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ANNUAL REPORT 2010

CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE www.helpkids.org.za Crisis Line: 0800435754


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

VISION Creating a safe environment for all children so that they can realise their potential

MISSION We promote the well being of all children, predominantly those in poor socio-economic communities by: Protecting Enhancing Empowering Networking Contributing Building Advocating

those in crisis and at risk the capacity of families and communities to protect and develop their children children to claim their rights and accept their responsibilities with other service providers for the benefit of the children to the development of National and International policies and legislation regarding children the capacity of other organisations to care for children for the rights of children

“We believe that children are our future and our inspiration.” We each have a responsibility to make the world we live in a better, safer place for our children. Don’t be overwhelmed by the challenges. Good has and will always overcome evil. It is up to us to see that this happens. Cape Town Child Welfare has a tremendous track record for positive intervention in changing the lives of the young. I am proud to be associated with their work and congratulate the committee, staff and volunteers on their efforts with very limited resources.

DESMOND TUTU – Archbishop Emeritus, Nobel Laureate and Patron of Cape Town Child Welfare CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE PO Box 374, Gatesville, ATHLONE, 7766 Lower Klipfontein Road, Silvertown, ATHLONE Tel: +2721 6383127 Fax: +2721 6385277 E-mail: information@helpkids.org.za

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Annual Report 2010

CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

Index Areas of Operation

page 3

Chairman’s Message

page 5

Chief Executive’s Overview

page 6

Direct Services Overview

page 7

Results at a Glance

page 8

Financial Reports

page 30

Our Donors

page 33

Printed by Cape Town Child Welfare, September 2010 Production Team: Production and Design- Ina Vermeulen, Editing- Niresh Ramklass & Penny Whitaker

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CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

*Athlone, Belgravia, Belthorn, Bokmakierie, Bridgetown, Crawford, Crossroads, Doornhoogte, Gatesville, Gleemore, Greenhaven, Hazendal, Heideveld, Kewtown, Lansdowne, Langa, Mountview, Rompvlei, Nerissa Estate, Parktown, Penlyn Estate, Penati Estate, Rondebosch East, Rylands, Silvertown, Sunlands, Surrey Estate, Sybrand Park, Vanguard Estate, Welcome Estate, Yorkshire Estate, Wetton, Kenwyn, Joe Slovo, Millers Camp, Waterfront, Pooke se Bos, Vygieskraal, Hanover Park, Newfields, Hout Bay Harbour Area, Imizamo Yetu, Klipfontein Mission, Thabo Mbeki, Bekela, Acasia Park, Never Never, Sweethome Farm, Pola Park, Marcus Garvey, Better Life, Grave Yard, Browns Farm, Block 6, Moon wood, Siyathalala, Siyazela, Hazeldene, Victoria Mzenge, Lower Crossroads, Joburg, Bukuzenzele, Mpinga Square, Vietnam, Philippi Horticulture, Ottery, Eagle Park, Peacock Close, Pelican Heights, Lotus River, Schaapkraal, Phumlani Village, Khayelitsha Site C, Section A-J, Tembani, Bongweni, Kwezi Park, Tambo Village, Sherwood Park, Primrose Park, Manenberg, Tambo Square, Joe Slovo, Milnerton, Du Noon, Site 5

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Annual Report 2010

SOME OF THE AREAS WE WORK IN

Hanover Park

Imizamo Yethu, Hout Bay

Imizamo Yethu, Hout Bay

Hanover Park

Manenberg

Langa

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CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

CHIEF EXECUTIVE NIRESH RAMKLASS

STAFF ORGANOGRAM 2009/2010

SENIOR DIRECT SERVICE MANAGER INA VERMEULEN

SENIOR DIRECT SERVICE MANAGER PENNY WHITAKER

SENIOR FINANCE MANAGER: CLIFFORD ROMAN

ADMIN & MAINTENANCE MANAGER: GEORGINA MOODLEY

FIRST LINE MANAGER HOUT BAY: DEBBIE DEMAS

SENIOR FIRST LINE MANAGER ATHLONE: DESIREE UYS

SENIOR FIRST LINE MANAGER PAYROLL: RAY JATTIEM

PAYROLL ASSISTANT: ROSHNI ROOPNARAIN

ATHLONE STAFF

HOUT BAY STAFF FINANCE DEPARTMENT STAFF

FIRST LINE MANAGER DU NOON: NOMONDE KULATI

FIRST LINE MANAGER KHAYELITSHA: ESMERELDA RAMKLASS

SENIOR FIRST LINE MANAGER: MONA WENTZEL

DU NOON STAFF

KHAYELITSHA STAFF

FIRST LINE MANAGER MANENBERG YOLANDA FRANSMAN

ACTING FIRST LINE MANAGER LOPP: NASEEBA MANUEL-DAVIDS

FIRST LINE MANAGER PHILIPPI EAST ELDORETTE MANENBERG FARAO STAFF

ADMIN & MAINTENANCE STAFF

LOPP STAFF

PHILIPPI EAST STAFF

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MAINTENANCE COORDINATOR: SONNY GOVENDER


Annual Report 2010

CTCW has revamped the fundraising efforts through new fundraising strategies and continued with the world-wide initiatives. The Board continued to support and challenge the Executive management to be effective in delivering a quality service to our clients – mainly the government and end-clients who are the children at risk.

This means we continuously try to extend our reach

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE Theo Nkone

During

the past financial year (20092010) our service delivery focus has followed a twin pronged strategy, consolidating new and existing programmes whilst simultaneously implementing new and innovative services. This approach was successfully fulfilled by staff and management and has resulted in firmer service delivery outputs and the introduction of much needed specialised therapeutic and professional development training facilities at our organisation.

2009 was also a year that required us formulating plans and broadening partnerships at the national level in preparation for the 2010 Football World Cup. Our key partners in that effort were the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund and the Champions for Children Campaign.

The Board of Management continued to perform its fiduciary and strategic responsibilities, guiding the Management team through policy and strategy development. This process culminated in the Annual Bosberaad where the Strategic Plan was reviewed and new programs were added to meet changing societal needs and maintain focus on our central task of protecting children.

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by servicing those areas that we did not service before whilst trying to improve the quality of the service we provide. To this end the Board also set plans in motion for the upgrading of our facilities and offices throughout all the areas in which services are being rendered. Because CTCW is a 102 year-old organisation we have to constantly examine and maintain our processes, buildings and infrastructure.

We

are deeply grateful to the Western Cape Department of Social Development for their continuous support of the work the organisation does. The National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund has also been fantastic in its support for our organisation with much needed funds for operating costs as well as for additional vehicles required. We are indeed thankful to both the aforementioned donors as well as all our other donors who are recorded in the donor’s list in this report.

We

also continue looking at ways our skills and innovation can contribute in improving the conditions of children at risk even outside of Cape Town. This we do by co-operating with like-minded organisations across South Africa and the world.

Whilst we face challenges ahead, I am excited by the opportunities we have to make a positive contribution to children at risk, even during the tough economic climate. My sincere thanks and appreciation goes to all my fellow Board members for giving off their time and expertise voluntarily to ensure the success of CTCWS. I also wish to thank the Management, Staff and Volunteers for their tireless efforts in ensuring that the children and families in Cape Town received the vital services required to make their lives better and healthier.

And finally I would also like to encourage everyone who reads this Annual Report to partner with us and be a champion for children at risk, your gift irrespective of size will go a long way !


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

Our social work statistics show that the numbers of children and families being reached remains high. Staff benefited from numerous training sessions aimed at building the level of expertise and intellectual capital in the organization.

Finally, I would like to thank our Board, Staff and volunteers for their tireless efforts and teamwork during the past financial year that ensured our success.

CHIEF EXECUTIVE REVIEW Niresh Ramklass

2009 has been a year of consolidation and expansion of service delivery and revenue generation. We made great progress in child protection services and began earnest preparations for implementing the new Children’s Act No. 38 of 2005. The new Act lays the foundation for fundamental changes to the child protection landscape in South Africa, demanding more intense social work investigative work and lengthier children’s court processes and procedures, all intended to serve children at risk more appropriately and ensure the protection of their rights.

Our social work staff continued with daily challenges at the coalface, witnessing a significant rise in child abandonment cases, as more and more parents simply dumped their babies and younger children like litter in bags and other horrendous packages. Child neglect also stood out as a major issue affecting children in Cape Town, displaying the human impact of rising poverty levels in our City. Social work teams engaged with thousands of children and their families at grassroots level in our continuous attempts at family preservation. The optimal functioning of families is a key challenge for us as social pathology threatens the very fabric of society.

All

Departments worked hard to meet their targets during the past year to ensure our overall success. I want to say a special word of thanks and appreciation to all Managers and First Line Managers for their commitment and outstanding contribution to the organisation during the 2009/2010 year.

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Annual Report 2010

alleged neglect after hours. A further 10 volunteers rendered vital services in respect of 24/7 crisis line for children.

In

DIRECT SERVICE MANAGERS’ OVERVIEW Penny Whitaker & Ina Vermeulen

Cape

Town Child Welfare underwent several changes in respect of service delivery during the 2009/2010 financial year which resulted in an overall increase in workload expectations across all units. These changes included the acquisition of additional areas of operation as well as an increase in our target group to include services to children up until the age of 18yrs ie: *The Athlone, Houtbay, Khayelitsha and LOP units increased their target group to 18 *The Manenberg unit increased its target group to 16 *The Guguletu unit(now Philippi East unit) commenced service delivery within Phillipi East area with children up to 18 years and are in the process of handing over all cases from Guguletu, Nyanga and Crossroads to The Department of Social Development as per new agreement.

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*The organisation commenced services within a new area namely Du Noon/Joe Slovo

As

a result of these changes 3523 new cases were received during the period under review indicating a 12.8% increase in comparison to the previous financial year. In respect of these new cases an increase was noted, in particular, with regards to neglect and abandonment, with 963 cases of neglect and 486 of abandonment being reported. An overall caseload of 6318 was attended to with 486 Children’s Court Inquiries being expedited. In addition 1981 foster care cases were also supervised.

The organization’s Eye on the Child program still remains a major part of our child protection service. 76 community volunteers assisted social workers in monitoring families and investigating

addition to child protection services this organization also implements capacity building programs in respect of which 23 865 adults and children were reached via awareness promotion activities ie talks, events and workshops. 600 adults participated within skills development programs. A further 325 parents benefitted from parenting skills training. Short term material relief was also provided to 1123 families.

As

is evident from the above the period under review reflects a significant increase in workloads, which has resulted in a hectic, fast spaced and eventful working environment.

It

should therefore be noted that the successes as attained would not have been possible were it not for the co operation, hard work and willingness of all direct service and support personnel including volunteers to go the extra the extra mile. We therefore wish to express our sincere appreciation for their unwavering commitment and dedication in terms of creating a safer environment for all children.


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

RESULTS IN A GLANCE TOTAL AMOUNT OF CASES FOR THE YEAR

NEW CASES FOR THE YEAR

FOSTER CARE CASES

1842 1667 1394

746

722

660

620 456 344

327 150

ATHLONE

PHILIPPI EAST

456

447

403

378 348

295 197

170

94

76

HOUT BAY

KHAYELITSHA

LOPP

MANENBERG

DU NOON

NUMBER OF CHILDREN'S COURT ENQUIRIES OPENED DURING THE PERIOD 195

128

33

ATHLONE

9

PHILIPPI EAST

HOUT BAY

KHAYELITSHA

42

35

29

LOPP

MANENBERG

24

DU NOON


Annual Report 2010

ATHLONE Senior Direct Service Manager: Ina Vermeulen Senior First Line Manager: Desiree Uys

The team consists of: 1 First Line Manager 2 Senior Social Workers 6 Social Workers 2 Community Development Workers 1 Social Auxiliary Worker 2 Administrative Clerks

The

Athlone unit serves the greater Athlone area, Heideveld, Hanover Park and Langa area. The Browns Farm area was amalgamated with the Guguletu office during the financial year due to changes in service agreements with the Department of Social Development.

The

areas served by the Athlone office is characterized by poverty, unemployment, crime and gangsterism, substance abuse, teenage pregnancy and a multitude of other social problems. Over the past year there has been an increase in the number of cases of very young children abusing substances, displaying behavior problems and biological parents abandoning their parental responsibility to others, mainly maternal grandparents. More clients are also approaching our office for advise on legal matters, for example divorce/custody issues as well as abuse of the child support grant by parents who have abandoned their children with caregivers.

Achievements during the year include the expansion of the peer group educators project to the Langa area, ongoing success with the skills training workshop, team coping with a high caseload in spite of many staff changes and vacancies. ECP volunteers continued to be a valuable support to the social work staff which enhanced service delivery as more clients could be reached.

Challenges

during the year which hampered service delivery was an increase in the number of children being referred who abuse substances and display behaviour problems as well as the absence of facilities and services available to them. The office also experienced a flood but were able to settle down after the damages were repaired. The unit had a high staff turnover during the year as 13 social workers left with the remaining staff having to cope with the workload.

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CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

General Capacity Building Programs BENEFICIARIES 104 families 45 children 20 volunteers 16438 persons 806 children 231 children

PROGRAM Material Relief Emergency Homes Isolabantwana Project (Eye on the Child) Life skills & Awareness Programs Holiday Programs Peer Group Educators and/or Children’s Committee 109 adults Capacity Building Programs 223 adults Parenting Skills Training

 Monitored 178 families  Assisted 84 families via Family Group Conferences  Removed 95 children via Form 4 to safety

Caseload for the Period New Cases

Children's Court Inquiries

Foster Care Cases

Family Preservation

Committals

238 11%

44 2% 344 16%

1394 65%

128 6%

Breakdown of new cases Neglect

Physical Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Abandonment

Other

431 31%

543 39% 172 12%

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Orphan hood

79 6% 67 5% 102 7%


Annual Report 2010

DU NOON/JOE SLOVO Senior Direct Service Manager: Ina Vermeulen First Line Manager: Nomonde Kulati

The team comprises of: 1 First Line Manager 4 Social Workers 1 Social Auxiliary Worker 1 Administrative Clerk 1 General Worker

The office operates in three areas in namely Du Noon, Joe Slovo and Kwa 5. The areas comprise of formal as well as informal settlements. Du Noon and Joe Slovo comprises of formal as well as informal housing, but Kwa 5 consists of only informal housing.

The

areas are over populated and most of the population are people coming from the rural areas as well as from neighbouring African countries to seek employment.

Cases received are mostly in respect of neglect and abandonment. There are other non governmental organizations that provide services in the community although gaps in non welfare services are evident, especially in Du Noon and Kwa 5.

The achievements include:   

Teamwork was encouraged thus promoting a better working environment. Establishing working relationships with other stakeholders in the community. Building partnerships with other organizations in terms of obtaining assistance with donations e.g. Sharing Abundant Life Together (SALT) provides our office with Food parcels, Little Lamb Nappies on a monthly basis. All emergency cases as referred by ACVV and Social Development, were attended to by the unit.

Service delivery was negatively impacted, when a group calling themselves “Community Leaders” threatened the safety of the staff as they challenged Cape Town Child Welfare’s presence within their community. Although services continued, staff had to be temporarily relocated to the Manenberg office.

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CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

General Capacity Building Programs BENEFICIARIES 137 families 11 children 227 persons 200 children

PROGRAM Material Relief Emergency Homes Life skills & Awareness Programs Holiday Programs

Caseload for the Period New Cases

Children's Court Inquiries

Foster Care Cases

Family Preservation

Committals

50 10%

39 8%

295 59%

94 18%

24 5%

Breakdown of new cases Neglect

Physical Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Orphan hood

42 19%

77 35%

73 33%

Abandonment

Other

13 6%

5 2%

11 5%

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Annual Report 2010

MANENBERG Senior Direct Service Manager: Ina Vermeulen First Line Manager: Yolanda Fransman

The Team consists of: 1 First Line Manager 5 social 2 Community Development Workers 1 Administrative Clerk 1 Domestic Worker

The vibrant and diverse community serviced by the Manenberg team consists of Manenberg, Sherwood Park, Primrose Park and Tambo Village. It is a community rife with anti social problems such as substance abuse, poverty, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence and apathy as is reflected in the team’s caseload.

The Manenberg team plays an instrumental role in Child Protection in the area, and for the period 2009/2010, rendered child protection services to children aged 0-16 years in collaboration with other stakeholders in and around the community. Working in Manenberg is by no means an easy task as staff has had to face a variety of challenges ranging from gang violence to unco-operative clients and unrealistic demands from clients. Despite this, the Manenberg team consists of a committed staff compliment. During the period under review, the team started an after school project at the office which has been a great success. The team also managed to do parenting skills training with a group of 8 parents, which also resulted in some of the parents helping with the holiday programmes. The holiday programmes run by the team has helped to keep many vulnerable children safe and off the streets, even if just for a week at a time.

Flash rains in August 2009 resulted in the social work offices being flooded, and the team being displaced for almost two months while renovations took place. The increase in the age group serviced by the team, the sustainability of committed volunteers, as well as the complex nature of problems dealt with by the team has resulted in staff feeling overwhelmed, and highlighted the need for more social workers for the area. Despite the challenges faced, child protection services in Manenberg continued.

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CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

General Capacity Building Programs BENEFICIARIES 83 families 35 children 10 volunteers 906 persons 860 children 5 children 12 adults 8 parents

PROGRAM Material Relief Emergency Homes Isolabantwana Project (Eye on the Child) Life skills & Awareness Programs Holiday Programs Peer Group Educators and/or Children’s Committee Capacity Building Programs Parenting Skills Training

 Monitored 88 families  Removed 2 children via Form 4 to safety

Caseload for the Period New Cases

Children's Court Inquiries

Foster Care

Family Preservation

113 15% 170 22%

447 59%

29 4%

Breakdown of new cases Neglect

Physical Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Orpanhood

Abandonment

124 27% 54 12%

265 57% 4 1% 3 1%

15

10 2%

Other


Annual Report 2010

PHILIPPI EAST Senior Direct Service Manager: Ina Vermeulen First Line Manager: Eldorette Farao

The team consists of: 1 First Line Manager 9 Social Workers 1 Senior Community Development Worker 3 Community Development Workers 1 Administrative Clerk 1 General Worker 3 Security Guards

The areas covered by this unit are vast and include: Klipfontein Mission, Thabo Mbeki, Bekela, Acasia Park, Never, Never, Pola Park, Marcus Garvey, Better Life, Grave Yard, Brown Farm, Moonwood, Block 6, Siyathlala, Siyanzela, Hazeldene, Victoria Mxenge, Sweethome Farm (Vlei), (Lower Cross Roads), Joeburg, Bukuzenzele, Woodbay and Vietnam.

The

social problems prevalent are child abuse, neglect, abandonment, orphanhood, substance abuse, behaviour problems, poverty and those affected and infected by HIV/AIDS.

It has been a year of changes for the Guguletu and Philippi-East teams. From the 01.10.2009 respectively the Department of Social Development, Guguletu has been responsible for the delivery of services to children between the ages of 0-18 in Guguletu, Nyanga and surrounding areas and our office has been responsible for the delivery of services in the Philippi-East area.

Our

office has built good networks and has collaborative relationships with other organisations since this demarcation of services. These collaborations have enhanced the service that we deliver to our clients. The hosting of both local and international social work students has also contributed positively towards developmental work done with children.

Child Protection has presented itself as a challenge due to our age group increasing as well as the complexities of the problems experienced by clients. Another challenge has been assisting parents with no ID documents or birth certificates for their children and therefore is unable to access basic services such as the Child Support Grant. This has also resulted in delays in respect of the efficient processing of statutory matters.

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CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

General Capacity Building Programs BENEFICIARIES 212 families 42 children 20 volunteers 3766 persons 147 children 12 children 217 adults 29 parents

 Monitored 13 families  Assisted 123 families via Family Group Conferences  Removed 15 children via Form 4 to safety

PROGRAM Material Relief Emergency Homes Isolabantwana Project (Eye on the Child) Life skills & Awareness Programs Holiday Programs Peer Group Educators and/or Children’s Committee Capacity Building Programs Parenting Skills Training

Caseload for the Period including Guguletu cases still being finalised New Cases

Children's Court Inquiries

66 4%

Foster Care

Family Preservation

Committals

308 19%

347 21%

722 44%

195 12%

Breakdown of new cases Neglect

Physical Abuse

Sexual Abuse

60 19%

69 22%

Orphanhood

50 16%

Abandonment

Other

8 2% 12 4%

119 37%

TALK ON TEENAGE SEXUALITY

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Annual Report 2010

HOUT BAY Senior Direct Service Manager: Penny First Line Manager: Debbie Demas

Whitaker

The team consists of: 1 First Line Manager 4 Social Workers 2 Community Development Workers 1 Social Auxiliary Worker 1 Administrative Clerk 2 Cleaners/general workers.

The

Hout Bay Team serves the greater Hout Bay area, stretching as far as Llandudno. However, our services are concentrated where the need is greatest, which are the poorer, most disadvantaged sections of the community. The homes in Hangberg consist of single housing units, and 3-story flats. As the population has increased, there has been a proliferation of wooden housing bungalows on every available open space, which mars the beauty of this village. Many of the fishing factories have closed down, resulting in increasing unemployment.

The informal settlement of

Imizamo Yethu is 5 km’s away from Hangberg, and stretches from the fringes of Hughenden Estate to the police station and is slowly encroaching up the mountain. The infrastructure is very poor –the roads are badly potholed and there is no drainage which results in flooding every winter, and the danger of fires and vermin outbreak during summer. Even though solid brick dwellings were built by volunteers, there are make-shift dwellings in the backyards on every available piece of land. People continue to stream into the community, straining the over-stretched resources.

The problems in the 2 areas are similar, viz neglect and abuse of children as a result of unemployment, substance abuse and poor parenting, domestic violence and challenging behavior especially amongst teenage children. Imizamo Yethu has an increasing number of requests for Committals due to the parents having died, and the rate of abandonment of children is on the rise.

Our greatest achievement as a team has been the trust and credibility we have built up in the Hout Bay community, especially amongst the children. We have tried to create a child-friendly environment, with the result that children come to the office to play, and view the social workers as their allies.

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Clients have a greater degree of cooperation. We held a number of successful events during the year, including a children’s hike, a 3-day environmental children’s camp, year end parties, and volunteer appreciation functions. We also successfully initiated our children’s committee, and the three students who did their practical work in our team received commendations from their learning institutions. Our sewing group made school skirts and our craft group received a small contract from a local restaurant to make condiment baskets

Our challenges

centred mainly around our office building and lack of resources. The offices were extremely cold wet and prone to flooding in winter, and stiflingly hot and sandy in summer. Being in an isolated spot, the building was prone to vandalism, which proved a security risk. The courts proved increasingly demanding, especially with the imminent introduction of the new children’s Act, and the change of commissioners in the Wynberg Court.


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

General Capacity Building Programs BENEFICIARIES 411 families 55 children 12 volunteers 732 persons 974 children 10 children 58 adults 22 parents

 Monitored 70 families  Assisted 40 families via Family Group Conferences  Removed 1 child via Form 4 to safety  Provided parenting skills training to 6 mothers

PROGRAM Material Relief and Soup kitchens Emergency Homes Isolabantwana Project (Eye on the Child) Life skills & Awareness Programs Holiday Programs Peer Group Educators and/or Children’s Committee Capacity Building Programs Parenting Skills Training

Caseload for the Period New Cases

Children's Court Inquiries

Foster Care

55 18%

Family Preservation

150 48%

76 24% 33 10%

Breakdown of new cases Neglect

Physical Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Abandonment

36 28%

28 22%

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Orphanhood

Behaviour

42 32% 6 5% 7 5%

10 8%


Annual Report 2010

KHAYELITSHA Senior Direct Service Manager: Penny Whitaker First Line Manager: Esmerelda Ramklass

The team consists of: 1 First Line Manager 6 social workers 2 Community Development Workers 1 Administrative Clerk 1 Domestic Cleaner

This unit is also responsible for the supervision of an Educare facility , Haus Haltern which is responsible for providing 47 children with cognitive stimulation within a safe and hygienic environment. The staff complement consists of 1 Principal; 1 teacher and 1 cook.

Khayelitsha

is a densely populated community characterized by huge levels of poverty as manifested via the following social problems ie malnutrition, child neglect, high school drop- out rates, substance abuse, high incidence of HIV/AIDS and related illnesses. Most households are female headed with a very large youth population. Unemployment remains high with an informal sector which consist mainly of spaza shops, taverns, taxi businesses, labourers and domestic workers. Residents live in primarily overcrowded living conditions characterized by corrugated iron shacks which lack basic amenities. Grant dependency is high with a growing increase in requests for committals for maintenance due to parents who have died or children being abandoned.

The

Khayelitsha team consists of a group of dedicated individuals who have achieved good relationships with community members as well as other stakeholders. This unit exceeded its targets within the following areas ie awareness promotion, youth life skills groups, HIV/Aids awareness programs, supportive and monitoring services, as well as family preservation programs. With the courts assistance, more parenting plans were formulated as opposed to the removal of children, thus strengthening family preservation services as rendered by this unit. Challenges were however experienced with the efficient processing of statutory matters due to the transient lifestyle of community members commuting between the Eastern and Western Cape.

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CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

General Capacity Building Programs BENEFICIARIES 176 families 25 children 13 volunteers 1796 persons 719 children 17 children 204 adults 43 parents

 Monitored 50 families  Assisted 25 families via Family Group Conferences  Provided parenting skills training to 21 mothers

PROGRAM Material Relief and Soup kitchens Emergency Homes Isolabantwana Project (Eye on the Child) Life skills & Awareness Programs Holiday Programs Peer Group Educators and/or Children’s Committee Capacity Building Programs Parenting Skills Training

Caseload for the Period New Cases

Children's Court Inquiries

Foster Care

Family Preservation

49 6% 334 42%

378 48%

35 4%

Breakdown of new cases Neglect

Physical Abuse

Sexual Abuse

30 27%

Abandonment

Orphanhood

39 35%

20 18% 12 11%

21

10 9%


Annual Report 2010

LOPP (Lotus River/Ottery/Philippi/Pelican Senior Direct Service Manager: Penny Whitaker Acting First Line Manager: Naseeba Manual-Davids 1 Acting first Line Manager 7 Social Workers 1 Senior Community Development Worker 2 Community Development Workers 1 Administrative Clerk 1 Parttime cleaner

The LOP team renders services in Lotus River, Ottery, Philippi Horticulture, and the Pelican Park Belt areas; which are predominantly non-white, Afrikaans speaking communities. There appears to be a clear barrier between the “haves” and the “have nots”; this unit has therefore identified a greater need for services rendered in areas like the Ottery and Lotus River flats, Phumlani Village, Freedom Park, Egoli and various other informal settlements.

These communities face a variety of social ills which include increased rates of unemployment, substance abuse and gang violence; this to a large degree results in a demoralized and apathetic community. We therefore find that child abuse and neglect as well as children displaying uncontrollable behaviour is prevalent.

The achievements include:     

Relocated from Head Office to an office situated in the Philippi Horticulture area Started an additional soup kitchen; provided close to 2000 people with a nutritious meal Started an additional Kids Club Reached more than 3500 children i.r.o child abuse awareness programs Greater focus was placed on family preservation, monitoring and support service which appears to have contributed to less removals

The challenges include:     

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High staff turnover Consistent vacant posts Familiarization and implementation of the New Children’s Act Insufficient safe/emergency homes Lack of accommodation within Children’s Homes

Park)


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

General Capacity Building Programs BENEFICIARIES

9 volunteers 4572 persons

95 adults 346 parents

PROGRAM Material Relief and Soup kitchens Emergency Homes Isolabantwana Project (Eye on the Child) Life skills & Awareness Programs Holiday Programs Peer Group Educators and/or Children’s Committee Capacity Building Programs Parenting Skills Training

 Monitored 381 families  Assisted 120 families via Family Group Conferences

Caseload for the Period New Cases

Children's Court Inquiries

Foster Care

Family Preservation

124 16% 403 53%

197 26%

42 5%

Breakdown of new cases Neglect

10 7%

Physical Abuse

18 12%

Sexual Abuse

Abandonment

8 6%

94 64% 16 11%

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Orphanhood


Annual Report 2010

ADOPTION SERVICES Senior Direct Service Manager: Penny Whitaker First Line Manager: Debbie Demas

The

specialist adoption team continues to deliver services of a high standard. The team consists of 2 fulltime social workers, Penny H enwood and Bianca Mechnig,( re-deployed from the Hout Bay unit Yolanda Moolman a part-time senior worker doing post adoption work, Debbie Demas, First Line Manager and Mandy Hussey, the Adoption Secretary. Our services cover the whole of the Western Cape.

The adoption team forms part of the Western Cape Adoption Coalition. The aim of the group is to foster co-operation amongst adoption service providers to ensure that standards are maintained and that all service providers are kept abreast of the latest trends and best practice models. With the introduction of the Register of Adoptable Children coming into force with the new Children’s Act, this co-operation is vital.

The

24

215

109

133

123

63

53

NUMBER OF ADOPTIONS EXPEDITED

POST ADOPTION SERVICE INTERVIEWS

ORIENTATION MEETINGS WITH‌

ADOPTIVE PARENTS TRAINED

23

SCREENING OF ADOPTIVE PARENTS

We were approached by the Department of Social Development to provide training in the screening and training of adoptive parents to 45 of their social workers over the Western Cape. This was done in 3 sessions of 2 days each. The adoption staff delivered the presentation, and the trainees were provided with a comprehensive training manual. Feedback was positive, and this exercise took the adoption team to a new level, and entrenched our stake in the field of adoption work.

255

COUNSELING TO ADOPTIVE PARENTS

the black race group, while the majority of prospective adoptive parents are from the coloured race group. Cross-cultural placements were done where no parents of the same cultural background of the adoptable child were available. A challenge this year was finding birth fathers in order to obtain their consent to adoption. This is time-consuming especially when little information about the birth fathers is known. An unfortunate consequence is that the adoption of babies is unduly delayed, and the babies spend many months in emergency care before they can be permanently placed. We are grateful to our loyal emergency mothers, who provide a valuable service, and give our babies unselfish love and care.

WORK DONE DURING THE YEAR

COUNSEL B/Ps AND THEIR FAMILIES

The majority of babies for adoption still come from

SUPPORT GROUPS

group of medical and legal professionals comprising the Adoption Panel continues to meet every 2 months, and provides the adoption team with valuable support and in-put.


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

AFTER HOURS CHILD PROTECTION SERVICES 0800435754 Manager: Ina Vermeulen

The

After Hours Child Protection services was implemented in 2006 with the development of the “Base Station�, a centre with a 24/7 crisis line for children and communication with social workers and community volunteers through a 2way radio system. The centre is manned after hours by volunteers who take the calls and refer the case to volunteers who then investigate immediately under the guidance of social workers.

The after hours child protection services remains an essential part of our child protection services as we ensure through this that children receive immediate attention. They therefore do not have to wait until the next working day which may be too late for him/her.

During

this financial year 626 children (+-52 per month), both within our areas of operation and nationally have been assisted. 59 children had to be placed in safe homes for 48 hours period due to being identified as being at risk within their homes.

We

want to sincerely thank our volunteers who remain committed to the children and give up their time to assist us in protecting them.

250

BREAKDOWN PER AREA CHILDREN ASSISTED

CHILDREN REMOVED

104 56 33 ATHLONE

25

14 GUGULETU

10

60

40 4

HOUTBAY

6

3

1

KHAYELITSHA

LOPP

4 MANENBERG

0 OTHER AREAS


Annual Report 2010

EDUCARE CENTRES Manager: Penny Whitaker

The

organization has 4 educare centres, namely Haus Haltern in Khayelitsha, Liefdespoort in Lotus River, Rooikappie in Ottery and Siyazama in Imisamo Yethu, Hout Bay.

On

average 175 children received cognitive stimulation within safe and hygienic educare facilities as supervised by the Khayelitsha, LOP and Hout Bay units.

UCT Sport Science Institute provided guidance to teachers in order to enhance the standard motor co ordination activities for children. As per norm each of the educare facilities participated in various developmental activities such as outings, fashion shows, graduation ceremonies and Christmas nativity plays. The success of these activities has largely been due to the initiative and organizational abilities as displayed by staff. The involvement of parents at these events has also been encouraging.

200

31

150

75

Liefdespoort Siyazama

100

50

Haus Haltern Rooikappie

50

42

0 Maximum no. of children at centres

26


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

OTHER PROJECTS UNCR CHILDREN’S RIGHTS COMPETION Manager: Penny Whitaker Social Auxiliary workers and Community Development Workers need to be commended for going the extra mile in obtaining the co operation of schools, in raising the awareness of children via a children’s rights art competition which addressed the 42 rights as outlined within the UNCR. 42 winners were selected from the 30 schools who participated. The winning drawings were inserted into a poster which has since been distributed to all the participating schools. These drawings and the poster also formed part of a Children’s rights art exhibition as held at the Annexe of the SA Art Museum. The poster was launched at a prize giving ceremony organized for the 42 winners on the 1st June 2009 to commemorate International Children’s Day.

MY CHILDREN’S ACT BOOK Manager: Penny Whitaker A child friendly version of the New Children’s Act, 38 of 2005 was officially launched on the 16th June 2009 at a function as hosted by the Cape Town Holocaust Centre as part of the Champions for Children’s rights campaign. It has since been distributed to schools within the Western Cape via the DSOD who purchased a total of 2000 copies. It has also been used to assist peer counselors and children’s committee members with their children’s rights awareness campaigns within schools.

UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME Manager: Penny Whitaker This organization as a successful recipient of a grant from the UNODC has been able to enhance its Victim Empowerment strategies through the training of all social work and social auxiliary workers, as well as peer counselors/ children’s committee members on the principles, procedures, min standards associated with Victim Empowerment by Unisa’s Department of Applied Psychology.

27


Annual Report 2010

THERAPEUTIC TRAINING AND SUPPORT CENTRE Manager: Penny Whitaker In an attempt to address the wellbeing of its social work staff complement, while simultaneously enhancing its case management standards, Cape Town Child Welfare has conceptualized the establishment of a Centre which has been modeled on the live supervision training technique used in the training of psychologists. This is the first of its kind to be implemented within a Child Protection setting. A partnership as established with UCT Child Guidance clinic has been significant in enabling social workers to access expert opinion iro complex cases The success of this clinic thus far can largely be attributed to this collaboration, as well as the commitment and courage displayed by team managers and social work staff to openly analyze their intervention strategies so as to enhance service delivery.

COMMUNITY NUTRITIONAL & DEVELOPMENT CENTRES, DU NOON AND JOE SLOVO Manager: Ina Vermeulen

The Community Nutritional and Development

Centres in Du Noon and Joe Slovo have been operating since July 2009. Both areas have 5 centres which are operational and each area has a consortium consisting of a representative of each centre. On average the centres in Du Noon feed between 50 and 200 beneficiaries per day and the centres in Joe Slovo feed between 30 and 120 beneficiaries per day. At the moment we have 13 volunteer cooks in Du Noon and 6 in Joe Slovo. The volunteers do receive monthly stipends. The skills development of the beneficiaries have started off slowly due to the priority of setting up the centres. We have however started to give talks in respect of application for ID documents and state grants to the beneficiaries. Training has also been provided to the consortium members in respect of finances, meetings, etc. STUDENT AND VOLUNTEER PLACEMENTS Manager: Ina Vermeulen

The organization have at the moment 76 community based Eye on the Child volunteers, 10 volunteers assisting at the after hour call centre 20 volunteer cooks and 6 administrative volunteers. In addition to this volunteers we accommodated 12 international volunteers during the year who assisted us short term. In addition to the volunteers the organization accommodated 6 social auxiliary work students, 12 local social work students and 9 international social work students for internships.

28


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

The

year ended with a net operating deficit of R75 843.00. Because of the aforementioned changes to the SME reporting framework, the investment reserve account has fallen by the wayside and the gains on the investment market values for the current financial year has been recorded in the Income Statement under Gains on disposal of investments of R2 370 214.00 .

Our Information Technology Systems have been upgraded with new state of the art equipment i.e. a Mercer Intel Xeon Dual Server (8 GB ram) with mirrored hard-drives. The system enables us to connect from remote locations to the server. The computers have been upgraded to Windows 2007. A new Panasonic Snom 300 VoIP Business telephone running on DSL lines have been purchased and installed. The systems are linked via a 16/24-port fast Ether Desktop switch.

FINANCES Senior Manager: Clifford Roman

The audited financial statements for the year ended 31 March 2010, will be available at the Annual General Meeting or on request from the Society.

We

have been compliant with the standards of the General Accepted Accounting Practice (GAAP). However, there has been a change to the South African financial reporting framework for which we have opted. The new framework is known as the IFRS for small and medium-sized business (SMEs).

There has been a 5 percent increase in the total income for the financial year ended 31 March 2010. The main contributors were Government, The National Lottery Distribution Fund and income from Rentals derived from networking with other Non-profit Organizations.

The total expenditure has increased by 7 percent for the same period as stated above. The increase in expenditure was a result of improvements on Land and buildings as well as supplementary assistance to the poor and the unemployed.

29

Intercom links have been installed between The Security Guard and the service departments of the Athlone Team, Desmond Tutu Aids Foundation and SANCA. These measures are designed to assist clients to get to the correct destinations and to alert the Security Guards if there are any trespassers on the property.

Monthly

financial reports are generated by the finance department. The statements are available in detailed and summarized versions reflecting Actual, Budgets and Variances for the current and year-to-date periods. We wish to thank the staff members for their commitment and loyalty.


Annual Report 2010

INCOME 2009

Goverment subsidy Gross collections from public

237417

81162

1971 567186

The National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund Community Chest WP

863922

0 693338

600050

Nelson Mandela C F

680215

Project specific funding

2291370 2274737

9453761

Membership fees Board Lodging, creche & counselling fees Administration fees Health & Welfare Seta Investment income Other income

30


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

799 910 277 308 1 142 115

EXPENDITURE 2009

223 979

Staff expenses

535 499 Transport & office Land & buildings expenses

2 552 066 Domestic expenses

12 046 847

Professional & special services Supplementary assistance Other expenses

31


Annual Report 2010

OUR DONORS C Adams Adriaan Carter Louw Trust AF Scratchley Trust Mr & Mrs Allen Anna Gronniger Charitable Trust BP Meaker Will Trust Kavin Brady Isabella Burke Mark Capeland AMB Capital DA Archibald E Bester FJJ Bester (Late – Estate) Cash Lost in Transit Child Hope Pre School M Clarke Colin Campbell Trust Diane Kaplan Charitable Trust Dora & William Oscar Heyne Charitable Trust Douglas Jooste Trust Dudley Family 3D X Act Edith Wilma Muller Charitable Trust EJ Lombardi Trust Elkanah House Grade 7 Mrs E Elsing Mrs E Errington FC Robb Charitable Trust F & E Bradow Charitable Trust Paul Farah Sharon Follentine Mrs C Frazer FG Fitzgerald GH Starck Trust ELJ Gautschi Mr & Mrs Gibson B & SM Goldstein Trust Gray Trust Greater Good SA Mr & Mrs Greig Carla Harding C & E Harding Trust E Harris N Harrison Cristina Henda T Hendricks Hillary & Dorothy Chamion Trust Huis Haarlem Oslo Hogskolen HWB Communications Investec JC Coetzee Trust Jet Lee Will Trust RG Jeffery

32

Truworths Joan St Ledger Lindbergh Trust FG Underhill D Kuni ES Van Der Horst Laserfix Mr A van Grinkel Laurium H Wallis Brown Lion’s club, Hout Bay MJ Walker Mary Stephen Trust Rene Warburg Mathers Trust Werksman Incorporated Business JA Miller (Hotchin) Williams Holmes Family MJ Moldenhauer Trust Charitable Trust The Myro Charitable Trust Ms AM Whitehead My School Hamish Whittal M Newington Green Primary C Whitty J Maartens Naeema Zakaah LS Marinus Tim Millner Marcelle Lang Willem and Lindsay Oets DONATIONS IN KIND Aldene de Vos Carolyn Powell(Christ ChurchGreg Kempe Kenilworth) Simon and Tali Andersen Susanne Mechnig Mr and Mrs Kempe Carol Allen Priscilla Henwood Hout Bay Senior’s Club Melanie van Beugnigen Gary Muller Martin Dullard Felicity Slabbert Paul and LeeAnne Maughn Marilyn Mays Jenny and Keith Leslie Marie Muller Catherine and Mavis Odendaal Judy and Tara Kuhn Fay and Roger Wood Woolworths, Hout Bay Heidi Seifret Spar, Hout Bay Patrick A Mulliner Shoprite, Hout Bay SH Nairne Stardot toys Theo Nkone Hout Bay Handiman Nkone Family Fiddlesticks Nussbaum Foundation UTX Youth Group Norman Thomson Chris-magician Foschini Clothing Mike Pearman Cape Town Suburban Clothing Guild ML Penberthy Bonita Hagan Peregrine Film Africa & Free Willy Powerbase Daphne Wood Ole Raatz Saskia Bush SAD 2010 United Ten Social Recreation Club E Sittig Karen Bason G Solanki Charlene Petersen Rory Spangenberg Elisabeth Ryan Montsumi Standard Bank Margie Cowen Shargey Incorporation Nasreen Haffejee Sonnekus & Toerien CC Edna du Plooy Studio K United Ten Social Recreation Club Suiderland Development Corporation Sharifa Jaffer LD Swan S. Safla Lorna Symonds and friends Louise Lots TS Berwitz World Trust Ghasodien Jaffer The Trust Shanaaz Natha Charlene Petersen


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

United Ten Social Recreation Club Trish meyer Yvonne Blaauw Edna du Plooy A. Arief Pearl Nel (FNB) Juan Beukes (PEP STORES) A. Van Der Berg Mane Richler R. Marankey Radhia Lakay Jacqui Paten City Lodge Mrs. Tillma Damm Andre Schreuder Olivia, Carla & Alison Kerry Petrie (Gilmorehill Collection) On Time Labour Hire CC Karen Basson J. Bierman & S. Fraser Beryl Matthee Josi Foord Lions Club Oasis food parcels Anna Maria Rajpaul Lance Boyd Rose Fivelman Rudia Faro Gavin Williams R. Harricombe Mirjam van Donk Astrid May Ms. M. Mclean Rev. Canon Robert M. Marankey Mr. A Van Der Berg

33

A VERY SPECIAL THANKS GO TO: Provincial Government, Western Cape

The National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund

Community Chest, Western Cape

Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund

Forderverein Khayelitsha e.V.Haltern am See


Annual Report 2010

2009/2010 BOARD MEMBERS From LtR: Mrs. Nuroun Mintin, Dr. Petra Abrahamse, Mrs. Sharon Follentine, Mr. Theo Nkone, (CHAIR),Dr. Jennifer Kallis, Mrs. Cynthia Frazer, Ms. Leah Abrahamson Absent: Ms. Christina Henda, Nazrina Tagledia(VICE CHAIR)

CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE STAFF CHIEF EXECUTIVE Niresh Ramklass SENIOR FINANCE MANAGER Clifford Roman SENIOR DIRECT SERVICE MANAGERS Ina Vermeulen, Penny Whitaker ADMIN & MAINTENANCE MANAGER Georgina Moodley SENIOR FIRST LINE MANAGERS Payroll: Ray Jattiem; Direct Services: Desiree Uys; Admin: Mona Wentzel FIRST LINE MANAGERS Debbie Demas, Eldorette Farao, Yolanda Fransman, Nomonde Kulati, Naseba Manuel-Davids, Esmerelda Ramklass LOCUM FIRST LINE MANAGER Pinky Ciya ADMIN PROJECT COORDINATOR Sathya Govender SOCIAL WORKERS Misbah Banderker, Marcia Chigumira, Bernadette Chinnian, Janice Cozette, Sithembile Dube, Nontombi Fundumele, Penelope Henwood, Nandipha Hlasela, Carlo Johnson, Kalev Kaudla, Lungelwa Kiva, Phathiswa Kulati, Stavroula Livanos, Nolitha Luningo, Pumla Madikizela, Thobeka Mafilika, Yolanda Matiti, Megan McCarthy, Marilyn McPherson, Bianca Meching, Yolanda Moolman, Vivien Nkohla, Andile Ntsume, Memory Nyatsanza, Liesel Oosthuizen, Shireen Pekeur, Barbara Retallick, Lee-Ann Sarel-Siljeurs, Mardelyn Snyman, Hazel Stamper, Virginia Tati, Marisa Teles, Thozama Tomose, Tasneem Variawa, Nosicelo Venkile, Roche Wilson, Patiswa Zepe SOCIAL AUXILIARY WORKERS Rita Cottle, Babalwa Dadabini, Nonkosi Donker, Amina Jacobs, Coleen Jacobs, Bukelwa Mahlaba, Sonja Muller, Vanessa Sampson, Rebecca Vuma COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT WORKERS Lungile Ngwevela, Audrey Booi, Leandi Cupido, Anneline Jaftha, Jecynthia Jones, Nolitha Lekoma, Yolandi Lotriet, Pikolomzi Ncambele, Maureen Skilder, Patience Dolweni, Patricia Magoda, Vuyiswa Sompeta PAYROLL ASSISTANT Roshini Roopnarain ACCOUNTS / TREASURY STAFF Yolanda Erasmus, Tania Lenders, Carmelita Titus, Rabia Botha ADMINISTRATION STAFF Zohra Ariefdien, Nokiuzola Gebengana, Aqeelah Hendricks, Mandy Hussey, Monica Lizwe, Berenice Ruiter, Phetho Theka, Amanda Visagie, Jennifer Wrankmore CLEANING STAFF Kayakazi Adams, Merle Adams, Veronica Francis, Eva Kiewitz, Virginia Mwanda, Patricia Smith, Liziwe Sontundu, Christia Gxalaba GENERAL WORKERS Thembelihle Geca, Mthokozisi Macholisa SECURITY Lennox Mbaba, Zola Ntsodo, Christopher Kwatsha EDUCARE PRINCIPALS Faranaaz Daniels, Sharon Josephs, Viola Makinana, Dorothea Tosa EDUCARE TEACHERS Aasiyah Abrahams, Miena Abrahams, Nomonde Nkosi, Theresa Ruiters, Nomphumelelo Xhoma EDUCARE COOKS Ntabiseng Mgambi, Paulina Selebedi

34


CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE

CAPE TOWN CHILD WELFARE Protecting children since 1908

35

Cape Town Child Welfare Annual Report 2010  

Annual Report for Cape Town Child Welfare - Year 2010

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