stop - Paynton Red Bull - Radisson Petro Pass - Regina Nistor’s Shell Access Stop - Regina Esso Grasswoods - Saskatoon Husky Travel Center - Saskatoon Petro Pass - Saskatoon Shell Access Truck Stop - Saskatoon Esso Truck Stop - Swift Current Husky Travel Center - Swift Current Petro Pass - Swift Current Shell Access Truck Stop - Swift Current UFA Cardlock - Swift Current Can-Am Travel Shop - Whitewood

British Columbia Husky Mohawk - Blue River Cache CreekHusky/Mohawk - Cache Creek Chevron Chilliwack - Chilliwack Cool Creek Agencies - Chilliwack Shell Chilliwack - Chilliwack Petro Can Chilliwack - Chilliwack Gloria’s Diner - Chilliwack Skyline Truck Stop - Craigallachie Golden Husky - Golden Hope Husky Travel Center - Hope Chevron Kamloops - Kamloops Petro Can Kamloops - Kamloops Petro Pass Kamloops - Kamloops Husky Truck Stop - Kelowna Petro Can - Kelowna Osoyoos Husky/Mohawk - Osoyoos Sicamous Husky - Sicamous Vernon Petro-Can - Vernon Dogwood Valley Husky - Yale

April 2009

Canadian Trucking Magazine


U.S. HOURS OF SERVICE SUMMARY Driving/On-Duty Time

- A driver may drive a maximum of 11 hours after taking 10 consecutive hours off duty - The driver cannot drive beyond the 14th hour after coming on duty, follow ing 10 consecutive hours off duty - The driver may not drive after 70 hours in 8 days.

Off-Duty Time

- A driver may restart a 7/8 consecutive day period after taking 34 or more con secutive hours off duty. - CMV drivers using the sleeper berth provision must take at least 8 consecu tive hours in the sleeper berth, plus 2 consecutive hours either in the sleeper berth, off duty, or any combination of the two.

Canadian Trucking Magazine

April 2009

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2009 CTM APRIL MAGAZINE