National Capital Region's Top Employers (2020)

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q Employees work in a team environment at the Ottawa head office of Shopify Inc., one of this year’s winners.

ABOUT THE WINNERS:

Designing a better workplace in the NCR THE COMPLETE LIST:

National Capital Region’s Top Employers (2020) ABOUT THE WINNERS:

Investing in training and skills development pays

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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

15th Annual Edition

NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020 Magazine Anthony Meehan, PUBLISHER

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©2020 Mediacorp Canada Inc. and Postmedia Network Canada Corp. All rights reserved. NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS is a trade mark of Mediacorp Canada Inc. Editorial inquiries: ct100@mediacorp.ca

p Working in a collaboration space at the Ottawa-based Canadian Internet Registration Authority/CIRA.

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The NCR competition at fifteen

ifteen years ago, we launched the National Capital Region’s Top Employers competition to shine a light on the Ottawa-area employers that stood ahead of their peers in creating exceptional workplaces. As editors, we spend much of our year scouring the country for employers that are doing something innovative when it comes to recruiting and retaining talented employees. The employment landscape in the nation’s capital has long intrigued our editors because it’s the only place in Canada – and one of a handful of places in the world – where the economy depends mainly on public sector and technology employers. The two sectors compete with each other for the best talent, but they also provide economic stability when one sector runs into headwaters. Today’s economy sees the National Capital Region firing on all cylinders, with one of the lowest unemployment rates of any metropolitan area in Canada. With unemployment hovering near a 30-year low, Ottawa-area employers are pulling out the stops to create better workplaces to attract and retain the best employees.

The white-hot economy has also followed the region’s success in becoming an attractive destination for newcomers to Canada. Many people are surprised to learn that one in four Ottawa residents is an immigrant, a population that’s growing twice as fast as the City’s other residents. Newcomers provide vital skills to local employers, especially in the technology industry, and ensure the economy keeps growing. The National Capital Region also provides a case study in how the best workplace policies and initiatives can spread from the private to public sector – and vice-versa. This year’s list of winners includes Crown corporations and other public employers with workplaces that look a lot like hot technology firms. And you’ll find technology employers that have borrowed many of the best benefits from the public sector. The winner in all of this is the job-seeker, who now has a remarkable choice of exceptional employers. Take a moment to read the stories of this year’s winners in this announcement magazine. We’re confident that you’ll agree there’s never been a better time to be looking for a top employer in the nation’s capital. – Tony Meehan


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

u Mike Scott, Senior

ERROL MCGIHON/POSTMEDIA

Director, Enterprise Support & Ottawa Site Leader at Adobe Systems Canada.

Designing a better workplace in the nation’s capital

I

n the middle of a drab and dreary Ottawa winter, no one wants to walk into an office space devoid of liveliness and joy. And this is something Adobe Systems Canada Inc. is well aware of. After embracing employee feedback in 2017, the company redesigned its Ottawa office, making it a space that’s both modern and comfortable. Some features include sit-stand workstations, collaborative workspaces, private meeting rooms, informal break rooms and an employee lounge complete with music, video games, pool table, foosball and table hockey. There is also an assortment of

O ttawa C itizen beverages for special events and a Starbucks on-site. “Having a vibrant and colorful space helps spark creativity, and it also fosters a more enjoyable work environment,” said Mike Scott, a senior director at Adobe. “Our employee lounge is another bright space where people come to relax, maybe play some video games, shoot some pool, or even grab a drink.” The new office is just one of the reasons Adobe was recently recognized as one of Ottawa’s top employers, according to a study completed for Postmedia. The study identifies top employers in the

National Capital Region. It is part of Canada’s Top 100 Employers project managed by Mediacorp Canada Inc. that recognizes employers with exceptional human resources programs. Adobe also provides employees generous maternity and parental leave. Offering 100 per cent of salary for up to 26 weeks as well as an adoption subsidy up to $25,000 for adoptive parents. “We see our employees as our most valuable assets. Above all else, it’s important that they feel supported during big moments,” Scott said. “As a father of four — I can certainly relate to how precious

those early days are.” Meghan Reid, a psychologist with Canada Career Counselling, said companies who offer a generous maternity or parental leave often do well at retaining talent. “It is important,” she said. “A lot of people in our society want to have children and need to have a source of income and a sense of purpose and having that leave is important to be able to balance those two aspects of life.” She said this can be particularly important for women in the workplace. “It can hold them back, people have assumptions once you’re a mother,” she


BETTER WORKPLACE DESIGN

Cont.

said. “When an employer effectively handles a leave and understands that this is just a part of life… I think that speaks well for the employer.” Being recognized as a top employer in Ottawa was a great honour for the company, Scott said. “Our team is diverse and talented ranging from customer care to engineering, from sales operations to marketing and everything in between,” he said. “We strive to provide a collaborative and creative environment to help make coming into the office every day fun and productive.”

In 2019, 80 per cent of Ottawa’s Adobe staff participated in local volunteer activities, Scott said. “This is just one example of how we’re leading the charge across the company,” he said. Adobe Systems Canada Inc. is a developer of industry-leading graphics, desktop publishing and enterprise application software. It employs 321 workers in Canada and over 22,000 worldwide. Founded in 1982 in San Jose, the company expanded to Ottawa in 2002 with the acquisition of Accelio. The fiscal 2018 revenue was $9.03 billion USD. – Luke Carroll

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ADOBE

NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

the onsite fitness facility at Adobe Systems Canada; Employees in the staff lounge at Adobe’s Ottawa office.

ADOBE

u Photos (clockwise): An employee uses


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THE OTTAWA HOSPITAL

NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

2 020 WINNERS The following organizations have been chosen as National Capital Region’s Top Employers for 2020 (employee counts refer to full-time staff only):

A

DOBE SYSTEMS CANADA INC., Ottawa. Cloud-based publishing and graphics software. 321 employees. Supports its new moms and dads with maternity and parental leave top-up payments, to 100 per cent of salary for up to 26 weeks. ALGONQUIN COLLEGE OF APPLIED ARTS & TECHNOLOGY, Ottawa. Post-secondary education. 1,305 employees. Offers flexible work arrangements, reduced hours in the summer and additional time off over the winter holidays. ALTERNA SAVINGS AND CREDIT UNION LIMITED, Ottawa. Credit unions. 532 employees. Offers a number of

great financial perks, from a defined contribution pension plan to year-end bonuses and discounted mortgage rates.

B

ABCOCK CANADA INC., Ottawa. Engineering services. 418 employees. Offers parental leave top-ups for fathers and adoptive parents, to 80 per cent of salary for up to 15 weeks. BANK OF CANADA, Ottawa. Central banking. 1,745 employees. Health plan flex dollars can be used to enhance coverage, deposited into a health spending account, taken as taxable income or used to purchase additional vacation time.

C

ANADA FOUNDATION FOR INNOVATION / CFI, Ottawa. Non-profit research institutions.67 employees. Offers four weeks of starting vacation allowance, along with flexible working arrangements and up to six paid personal days off annually.

p A registered nurse in the hemodialysis unit at The Ottawa Hospital.

CANADA MORTGAGE AND HOUSING CORPORATION / CMHC, Ottawa. Federal administration of housing programs. 1,955 employees. Reaches out to the next generation through summer employment, paid internships and co-op placements for students and new grads.

CANADIAN HERITAGE, Gatineau. Federal department overseeing culture and heritage. 1,835 employees. New parents can plan for a reduced work schedule when returning from maternity and parental leave as well as take advantage of onsite childcare.

CANADA REVENUE AGENCY / CRA, Ottawa. Federal tax collection agency. 43,577 employees. Offers phased-in retirement options along with a defined benefit pension plan and a health benefits plan with no age limit.

CANADIAN INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH INFORMATION / CIHI, Ottawa. Non-profit organizations. 764 employees. Supports ongoing training through a range of in-house initiatives as well as generous tuition subsidies for job-related courses, up to $10,000 annually.

CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION (CBC) / RADIO-CANADA, Ottawa. Public broadcasting. 7,287 employees. Offers all new parents maternity and parental leave top-up payments for up to 17 weeks with the option to extend their leave into an unpaid leave of absence.

CANADIAN INTERNET REGISTRATION AUTHORITY / CIRA, Ottawa. Manages the .ca top-level domain. 88 employees. Manages a dedicated Community Investment Program that supports internet access projects in underserved communities across the country.


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

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CANADIAN NUCLEAR SAFETY COMMISSION, Ottawa. Federal regulator of nuclear power and materials. 937 employees. Hosts an annual health fair complete with information kiosks covering topics from naturopathy to fitness tips. CARLETON UNIVERSITY, Ottawa. Post-secondary education. 2,224 employees. Manages an ongoing healthy workplace initiative that includes a dedicated healthy workplace officer and a network of healthy workplace champions across the university.

CASINO DU LAC-LEAMY, Gatineau. Casino resorts. 869 employees. Offers four weeks of paid vacation after their first year of employment, moving to five weeks over the course of their careers. CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL OF EASTERN ONTARIO / CHEO, Ottawa. Specialized hospitals. 1,746 employees. Encourages ongoing learning with generous tuition subsidies for courses related and not directly related to their current position, to $2,000 annually. COMMUNICATIONS SECURITY ESTABLISHMENT / CSE, Ottawa. Federal signals intelligence agency. 2,527 employees. Offers a defined benefit

pension plan and helps retirees to stay connected through their own alumni association.

D

EPARTMENT OF FINANCE CANADA, Ottawa. Federal department overseeing finance and economic forecasting. 740 employees. Manages a unique “FIN Ideas Hub” that offers informal sessions to capture a wide range of employee feedback. DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE / DND, Ottawa. Federal department overseeing Canada’s armed forces. 25,935 employees. Reaches out to the next generation through apprenticeships and operational development

programs, and the “New Student Passport” onboarding program.

E

GG FARMERS OF CANADA, Ottawa. Industry associations. 56 employees. Provides maternity leave top-up payments for new moms to 70 per cent of salary for 17 weeks, as well as offering the same parental top-up for new dads and adoptive parents for 15 weeks. EMPLOYMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT CANADA, Gatineau. Federal department overseeing employment insurance system and social development. 26,460 employees. Supports a number of employee affinity networks such as the Visible Minority Network, the BANK OF CANADA

2020 WINNERS

p An image for the record books, as senior

deputy governor of the Bank of Canada, Carolyn Wilkins, and museum director, Ken Ross, accompany Wanda Robson (centre) as she looks at the image of her sister, Viola Desmond, now featured on Canada’s $10 bank note.


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

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Employees with Disabilities Network and the Indigenous Employees’ Circle. ENGINEERS CANADA, Ottawa. Professional membership organizations. 47 employees. Offers three weeks of paid starting vacation for new employees, moving to four weeks after only four years on the job. EXPORT DEVELOPMENT CANADA, Ottawa. Federal trade financing and support agency. 1,699 employees. Manages the “LiveWell” wellness program that features free confidential health screenings and lunch hour sessions on variety of wellness topics.

q Celebrating National

Indigenous Peoples Day on the picturesque Ottawa campus of CMHC.

F

ISHERIES AND OCEANS CANADA AND THE CANADIAN COAST GUARD, Ottawa. Federal department overseeing fisheries and oceans. 11,892 employees. Developing a dedicated Indigenous Requirement and Retention Strategy and a First Nations bridging pilot project in partnership with Indigenous organizations.

H

EALTH CANADA / SANTÉ CANADA, Ottawa. Federal department overseeing health and safety regulation. 8,192 employees. In addition to generous maternity and parental leave top-ups, new parents can apply to extend their leave into an unpaid leave of absence.

HOUSE OF COMMONS ADMINISTRATION, Ottawa. Legislative bodies. 2,021 employees. In addition to working in one of the country’s most ATINEAU, VILLE DE, Municipal recognized landmarks, employees have governments. 2,709 employees. free access to an onsite fitness centre as Encourages a culture of continuous well as an onsite childcare centre. learning through a variety of in-house HYDRO OTTAWA, Gloucester. training initiatives and tuition subsidies Electricity distributors. 686 employees. for courses at outside institutions.

G

Supports new parents to be with a generous IVF subsidy if needed and follows-up with maternity and parental leave top-ups for new parents.

I

MMIGRATION, REFUGEES AND CITIZENSHIP CANADA / IRCC, Ottawa. Federal department overseeing immigration and citizenship. 8,505 employees. Supports dedicated employee “Wellness and Mental Health Champions and Co-Champions” to promote employee well-being initiatives across the workplace. INNOVATION, SCIENCE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CANADA, Ottawa. Federal department responsible for fostering a growing,

CMHC

2020 WINNERS


NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

2020 WINNERS

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Continued

competitive, and knowledge-based Canadian economy. 5,374 employees. Offers new mothers generous maternity and parental leave top-up payments to 93 per cent of salary for 52 weeks as well as parental top-up for new dads and adoptive parents for 37 weeks. INVEST OTTAWA AND BAYVIEW YARDS, Ottawa. Non-profit organizations. 62 employees. In addition to three weeks of starting vacation, offers additional time off during the summer and winter holidays and up to eight paid personal days off annually.

L

A CITÉ, Ottawa. Post-secondary educational institutions. 585 employees. Offers free access to an onsite fitness facility that features a variety of instructor-led classes such as kickboxing, yoga and Zumba. LUMENTUM, Nepean. Specialty manufacturing. 283 employees. Encourages ongoing education with generous tuition subsidies for courses at outside academic institutions, up to $5,000 annually.

M

D FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT, Ottawa. Financial services. 1,471 employees. Head office employees enjoy outdoor seating areas along with a full-service bistro that features a professional chef who prepares healthy lunch options every day. MEDICAL COUNCIL OF CANADA, Ottawa. Professional membership organizations. 205 employees. New wellness program also includes free onsite boot camp, strength and mobility, yoga and Zumba classes. MODERN NIAGARA GROUP INC., Kanata. Engineering services. 2,369 employees. Offers practical savings through WorkPerks discount program, which offers savings on home and auto insurance as well as discounted lease rates and prices on vehicles.

N

ATIONAL CAPITAL COMMISSION, Ottawa. Federal Crown corporation responsible for the National Capital Region. 442 employ-

p A resource management officer

in the executive boardroom at the Ottawa head office of the Canada Revenue Agency/CRA.

CRA

MONTFORT HOSPITAL / HÔPITAL MONTFORT, OTTAWA, Teaching hospitals. 1,062 employees. Helps employees transition to the next chapter through phased-in work options when nearing retirement.


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ees. Offers a variety of flexible work options, including shortened and compressed work week options, telecommuting and up to five personal paid days annually.

EDC

2020 WINNERS

NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

NAV CANADA, Ottawa. Air traffic control. 5,201 employees. Provides contributions to a defined benefit pension plan and health benefits that extend to retirees with no age limit. NUTRITION INTERNATIONAL, Ottawa. Non-profit organizations. 89 employees. Supports new mothers with maternity and parental leave top-up payments to 93 per cent of salary for up to 24 weeks.

O

FFICE OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL OF CANADA, Ottawa. Public finances audit and administration. 606 employees. Encourages lifelong learning with full tuition subsidies for outside courses, whether or not they related to an employee’s current position.

p The lobby at the Ottawa head office of EDC features inspirational quotations from employees.

S. LAVALLÉE/VILLE DE GATINEAU

OTTAWA COMMUNITY HOUSING CORPORATION, Ottawa. Local housing authorities. 381 employees. Helps the next generation gain valuable career-level work experience with co-op placements, paid internships and summer job opportunities. OTTAWA HOSPITAL, The, Ottawa. General hospitals. 6,298 employees. Encourages healthy lifestyle choices through a “Healthy Workplace Task Force” as well as offering subsidized access to an onsite GoodLife Fitness centre. OTTAWA, CITY OF, Ottawa. Municipal governments. 11,288 employees. Manages a Workplace Wellness and Productivity Network that includes resources on physical, mental and emotional health and well-being.

P

ERLEY-ROBERTSON, HILL & MCDOUGALL LLP / S.R.L., Ottawa. Law firms. 114 employees. Organizes variety of social events throughout the year, including weekly breakfasts, summer barbecues, and holiday parties at Christmas for employees and their children.

R

OYAL, THE, Ottawa. Psychiatric and mental health hospitals. 898 employees. Manages an onsite Centre for Learning and Telemedicine that features a 180-seat auditorium, videoconferencing, as well as computer training facilities and a medical library.

p Lova works for the Ville de Gatineau

on complex buying, including: chemical products, specialized equipment and professional services.


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

S

HOPIFY INC., Ottawa. Cloud-based retailing software for small businesses. 3,667 employees. Employees start each day with free breakfasts and throughout the day enjoy a variety of snacks such as fresh fruit, trail mix, yogurt, ramen, chips and chocolate.

mental health and mental illness awareness week as well as an annual wellness fair.

SMART & BIGGAR, Ottawa. Law firms. 349 employees. Encourages employees to become recruiters for the firm with generous new employee referral bonuses, from $1,000 to $2,000.

T

OMLINSON GROUP OF COMPANIES, Nepean. Construction services. 1,370 employees. Supports employees with tuition subsidies for courses at academic institutions and offers an academic scholarship program for employees’ children.

U

NIVERSITIES CANADA, Ottawa. Professional membership organizations. 80 employees. Along with maternity and parental leave top-up payments for new parents, employees can take advantage of an onsite childcare centre when they are ready to return to work. UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA, Ottawa. Post-secondary educational institutions.

4,604 employees. Invests in employees and their families with full tuition coverage for regular undergraduate courses and programs of study.

W

ORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA / WUSC, Ottawa. Non-profit organizations. 115 employees. Manages a number of unique award programs, including “Rookie of the Year” for a recently hired employee or intern, and the “Playground Award” for employees who make an extra effort to make work fun. — Richard Yerema & Kristina Leung

BEN WELLAND/SURVEYMONKEY

STATISTICS CANADA, Ottawa. Federal statistical agency. 4,972 employees. Supports a “Workplace Wellness Committee” that organizes an annual

SURVEYMONKEY CANADA INC., Ottawa. Cloud-based survey software. 161 employees. Encourages all employees to share in the company’s success with a share purchase plan.

TREND MICRO TECHNOLOGIES INC., Kanata. Software application developers. 296 employees. Offers three weeks of starting vacation and moves all employees to four weeks of paid vacation after only three years on the job.

p Employees at SurveyMonkey Canada attending a

training session at the company’s Ottawa head office.


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Investing in skills development and training pays handsome dividends for local firm O ttawa C itizen

WAYNE CUDDINGTON / POSTMEDIA

A

multifacted approach to employee education and development has led Babcock Canada Inc. to become one of the top employers in the National Capital Region, a study conducted for Postmedia found. The study identifies top employers in the region and is part of Canada’s Top 100 Employers project, managed by Mediacorp Canada Inc., which recognizes employers with exceptional human resources programs and “forward-thinking workplace policies.” Babcock is a provider of engineering services to the defence, energy and transport sectors. It is currently delivering submarines for the Royal Canadian Navy as well as air ambulance and wildfire suppression services to the Province of Manitoba. Babcock Canada was recognized for its focus on employee development, offering tuition subsidies up to $1,000 for current employees, mentoring opportunities, paid internships and co-op placements for students and recent grads — Babcock hires about 60 co-op students every year. “Babcock supports employee attendance at workshops, seminars, and other training events including participating in continuing education programs at post-secondary institutions such as the University of Ottawa and Algonquin College,” said Keely Gregory, manager of communications at Babcock. Babcock has also developed two in-house development programs — one for mentoring and another for leadership. “Training and development is indeed a focus of Babcock’s,” Keely said. Tammy Schirle, an economics professor at Wilfrid Laurier University, said employers focusing on employee education is beneficial to both parties. “I think something like the tuition coverage is a good investment on the employer’s part to keep up their employees’ skills,” she said. Babcock has also placed an emphasis on employee engagement and has several social events throughout the year including

p Keely Gregory, manager of

internal communications in the offices of Babcock Canada, an engineering consultant company based in Ottawa.


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TRAINING DIVIDENDS

Cont.

WAYNE CUDDINGTON / POSTMEDIA

picnics, golf tournaments and charity bike rides. “Babcock provides generous funding for social activities, however, much of the credit is due to our employee-led social committees who arrange and carry out numerous events,” Keely said. “These events help employees feel engaged and they boost positive feelings about the company.” Another strong focus of Babcock is a generous maternity and parental leave, with top-up payments of 80 per cent salary for up to 30 weeks. Schirle said a generous maternity and parental leave is very beneficial for workplace moral. “I think that this is an investment in skills,” she said. “If it looks like you are going to have an employer who is going to

Photos (clockwise):

1. Alex Lewis, left, a project manager at Babcock Canada, sells draw tickets to Jake Jacobson, VP Business & Corporate Development, for the Motorcycle Ride for Autism.

2. Holly Moroney, left, a marketing assistant at Babcock Canada in Ottawa, with Keely Gregory.

be helping you out and offering a very family-friendly environment, you’re willing to make those investments as an employee.” A recent employee engagement survey found employees rated their satisfaction with work-life balance as high, Keely said. This may be a result of the compressed work schedule which allows employees to take every second Friday off. Babcock was excited to be recognized among the city’s top employers and said it is a reflection of its priorities as a company. “This process has been beneficial as it has allowed us not only an opportunity to reflect upon our current employee value proposition, but to also make some improvements based on the lessons we have learned through researching former winners,” Keely said. “Employees are excited about the new initiatives and benefits that we are introducing in 2020.” – Luke Carroll

BABCOCK

NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Algonquin College turns hopes and dreams into lifelong success

S

arah Gauen had more than 10 years of experience in her field when she joined Algonquin College in 2017 as its first inclusion and diversity specialist. “Most of my work had been projectbased,” she says. “Here I saw an opportunity to work deeply in an organization looking for systemic barriers with people who would champion diversity and inclusion.” Algonquin created Gauen’s role to further its People Plan, which includes “building a vibrant, resilient and diverse workforce and fostering an inclusive workplace culture that values the unique strengths of each employee.”

“We attract people with great passion, who are committed to seeing learners come through and gain knowledge and skills they can use to help their communities prosper.” __ Claude Brulé

ALGONQUIN COLLEGE'S CEO CLAUDE BRULÉ AT 'AC VISION', AN EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT EVENT HELD LAST YEAR

President & CEO

“The ultimate goal is to make sure people contribute to the best of their ability,” she says. Through full-time and continuing education programs, Algonquin provides almost 45,000 students with access to the education and skills training demanded by the marketplace to launch a rewarding career. Within this context, Gauen applies her expertise in promoting a positive working and learning culture that values diversity and fosters equity, fairness, respect, cross-cultural understanding and inclusion. “People are here to support our learners,” says Claude Brulé, the college’s president and CEO. “We make it a point

to make sure that people understand our mission: to transform hopes and dreams into lifelong success.” With the support of Brulé and his leadership team, Gauen works closely with Algonquin’s employee inclusion and diversity circle to eliminate barriers in its employment practices. “No organization has a perfectly inclusive workplace,” says Gauen. “That’s because inclusivity’s changing all the time. Fifteen years ago, for example, there was little talk about transgender inclusivity.” Algonquin’s core values of caring, learning, integrity and respect have contributed to its continuing vitality and growth, says Brulé, who joined the college after 23 years

in the Air Force occupational branch of the Canadian Forces. “In the 20 years I’ve been at the college, it’s doubled in size of footprint, number of programs and student body. That’s attributable to the commitment of its employees. We attract people with great passion, who are committed to seeing learners come through and gain knowledge and skills they can use to help their communities prosper.” Before she joined Algonquin, Gauen had lived in Ottawa for more than 10 years. “I knew about the college, but I didn’t realize how big it is or the impact it has on the community. “People here really care about their work and about each other,” she says. “And

Algonquin College, Eastern Ontario’s largest Polytechnic institute, is an innovative, and sustainable place to study and work. Join a global leader in personalized and experiential learning.

there are tremendous opportunities for growth. You can spend your whole career here doing different things.” 

1,351 93% 49 38%

FULL-TIME STAFF IN CANADA MATERNITY/PARENTAL LEAVE TOP-UP PAY FOR 52 WEEKS YEARS, LONGEST-SERVING EMPLOYEE OF EXECUTIVE TEAM ARE WOMEN

This story was produced by Mediacorp in partnership with Postmedia, on behalf of Algonquin College

Changing Lives

algonquincollege.com/careers


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

CMHC employees are fully autonomous and accountable

E

mployees at Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) choose how to organize their work and their time to ensure they can meet all the demands in their lives – both professional and personal. For senior actuary Philippe Grégoire, that means occasionally taking meetings via Skype while he is walking on a treadmill. It sometimes also means leaving the office at 2 p.m., or working all day at home and having dinner ready by the time his wife, who also holds a full-time job, returns with their children. Then he can continue working after the kids are in bed. Grégoire is able to do that because in 2018, CMHC became the largest organization in Canada to implement a ResultsOnly Work Environment (ROWE)™️. “It’s an approach where employees have much more accountability and autonomy over their work,” explains Evan Siddall, president and CEO of CMHC. “In a sense, each CMHC employee is now an entrepreneur.”

“What makes CMHC a wonderful place to work is the deep knowledge that we are making a real difference in the lives of Canadians.”

__ Evan Siddall President & CEO

“ROWE has been a game-changer this year while I was juggling big projects at work, two young kids in daycare with different needs and occasional illnesses, and the purchase of a new house,” says Grégoire. “With ROWE, I am able to

PHILIPPE GRÉGOIRE AND CO-WORKERS AT CMHC

efficiently manage my stress and energy levels and optimize my productivity. From a work-life balance perspective, my relationship with my wife and children has improved greatly, and my overall quality of life has benefitted tremendously.” Both Grégoire and Siddall note that employees are also motivated by CMHC’s role in leading federal initiatives under the National Housing Strategy, a plan to create a new generation of housing in Canada; and, by CMHC’s ambitious and audacious goal to ensure that by 2030, everyone in Canada has a home that they can afford and that meets their needs.

lifeatcmhc.ca #LifeAtCMHC

“What makes CMHC a wonderful place to work is the deep knowledge that we are making a real difference in the lives of Canadians,” says Siddall. “For many of us, it’s the reason we joined in the first place.” “Over the past few years, everything we have been doing is with the sole purpose of executing our 2030 aspiration,” he says. “We have reorganized our company, putting our diverse clients at the centre of our thinking, and we have made a huge investment in technology to accelerate our effectiveness. And, most important, we have liberated our people to do their best work for Canadians.” 

1,955 422 44 3

FULL-TIME STAFF IN CANADA JOBS AVAILABLE LAST YEAR YEARS, LONGEST-SERVING EMPLOYEE WEEKS, STARTING VACATION ALLOWANCE

This story was produced by Mediacorp in partnership with Postmedia, on behalf of Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Teams get into healthy competition at CIHI’s Ideathon

R

oxanne Parayre trod a roundabout route to a tech career. The Ottawa native joined the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) in 2007, working in human resources. In 2013, while employed there full-time, she returned to university to do an MBA in technology and innovation. “I had always wanted to do something technology-focused,” she says. “So I eventually put together a business case based on my continuing education plans and submitted it to CIHI.” The employer proved very supportive, covering part of her tuition and allowing flexibility to balance work and school priorities.

“CIHI's culture encourages collaboration, creativity and open, candid conversations.”

__ David O'Toole President & CEO

Since mid-2018, Parayre has been manager, corporate products in CIHI’s IT division. Her career pivot fit well with CIHI’s mandate. The non-profit is where health data intersects with tech and innovation. It collects and analyzes data on health and healthcare in Canada, and makes it available as databases, reports, measurements and standards. Investing in employees’ growth is an imperative at CIHI, says president and CEO David O’Toole. “We’re reinforcing professional development opportunities. We’ve created an advisory team that is a representative cross-section of our employees, and it will recommend priorities for investing in professional development for our staff.” O’Toole adds that employees’ level of

ROXANNE PARAYRE AT THE DRAWING BOARD FOR CIHI'S IDEATHON

engagement and the ongoing efforts to involve them in the life of the organization are important factors in making it a good place to work. “CIHI’s culture encourages collaboration, creativity and open, candid conversations.” The showcase for these attributes is the annual Ideathon, a CIHI-wide event where some 200 employees come together – in person and by video conference – to form cross-functional teams, develop ideas over two days and pitch them to a panel of judges. The three winning teams later get to present their ideas to the CIHI executive. The first CIHI-wide Ideathon, held in 2018, promoted collaboration between

CIHI’s tech division and its business units. The second had as its theme conceiving ideas to help solve business unit problems. While still in the idea phase, one innovation that emerged from the 2018 event was a mobile app that could enable someone needing urgent medical care to ascertain which hospital is closest and what its performance metrics and wait times are. “It’s a fabulous idea that our people were able to pull together in just two days,” says O'Toole. Parayre has volunteered on Ideathon’s organizing committee both years. “It created a palpable sense of energy across the entire organization,” she says. “We’re trying to make it bigger and better each year. 

CIHI’s culture encourages collaboration, creativity and open, candid conversations Our people are passionate and dedicated — we always strive to do our best

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cihi.ca Better data. Better decisions. Healthier Canadians.


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Carleton University champions workplace health

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he president of Carleton University, BenoitAntoine Bacon, is a neuropsychologist who specializes in the visual system. When he looks out at Carleton’s campus in Ottawa, he likes what he sees. “We have a beautiful site with water on both sides – the Rideau river and the Rideau Canal – and the harmony and beauty of the campus shape our caring and collaborative culture,” he says. “It’s a privilege to work at a place like Carleton, with our beautiful physical location and our mission to help the next generation. There’s something purposeful, hopeful and noble about working with young people.”

“It's a privilege to work at a place like Carleton, with our beautiful physical location and our mission to help the next generation.”

CARLETON UNIVERSITY’S HEALTHY WORKPLACE HOSTS A MENTAL HEALTH FAIR FOR ITS EMPLOYEES

__ Benoit-Antoine Bacon President

Over the past 10 years, the university has made a concerted effort to sustain this culture by implementing a healthy workplace program for its faculty and staff. “We were an early adopter of this kind of framework,” Bacon says. “It has evolved over time to be more all-encompassing, including not only physical health but mental health, financial health and work-life balance.” The program has been so successful that in November 2019, the non-profit Excellence Canada awarded Carleton gold-level certification in mental health at work, the first time a post-secondary institution has achieved this designation. “It was a major achievement, a validation of everything we’ve been doing,” says Bacon.

As healthy workplace officer, Samantha Munro oversees the program, working with a cross-functional committee and a network of more than 85 healthy workplace champions. In 2015, the university incorporated mental health into its healthy workplace strategic plan, committing to adopt the Mental Health Commission of Canada’s national standard for psychological health and safety in the workplace. “We continually work to make sure the healthy workplace plan is a good fit, meeting the needs of our people,” says Munro, who has been involved in the healthy workplace program since 2012, first on a co-op basis while she was an undergradu-

ate, then full-time for the past five years. “Among the things we do are programming, such as a suite of mental health training opportunities and in-house training for building resilience and supporting colleagues in distress,” she explains. “Then there’s the Not Myself Today campaign, the campus-wide Let’s Talk Day in January, and lunchtime workshops and activities. And we have inspiring speakers, including faculty members who talk about their research. We’ve made a ton of progress, but there’s still more to be done.” Meanwhile, Munro concludes, “Working here is like having a second family. There are so many opportunities to develop

friendships, as well as personal and professional growth.” 

2,224 226 52 51%

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THE PERFECT PLACE TO LEARN, GROW AND BE INSPIRED. carleton.ca


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

A meaningful mission draws people to CSE

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an Rogers knew that the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) was an incredible place to work from the moment he started as a computer science co-op student 17 years ago. Now a deputy chief, he is responsible for CSE’s foreign intelligence program. “You get to work with some very smart people on really challenging problems,” says Rogers, who moved from a technical role into policy before becoming executive management. “Largely, we’re there to try and keep Canadians safe and secure by producing intelligence to stop threats to Canada’s security. We have a truly engaged workforce, not just because of the benefits and pay, but we have a mission and a goal in mind.” While that sense of mission permeates the culture, the organization is also actively involved in the community, raising hundreds of thousands of dollars for charity.

“There's a sense of being able to do things you can't do anywhere else because of the classified work.”

__ Dan Rogers Deputy Chief of Signals Intelligence

“Because we’re an intelligence organization, you might think that we’re secretive and insular, but that’s increasingly not true,” says Rogers. “We’re really trying to be engaging, and the way we do that is through these great community events, such as going out to play volleyball or designing escape rooms. It also helps our recruitment so people know we exist.”

EMPLOYEES AT THE COMMUNICATIONS SECURITY ESTABLISHMENT WORK IN A LIGHT AND OPEN WORKSPACE

Retaining and attracting top talent is a priority at CSE since their business has been steadily growing. Rogers says that growth has created a ton of opportunities for people to move around within the organization if they want to try different and interesting things. “There are still days when I wake up and find it fascinating that I get to know some of the secrets that happen at CSE,” says Rogers. “There’s a sense of being able to do things you can’t do anywhere else because of the classified work.” As a new employee, Taylor, an analyst who can’t reveal his full identity, says

this aspect of intelligence work makes it exciting to come through the door every morning and hard to peel yourself away at the end of the day. Taylor first joined as a co-op student while finishing his PhD in English literature, and quickly found the work addictive. “You know what you’re doing is important and intrinsically meaningful,” says Taylor. “But I also found the workplace very dynamic with a diversity of people with all kinds of interests from different educational backgrounds. My team is constantly collaborating and working together. 

Apply today at cse-cst.gc.ca/careers

Communications Security Establishment

Centre de la sécurité des télécommunications

2,527 22,733 46 207

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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

The House of Commons is full of hidden jewels

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endy Gordon likens the role of her team within the House of Commons Administration to the jewels in a watch movement: they’re small, tough, resist friction, maintain stability and operate in a challenging environment. As deputy law clerk and parliamentary counsel in the legislation services section of the office of the law clerk and parliamentary counsel, Gordon leads a group of 16 experts who help backbench MPs write private members’ bills and amendments to government bills. Legislation services is just one of many specialized groups within the House Administration, all dedicated to helping MPs do their work as effectively as possible.

“This is a very forward-thinking, 21st - century place in addition to its history and tradition. I feel my voice is valued - my age and gender aren't an issue.”

__ Valerie Boudreau Manager, Jurilinguist & Legislative Publication Service, Legislation Services

“The goal of the House Administration is to enable members to fulfil their various parliamentary functions,” she says. “In our office we support the legislative function. Cabinet is served by the department of justice when bills are written, while backbenchers are served by legislation services. “It’s very precise work – we’re dealing with the laws of the country – and there’s usually time pressure. The MP will describe the objective of the bill or amendment, and we’ll put it into words. We work in a confidential, non-partisan way, helping members

VALERIE BOUDREAU (LEFT) AND WENDY GORDON (RIGHT) FROM THE HOUSE OF COMMONS AT A BRANCH OF THE LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT

navigate the complex legislative process and accurately express their ‘voice’ within it. We’re all aware of the high stakes involved.” In the 42nd parliament, which ended in September 2019, Gordon’s team prepared 720 private members’ bills and drafted more than 6,500 amendments to government bills. The team consists of 16 people, including lawyers, translators, jurilinguists and publications officers. Valerie Boudreau, manager of jurilinguist and legislative publication services, explains what a jurilinguist is: “We do the final revision of bills before they’re tabled in the House, to make sure the wording is correct in both official languages. We usually have a law back-

ground but may also be former translators.” Boudreau practised law for two years, then decided she wanted a less traditional role, so she earned a master’s degree in legal translation. After working for a translation bureau, she moved to the House of Commons seven years ago. “A friend told me about the work-life balance, which was appealing to me,” she says. “This is a very forward-thinking, 21st-century place in addition to its history and tradition. I feel my voice is valued – my age and gender aren’t an issue. My colleagues share a common passion for the law, with a sense that our work is very special, bigger than ourselves.” 

2,021

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JOBS AVAILABLE TO EXTERNAL CANDIDATES LAST YEAR

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WEEKS (MAX) MATERNITY & PARENTAL LEAVE TOP-UP PAY

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Work where history is made ourcommons.ca/en/employment


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Technology and culture link Hydro Ottawa to the future

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hen winds hammered through the city at 90 km/h on a blustery November morning, more than 9,000 customers of Hydro Ottawa lost their power. But with leading-edge technology to coordinate its response, Hydro Ottawa’s crews restored power within hours to almost every customer. From its incident command centre at Hydro Ottawa’s east campus, Jeff Bradford, supervisor, distribution operations, was one of the supervisors organizing and monitoring the restoration initiative. “We were seated around a table in the ready room with two large digital screens that showed exactly where each crew had been mobilized,” he says.

“We focused on frequent communication, transparency... and opportunities for employees to have a voice.”

__ Donna Burnett Vachon Director, Change & Organization Development

While customers could track their progress using Hydro Ottawa’s website, Twitter or telephone lines, crews at each location communicated updates to the command centre. The successful restoration of power demonstrated once again how Hydro Ottawa is re-inventing how work gets done through technology. In a multi-year initiative, the utility has not only modernized its physical work environments but also embraced new ways of working with an emphasis on collaboration, innovation and health and well-being.

HYDRO OTTAWA EMPLOYEES FOCUS ON TECHNOLOGY, COLLABORATION AND TEAMWORK TO ENHANCE SERVICE TO ITS CUSTOMERS By engaging and communicating with employees throughout the two-year transformation and inviting their participation in the process, Hydro Ottawa ensured that employees were ready to take full advantage of its new technologies and collaborative work environments. “We wanted employees to see what new technologies could do for them,” says Donna Burnett Vachon, director, change and organization development, who moved to the utility almost three years ago to help guide the transformation. Throughout the two-year execution of its change strategy, “we focused on frequent communication, transparency, abundance of information, interactive displays and opportunities for employees to have a voice,” she says. “Employee engagement

and extensive communication through many mediums were critical to the success of this transformation.” When employees moved into their new work environments in early 2019, they wasted no time in putting the utility’s technology to work. “In the past, the process wasn’t as collaborative,” says Bradford, whose nine-person team works in underground cable chambers in the city’s downtown core to maintain power to high-profile customers like the federal government, including Canada’s parliament buildings. “Now we can work together more efficiently to coordinate our crews and ensure that each one goes where it’s needed.” In designing the new facilities and transforming its culture, Hydro Ottawa’s change

leaders contacted other utilities and businesses in Canada. “We visited their facilities to leverage their best practices,” says Burnett Vachon. “Now they come to learn from us.” 

686 5,729 38 3

FULL-TIME STAFF IN CANADA JOB APPLICATIONS RECEIVED LAST YEAR YEARS, LONGEST-SERVING EMPLOYEE WEEKS, STARTING VACATION ALLOWANCE

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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Trust empowers people at MD Financial Management

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D Financial Management is all about trust, from its client relationships to the way it treats its employees, says Kathy Labrecque, vice president, human resources. With headquarters in Ottawa, the company provides wealth management services to physicians and their families across Canada. “At MD, we’re driven by a single purpose: to ensure the financial well-being of physicians,” Labrecque says. “We know physicians and we have their trust. We want to make sure the employee experience drives the client experience, so we empower our people and trust them.”

My work allows me to reduce the financial stress in physicians' lives. We're helping doctors help Canadians every day.

A SNAPSHOT OF MD FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT’S CLIENT-FACING STAFF GATHERING AT THIS YEAR’S ALL ADVISOR CONFERENCE

__ Sebastien Pilon Associate Portfolio Officer

More than half of the company’s head office employees are flex workers, and the physical environment reflects the same open attitude, she notes. “There are no closed-door offices. We focus on work-life integration and give our people the support and tools they need. The entire organization is set up around enabling our advisers to serve physicians, so they can do what they do best: caring for Canadians.” Sebastien Pilon sees trust in action in his role as an associate portfolio manager. “MD hires professionals. We have targets and client expectations, but the company trusts us to know how to meet them,” he

says. “This trust allows for flexibility in my work schedule. I can work from home on days I don’t need to be in the office, which is very helpful as I have a young family. “All of us are paid a salary with no commissions, so our clients can trust that our recommendations are unbiased. We’re always sharing information and collaborating for the benefit of our clients, just as physicians trust their own colleagues. We all have the same goal and we help each other to achieve it.” Pilon has a business degree from Algonquin College and the University of Ottawa and is currently working on his chartered financial analyst designation. Based in Ot-

tawa, he has been with MD for eight years and works with the company’s financial consultants serving clients in a territory that stretches to North Bay. “I really enjoy the work, the travel and the clients,” he says. “As both the medical and financial industries evolve, my job continues to be very interesting and engaging. My work allows me to reduce the financial stress in physicians’ lives. We’re helping doctors help Canadians every day. A lot of my colleagues feel this way.” Adds Labrecque: “I’ve worked for several different organizations and can say that MD’s culture is very different. It’s passionate, innovative and collaborative.” 

1,482

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8,263

JOB APPLICATIONS RECEIVED LAST YEAR

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YEARS, LONGEST-SERVING EMPLOYEE WEEKS, STARTING VACATION ALLOWANCE

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Be a part of our team Helping Canadian physicians and their families achieve financial well-being. Learn more at mdm.ca/md-difference/careers MD Financial Management provides financial products and services, the MD Family of Funds and investment counselling services through the MD Group of Companies. For a detailed list of these companies, visit md.ca.


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

At Modern Niagara, leaders walk the upbeat talk

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ave Prubant didn’t know much about Modern Niagara until a couple of years ago. Though it has been around for the past 60 years, the Ottawa-based multi-trade construction company had only started to grow the electrical side of its business at that time. With all his experience in contracting, Prubant was intrigued at the idea of being part of that growth – but he confesses that the positive culture at Modern Niagara took a little time to get used to. “A simple thank you goes a long way in the trade,” says Prubant, Modern Niagara Ottawa’s labour manager. “Upper management really reassures you about how valued an employee you are, which is huge. They want to know how much we feel we’re contributing to the cause.”

“Upper management really reassures you about how valued an employee you are, which is huge.”

__ Dave Prubant Labour Manager

That’s one of the reasons Laura Milsom “fell in love” with Modern Niagara during a six-month contract. Milsom was brought in to build the company’s first in-house human resources team. “The very first programs we developed were Learning and Development and the Enhancing Employee Engagement survey,” says Milsom, now the manager of employee performance and success operations. “Before we even had policies,

DAVE PRUBANT, LABOUR MANAGER, AT MODERN NIAGARA we were focused on how we were going to help our employees develop and how to measure if they were happy working for us. It was really telling of an attitude of treating employees as humans first.” Indeed, Milsom was completely supported by the company when she had to take a leave of absence to look after her son. When she returned, she says, “it was like coming home.” At Modern Niagara, core values are not just something written on a sign on the wall. They represent what has helped make the company so successful over the past six decades, and they are taken seriously. “Management makes decisions that are in

line with the company’s values,” Milsom adds. “Making money is important but if you’re not living the core values, that’s not okay.” And the passion for the business comes from the top down – another factor that makes Prubant feel he made “the best career decision” by joining Modern Niagara. CEO Brad McAninch “is so passionate about labour productivity and the analytics aspect of it, and it makes my job so easy, so rewarding,” he adds. “To me, to have somebody that passionate about this business makes it really easy to get out there and really push the guys and strive for the best.” 

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We are building Canada’s infrastructure. Join our growing team and help make buildings work!

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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

NAV CANADA uplifts employees and their communities

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hristine McAuliffe is spreading her wings. For 17 years, she was an air traffic controller in the Edmonton region of NAV CANADA, the nonprofit corporation that owns and operates the country’s civil air navigation system. Since 2017, however, she has been a manager of air navigation system operations coordination at the head office in Ottawa. Her current job involves coordinating with the units that support the operational employees such as air traffic controllers, flight service specialists and air traffic operations specialists. “It’s a new and exciting challenge,” she says. “I enjoyed being a controller, and now I’m learning more about the business and how much head office does that supports what’s going on in the field.”

“We are committed to giving our employees an inclusive and fulfilling work environment where they feel safe and supported.” __

Neil Wilson President & CEO

The organization has over 5,200 personnel Canada-wide (including 1,500 in the National Capital Region). “We are committed to giving all our employees an inclusive and fulfilling work environment where they feel safe and supported,” says Neil Wilson, president and CEO. As part of that commitment, NAV CANADA provides peer support programs: employees affected by various challenges related to their physical health, mental health, or life events can talk confidentially with a co-worker who had a similar experience. One such program, Light the Way,

NAV CANADA EMPLOYEES VOLUNTEERING AT HABITAT FOR HUMANITY’S WOMEN BUILD promotes employees’ mental health. “I have used it twice for family issues,” says McAuliffe. “The peer supporters are welltrained and incredibly supportive.” Two other peer programs address substance use disorders and critical incident stress. “We are increasing the number of peer support and wellness programs,” says Wilson. “I know from people who have gone through them that they are invaluable.” As the organization helps its employees, it also strengthens their communities. In 2018-19, the organization donated to more than 300 charities across Canada. Staff identify the causes they wish to benefit, and the employer matches individual contributions. In Ottawa, the NAV CANADA Cares

committee designated as priority causes the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) and the Ottawa Hospital Foundation in support of cancer research. Over a decade, campaigns have raised $3 million for the foundation and more than $600,000 for CHEO. McAuliffe is a dedicated fundraiser. She volunteered for the Ottawa Hospital campaign and participates with co-workers in an annual walk for the Ottawa Mission homeless shelter. This past year, she formed a team of female co-workers who helped build a family home in Cornwall on behalf of Habitat for Humanity’s Women Build. The team raised $5,600, which NAV CANADA matched. That, says

McAuliffe, “is incredible support from our organization.” 

5,201

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531

JOBS AVAILABLE LAST YEAR

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JOBS APPLICATIONS RECEIVED LAST YEAR CHARITIES HELPED LAST YEAR

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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Variety is a key perk for Auditor General employees

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or Sarah Ouerd, an audit professional with the Office of the Auditor General (OAG), the best thing about the job is the new challenges. “We’re always doing something different,” says Ouerd. “We go from one audit to the next. It keeps things interesting and we’re always learning.” That comes with the territory, given the size and scope of the federal government. “Our employees tell us it seems like they have a different job every time they do an audit,” says Kimberly Leblanc, director general of human resources. “They can go from the Department of the Environment and Climate Change to the Department of National Defence.”

“Our employees tell us it seems like they have a different job every time they do a different audit.”

OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL EMPLOYEES CELEBRATING THE PRIDE PARADE IN OTTAWA

__ Kimberly Leblanc Director General of Human Resources

Variety is just one of the attractions. The other is the service rendered to their fellow citizens. “Our employees really relate to our mandate and values,” Leblanc says. “They’re assuring Canadians that their money is well spent and that government programs are well managed.” The OAG employs both financial and performance auditors. The former are responsible for examining the books of various departments, agencies and Crown corporations while the latter scrutinize the management and delivery of programs. Financial audit professionals, like Ouerd, must have their Chartered Professional Accountant designation. She acquired the designation after joining the Office in

OUR

January 2016 and received support from an internal mentor as well as an external consultant. She wrote the three-day final exams in 2017, along with several colleagues, and every one of them passed. “We all had our ups and downs while going through the process. However, we always felt greatly supported and the Office provided the tools we needed to succeed,” says Ouerd. Performance auditors must have a master’s degree, says Leblanc. The Office hires from a diverse range of disciplines, including law, environment, finance and IT, among others. “They have to gather a lot of information, pull out key information, analyze it

people strength fuel our

oag-bvg.gc.ca

and come to a conclusion,” says Leblanc. The OAG invests heavily in employee development, and that includes those employed in corporate departments such as finance, legal, human resources and IT. The OAG sets competencies for positions at all levels and provides online materials, learning circles and in-class instruction to help employees acquire the necessary technical and soft skills. Financial support is available for those who are pursuing external training or educational opportunities. “We don’t have a cap on how much is available to individual employees,” says Leblanc. “But we definitely have an annual budget. After all,

we have to manage taxpayer money in a responsible way.” 

606 37 62.6% 64.7%

FULL-TIME STAFF IN CANADA YEARS, LONGEST SERVING EMPLOYEE OF EMPLOYEES ARE WOMEN OF MANAGERS ARE WOMEN

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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

The City of Ottawa makes employees its top priority

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hen Steve Kanellakos assumed his role as city manager of the City of Ottawa in 2016, he decided to take the pulse of his 17,000-strong workforce. He met with over 3,600 staff and received 15,200 written comments. The results weren’t always encouraging. “Many employees felt they weren’t being supported and that red tape and a lack of communication was getting in the way of their professional development and ability to serve our residents,” says Kanellakos. Since then, the City has moved on several fronts, with the stated goal of making “our people our top priority.” All senior managers were appraised and assigned coaches to guide them in making the workplace more engaging and supportive.

“Our people get great satisfaction knowing what they do contributes to our community.” __ Steve Kanellakos City Manager The City’s entire professional development program was revamped to put greater emphasis on experiential training and coaching. New programs were introduced to help groom the next generation of leaders and smooth succession concerns as Baby Boomers retired. A renewed focus was placed on programs to promote workplace health and wellness, with a particular emphasis on mental health. At the same time Kanellakos kept reaching out for employees’ input and ideas; since 2016, he has overseen 19 staff forums.

STEVE KANELLAKOS WITH THE 2019 RECIPIENTS OF THE CITY MANAGER’S AWARD OF DISTINCTION FROM THE CITY OF OTTAWA The outreach is paying dividends. The City’s latest employee engagement survey showed a job satisfaction rate of 72 per cent, the highest since such surveys began in 2008. “We’re definitely going in the right direction,” says Kanellakos. “There’s a sense the organization is investing in its people and there’s greater clarity about what we are trying to achieve.” City employees take satisfaction in knowing what they do contributes to their community, he adds. “But if we don’t take care of our people, then we won’t see the high calibre of services we want for our residents.” Kimberley Asiri, an infrastructure sup-

port strategist, says City employees “take pride in what they do and often go above and beyond their everyday responsibilities because they know the positive difference they make.” Asiri adds that the City provides endless opportunities for career advancement through training and learning courses, mentorship and job shadowing. She appreciates that the City makes a point of recognizing individual and team achievements – Asiri was herself given the City Manager’s Award of Distinction as an emerging leader this past June. Asiri also welcomes the City’s focus on making employees its top priority. “We have great people who inspire me

every day,” she says. “I’m proud of what we accomplish together. 

11,217

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JOBS AVAILABLE LAST YEAR

48 43%

YEARS, LONGEST-SERVING EMPLOYEE OF MANAGERS ARE WOMEN

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The City of Ottawa is proud to be one of the National Capital Region’s Top Employers A City for everyone.

Visit ottawa.ca/careers


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Staff go the extra mile at The Ottawa Hospital

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few years ago, RN Courtney Argue and a colleague at The Ottawa Hospital discovered that a Walmart in Ogdensburg, N.Y., was selling big bottles of shampoo and conditioner for a dollar. So, the two women made the one hour-plus drive and bought a big shopping cart’s worth of hair products. They were supporting staff in the hospital’s psychiatric ward, who provide free toiletries for patients because some of them don’t get visitors or have safety issues if they leave their ward. Argue says going the extra mile, sometimes literally, is key to the ethos of the teaching and research hospital – also a trauma centre – and keeps employees engaged in their work. “We provide the compassionate care that we would want for our loved ones,” says Argue. “That is central to the hospital’s vision.”

“We provide the compassionate care that we would want for our loved ones. That is central to the hospital's vision.” __ Courtney Argue RN

Extras like the toiletries, or the annual baking sale that raises money for Christmas stockings for holiday-season patients, are part of what makes The Ottawa Hospital a “special place,” says Renée Légaré, executive vice-president and chief human resources officer. “Our staff take the time to give patients the best care possible, and they’re aware that we treat some of the sickest patients in our region, who need our

OPERATING ROOM STAFF AT THE OTTAWA HOSPITAL SHARING A LIGHTER MOMENT compassionate care,” she adds. When tragedy strikes the community, such as the January 2019 Westboro station bus crash that killed three and injured 24 people, staff rally in impressive ways. “Not just our clinicians but staff in all areas of the hospital, including housekeepers and transport workers, gathered together to make sure that we had the right equipment, enough blood, enough rooms,” recalls Légaré. “Some staff members were in cars on their way home when they heard news, and they drove back to help.” Besides deeply committed staff, the hospital attracts some of the best and brightest to its research activities, undertaken in

conjunction with The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. “The hospital offers a lot of cutting-edge treatments and technology as a result of all the research we do here,” notes Argue. “I’m proud to be able to provide my patients with those treatments.” Working in a hospital can be stressful, and the hospital has several wellness programs, including counselling for employees in the wake of an event like the bus crash. Another important piece to its success is the accessibility of top-level staff. “We’re very large,” says Légaré, “but our CEO, Dr. Jack Kitts, and senior management team have an open-door policy, which helps create a family-type atmosphere.” 

6,298

FULL-TIME STAFF IN CANADA

1,143

NEW EMPLOYEES HIRED LAST YEAR

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NEW NURSING GRADUATES HIRED LAST YEAR

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OF EMPLOYEES ARE WOMEN

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A challenging and rewarding work environment awaits you! Respect for the Individual • Compassion • Commitment to Quality • Working Together OttawaHospital.on.ca/en/Career-Opportunities OttawaHospital.on.ca/fr/Career-Opportunities

“Our Vision is to provide each patient with the world-class care, exceptional service and compassion we would want for our loved ones.”


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

How Tomlinson Group took training into its own hands

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hen the construction company that David Ingimundson worked for was acquired by the Tomlinson Group of Companies in 2011, he decided he had two options for dealing with the change. “I could resist it or embrace it,” he says. He chose to take full advantage of everything his new employer had to offer. In particular, he embraced the opportunity to develop his skills and career through what’s known as Tomlinson University, a program that provides employees with a variety of educational courses, some of them developed internally, others through partnerships with institutions such as Algonquin College and Bell Leadership Institute.

“We offer personal development as well as skills training because if you don't know who you are, you can't lead others.”

__ Ron Tomlinson CEO

“You’re not limited in the courses you can take,” says Ingimundson, “and they don’t have to be specifically job-related. They include leadership, career development and health and safety, for example.” While furthering his education at Tomlinson, Ingimundson has progressed from the role of crew foreman to superintendent, and in 2018 was given additional administrative responsibilities as construction resource manager. He now spends about half his time in the office, the other half in the field, where he oversees 20 crews that build and rehabilitate sewers and watermains, and three grading crews.

THE ESTIMATING TEAM AT THE TOMLINSON GROUP OF COMPANIES REVIEW DRAWINGS AS PART OF A QUOTATION FOR A TENDER Based in Ottawa, Tomlinson Group delivers environmental, construction and transportation infrastructure services in eastern Ontario and beyond. CEO Ron Tomlinson, third-generation leader of the family-owned company, explains how Tomlinson University came to be. “If I look back 15 or 20 years, this was an old industry that was set in its ways. I knew we had to change that in order to grow. We wanted our people to grow with us to stay ahead of our competitors, but most schools at that time were focused on technology rather than programs for skilled trades. So we decided we had to train and develop our people ourselves.

“We offer personal development as well as skills training because if you don’t know who you are, you can’t lead others,” Tomlinson adds. “The soft skills like communication and leadership are the hardest to find in our industry. We want a team atmosphere, and as much as we can, we encourage people to move up. We’re way better off moving people up than bringing them in.” Ingimundson credits the education he’s received at Tomlinson for his own career development. “I’ve been able to grow myself into a good position and I’m still growing,” he says. “I’m proud to represent a company that believes in its people and supports them.” 

1,370

FULL-TIME STAFF IN CANADA

333

JOBS AVAILABLE LAST YEAR

38 784

YEARS, LONGEST-SERVING EMPLOYEE STAFF VOLUNTEER HOURS LAST YEAR

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Build your career with an award winning team. The RED ARMY wants you! TomlinsonGroup.com/BuildYourCareer


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

Work, play and help others at Trend Micro Canada

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ince Brent Jackson joined Trend Micro Canada Technologies Inc. as a software developer in 2017, he has attended training sessions at his Ottawa office to improve his skills and knowledge. In December, he’ll be travelling further afield to learn even more when the company flies him to Taiwan. “I’m pretty excited,” says Jackson. “It’s my first substantial work trip, and culturally it’ll be a cool experience. It’ll also be good to meet colleagues I’ve been working with remotely face to face.” A market leader in cybersecurity solutions, Trend Micro’s products and services help consumers and companies make it safe to do business on the internet. Jackson’s product, Deep Security, is primarily developed in Ottawa and Taiwan.

“Giving back is bred into our corporate culture.”

__ Bob Kedrosky Senior Director, HR. Americas

There are numerous opportunities to increase knowledge at Trend Micro. One favourite is Hack Days, where employees devote two days to working on personal projects or work items they haven’t had time to focus on. Someone might write an algorithm that will solve a problem or create an app that will help the company stay one step ahead of hackers. “They buy us dinner that night if you stay late and lunch the next day, and presenters get an Amazon gift card,” says Jackson. “I’ve presented a ‘hack’ where

TREND MICRO EMPLOYEES SORTING FOOD TO SUPPORT THE OTTAWA FOOD BANK I’ve had a really ambitious goal and failed miserably – but I still presented it, which is great learning.” Productivity is boosted by flexible work hours. “We don’t punch clocks,” says Bob Kedrosky, senior director, HR, Americas. “We trust our employees to get their work done, whether it’s at midnight or 6 a.m.” People are also encouraged to take breaks, which could mean playing golf or baseball in the indoor games simulator or having a friendly match of foosball or ping pong. There are clubs for soccer and running, while cross-country skiing is directly out the back door. “We think it’s

critical for our employees to have fun and be social,” says Kedrosky. Trend Micro has a serious side, too, and a strong sense of corporate social responsibility. Twice a year, employees are offered a chance to spend a week in the Philippines building homes. The company pays their airfare, and they take half of the week in vacation days while the rest is “granted.” “We’ve built hundreds of homes there,” says Kedrosky, who hopes to go next year. “Giving back is bred into our corporate culture. We recognize that we’re very fortunate to have good, well-paying jobs and we’re lucky to live in Canada.” 

296 42

YEARS, AVERAGE AGE OF ALL EMPLOYEES

45% 8,000

OF EXECUTIVE TEAM ARE WOMEN

For over 30 years, Trend Micro’s vision has been to master the art form of making the world safe for exchanging digital information. Check out our current career opportunities at www.trendmicro.com/careers.

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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

The grass is greenest at Universities Canada

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ho leaves an employer they love only to return a few months or years later to work there again? Universities Canada currently has seven employees who have done exactly that, circling back after exploring opportunities elsewhere. Alison Evans, director of communications, is one of them, a returning staff member who jumped at the chance to be part of senior management after eight years away holding leadership positions in other sectors.

“I'm delighted that people go out. They experience other work cultures, develop new skills and then bring all that richness back.” __ Paul Davidson CEO & President “Representing higher education is an amazing opportunity and privilege,” says Evans. “A key reason I came back is the people and culture here, but it’s also the importance of the mandate, about supporting institutions that are nation-builders and bridge-builders with other nations. Right now, the world needs that.” What Evans appreciates most are the incredible foundation, training and opportunities for development she received during the decade she spent earlier at Universities Canada. And although she’s barely been back a year, she’s already had her portfolio expanded. “I feel like I've come back with all kinds of new insights and that is a huge win-win for me and for the organization,” says Evans. “After being in industries that have skills or labour shortages, I’ve seen the im-

Bright Minds. Bright future. Thanks to our employees.

RETURNING STAFF MEMBERS APPRECIATE THE FOUNDATION, TRAINING AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR DEVELOPMENT UNIVERSITIES CANADA HAS TO OFFER portance and benefits of higher education from the other side. This is the best team and the best cause.” Paul Davidson, CEO and president, couldn’t be more pleased to extend the welcome mat to folks who leave for whatever reason and then come back. He understands people may have a range of interests and want to try something else. “I'm delighted that people go out,” he says. “They experience other work cultures, develop new skills and then bring all that richness back. It’s a way of constantly renewing our organization and making sure we remain best in class.” Davidson believes what people miss

most when they leave is the mission towards advancing higher education, research and innovation along with the opportunity to make a real difference. “It’s not just a job,” he says. “The work is substantive and engaging. People get to work closely with university leaders and researchers and see phenomenal work happening on campuses across Canada. There's a sense of common purpose and an openness to new ideas.” Other benefits include the organization’s very intentional career development track and family-friendly environment. “Those who return can tell colleagues, the grass may look greener over there but

De l’esprit et de l’avenir. Grâce à nos employés. univcan.ca

I went over and in fact, things are pretty good right here.” 

80 43 4 71%

FULL-TIME STAFF IN CANADA YEARS, AVERAGE AGE OF ALL EMPLOYEES WEEKS, STARTING VACATION ALLOWANCE FOR MOST STAFF OF EXECUTIVE TEAM ARE WOMEN

This story was produced by Mediacorp in partnership with Postmedia, on behalf of Universities Canada


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NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION’S TOP EMPLOYERS 2020

World University Service of Canada offers real purpose

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s they strive to improve the lives of others, many international development organizations also offer Canadians careers and volunteer opportunities with meaning and purpose. As Carolyn McKee sees it, WUSC (World University Service of Canada) does all that – and more. What makes WUSC so compelling, she says, is not only its vision, but the innovative approaches it takes to achieving its mission of a better world for all young people. As a program officer, Student Refugee Program (SRP), McKee’s responsibilities include guiding groups of post-secondary students through the process of sponsoring young refugees to resettle and continue their education in Canada. “I really like the idea of connecting the local to the global,” she says. “The way we work with young people is really making a big difference.”

“WUSC works really hard to develop talent within the organization.”

__ Stephanie Leclair Senior Manager, Communications & Philanthropy

WUSC’s vision is rooted firmly in the belief that with the right opportunities and support, youth can create a better world for themselves, their families, and their communities. Through its unique youthto-youth sponsorship model, the SRP is the only program of its kind to combine resettlement with opportunities for higher education. In all, the SRP supports 130 students a year through partnerships on over 90 Canadian campuses. It is also just one example of the breadth

EMPLOYEES FROM WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA (WUSC) AT WINTER FUN DAY of programming under the aegis of the Ottawa-based non-profit. In collaboration with a diverse network of post-secondary institutions, private-sector partners, governments, and civil society organizations, WUSC employees and volunteers work to improve education, economic and empowerment opportunities for youth, women and refugees in more than 25 countries across Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Given the nature of the work, it’s hardly surprising that when it comes to hiring, fit is a key consideration. Sylvie Villemure, chief human resources officer, says WUSC looks for people who share the organization’s values of inclusivity, leadership and

integrity. These also happen to be key ingredients for a workplace culture that is dynamic, action-oriented and respectful. The office in Ottawa’s centrally located Hintonburg neighbourhood is also a very friendly place, Villemure adds. “Colleagues trust each other,” she says. “We have a lot of staff who work both within and across departments so there are lots of opportunities to collaborate and keep current.” Stephanie Leclair, senior manager, communications & philanthropy, enjoys the lively, collegial atmosphere. She also appreciates the opportunities WUSC has given her to advance in her career. “WUSC works really hard to develop

Work towards a better world. Rewarding careers and volunteer opportunities available in Canada and in over 20 countries around the world. Join our team and learn more at wusc.ca

talent within the organization,” says Leclair. “Working here has exceeded all my expectations.” 

115 30 4 54%

FULL-TIME STAFF IN CANADA YEARS, AVERAGE AGE OF ALL EMPLOYEES WEEKS, STARTING VACATION ALLOWANCE OF MANAGERS ARE WOMEN

This story was produced by Mediacorp in partnership with Postmedia, on behalf of WUSC


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