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VISION Creating a safe environment for all children so that they can realise their potential

MISSION We promote the well being of all children, predominantly those in poor socio-economic communities by: Protecting Enhancing Empowering Networking Contributing Building Advocating

those in crisis and at risk the capacity of families and communities to protect and develop their children children to claim their rights and accept their responsibilities with other service providers for the benefit of the children to the development of National and International policies and legislation regarding children the capacity of other organisations to care for children for the rights of children

“We believe that children are our future and our inspiration.” We each have a responsibility to make the world we live in a better, safer place for our children. Don’t be overwhelmed by the challenges. Good has and will always overcome evil. It is up to us to see that this happens. Cape Town Child Welfare has a tremendous track record for positive intervention in changing the lives of the young. I am proud to be associated with their work and congratulate the committee, staff and volunteers on their efforts with very limited resources.

DESMOND TUTU – Archbishop Emeritus, Nobel Laureate and Patron of Cape Town Child Welfare CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE PO Box 374, Gatesville, ATHLONE, 7766 Lower Klipfontein Road, Silvertown, ATHLONE Tel: +2721 6383127 Fax: +2721 6385277 E-mail: information@helpkids.org.za

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INDEX

Areas of Operation Cape Town Child Welfare 2010/2011 Board Members Cape Town Child Welfare 2010/2011 staff Message by the Chair Overview by The Chief Executive Results in a Glance Overview of Houtbay, Khayelitsha and Lotus River/Ottery/Philippi Houtbay Khayelitsha Lotus River/Ottery/Philippi/Pelican Park Adoption Houtbay Panel Volunteer Function for TTSC Volunteers Educare Centres Therapeutic Training and Support Centre Victim Empowerment Program Overview of Athlone, Hanover Park, Manenberg, Du Noon/Joe Slovo and Philippi East Athlone Hanover Park Manenberg Du Noon/Joe Slovo Philippi East After Hours Child Protection Services Community Nutritional and Development Centres Financial Report Donors

page 1 page 1 page 2 page 3 page 4 page 5 page 6 page 7 page 9 page 11 page 13 page 13 page 13 page 14 page 15 page 15 page 16 page 17 page 19 page 21 page 23 page 25 page 27 Page 28 page 29 page 31

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AREAS OF OPERATION *Athlone, Belgravia, Belthorn, Bokmakierie, Bridgetown, Crawford, Crossroads, Doornhoogte, Gatesville, Gleemore, Greenhaven, Hazendal, Heideveld, Kewtown, Lansdowne, Langa, Mountview, Rompvlei, Nerissa Estate, Parktown, Penlyn Estate, Penati Estate, Rondebosch East, Rylands, Silvertown, Sunlands, Surrey Estate, Sybrand Park, Vanguard Estate, Welcome Estate, Yorkshire Estate, Wetton, Kenwyn, Joe Slovo, Millers Camp, Waterfront, Pooke se Bos, Vygieskraal, Hanover Park, Newfields, Hout Bay Harbour Area, Imizamo Yetu, Klipfontein Mission, Thabo Mbeki, Bekela, Acasia Park, Never Never, Sweethome Farm, Pola Park, Marcus Garvey, Better Life, Grave Yard, Browns Farm, Block 6, Moon wood, Siyathalala, Siyazela, Hazeldene, Victoria Mzenge, Lower Crossroads, Joburg, Bukuzenzele, Mpinga Square, Vietnam, Philippi Horticulture, Ottery, Eagle Park, Peacock Close, Pelican Heights, Lotus River, Schaapkraal, Phumlani Village, Khayelitsha Site C, Section A-J, Tembani, Bongweni, Kwezi Park, Tambo Village, Sherwood Park, Primrose Park, Manenberg, Tambo Square, Joe Slovo, Milnerton, Du Noon, Site 5

2010/2011 BOARD MEMBERS TOP LEFT: TOP RIGHT: BOTTOM L TO R:

NOT ON PHOTOS:

Mrs. Nazrina Teladia (CHAIR) Mr. Theo Nkone (VICE CHAIR) Mrs. Sharon Follentine, Dr. Petra Abrahamse, Dr. Jennifer Kallis, Mrs. Cynthia Frazer, Ms. Leah Abrahamson, Mrs. Nuroun Mintin, Mr. Aiden Kelly Dr. Pearl Mbeje, Dr. Keith Cloete, Mrs. Christina Henda

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2010/2011 STAFF CHIEF EXECUTIVE NIRESH RAMKLASS

SENIOR DIRECT SERVICE MANAGER INA VERMEULEN

SENIOR FIRST LINE MANAGER ATHLONE: DESIREE UYS

SENIOR DIRECT SERVICE MANAGER PENNY WHITAKER

SENIOR FINANCE MANAGER: CLIFFORD ROMAN

FIRST LINE MANAGER HOUT BAY: DEBBIE DEMAS

ADMIN & MAINTENANCE MANAGER: GEORGINA MOODLEY

SENIOR FIRST LINE MANAGER PAYROLL: RAY JATTIEM

PAYROLL ASSISTANT: ROSHNI ROOPNARAIN

ATHLONE STAFF

HOUT BAY STAFF FINANCE DEPARTMENT STAFF

FIRST LINE MANAGER DU NOON: NOMONDE KULATI

FIRST LINE MANAGER KHAYELITSHA: PINKY CIYA

SENIOR FIRST LINE MANAGER: MONA WENTZEL

DU NOON STAFF FIRST LINE MANAGER MANENBERG YOLANDA FRANSMAN

KHAYELITSHA STAFF ACTING FIRST LINE MANAGER LOPP: NASEEBA MANUEL-DAVIDS

ADMIN & MAINTENANCE STAFF FIRST LINE MANAGER PHILIPPI EAST ELDORETTE MANENBERG STAFF FARAO

LOPP STAFF

FIRST LINE MANAGER HANOVER PARK: ESMERELDA RAMKLASS

FIRST LINE MANAGER PHILIPPI EAST: ELDORETTE FARAO

PHILIPPI EAST STAFF

HANOVER PARK STAFF

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MESSAGE BY THE CHAIR: NAZRINA TELADIA

Children in South Africa have a constitutional right to parental or family care, shelter, dignity, safety, basic health – care services, education and protection from neglect, abuse, degradation and exploitation. According to the 2009 / 2010 Child Gauge:  About 3, 9 million of SA’s children are orphans who have lost one or both parents,  23% of children do not live with either of their biological parents,  34% of children live in households where no adults are employed,  64% of children live in households with per capita income of less the R569 a month,  18% of children live in households that report child hunger and 18% of children between the ages of 1 and 9 have suffered from stunting which indicates chronic malnutrition,  Children under 5 account for 80% of child deaths in SA. These deaths result from neonatal causes and childhood infections (HIV, diarrhoea, and lower respiratory infections) and  Injury is the leading cause of death among older children; most childhood deaths are rooted in poverty. This is what the resilient men and women of Cape Town Child Welfare faced this past year. It is the role of government to provide a safety net for children at risk, but the government alone cannot fix the problem. An organisation like CTCW complements the work of government. Often the organisation goes beyond what government provides as a resource base to implement its programs. Unwaveringly, CTCW has in the year under review responded to its mandate with innovation, strength and boldness recognising that given our heinously high incidence of child rape and child abuse we need to do a great deal more than what we have done and doing to protect children. The social workers

in the front line who often in the face of great odds have remained at the cutting edge of service delivery; facing a multitude of diverse challenges the CEO, his Managers and First Line Managers, his administrative and finance teams have exercised the necessary diligence in overseeing the organisations assets; volunteers have supported the staff and have in return gained valuable experience, and, the Board’s collective responses of a multi - skilled, committed body have contributed to making my job a relatively easy one this past year. The reports which follow indicate a huge organisational workload and achievements for the past year. To all of you, I salute you, your contribution is invaluable and I thank you. CTCW has remained relevant by intensifying the lobbying and advocacy functions. Partnerships have been strengthened and innovative ways to deliver services that strengthen the capacities of children, families and communities have been recognised locally, nationally and internationally. Revenue generation is of course vitally important, but donors have given in many other incalculable ways which have helped us in the current unchartered waters of the ongoing economic crises. Our heartfelt gratitude to our donors who displayed their confidence in us, and we assure them of excellent returns for their investments by creating a world fit for children. Prudent financial and strategic management measures have been put in place and the overall financial results are pleasing. Financial and information communications technology have been brought into line with current cutting edge systems, while staff continue to sharpen their skills to keep up with international trends. Rajesh Tandon, co - founder and President of the Society for Participatory Research in Asia, based in New Delhi, said that practitioners in the NGO sector share a common faith; “that of change - masters, catalysts, providers, protesters, innovators, knowledge crucibles, social and political entrepreneurs acting to redefine relations of power with families, communities, institutions governments from local to global.” This is the essence of CTCW, and while there will always be challenges ahead, I trust that positive possibilities will abound in the future of this leading child protection agency. So to all who read this report, I encourage you to be champions for our children by partnering with us by investing revenue, skills, time, and finding new partners all in an effort to do our bit to combat the statistics stated at the beginning of this report. After all, ‘it takes a village to raise a child’, help us to let that village be Cape Town.

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OVERVIEW BY THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE: NIRESH RAMKLASS

The Non-Profit sector was particularly hard hit by the global financial crisis that saw major United States financial institutions fall, leading to the eventual downgrading of the US economy. The fallout from those events sent repercussions throughout the world leading to toughening of economic policies and fiscal containment strategies being implemented post haste by all and sunder. The donor Rand/Dollar continued to decline from the previous financial downturn and sent misery throughout the NPO community, especially in developing countries, as developed countries scrambled to implement social security and social development programs, previously not contemplated, as unemployment spiked following large scale downsizing by major industries, including carmakers.

Social work teams engaged with thousands of children and their families at grassroots level in our continuous attempts at family preservation. The optimal functioning of families is a key challenge for us as social pathology threatens the very fabric of society. Social workers carried caseloads of 100 to 203 each, doubling and trebling the national norm of cases per social worker, all too often, and leading to many social workers resigning from our service. Relief has been difficult to find as the Department of Social Development engaged in a Modernizing process which essentially restructured their operations and increased their overall human and material resource significantly, whilst leaving the NPO sector virtually unchanged and painfully undersubsidized. Nevertheless our staff displayed courage and integrity and managed over 5600 cases during the year under review, averaging 466 cases per month. Departments worked hard to meet their targets during the past year to ensure our overall success. I want to say a special word of thanks and appreciation to all Managers and First Line Managers for their commitment and outstanding contribution to the organisation during the 2009/2010 year. Our social work statistics show that the numbers of children and families being reached remains high. Staff benefited from numerous training sessions aimed at building the level of expertise and intellectual capital in the organization. Finally, I would like to thank our Board, Staff and volunteers for their tireless efforts and teamwork during the past financial year that ensured our success.

Cape Town Child Welfare was not spared during this economic decline, posting an R1.96m operating deficit in the 2010/2011 year. Our financial struggles were directly impacted by: Declining government subsidy rates Increased geographical areas of service delivery Increased target group for service delivery (from 0-12 to 0-18) without concomitant increase in subsidy Increased cost of service delivery Increased costs due to service accessibility to communities Decreasing support from key donors due to global market volatility Our social work staff continued with daily challenges at the coalface, witnessing a significant rise in child abuse and neglect cases. Child neglect also stood out as a major issue affecting children in Cape Town, displaying the human impact of rising poverty levels in our City.

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RESULTS IN A GLANCE BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOADS

Athlone H/Park Philippi East 963 261

New Cases

H/bay

K/litsha

LOPP

M/berg

325

264

490

452

Du Noon 248

Children's Court Inquiries

139

80

62

45

213

30

13

Foster Care Supervision

295

324

93

140

141

243

133

Family Preservation

408

46

75

171

456

38

79

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES

Athlone

H/Park

Neglect

311

Philippi East 30

H/bay

K/litsha

LOPP

M/berg

Du Noon

39

69

157

234

19

Physical Abuse

53

13

9

17

41

14

11

Sexual Abuse

35

8

10

4

31

4

0

Abandonment

121

24

8

24

14

1

13

Orphan hood

84

94

6

61

8

6

6

*H/Park=Hanover Park, H/bay=Houtbay, LOPP= Lotus River/Ottery/Philippi/Pelican Park, M/berg= Manenberg

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OVERVIEW BY SENIOR DIRECT SERVICE MANAGER: PENNY WHITAKER KHAYELITSHA, HOUTBAY AND LOTUS RIVER/OTTERY/PHILIPPI/PELICAN PARK The effective implementation of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005 requires the availability of skilled practitioners of which there is a documented shortage. The period under review has been marked by the effects of the implementation of this New Children Act 38 of 2005 within the context of insufficient human resource capacity. This set the foundation for an extremely stressful year characterized by much uncertainty, confusion and anxiety caused by increased statutory expectations placed on already overburdened inexperienced social workers. The initial and ongoing emphasis placed on addressing the Sect 159 backlogs together with the time consuming court based foster care grant application backlog has resulted in an over emphasis on statutory services, which to a certain degree resulted in the implementation of prevention and early intervention programs being compromised as will become evident later in this report. There has been a slight increase in our intake figures as can be seen in the table below:

In addition the average caseloads per worker exceeds the national norm of 60 by between 30-60% . The table below reflects the caseloads per area. INCREASE OF CASELOADS PER AREA

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 2009/2010

K/LITSHA 508

HOUTBAY 309

LOPP 431

2010/2011

633

577

587

In addition to the aforementioned caseload management challenges, statistics also show concerning trends such as the increase in poverty and substance abuse related social problems emerging within communities under discussion contributing to an increase in the complexity of cases. A situation which has been aggravated by the absence of resources( treatment as well as placement ) particularly for children with special needs. Despite these very difficult working conditions there remain staff members and volunteers who have continued to persevere demonstrating resilience, dedication and commitment to the vision of this organization. I therefore would like to take this opportunity to express my sincere appreciation for their courageous , tireless efforts in trying to promote the well being of all vulnerable children.

INCREASE OF INTAKE PER AREA

500 400 300 200 100 0 2009/2010

K/LITSHA 200

HOUTBAY 148

LOPP 416

2010/2011

206

203

486

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HOUTBAY REPORT Compiled by Debbie Demas

Hout Bay is a premier tourist destination, renowned for its natural beauty. It is often referred to as a microcosm of South Africa, with diverse group of people of all cultures and socio-economic circumstances living in close proximity. While the more affluent in the community are well resourced, the community in Hangberg and Imizamo Yethu experience many challenges. Chief amongst these are poverty and unemployment, leading to neglect and abuse of children. Children have also become targets for sexual predators, who lure them with material goods. Children are often left unsupervised by caregivers, making them easy targets. The communities in question have become a haven for drug merchants and illegal taverns, with the subsequent increase in substance abuse in parents and children. The negative consequences of this is an alarming increase in substance abuse by younger children leading to poor school performance and early school drop-out, behaviour problems and risky sexual behaviour with teenage pregnancy and the increase in STD’s including HIV/AIDS.

The Hout Bay unit, consisting of 4 social workers, 2 social auxiliary workers, 2 community development workers, an administrative clerk and a part-time cleaner (see photo above), has maintained and increased its profile in the community, thanks largely to the dedication and commitment of the staff. During the riots in Hangberg, the team had a strong presence in that we conducted trauma counselling in the community, and showed our

support by attending community meetings. The number of our volunteers and donors continued to grow, which is indicative of the goodwill the team has built in the community. We continue to reach large numbers of children at our life skills and holiday programs, as well as our soup kitchens. Children identify with the team and the office is regarded as a safe haven. We have placed strong emphasis on our family preservation services, and managed to send 40 parents and 5 children to drug rehabilitation

centres, and establish an after –care group for these parents. Given that substance abuse is a major challenge in the area, our services have remained relevant to the needs of the community. Our greatest challenge was the sudden eviction from our premises at the yacht club during June 2010, and our redeployment to Head Office immediately thereafter. We were far removed from our client base, and service delivery was challenging. We had no proper offices and no access to telephones and other resources in the community, until we moved into new premises in February, 2011. Staff turnover was another challenge which lead to certain developmental activities put on hold. By the beginning of the financial year, the staff composition had altered almost completely. This meant that much time and energy had to be invested into orientating new staff, and re-establishing our activities. The team however rose above the challenges and made sure that service delivery is not compromised.

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GENERAL CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMS PROGRAM RECEIVED MATERIAL RELIEF SOUP KITCHEN PLACED IN EMERGENCY CARE ACTIVE IN EYE ON THE CHILD PROJECT BENEFITTED FROM AWARENESS PROGRAMS/TALKS/EVENTS ATTENDED LIFE SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED HOLIDAY PROGRAMS DURING YEAR ATTENDED PARENTING SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED AND COMPLETED SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS SERVES ON CHILDREN’S COMMITTEE

NUMBER REACHED 1180 families 50 meals per day over ¾ days pw 57 children 12 volunteers 4932 persons 834 persons 1247 children 62 adults 13 adults 28 children

ASSISTANCE BY THE EYE ON THE CHILD VOLUNTEERS 101 families

MONITORED BY VOLUNTEERS

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOAD

700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

NEW CASES OPENED

CHILDREN'S COURT INQUIRES

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

CASES

325

62

93

FAMILY PRESERVATION CASES 75

CHILDREN

650

85

110

225

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES RECEIVED DURING THE PERIOD 100 80 60 40 20 0

NEGLECT

CASES

39

PHYSICAL ABUSE 9

CHILDREN

95

11

SEXUAL ABUSE 10

ORPHAN HOOD 6

ABANDON MENT 8

BEHAVIOUR 17

SUBST ABUSE 18

10

9

9

19

18

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KHAYELITSHA REPORT Compiled by Pinky Ciya

Khayelitsha is isiXhosa name for “New Home”. It was established in February 1985 and consists mainly of people who were living in backyards of established townships such as Langa, Gugulethu and Nyanga. Khayelitsha is approximately 28 km from Cape Town CBD. It has grown at a phenomenal rate to accommodate an influx of people from the Eastern Cape. There is an absence of consensus regarding Khayelitsha’s exact population size. According to SA 2001 the population of Khayelitsha is 329 026 while other surveys like the Khayelitsha Population Register Update (KPRU) suggest a population of 406 779 and the Khayelitsha Development Forum’s estimate it as being 1 000 000. There appears to be agreement though that the population is relatively youthful with about 30% of the population falling between the ages of 0 to 14 years. In 2005 Khayelitsha was identified as one of the poverty nodes (Presidential Nodes) in need of urban renewal. It currently has 14 poverty pockets where most of the people depend on social grants as a form of livelihood.

The key challenges facing Khayelitsha are Poverty, Unemployment, Overcrowded living conditions, Crime and violence, Lack of land for formal housing and land invasions. There are also High levels of HIV and AIDS, Teenage pregnancy, Alcohol and Drug abuse along with an absence of youth development Despite these developments by government and the business sector in challenges there has been noticeable infrastructure the

form of schools, clinics, places of worship, libraries, educare centres, 1 radio station, community centres etc. The unit working in Khayelitsha consists of 1 First Line Manager, 6 social workers, 2 social auxiliary workers, 2 community development workers, 1 administrative clerk and 1 cleaner (see photo above). The absence of a First Line Manager for the unit for approximately 5 months had an impact on the unit as the necessary guidance and support in the implementation of the units objectives was not on a continuous basis. In addition the high staff turnover and challenges to fill vacant positions has negatively impacted on the continuity of service delivery and resulted in a very inexperienced staff complement who required a great deal of training and guidance. Further to this it has been a challenge to trace clients has been challenging due to the high levels of mobility within the community as caused by upgrading developments within the area.

Due to unemployment and poverty in the area material aid has been an important part of service delivery and had positive impacts such as enhancing temporary safe carers commitment and dedication to continue providing temporary care to vulnerable at risk children, ensuring that children remain at school and were not deprived of their right to be educated and ensuring that children’s basic rights for food and safety are upheld thus also enabling children to remain within their families and communities of origin. The job skills project contributed to the enhancement of the earning potential of community members as it was presented in conjunction with Business skill training workshops.

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GENERAL CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMS PROGRAM RECEIVED MATERIAL RELIEF PLACED IN EMERGENCY CARE ACTIVE IN EYE ON THE CHILD PROJECT BENEFITTED FROM AWARENESS PROGRAMS/TALKS/EVENTS ATTENDED LIFE SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED HOLIDAY PROGRAMS DURING YEAR ATTENDED PARENTING SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED AND COMPLETED SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS SERVES ON CHILDREN’S COMMITTEE

NUMBER REACHED 916 families 32 children 4 volunteers 367139 persons 35 persons 1025 children 37 adults 355 adults 17 children

ASSISTANCE BY THE EYE ON THE CHILD VOLUNTEERS 267 families

MONITORED BY VOLUNTEERS

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOAD

600 500 400 300 200 100 0

NEW CASES OPENED

CHILDREN'S COURT INQUIRES

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

CASES

264

45

140

FAMILY PRESERVATION CASES 171

CHILDREN

546

67

193

294

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES RECEIVED DURING THE PERIOD

140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NEGLECT

CASES

69

PHYSICAL ABUSE 17

CHILDREN

81

21

SEXUAL ABUSE 4

ORPHAN HOOD 61

ABANDONM ENT 24

OTHER

4

89

29

129

89

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LOTUS RIVER/ OTTERY/ PHILIPPI/ PELICAN PARK REPORT Compiled by Naseba Manuel-Davids

LOP unit serves a total population of 46515 people from the Lotus River, Ottery, Philippi Horticulture, Eagle Park, Phumlani Village, and Pelican Park area. (City of Cape Town Census 2001) These areas are geographically situated between Lansdowne Road, Vanguard Drive, Spine Road and De Wet Road/Plantation Road. This is a predominantly coloured community with its own diversity. There are two dominant religious practices ie Christianity and Islam. There also appears to be a clear divide between the low/no income and the mid/high income community socio economic groupings. The majority of our cases come from the low/no income community due to the social ills related to poverty. In the Lotus River/Ottery community high gang related issues like crime, violence and drugs, appear to be negatively impacting on the wellbeing of the children. While in the Philippi farming community alcohol abuse is a significant factor. Given the statistical parallel between substance abuse and neglect it is apparent that the neglect of our children is mainly as a result of substance abuse. An increase has also been noted in children displaying uncontrollable behaviour which appears to be related to the social problems within the area. Although the reporting of neglect cases are significantly higher than physical and sexual abuse cases, the incident rate of these cases remain an area of concern.

Successes of the unit include:  an afterschool program facilitated twice a week at our Lotus River Site office; more than 35 children attended this program weekly.  Human Chain commemorating the16 days of activism; an estimate total of 3774 people witnessed the event.  The Phumlani Village & Freedom Park Kids Club, a weekly after school program educating children in the community on life skills; 514 children were reached  Hairdressing training course facilitated by our volunteer Berenice Brink; 31 participants successfully participated in this program.

The challenges included:  High staff turnover and ongoing vacancies  Implementation of the new Children’s Act  Recruiting temporary safe carers  Securing alternative placements in particular for children with special needs  Building the capacity of volunteers in order for them to be utilized more effectively.

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GENERAL CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMS PROGRAM RECEIVED MATERIAL RELIEF MEALS PROVIDED AT SOUP KITCHEN 3 DAYS A WEEK PLACED IN EMERGENCY CARE ACTIVE IN EYE ON THE CHILD PROJECT BENEFITTED FROM AWARENESS PROGRAMS/TALKS/EVENTS ATTENDED LIFE SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED HOLIDAY PROGRAMS DURING YEAR ATTENDED PARENTING SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED AND COMPLETED SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

NUMBER REACHED 244 families 3492 meals 80 children 7 volunteers 5597 persons 542 persons 1133 children 18 adults 46 adults

ASSISTANCE BY THE EYE ON THE CHILD VOLUNTEERS 301 families

MONITORED BY VOLUNTEERS

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOAD

1000 900 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 0

NEW CASES OPENED

CHILDREN'S COURT INQUIRES

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

CASES

490

213

141

FAMILY PRESERVATION CASES 456

CHILDREN

980

421

290

912

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES RECEIVED DURING THE PERIOD 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

NEGLECT PHYSICAL ABUSE

SEXUAL ABUSE

ORPHAN HOOD

ABANDO NMENT

CASES

157

41

31

8

14

CHILDREN

314

41

31

8

14

BEHAVIO SUBSTAN DOMESTI FOSTER UR CE ABUSE C CARE PROBLEM VIOLENCE APPLICAT S IONS 86 94 26 103 86

188

52

103

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ADOPTION SERVICES REPORT Compiled by Debbie Demas The specialist adoption team operates from the head office, as this is more accessible to clients, especially birth mothers who mainly come from the surrounding townships. The adoption team continues to deliver services of a high standard, in accordance with National standards. The team consists of 2 full-time social workers, Penny Henwood and Bianca Mechnig, Yolanda Moolman a part-time senior worker doing post adoption work, Debbie Demas, First Line Manager and Mandy Hussey, the Adoption Secretary. Our services cover the whole of the Western Cape. The adoption team forms part of the Western Cape Adoption Coalition. The aim of the group is to foster co-operation amongst adoption service providers to ensure that standards are maintained and that all service providers are kept abreast of the latest trends and best practice models. With the introduction of the Register of Adoptable Children coming into force as well as the demands of the new Children’s Act, this co-operation is vital. A further challenge encountered as a result of the Children’s Act, is the different interpretation of the Act by the various Presiding officers. Meetings were held with the presiding officers in an attempt at clarification, and in order to reach uniformity. The group of medical and legal professionals comprising the Adoption Panel continues to meet every 2 months, and provides the adoption team with valuable support and in-put. An Appreciation Function was held at the Newlands hotel for this group to express our thanks for their on-going support. The majority of babies for adoption still come from the black race group, while the majority of

prospective adoptive parents are from the coloured race group. Cross-cultural placements were done where no parents of the same cultural background of the adoptable child were available. Since a child cannot be placed in adoption until declared adoptable in terms of the Children’s Act, most babies need to be placed in emergency care for at least two months. The recruitment and supervision of emergency parents has therefore become an important part of adoption services, as these parents are vital to the smooth running of our services.

WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR 460 375

208 165

145 77

45

31

HOUTBAY ADVOCACY PANEL: P Whitaker

VOLUNTEER FUNCTION: P Whitaker

This panel consists of a group of concerned professionals residing within Houtbay who became aware of the challenges facing the Houtbay Unit and mobilized their efforts to assist with finding more suitable office premises. As a result of their efforts, in particular negotiations between Dan Japhta at Oceana Brands and Dr Eugene Burger, CTCW obtained the use of offices at no cost from Oceana Brands. This has enabled CTCW to maintain a much needed presence within this community. We hereby wish to extend our sincere appreciation for the generosity as displayed by Oceana Brands, Dr Eugene Burger, Mrs Judy Cloete, Mr Bernard Altman and Mrs Lynda Thomas.

On the 9th Dec 2010 a cocktail function was organized as a gesture of appreciation to UCT Child Guidance Clinic, RX Child and Family unit and Lucy Sawyer a qualified volunteer psychologist from the UK for their commitment to the successful implementation of the Therapeutic training and Support Centre. This event would not have been possible were it not for the overwhelming generosity as demonstrated by the Newlands Garden Court Hotel who provided the venue at no cost and the One and Only Spa, the Vineyard Spa, the Andros Spa, the Pepper Club, Klein Constantia, the Radisson Hotel Spa, the Houtbay Manor Spa, and Lindt chocolates.

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EDU CARE CENTRES

LIEFDESPOORT, PHILIPPI : N Manuel-Davids

HAUS HALTERN, KHAYELITSHA: P. Ciya

Haus Haltern Educare is situated in E- Section, Khayelitsha. This educare is now 16 years old and is still operating effectively. It is registered with the Department of Social Development as an Early Childhood Development facility which accommodates 40 children from ages 2–5 years. Most of the children attending are from the surrounding areas, the furthest area being Harare. The children are divided into two groups, ages 2-3 years and 4-5 years where different activities are implemented according to their developmental needs.

SIYAZAMA, HOUTBAY: D Demas

Liefdespoort is situated in Highlands Estate, Philippi Horticulture. It is a predominantly Afrikaans speaking coloured farming community and the children therefore come from a very low socio-economic background. Sadly many of the community members have a history of alcohol abuse which impacts on the well being of children. A large number of children in the community resultantly suffer from Foetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). 26 Children attend Liefdespoort at the moment. The centre aims to enhance the development of the children registered with them. Learning is facilitated in a child friendly manner; predominantly through play. Liefdespoort has certainly been blessed with sponsorship/donations from various stakeholders which includes Labour net, ex-foreign volunteers, churches and other community members. It has reliable parents and volunteers who regularly assist when the need arises.

ROOIKAPPIE, OTTERY : N Manuel-Davids

The children at Siyazama Educare come from the surrounding informal settlement of Imizamo Yethu. The administrative systems and management have improved and become more streamlined since the social auxiliary worker took on the role of substitute principal. The teachers now have more time to plan programs and make them relevant to the experience of thereby improving the quality of their cognitive and social stimulation. Siyazama’s building has been given a beautiful makeover with the generous input of volunteers from Herschell Girl”s School and All Out Africa, who painted murals and fixed the toilets. Siyazama hosted a successful annual inter-creche sports day at Kronenedal Primary School grounds, which attracted many of parents and community members. The centre was the winner of the Sporting event for the 2nd year running. .

Rooikappie is situated in a predominantly Afrikaans speaking coloured community in the centre of the Ottery flats, a community enmeshed in social ills. This includes poverty, unemployment, high crime rates and substance abuse (predominantly tik abuse). Rooikappie is a safe haven for 36 children between the age of 2 to 6 years. It is an institution that aims at enhancing the development of the children through a structured program focussing on the positive development of the children. Rooikappie has been blessed by sponsorships from various sources like ABSA, Cape Town City Council and various community members. It has a reliable parent committee and is able to depend on members of the community to volunteer their services when need be.

14


THERAPEUTIC TRAINING AND SUPPORT CENTRE compiled by Penny Whitaker The concept was implemented in response to an increase noted in the complexity of casework challenges facing inexperienced workers within a context of limited resources and increasing workload demands. Its primary objectives therefore being:  To enhance the competency levels of social workers  To train social workers in innovative, evidence based therapeutic approaches  To promote strategic and collaborative partnerships with Universities  To bridge the gap between research and practice  To reduce occupational stress  To establish an environment of learning within the organization The objectives were reached through the implementation of four main components as shown in the graphic presentation below:

VICTIM EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM compiled by Penny Whitaker CTCW became the successful recipient of a funding grant from the UNODC to implement a Victim Empowerment Program for the period October 2009 until October 2010. The following impact was made for the period April 2010 until November 2010:  16 peer counsellors along with 5 community developers/ social auxiliary workers received training in respect of VEP  3067 persons were reached in terms of counselling and referral services  614 persons reached in respect of family preservation and reunification services

This concept was implemented in March 2010 following receipt of funding from Baker Hughes. The following impact was made:  20 cases presented by workers across the agency  100% of workers described their experience as beneficial  92.8% of workers found the input as provided by the panel as supportive, enlightening, validating  immediate access to combined intellectual expertise  positive outcomes in respect of most cases presented  improved quality of assessments  expansion/increased options in terms of referral routes ( Edith Kriel, B. Altman, Children for Tomorrow)  service delivery gaps and learning needs identified  sharing of intellectual expertise  the facilitation of training workshops in respect of learning needs identified  commitment and co-operation as received from UCT Child Guidance Clinic/ RX Child and Family Unit/UK psychologist Lucy Sawyer  Research opportunities identified by psychology interns  Creation of a supportive, relaxed and validating learning environment  Improved understanding among social workers of the importance of doing a thorough history taking We wish to express our sincere appreciation to Anatasia Maw, deputy director UCT Child Guidance Clinic, Carly Abramovitz Kim De La Harpe Oliver Mitchell Maura Lappeman ,psychology interns and Lucy Sawyer, registered psychologist from the UK without whose input at the weekly presentation sessions the aforementioned outcomes would not have been possible.  278 persons were reached in respect of supportive and monitoring services  533 victims felt supported and safe from further violence /crime/abuse  4369 persons were reached in respect of awareness promotion activities on VEP  244 persons were reached in respect of group work activities

15


OVERVIEW BY SENIOR DIRECT SERVICE MANAGER: INA VERMEULEN ATHLONE, HANOVER PARK, MANENBERG, DU NOON/JOE SLOVO, PHILIPPI EAST The 2010/2011 financial year was one of the most challenging periods experienced by the different teams in respect of increasing caseloads and the increasing demands that came with the implementation of the new Children’s Act. In spite of this the social workers showed commitment and it is positive to note that only 5 of 27 social workers resigned during the period. The social workers and support staff also shown their commitment through after hours work and their willingness to go the extra mile. In the period 27 social workers had to deal with 1924 new cases, an average of 160 new cases per month, had to supervise 995 foster care supervision cases, rendered family preservation services to 163 families and dealt with 262 Children’s Court Inquiries, an average of 22 per month.

ATH 963

MB 452

PE 261

DN 248

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

295

234

324

133

FAMILY PRESERVATION

408

23

46

79

COURT INVESTIGATIONS

139

NEW CASES

30

80

factor in neglect and abuse. It plays a role in neglect, children left unsupervised as well as children abandoned with grandparents. Adding to that unemployment and poverty lead to overcrowding and multiple social problems within homes which make it extremely challenging to try and render family preservation services as there are so many different problems within one household. It has become part of social workers’ daily duty in respect of cases to conduct drug tests as “Tik” has become part of many parents’ lifestyle. In the Xhosa speaking areas the trends are different in respect of substance abuse but here unemployment and poverty play as big a role in the neglect and abandonment of children. Children in this areas however also loose their parents more often. If you look at Philippi East 94 new cases (+-8 per month) were received during the year due to the fact that the children’s parents died. You can therefore see in the statistics of teams that the number of new neglect cases referred in the Cape Flats areas are between 200 – 450 and in the Xhosa speaking areas between 19 – 30. Orphan hood on the other hand is 94 in the Xhosa speaking areas and less than 10 in the Cape Flats areas. The number of referrals in respect of physical abuse, sexual abuse and abandonment have decreased in most of the areas with especially abandonment an extensive decrease. It is uncertain what the reason for this is.

MB

PE

DN

New Intake

AT H 963

452

261

248

Neglect

311

234

30

19

Physical Abuse

53

14

13

11

Sexual Abuse

35

4

8

0

Abandonment

121

1

24

13

Orphan hood

84

6

94

6

13

The trends in the Cape Flats areas have shown that substance abuse is becoming more and more a major

16


ATHLONE REPORT Compiled by Desiree Uys the new Children’s Act and staff is finding their way around the implications and implementation of the Act. The UNODC victim empowerment program was implemented successfully.

The Athlone unit consisting of 1 first line manager, 7 social workers, 2 social auxiliary workers, 1 community development worker and an administrative clerk, serves the general Athlone area including Heideveld, Lansdowne and Langa. According to the 2001 Census there are 45,056 people living in Heideveld/ general Athlone/Lansdowne area and 70% is Coloured, 24% Indian, 3% Black and 4 % White. In Langa 99% of the 49,667 residents are Black and the rest are White or Coloured. The communities experience a wide range of social problems including poverty, overcrowding, unemployment, substance abuse and gangsterism. HIV/AIDS has led to a high caseload of orphans in the Langa area while the general Athlone areas present more cases reported due to neglect as a result of substance abuse. There is an increase in the number of children deserted by their parents in all areas, mainly linked to substance abuse. There is also a steady increase in the number of cases reported of younger children displaying behaviour problems of a serious nature but a lack of resources to assist these children are becoming more apparent as we try and assist them and their families.

ECP volunteer involvement is dwindling and we need to look at ways to sustain and revive this project at present. Staff turnover also impacted negatively on casework and other developmental activities and this was further influenced by the completions of backlogs for foster care extension orders.

Awareness promotion done before and during the World cup led to 0 cases reported as a result of the work done. Parenting skills training continues to grow with more people reached than ever before over the past year. Partnerships with other organisations for holiday programs were very successful. Family reunification services are improving due to the expectations within

17


GENERAL CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMS PROGRAM RECEIVED MATERIAL RELIEF PLACED IN EMERGENCY CARE ACTIVE IN EYE ON THE CHILD PROJECT BENEFITTED FROM AWARENESS PROGRAMS/TALKS/EVENTS ATTENDED LIFE SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED HOLIDAY PROGRAMS DURING YEAR ATTENDED PARENTING SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED AND COMPLETED SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

NUMBER REACHED 130 families 70 children 9 volunteers 3760 persons 321 persons 1461 children 81 adults 65 adults

ASSISTANCE BY THE EYE ON THE CHILD VOLUNTEERS 70 families

MONITORED BY VOLUNTEERS

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOAD

1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

NEW CASES OPENED

CHILDREN'S COURT INQUIRES

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

CASES

963

139

295

FAMILY PRESERVATION CASES 408

CHILDREN

1444

347

442

612

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES RECEIVED DURING THE PERIOD 500 400 300 200 100 0

NEGLECT

CASES

311

PHYSICAL ABUSE 53

CHILDREN

466

53

SEXUAL ABUSE 35

ORPHAN HOOD 84

ABANDON MENT 121

SUBSTANCE ABUSE 257

MAINTENA NCE 154

35

151

145

308

169

18


Domestic Violence, Crime, Death, Premature Mortality. This satellite office in Hanover Park formed part of the operation of the Athlone Unit of Cape Town Town Child

HANOVER PARK REPORT Compiled by Esmerelda Ramklass

Hanover Park, at present an area of great concern is located in the Metro South Region of Cape Town. It is known for its crime related activities like the operation of various gangs and smuggling of drugs which lead to many gang fights in the year under review. According to Space Time Research completed in 2001 it has a Population of 33318 Coloureds, 350 Black African, 65 Indian/Asian and 22 Whites. This population of almost 50 000 has 8221 employed people, 5044 unemployed, 1901 scholars, 1103 pensioners and 2888 homemakers. Further statistics reflects that only 291 people completed schooling (grade10-12) and 79 completed a Higher Education.

Key challenges and social problems of the area are Poverty, Unemployment, Gangsterism, Alcohol- and Drug Abuse, Overcrowded Living Conditions, Lack of Formal Housing, High Levels of Child Abuse and Neglect,

Welfare with 1 First Line Manager, 1 Administration Worker/Receptionist, 2 Social Workers and 1 Development Worker (for the Athlone area). During July 2010 the one social worker resigned, but the unit still continued with service delivery. With the appointment of the After Hours/ Hanover Park First Line Manager in July 2010 the unit was separated from the Athlone Unit and in August 2010 the vacant social work position was filled. By December 2010 another social worker was appointed to deal with the increase in caseload in the area. As the staff complement increased, so did the cases resulting in all three social workers on a weekly basis being involved with investigations into Child Abuse and Neglect, attending Children’s Court Inquiries and attending to proving services to the community. Gangsterism and the effect it has on the social workers ability to complete their investigations in the high risk areas of gangs. The operation of drug smuggling and use in many households which leads to neglect and abuse of children. High levels of Crime, Domestic Violence in households. Absenteeism of parents due to their involvement in crime and drug-and alcohol abuse which leads to other family members, mostly older grandparents having to look after their children. Increase in youngsters joining the various gangs in the area as the life of gangsterism, drug smuggling is what they are used to and what is perceived as being the only source of income in many households. Drug-and Alcohol use has also led to a lot of parents especially women disappearing from their households alleged to be prostituting themselves or just making a way for their next fix.

19


GENERAL CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMS PROGRAM RECEIVED MATERIAL RELIEF PLACED IN EMERGENCY CARE ACTIVE IN EYE ON THE CHILD PROJECT BENEFITTED FROM AWARENESS PROGRAMS/TALKS/EVENTS ATTENDED LIFE SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED HOLIDAY PROGRAMS DURING YEAR ATTENDED PARENTING SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED AND COMPLETED SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

NUMBER REACHED 53 families 77 children 4 volunteers 2589 persons 194 persons 550 children 29 adults 6 adults

ASSISTANCE BY THE EYE ON THE CHILD VOLUNTEERS 30 families

MONITORED BY VOLUNTEERS

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOAD

1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

NEW CASES OPENED

CHILDREN'S COURT INQUIRES

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

CASES

364

89

249

FAMILY PRESERVATION CASES 787

CHILDREN

439

145

307

1107

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES RECEIVED DURING THE PERIOD 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

NEGLECT

CASES

62

PHYSICAL ABUSE 16

CHILDREN

75

20

SEXUAL ABUSE 9

ORPHAN HOOD 18

ABANDONME NT 3

OTHER

11

22

4

307

256

20


MANENBERG REPORT Compiled by Yolanda Fransman The team of 5 social workers, 1 social auxiliary worker and 1 community development worker with the guidance of a first line manager serve this community and has made a lot of stride in winning the community’s trust. During the period the team’s biggest achievements were their life skills sessions with troubled teenagers, parenting training in partnership with Life Choices with mothers as well as fathers and their numeracy and literacy project. Whether you love it or hate it, the diverse community of Manenberg is like no other community. Besides being home to many cultures, and presenting with many challenges and potential, there is a very strong sense of community which is not to be underestimated. Working in Manenberg is not for the feint hearted and will leave an indelible mark on the lives of every person fortunate to work in it, as all the Child Welfare workers who ever worked in the area will attest to. The area covered by the Manenberg team covers the greater Manenberg area, Sherwood Park, Primrose Park, and Tambo Village. The age group covered by the team was 0-17 years. Problems experienced include: poverty, unemployment, substance abuse, gang violence, child abuse etc. Community participation is very important as is evident in the number of community based organizations in the area and the empowerment of community members to take ownership of their community through local initiatives. Child protection however remains a great challenge for the area, and although there is collaboration between different stakeholders to address this challenge, the community needs to start taking much more responsibility to reduce the increasing social problems in the area.

They

however

also

experienced

the

following

challenges:  Implementation of Children’s Act 38/2005 resulting in backlog of foster care amongst other things. Also increase in workload as requirements for the review of foster care placements have increased.  Impact of New Children’s Act on committals for maintenance which has dire consequences for many vulnerable children.  Lack of temporary safe care facilities, especially for teenagers.  Dealing with the consequences of substance abuse.

21


GENERAL CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMS PROGRAM RECEIVED MATERIAL RELIEF PLACED IN EMERGENCY CARE ACTIVE IN EYE ON THE CHILD PROJECT BENEFITTED FROM AWARENESS PROGRAMS/TALKS/EVENTS ATTENDED LIFE SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED HOLIDAY PROGRAMS DURING YEAR ATTENDED PARENTING SKILLS TRAINING SERVES ON CHILDREN’S COMMITTEE

NUMBER REACHED 40 families 22 children 2 volunteers 1704 persons 20 persons 758 children 18 adults 7 children

ASSISTANCE BY THE EYE ON THE CHILD VOLUNTEERS 22 families

MONITORED BY VOLUNTEERS

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOAD

1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

NEW CASES OPENED

CHILDREN'S COURT INQUIRES

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

CASES

452

30

195

FAMILY PRESERVATION CASES 23

CHILDREN

1002

39

243

38

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES RECEIVED DURING THE PERIOD 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

NEGLECT

PHYSICAL ABUSE

SEXUAL ABUSE

ORPHAN HOOD

ABANDONME NT

CASES

234

14

4

6

1

SUBSTANCE ABUSE, CUSTODY, ACCESS 193

CHILDREN

346

15

4

8

1

269

22


DU NOON/JOE SLOVO REPORT Compiled by Nomonde Kulati 

DU Noon is located in the west side of Cape Town and falls under the Milnerton Area. It is divided into three phases and has informal settlements within these areas. The community comprises of youth and middle aged. The population originates from different areas, migrating to seek employment. The community therefore grows rapidly as a result of migration as well as high birth rate. Teenage pregnancy rates are high and prevalent among the informal settlements as well as high rates of HIV/AIDS – children at risk since parents do not take preventative measures. The environment is affected by over population, sewage problems and frequent fires to informal settlements. Social problems in the area include alcohol and substance abuse, unemployment and as a result an increase in the levels of poverty. child abuse, neglect and abandonment .

Partnering with Epilepsy South Africa to conduct awareness during Child Protection month  Visited Educares to empower the educators with information regarding child abuse: Including Child’s Rights, parent’s rights and the signs of abuse  Started a new program at Du noon clinic. The program is geared towards expectant mothers and provides awareness and support in an effort to prevent/avoid child abandonment  Conducted World Aids Day Program which benefited both affected and infected adults and children

The main challenges for the team were the following:  High caseloads which prevent workers from providing quality care to clients  Training for volunteers postponed due to shortage of staff  Insufficient safe mothers and emergency care givers to place children in community

The team’s successes include the following:  Connecting with high school students to conduct workshops on Teenage Pregnancy: Protection and Prevention

23


GENERAL CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMS PROGRAM RECEIVED MATERIAL RELIEF PLACED IN EMERGENCY CARE BENEFITTED FROM AWARENESS PROGRAMS/TALKS/EVENTS ATTENDED HOLIDAY PROGRAMS DURING YEAR ATTENDED PARENTING SKILLS TRAINING

NUMBER REACHED 300 families 12 children 350 persons 200 children 40 adults

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOAD

400 350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

NEW CASES OPENED

CHILDREN'S COURT INQUIRES

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

CASES

248

13

133

FAMILY PRESERVATION CASES 79

CHILDREN

365

19

173

102

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES RECEIVED DURING THE PERIOD

350 300 250 200 150 100 50 0

NEGLECT

CASES

19

PHYSICAL ABUSE 11

CHILDREN

24

14

ORPHAN HOOD

OTHER

6

ABANDONMEN T 13

8

13

306

199

24


PHILIPPI EAST REPORT Compiled by Eldorette Farao

 

 Philippi East area stretches from Duinefontein Road, to Symphony Road bounded by Landsdowne Road and Vanguard Drive. Philippi-East is not only a diverse area in terms of population, culture but also business and housing type both being formal and informal. Although this area is predominantly IsiXhosa there is a growing Afrikaans community. Our Philippi Areas include: Klipfontein Mission, Thabo Mbeki, Bekela, Acasia Park, Never, Never, Pola Park, Marcus Garvey, Better Life, Grave Yard, Brown Farm, Moonwood, Block 6, Siyathlala, Siyanzela, Hazeldene, Victoria Mxenge Sweethome Farm (Vlei), Joeburg, Woodbay, Vietnam and Bukuzenzele. According to the 2001 Census the population of PhilippiEast was 110 316 and it is projected to be 157 217. This community is served by 15 service stations; 31 schools; 3 post offices; 3 police stations; 1 fire station; 4 clinics; 2 hospitals; 3 community centres; 2 shopping centres; 1 library; 1 magistrate’s court; and numerous sports facilities. The most common problems reported are neglect, abandonment, alcohol abuse, orphanhood. (HIV/Aids, Abuse(Crime, Violence), Poverty & Unemployment, and Family Crisis)

The unit’s successes include:  Awareness promotion through establishing 1 hour radio slot with Radio Zibonele discussing

 

issues relevant to our work two Wednesday per month. Recruitment drive for emergency and foster parents Family Preservation through empowerment of parents and families to care and protect their children. Collaboration with other NGO’s during the 2010 Soccer World Cup by co- facilitation holiday programmes Creating Victim Empowerment through discussion and distribution of reading materials Awareness created regarding the New Children’s Act by facilitating talks at schools by utilizing “My Children’s Act book.” Stability within the team as no vacancies was experienced throughout this past year.

Challenges for the unit include:  A huge challenge has been finding suitable placements for children and ensuring that all siblings are kept together.  The Implementation of the Children’s Act especially as it is a learning process for all involved being from the client, social worker to the Children’s Court.  Obtaining Birth Certificates in respect of children in light of the fact that fraudulent claims are made at Home-Affairs to access the Child Support Grants.  Uncooperative parents making family reunification difficult.

25


GENERAL CAPACITY BUILDING PROGRAMS PROGRAM RECEIVED MATERIAL RELIEF MEALS PROVIDED AT SOUP KITCHEN 5 DAYS A WEEK PLACED IN EMERGENCY CARE ACTIVE IN EYE ON THE CHILD PROJECT BENEFITTED FROM AWARENESS PROGRAMS/TALKS/EVENTS ATTENDED LIFE SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED HOLIDAY PROGRAMS DURING YEAR ATTENDED PARENTING SKILLS TRAINING ATTENDED AND COMPLETED SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS SERVES ON CHILDREN’S COMMITTEE

NUMBER REACHED 176 families 26040 meals over 12 months 45 children 8 volunteers 733500 persons 25 persons 1000 children 20 adults 155 adults 10 children

ASSISTANCE BY THE EYE ON THE CHILD VOLUNTEERS 18 families

MONITORED BY VOLUNTEERS

BREAKDOWN OF TOTAL CASELOAD

500 400 300 200 100 0

NEW CASES OPENED

CHILDREN'S COURT INQUIRES

FOSTER CARE SUPERVISION

CASES

261

80

324

FAMILY PRESERVATION CASES 46

CHILDREN

469

116

388

69

BREAKDOWN OF NEW CASES RECEIVED DURING THE PERIOD 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0

NEGLECT

CASES

30

PHYSICAL ABUSE 13

CHILDREN

45

20

SEXUAL ABUSE 8

ORPHAN HOOD 94

ABANDONM ENT 24

OTHER

8

141

24

138

92

26


AFTER HOUR CHILD PROTECTION SERVICES Compiled by Esmerelda Ramklass The After Hours Service/Basestation/ Toll free number is operational to receive calls nationally and doesn’t serve a specific population. It is in operation to address the needs of all children and families and will respond to reports of abuse and protect children within the jurisdiction of Cape Town Child Welfare. Callers

ATHLONE H/PARK CHILDREN ASSISTED

36

44

PHILIPPI EAST 4

CHILDREN REMOVED

5

5

1

reporting abuse of children outside the Jurisdiction of Cape Town Child Welfare will otherwise be referred to the appropriate resources in a specific area.

HOUTBA KHAYELIT Y SHA 3 5 0

0

LOPP 15

MANENB ERG 25

OTHER AREAS 101

1

1

0

120 100 80 60 40 20 0 NEGLECT

PROBLEM AREA 65

PHYSICAL ABUSE

22

SEXUAL ABUSE

7

ABANDONMENT

30

ORPHAN HOOD

4

OTHER

107

27


COMMUNITY NUTRITIONAL AND DEVELOPMENT CENTRES Compiled by Ina Vermeulen The Community Nutritional and Development Centres in Du Noon, Joe Slovo, Kensington and Witsand, Atlantis were managed with the assistance of 3 community development workers. The graph below shows the amount of centres in each area, the amount of volunteer cooks in each area and the average amount of beneficiaries per area per day. The projects are targeting the unemployed especially those who are unemployable because they lack basic skills, the abused women and children, the poor of the poorest and the people who are affected and infected

300 250 200 150 100 50 0

by HIV and Aids. The projects are therefore much needed in the communities where it was established. The community development workers also started at looking at skills development for the committees as well as the beneficiaries. This will ensure that people do not get dependent on the feeding provided once it is implemented. During the past year the Witsand project was very successful as it established a committee and several of the new committee members could attend skills and leadership training.

Du Noon 6

Joe Slovo 5

Kensington 4

Atlantis 2

Volunteer Cooks

12

6

8

6

Beneficiaries

294

193

176

153

Centres

28


FINANCIAL REPORT BY THE SENIOR FINANCE MANAGER: CLIFFORD ROMAN The annual financial statements for the year ending 31 March 2011 have been prepared in accordance with the International Reporting Standards for Small – and Medium – size Entities and will be available at the Annual General Meeting or on request from the Society. The total revenue from operations was R21, 570, 703. The main sources of income were the following categories:  Collections from the public  Fees Income  The Government Subsidy  Other Income  The National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund  Other Organisations

been purchased. The new copiers facilitate fax to e-mail submissions. While the Society continued to operate in a most cost effective manner and substantially contained expenses, the raising of funds remains problematic and the absolute increase in income did not match the rise in expenditure. This caused a draw down on the investments of the Society. The Finance Department produces monthly accounts for the Organisation which has eight core departments, four crèches and three affiliates. The Sage ERP Accpac has been upgraded to version 6.1 and the modules used are Peresoft Cashbook, General Ledger, Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable. The Sage ERP Accpac Accounting System facilitates drill-down methodologies which reach right to the core of the individual entries in the ledgers. It is a user-friendly system which interfaces with the Softline VIP Payroll system. Therefore comparative year on year financial figures can be produced. The relatively new staff of the Finance Department are to be commended for their loyalty, effort and commitment.

The total expenditure for the year was R23, 546, 237. The expenditure categories are listed below:  Staff expenditure  Transport and Office  Land and Buildings  Domestic Expenditure  Professional and Special Services  Sundries The profit on sale of share investment is R322 705. The financial year ended with a deficit of R2, 432, 859.78. The provision for leave pay has been increased by R186, 676. A new Dell Server has been installed with mirrored hard drives and a tape drive with an after hours back up facility. Telkom contracts have been changed to suit our business requirements and to curtail unnecessary costs. A new Telephone Management System has been installed, The new system allows for free calls between our site offices. New fax/photocopier machines have

29


INCOME 12 000 000 10 000 000 8 000 000 6 000 000 4 000 000 2 000 000 0 Board Project Lodging, Members Admin creche & specific hip fees fees funding counselli ng fees 2009/2010 10 145 67 2 297 741 2 827 603 670 000 400 000 30 000 308 235 527 73 139

157 083 1 985 964

2010/2011 11 192 09 1 719 259 3 883 806 524 800 161 825

353 398 3 351 280

Gross DSD collection Comm NLDTF NMCF subsidy s from Chest WP public

0

160

291 097

74 979

Finance Income

Other income

EXPENDITURE 14 000 000 12 000 000 10 000 000 8 000 000 6 000 000 4 000 000 2 000 000 0 Staff expenses

Transport & office

2009/2010

11 690 312

3 108 134

Land & buildings expenses 2 009 127

2010/2011

13 953 555

4 035 913

2 445 602

Domestic expenses

Professional & Supplementary Other expenses special services assistance

346 802

737 302

556 568

536 730

527 776

999 090

860 430

723 871

30


DONORS K Adams B Anthony E Bester I Capital M Clarke S Conway PJ Cook P Crawford E Elsing Forderverein Khayelitsha e.V.Haltern am See C Errington FG Fitzgerald DT Fletcher JI Greig C P E Hansen E Harris T Hendricks N Hossain RG Jeffery C Jeffries B Jordaan V Kessler M Kilian H Kotze S Kuhn D Kuni E Laurenson JJ Maartens LS Marinus N Michalopoulus JA Millar E Nel J ET O'Malley D Otto R Pitt O Raatz D Schutte R Simpson B Smit R Smit G Solanki LD Swan L Thomas FG Underhill ALF van Ginkel W Viljoen MJ Walker V Webber H Whittal

N Zakaah Acumen Capital Bowman Gilfillan Attorneys Cape Twines Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr Consolite (Pty) Ltd Fairtree FRAIM My School National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund PSG Absolute Speedfreight The E J Lombardi Trust The Frank and Edna Bradlow Charitable Trust The Lynette Croudace Trust The William Holmes Family Trust Werksmans Incorporating Jan S de Villiers X-Chequer Fund Man - Fraim Adriaan Carter Louw Trust B & SM Goldstein Trust Brendalyn & Ernest E Stempel Foundation Elan Polo S A Greater Good South Africa Heyne Charitable Trust HWB Communications Kantey & Templer Laserfix Mathers Trust Mazars Moores Rowland Nelson Mandela Children's Fund Suiderland / Pioneer Fishing (Pty) Ltd The A F Scratchley Will Trust The Alison and Bill Charitable Trust The Anna Groninger Charitable Trust The C & E Harding Charitable Trust The Colin Campbell Trust The Diane Kaplan Charity Trust The Douglas Jooste Trust The F G Connock Charity Trust The Frank Robb Charitable Trust The G H Starck Trust Fund The J C Coetzee Trust Nr 2 The J E T Lee Will Trust The M J Moldenhauer Trust The Mary Stephen Trust The Nussbaum Foundation The Soundlab (Pty) Ltd The Viking Social & Upliftment Trust Community Chest Western Cape

31


The National Lottery Distribution Fund funded Cape Town Child Welfare for this period with an amount of R3 883 806.00. A portion of the funds was for the purchasing of 4 additional vehicles for the social workers and to transport children. We are greatful for The Fund’s ongoing support to the organisation

OUR APPRECIATION FOR ONGOING SUPPORT ALSO TO:

32


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE PO BOX 374 GATESVILLE, ATHLONE, 7766 LOWER KLIPFONTEIN ROAD, GATESVILLE, ATHLONE T: 021 6383127 F: 021 6385277 information@helpkids.org.za www.helpkids.org.za

33


Cape Town Child Welfare Annual Report 2011