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CLEVELAND STATE WINTER 2013 ISSUE

PARKER HANNIFIN ENDOWED CHAIR

RESEARCH ADVANCES “SMART” PROSTHETIC LIMBS P.10

ENGAGED RESEARCH P. 14 FULBRIGHT SCHOLARS P. 16 STEM EDUCATION P. 21


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CONTENTS  FEATURES

Cleveland State Magazine

ENDOWED CHAIR P10

EDITOR/WRITER Barbara Chudzik

Professor’s research advances “smart” prosthetic limbs

GRAPHIC DESIGN Patsy D. Kline PHOTOGRAPHY Brian Hart Rob Wetzler

ENGAGED RESEARCH P14

PRESIDENT Ronald M. Berkman

CSU ranks sixth in Ohio for research and development

ACTING PROVOST George Walker VICE PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY ADVANCEMENT EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, CSU FOUNDATION Berinthia R. LeVine

FULBRIGHT SCHOLARS

ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING AND STUDENT RECRUITMENT Rob A. Spademan

FULBRIGHT SCHOLARS P16

Five awards place CSU second in nation

CONTACT US 216-687-2201 phone 216-687-9278 fax csuohio.edu/magazine 2121 Euclid Avenue EC 182 Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2214

STEM EDUCATION P21

Grant supports high school classes at CSU

DEPARTMENTS POSTMASTER Send address changes to Cleveland State University Division of University Advancement 2121 Euclid Ave, UN 501 Cleveland, Ohio 44115-2214 Cleveland State University is an AA/EO institution. Copyright © 2013 CSU University Marketing. Cleveland State Magazine is for alumni and friends of CSU and is published by the Division of University Advancement, located in the Union Building, 2121 Euclid Ave., RM 501, Cleveland, Ohio 44115. Third-class postage is paid at Cleveland, Ohio. 12-01055-pk/100M

PHOTOS MAIN CLASSROOM Inside front cover JULKA HALL Page 3 WELCOME CENTER Back cover

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

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NEWS BRIEFS

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CONSTRUCTION ZONE

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OUR COLLEGES

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AROUND CAMPUS

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ADVANCEMENT NEWS

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ALUMNI NEWS

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VIKING SPORTS

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CLASS NOTES

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President’sMESSAGE This July will mark my fourth anniversary as president of Cleveland State University. What a journey it’s been – and I’m talking more than the miles from South Florida to Northeast Ohio.

Cleveland State has made remarkable progress on so many fronts – student success initiatives to improve graduation and retention rates; new faculty to enhance our academic and research programs; an Arts Campus in conjunction with Cleveland Play House and PlayhouseSquare that enables our students to perform on stage at the renovated Allen Theatre; a thriving Campus International School and new STEM campus set to open this fall, both in partnership with the Cleveland Metropolitan Schools; quadrupling of our research and development, bringing CSU into the ranks of the top 200 universities nationally; a groundbreaking collaboration with Northeast Ohio Medical University that will revolutionize urban health care; the largest and most academically prepared freshman class in CSU history; and so much more. These accomplishments are the result of teamwork between our administration and faculty, staff, students, alumni, donors, and corporate and community partners. To say I’m proud is an understatement. And we’ve only just begun! One of the most exciting projects on the horizon is our Center for Health Innovation, which will serve as the academic campus for our CSU/NEOMED Urban Primary Care Initiative, and set new standards for health-care education. (See story on page 18.) As we all know, health care in this nation is rapidly changing and its

workforce must change as well to handle new demands. Through our Center for Health Innovation, CSU will be at the forefront of innovative medical and health-care education that teaches doctors, nurses and other health professionals how to work together. We call it “innovation through collaboration.” The center will bring together under one roof all of CSU’s health-care and medical-education programs. It will foster team approaches to health-care delivery and promote opportunities for engagement with external partners and interdisciplinary research. Building on our considerable strengths in nursing and health sciences, we will focus on urban primary care, community care and prevention, and on building a core of providers to work in teams. Capitalizing on the assets of Cleveland as a leader in world-class health care, the center will help us expand dynamic partnerships with internationally renowned institutions such as the Cleveland Clinic while blazing new trails in urban health care in conjunction with NEOMED. Collaboration will spark innovation as we prepare the next generation of doctors, nurses and health professionals to work together to serve communities with passion and compassion. I am incredibly excited about the opportunities and challenges ahead. I hope you share that excitement. Ronald M. Berkman PRESIDENT

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“HOT” VIKING BETTY WHITE When it comes to “hot” Vikings, legendary actress/ comedienne Betty White is in a class all her own. The star of the original TV Land series Hot in Cleveland returned to school this season – at CSU. As her character, Elka, attended accounting classes, the 91-year-old blazed a fashion trail, sporting a customized BeDazzled Cleveland State sweatshirt. A second Hot character, Joy, played by actress Jane Leeves, also is attending CSU this season. Check it out Wednesdays at 10 p.m. 

VISIT CSU AT SPRING OPEN HOUSE

Visit www.csuohio.edu/openhouse for a complete schedule

Want to learn more about the University? Join us for Spring Open House on Saturday, April 6, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Student Center. This always-popular event provides an opportunity for guests to pick and choose from a wide range of activities, including student-led campus tours that visit the new Arts Campus and residence halls; a campus fair featuring 40-plus 4

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CSU programs, departments and student clubs; special events in each of CSU’s Colleges; information sessions on such topics as financial aid, academic programs, and selecting a major; and much more. Guests can stay for the entire open house or come and go as they like. We look forward to seeing you! 


CLEVELAND A TOP COLLEGE CITY Cleveland is the 12th best mid-size metropolitan area for college students, according to the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER).

FACULTY EXPERTISE ONLINE http://expertise.csuohio.edu

Looking for an expert on just about any subject imaginable? Check out CSU’s new online Faculty Expertise Database. It’s easy to use. Just input the name of a faculty member, an academic department, or an area of research/interest. The database then searches every College and department in the University to provide information about faculty and their areas of expertise. The new database makes it easy for business, industry, government, and media to access CSU researchers. The database also facilitates interaction between non-CSU and CSU researchers with compatible interests, helping to foster new collaborations among institutions and with potential sponsors. The Faculty Expertise Database helps students identify faculty with whom they might like to conduct research, and helps faculty locate new collaborators. 

This is the first time Cleveland made the list. Two other Ohio cities, Columbus and Cincinnati, ranked 11th and 17th, respectively. In compiling its 2012 list of the top 75 cities and towns in the United States for its College Destinations Index, AIER looked at such factors as overall academic and cultural environment, quality of life and professional opportunities. Cities also were evaluated for their college student concentration per 1,000 population, student diversity, academic research, degree attainment, cost of living, arts and leisure, accessibility by foot, public transportation or bicycle, percentage of workforce in arts, education, knowledge industries, science, engineering, management and other fields, earning potential, entrepreneurial activity, brain gain/ drain, and unemployment rate. “The characteristics that make up a great college destination often make a location ideal for business, retirement and tourism. A top AIER College Destinations Index ranking should be just as important to a town or city as it is to the schools located there and the families and students attending or considering them,” said an AIER representative.  Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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CSU IS MILITARY FRIENDLY

For information, visit www.csuohio.edu/studentlife/vikingvets

For the fourth consecutive year, CSU has been named by G.I. Jobs magazine as a military friendly school. The magazine surveyed more than 12,000 colleges, universities and trade schools nationwide to find those that are most active in recruiting and supporting military students. CSU’s Veteran Student Success Program (VSSP) helps Viking vets make the transition from military service to college student. The program is staffed daily by a full-time coordinator and student employees, all of whom are veterans. In addition, CSU is one of only eight universities nationwide 6

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with a VA VetSuccess on Campus counselor. Located in and working with the VSSP, the VA counselor deals with all benefits questions and issues right on campus. Cleveland also has a wealth of VA facilities, including a hospital, two vet centers and several community-based outreach centers. All VA-connected needs can be addressed within a short distance of the University. As veterans embark on their next mission, CSU provides them with a great education and all the support they need to be successful. ď Ź


JAPANESE FOREIGN MINISTRY HONORS PROFESSOR

VOINOVICH COLLECTION IS ONLINE

Toshinori Munakata, professor emeritus of computer and information science, has received a prestigious certificate of commendation from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan.

CSU and Ohio University are working together to digitally archive documents related to the public career of George Voinovich.

An expert in the field of artificial intelligence, Dr. Munakata was honored for his internationally recognized research and scholarship, as well as his accomplishments in promoting mutual understanding between the United States and Japan. A native of Japan, Dr. Munakata has been profiled in the Japanese edition of Newsweek as one of 25 Japanese who changed the world. He has published numerous scholarly articles, served as editor of two computer science journals, and published a textbook, Fundamentals of the New Artificial Intelligence, that is used in classrooms worldwide. 

The Voinovich Collection can be found at www.voinovichcollections.library.ohio.edu/

The former Ohio governor and U.S. senator has donated reports, correspondence, position papers and photos spanning 20 years to the project. To date, 133 pieces have been scanned and reformatted and are available to the public. Additional material from Voinovich’s nine years as Cleveland’s mayor will be added. Faculty from both CSU and OU selected the materials to be archived and will use them in course work. Voinovich, who retired from public service in 2010, is a graduate of Ohio University and holds an honorary doctor of laws degree from Cleveland State. He is a Senior Fellow in CSU’s Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs.  Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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CAMPUS TO BE TOBACCO FREE

Beginning fall semester, the use of tobacco in any form will not be permitted on the CSU campus. The University’s board of trustees has approved the ban, which complies with an Ohio Board of Regents request that all public universities in the state adopt a tobacco-free policy.

PLATES SUPPORT SCHOLARSHIPS

For information, visit www.bmv.ohio.gov

With a sprawling campus covering 85 acres in the heart of downtown Cleveland, defining CSU’s physical boundaries is challenging. So the University is seeking input from the campus community, as well as its downtown neighbors and the general public, to help craft the plan

that will be implemented. In 1993, CSU adopted a smoke-free environment policy that prohibits smoking inside all University buildings. Since 2006, CSU has complied with Ohio’s Smoke-Free Work Place Act, which prohibits smoking within 20 feet of building entrances. 

Show your Viking pride while supporting student scholarships! It’s easy – just purchase an Ohio license plate bearing the Viking logo and Magnus mascot. The cost of the distinctive CSU plate is your annual renewal fee plus an additional $35. But $25 of that added charge comes directly back to the University and is used to support student scholarships. Personalized CSU plates, with initials, names or messages, are also available upon request and approval of the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles. 

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TRUSTEES ENDORSE PRESIDENT’S TRANSFORMATIVE VISION President Ronald M. Berkman has agreed to extend his contract and serve Cleveland State for three more years. The University’s board of trustees unanimously approved the extension to 2017, signifying its enthusiastic endorsement of the president’s vision and leadership over the past three years. “During President Berkman’s tenure, Cleveland State University has undergone a rebirth,” said Robert H. Rawson Jr., board chairman. “He has enhanced the University through key partnerships that leverage assets within the community and the region, including a groundbreaking collaboration with Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) that will foster urban health care. “We are confident that under his leadership, CSU will continue to prosper and become a best-in-class university, driven by student success and strong faculty.” The president said he was honored by the endorsement of his leadership. “I look forward to continuing to move the University forward in

partnership with the board, our faculty, staff and students, and the entire community,” he added. Since becoming CSU’s sixth president in 2009, President Berkman has made student success a top priority, initiating several new policies aimed at dramatically improving graduation and retention rates, such as a robust new online degree audit program, intensive counseling, multi-term course registration and course wait lists. In addition, $1 million per year has been earmarked for new full-time tenure and tenure-track professors for high-priority areas. President Berkman is the driving force behind CSU’s Center for Health Innovation, a stateof-the-art learning facility set to open in 2015. With President Berkman at the helm, the University welcomed the largest and most academically prepared freshman class in its history in fall 2012, completed a $500 million campus makeover, and extended its reach into the heart of Cleveland’s theater district with an extensive new Arts Campus – a one-of-a-kind

collaboration with Cleveland Play House and PlayhouseSquare. President Berkman has demonstrated a strong commitment to improving not only higher education in Cleveland, but also education at the primary and secondary levels by way of the thriving Campus International School (currently serving grades K-4) and the new STEM high school that will open this fall on the University campus. These projects are partnerships with the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. During his tenure, the University’s research and development expenditures have nearly quadrupled, elevating CSU into the ranks of the top 200 U.S. universities for R&D. CSU also ranks second in the nation for Fulbright Scholars. In addition, donors have endorsed the president’s leadership, with the University receiving its two largest single financial gifts -- $10 million from Monte Ahuja and $6 million from Bill Julka, prominent business leaders who are also alumni. 

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PARKER HANNIFIN ENDOWED CHAIR

RESEARCH ADVANCES “SMART” PROSTHETIC LIMBS

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Adults and children with mobility impairments may someday experience an unprecedented level of independence, thanks to a partnership between Cleveland State University and Parker Hannifin Corporation. Parker recently pledged $1.5 million to CSU for an endowed professorship and research into human motion and control. The primary objective of this research is to improve advanced prosthetics and orthotics in their ability to replicate the movement of healthy human limbs.

Antonie (Ton) van den Bogert, an internationally renowned researcher in biomechanics, has joined the Fenn College of Engineering’s Department of Mechanical Engineering as the Parker Hannifin Endowed Chair in Human Motion and Control. He has been affiliated with the College since 1999 as an adjunct professor. The opportunity to collaborate with Parker engineers on potentially life-enhancing technology is a challenge that excites the native of The Netherlands. (Continued on page 12)

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LUUK DOBBE, A GRADUATE STUDENT FROM THE NETHERLANDS, IS DOING AN INTERNSHIP AT CSU IN THE PARKER HANNIFIN LAB

“People who have lost the use their legs because of paralysis, stroke, spinal cord injury or disease suffer physically, psychologically and emotionally,” says Dr. van den Bogert, who has long been intrigued by the control of human movement. “Helping them get back on their feet through science and technology is an exciting opportunity to impact human lives.” The Parker gift provides funding for a new human motion and control laboratory and equipment, including a rare V-Gait treadmill that uses motion sensors and 10 cameras to capture human movement. CSU’s V-Gait is one of only a few worldwide. “With the V-Gait, we can test subjects while they walk. We can have them move uphill and downhill, and we can push the treadmill sideways to measure their motions and muscle actions as they react to the disturbance. The lab provides a unique and rich testing environment that allows us to study human movement and control in very great detail, and then transfer that knowledge into mechanical devices,” says Dr. van den Bogert. That’s where Parker Hannifin comes in. The Clevelandheadquartered firm is the world’s leading diversified manufacturer of motion and control technologies and systems, providing precision-engineered solutions for a wide variety of markets. “I want to make an impact by designing control systems that are inspired by human movement. My interest is trying to figure out how to control the motors on robotic legs so they’re as smart as our muscles and our nervous system. We want to build some sort of brain into these devices, so they operate like a normal limb would. This is the sort of thing we hope to discover in our new lab,” says Dr. van den Bogert. The professor is highly respected for his innovative work analyzing human movement and for developing computer simulation methods to study the effects of neuromuscular control and 12

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mechanical devices on human movement. “Originally, I was a physicist. But I transitioned into biomechanics because I enjoy coming up with ideas that are useful in the real world. You can develop something today and it could be on the market a few years later. Of course, you also can work for 10 years on one idea. “My expertise is computational models; Parker’s expertise is designing motion hardware and controls,” he says. “Joining forces complements both our strengths and combines theory with human experimentation and engineering to develop assistive technology; that is, smart prosthetic limbs and assistive devices.” By this fall, CSU’s Department of Mechanical Engineering plans to expand its faculty by adding an expert in robotic devices, presenting opportunities for collaboration between Dr. van dan Bogert and the new hire. Doctoral students also are being recruited, thanks to a $400,000, four-year grant from Parker to provide research fellowships. Even Dr. van den Bogert’s undergraduate students are getting engaged in his work. “They are fascinated by technology that helps people,” he says. “For their mechanical engineering projects, I have one student who is designing a wheelchair lift and another who is designing a mechanical leg. “Developing fundamental knowledge of how humans control movement is an area that needs greater understanding. The Parker Hannifin Endowed Chair makes it possible to implement a long-term plan that will make Cleveland State a world leader in the development of technology for sports and rehabilitation,” he adds. “I am especially looking forward to having a partner in Parker Hannifin that can bring this research into the marketplace and to the people who need it most.” 


FUN FACTS Dr. van den Bogert invented and patented the Kickstart Orthosis, a device that helps disabled people walk faster and farther. The device was inspired by the anatomy of horses, and the long tendons that enable them to walk and run. He received a Technical Achievement Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 2004 for his contributions to the development of 3D human animation. However, he does not have an Oscar on his mantel; the award did not come with a statuette.

MEET DR. van den BOGERT Antonie (Ton) van den Bogert holds a Ph.D. in biomechanics from the University of Utrecht in The Netherlands, where he researched the movement of horses. He served as a post-doctoral fellow and assistant professor of kinesiology at the University of Calgary in Canada, where he specialized in the mechanics of sports performance and sports injuries in humans.

Dr. van den Bogert came to Cleveland in 1998 and continued his work on sports injuries and orthopedics at the Lerner Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic for 12 years. Most recently, he founded Orchard Kinetics LLC, a Cleveland company dedicated to research and innovation in biomechanics. He continues to serve as company president. He also is president of the International Society of Biomechanics.

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ENGAGED CSU RANKS SIXTH IN OHIO FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Dr. Aaron Severson

CLEVELAND STATE’S ONGOING INVESTMENT IN A CREATIVE, GROUNDBREAKING RESEARCH PROGRAM IS PAYING DIVIDENDS. CSU NOW RANKS AMONG THE TOP 20 PERCENT OF UNIVERSITIES IN THE NATION FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, ACCORDING TO THE LATEST NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION HIGHER EDUCATION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SURVEY. The University has made dramatic progress to improve both its national and statewide rankings. With overall R&D expenditures of $55.5 million in fiscal year 2011, CSU comes in 193rd in the NSF’s national rankings, up from 220 in 2010 and 261 in 2009. Among universities in Ohio, the NSF ranks CSU sixth in federally financed R&D expenditures, well ahead of many other institutions, including Wright State University, Ohio University, Kent State University, Miami University, The University of Akron and Bowling Green University. On average, R&D spending at higher education institutions increased four per-

cent between 2010 and 2011, according to the NSF survey. By comparison, R&D expenditures at CSU increased 65 percent over the same period. In 2009, CSU spent $14.3 million on R&D. Since then, the University has nearly quadrupled that total. CSU’s research program has been recognized and funded by such prestigious organizations as the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, NASA, the Human Frontier Science Program, and many others. The increase in R&D expenditures is expected to have a positive impact

on CSU’s share of Research Incentive appropriations, which the Ohio Board of Regents awards to universities based on their levels of external research support. “Since the late 1990s, CSU has actively recruited promising researchers from prestigious insitutions,” notes Jerzy Sawicki, interim vice president for research. One such hire is Aaron Severson, who joined CSU’s College of Sciences and Health Professions in September as assistant professor of biological, geological and environmental sciences. He was recruited from the University of California-Berkeley and has published peer-reviewed manuscripts in top academic journals such as Genes & Development and Developmental Cell. He brings to CSU his groundbreaking research with Caenorhabditis elegans, a transparent roundworm, in which he


RESEARCH “Building on this knowledge could someday lead to the development of drugs and therapies to help high-risk couples.” DR. AARON SEVERSON

Caenorhabditis elegans

studies the mechanisms that ensure that offspring have the appropriate number of chromosomes. Understanding this process is critical as abnormalities in chromosome number are the leading cause of miscarriages and congenital birth defects, including Down Syndrome where patients have 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. Dr. Severson explains that in all organisms, accurate transmission of the genome (a full set of chromosomes) during cell division is essential to prevent genetic instability. This is especially true during meiosis, the process that reduces genome copy number from two to one during the formation of gametes (sperm and eggs). Defects in meiosis create gametes that have the wrong number of chromosomes. Such chromosomal abnormalities affect all cells of an embryo and

profoundly impact health. “In humans an estimated 30 percent of fertilized embryos have abnormal chromosomal content at conception. Many of these embryos are so defective, the woman doesn’t become pregnant. Nevertheless, about five percent of pregnancies result in birth defects and miscarriages caused by abnormal chromosomes. “Understanding how meiosis works can help us understand what goes wrong. Building on this knowledge could someday lead to the development of drugs and therapies to help high-risk couples,” he says. Using Caenorhabditis elegans, which means elegant rod, Dr. Severson studies how gametes inherit exactly one copy of every chromosome. His work has challenged established paradigms and revealed important new insights into the complex process of meiosis.

The microscopic worms, just one-sixteenth of an inch in size, have very similar biology to humans. “What happens in us happens in them,” he says. “Looking for gene mutations in worms is like looking for a needle in a haystack,” he admits. But identifying and studying genetic mutations in the worms has helped him advance the understanding of reproductive biology and may lead to breakthroughs in finding potential causes and treatments for cancer and other diseases that result from similar types of mutations. Happy to be at CSU, Dr. Severson praises CSU’s commitment to expanding its research program. “CSU’s growing reputation as a research university is very attractive to faculty like me. I am eager to do all I can to help CSU continue to boost its research profile,” he says. 


FULBRIGHT SCHOL ARS THE WORLD IS THEIR CLASSROOM CSU continues to be a pacesetter in Fulbright Scholars, ranking second in the nation with five faculty members receiving the prestigious recognition. With nearly 50 Fulbright grants awarded to CSU faculty during the past decade alone, Cleveland State consistently ranks among the nation’s top universities for Fulbright Scholars. The Fulbright Program, considered an international benchmark of faculty excellence, is sponsored by the U.S.

Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. It is designed to increase mutual understanding among the people of the United States and other countries. The Fulbright Program provides participants – chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential – with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research, exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns.

JAYNE FUGLISTER, professor emerita of accounting, has returned from her Fulbright visit to Podgorica, Montenegro in southeast Europe. She spent fall semester at the University of Montenegro, teaching as a guest lecturer in international accounting and co-authoring three research papers with faculty and doctoral students. She also gave a presentation at the Central Bank of Montenegro. Dr. Fuglister, who taught at CSU for 25 years, continues to do research papers with the scholars she met during her four-month Fulbright experience.

MILENA STERIO, associate professor of law, is spending four months at Baku State University in Baku, Azerbaijan at the crossroads of western Asia and eastern Europe. She is teaching two law classes and also conducting research about statehood and secession issues as they relate to the Nagorno-Karabakh region, an area under dispute between Azerbaijan and Armenia. Most recently, Sterio lent her international law expertise to assist in the prosecution of Somali pirates.

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RAMA K. JAYANTI, professor of marketing, is at the Indian Institute of Management in Bangalore for six months, teaching a course on sustainability and continuing her research on subsistence marketplaces. She will present her research on sustainability at the Indian Institute of Management in March and at the Enterprise Marketing and Globalization Conference in Singapore in April. She has been with CSU since 1992.

JANCHE SANG, associate professor of computer and information science, has taught at CSU since 1994. He is spending his nine-month Fulbright at National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan, off the coast of mainland China. Dr. Sang is partnering with the computer science research team there to develop efficient software tools for simulating embedded systems. His work is addressing the many challenges posed by the growth of the semiconductor industry in Taiwan.

BRIAN RAY, associate professor of law, is spending seven months at Stellenbosch University and the University of the Western Cape in South Africa, conducting research on what scholars have described as the second-wave social-rights decisions by the South African Constitutional Court and the roles that civil society, social movements and public-interest lawyers have played in those cases. Ray has been a C|M|LAW faculty member since 2005.

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ONE OF MANY CONCEPTS UNDER CONSIDERATION

ILLUSTRATION BY PELLI CLARKE PELLI

HEALTH INNOVATION CENTER TO PROMOTE COLLABORATION In what is expected to set the gold standard for health sciences education, all the University’s health-care and medical-education programs will come together in CSU’s Center for Health Innovation, slated to open in 2015. The center will house the College of Sciences and Health Professions, the School of Health Sciences and the School of Nursing, while also providing the academic campus for the Urban Primary Care Initiative, CSU’s partnership with Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) to train primary care physicians to serve urban areas. The center will bring together under one roof CSU’s much-in-demand occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and speech and hearing programs. Disciplines such as biomedical engineering will use the space as well. By design, the Center for Health Innovation will foster interaction and collaboration among departments campus-wide, as faculty, students and health professionals work together to advance research, teaching and learning. “Traditionally, health-care training and preparation have existed in silos with students working in collaboration only when they get into the 18

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real-world environment,” says President Ronald M. Berkman. “CSU is changing that model to promote collaboration and collegial learning across a broad spectrum.” In addition to providing state-of-the-art facilities for educating the next generation of health professionals and fostering team approaches to health-care delivery, the center will promote opportunities for engagement with external partners, and facilitate health instrumentation and commercialization. Pelli Clarke Pelli of New Haven, Conn., working with the local office of Stantec, a design/consulting firm, has been selected as the architect for the project. Although plans are preliminary, possible designs include a zigzag building resembling a lightning bolt, with glassy lobbies converging in a central, multi-story atrium. No stranger to Cleveland, the Pelli firm designed KeyCorp Tower on Public Square, as well as five Cleveland Clinic buildings. Established in 1977 and led by the former dean of the School of Architecture at Yale University, the firm also has designed some of the world’s most iconic buildings, including the Petronas Tower in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the World Financial Center in New York, and the International Finance Centre in Hong Kong.


VIKING HALL DEMOLITION

PHOTO BY JOHN SOEDER

It once was the site of a Holiday Inn, often housing performers as they passed through town for shows at PlayhouseSquare. Then CSU purchased the property at East 22nd Street and Euclid Avenue, and the former hotel became Viking Hall, providing a home to students for 24 years. Now the wrecking ball has reduced to rubble the residence hall and the adjacent Wolfe Music Building. But from the dust and debris will rise CSU’s Center for Health Innovation, slated to open in 2015.

Highly visible in the heart of CSU’s campus, the $45 million Center for Health Innovation will sit directly across Euclid Avenue from the Student Center. CSU sold bonds to finance $35 million of the cost; NEOMED has contributed $10 million. In addition to classrooms, the center will have joint-use facilities such as simulation labs and examination rooms,

dedicated space for interdisciplinary research, and more. Construction is expected to begin this fall. “The Center for Health Innovation will be a dynamic showcase that will enable Cleveland State to be a leader in a fully integrated approach to medical and health-care education,” notes President Berkman.  Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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UNION BUILDING,1836 EUCLID AVENUE

GRAND OPENING OF THE UNION BUILDING

HISTORIC UNION BUILDING HOME TO NEOMED ACADEMIC CAMPUS A historic Cleveland building, once falling into disrepair so severe that pigeons made the vacant floors their home, has been brought back to life by a public-private partnership led by Cleveland State. The restored Union Building, at 1836 Euclid Avenue, is the newest addition to the University’s growing downtown footprint. The building is home to a number of CSU units, including the CSU Foundation, University Advancement, Enrollment Services, the Registrar and Treasury Services offices, and Health and Wellness Services. In addition, two floors serve as the academic campus for the Urban Primary Care Initiative, a joint educational partnership between CSU and Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) to train primary care physicians for urban areas. CSU partnered with Liberty Development Company of Westlake and Arkinetics, a Cleveland architectural firm, to save the Union 20

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Building. Funding from private sources and state and federal historic tax credits helped make the $22 million renovation a reality. CSU is leasing the building from owner Liberty Development. While the eight-story structure was gutted and completely renovated, many original features were salvaged. These include the lobby’s decorative arched ceiling, ornamental iron railing, terrazzo staircases and corridors, and the terra cotta façade. Both CSU President Ronald M. Berkman and NEOMED President Jay A. Gershen are pleased that their joint educational initiative has a campus home. “Our first class of 35 students will live and learn here,” said President Berkman. “Our vision is to transform the way medicine is practiced in urban areas. We are providing opportunities for students who might only have imagined that one day they could be a doctor.” Dr. Gershen noted that the CSU/NEOMED initiative addresses a critical health-care issue

– how to diversify the workforce to provide better medical care to underserved urban and rural areas. In addition, the initiative will help reduce crushing student loans through unique features like Education for Service, which will provide tuition dollars for physicians who agree to work in the Cleveland area for five years. NEOMED’s space on floors six and seven includes offices, conference rooms, classrooms and simulated patient training rooms. Built in 1913, the Union Building was originally six stories high. Two years later, a south wing was built and in 1917, two upper floors were added. The 85,000-square-foot structure still retains its unique “T” shape, with north and south wings connected by a central link. CSU’s repurposing of the historic site brings new life to a spot on Euclid Avenue that had been largely abandoned – part of a continuing effort to create a thriving living and learning neighborhood in the heart of downtown Cleveland. 


 In an editorial, the Plain Dealer praised the STEM campus at CSU, saying “The partnership between Cleveland State University and the Cleveland schools just keeps getting better and better. Now the college and school district are upping the ante in a big way, with a $1.25 million grant from the KeyBank Foundation to move 11th- and 12th-graders in the MC2STEM High School to CSU’s campus. The concept earns a solid A.” RHODES TOWER, FUTURE HOME OF STEM

GRANT SUPPORTS HIGH SCHOOL STEM EDUCATION AT CSU Juniors and seniors at Cleveland’s MC2STEM High School for science, technology, engineering and math will soon relocate to the Cleveland State campus, thanks to a $1.25 million grant from KeyBank Foundation. The grant enables the Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) and CSU to create a joint campus for 11th- and 12th-grade STEM students by funding renovations to Rhodes Tower. Upgraded facilities on the second and third floors will include renovated classrooms, laboratories and a fabrication lab, or FabLab, where computers and production equipment are linked through sophisticated technology that allows students to create objects based on their own designs. In addition to funding renovations, KeyBank Foundation’s grant provides scholarship support for students intending to take early college courses and enroll at CSU. It also includes budget support for CSU to provide professional development opportunities for STEM teachers, as well as graduate student support. “We are thankful to KeyBank Foundation for continued support of innovative educational programs and pathways to college for Cleveland students. The creation of the MC2 partnership would not be possible without this gift and the commitment of our faculty to the mission of preparing a new generation of students to succeed in college,” said President Ronald M. Berkman. STEM students will be on campus this fall, and perhaps as early as summer. MC2STEM High School, which offers a special curriculum emphasizing science, technology, engineering and math, has demonstrated significant success in preparing students for

higher education. Its goal is to immerse high school students in a college environment, to

and faculty from both institutions. Innovative partnerships between CSU and

better prepare them for enrollment at a fouryear university. MC2STEM recently graduated its first class; 100 percent of those graduates enrolled at a university. Students must apply to attend the school. Currently, ninth-grade students at MC2 attend classes at the Great Lakes Science Center, while 10th-graders are taught at GE Lighting’s Nela Park campus in East Cleveland. Juniors and seniors have been attending class at the school district’s Health Careers building on East 32nd Street. MC2 can accommodate 100 students at each grade level. Officials hope moving the upper grades to CSU will increase student retention as well as the number of students who take college classes. Through a state program, those classes are free to students, but count for high school and college credit. Students from the CSUTeach program for prospective high school math and science teachers will be involved in the new collaboration, working with the high school STEM students. Cleveland schools CEO Eric Gordon notes that “long-standing partnerships maintained with KeyBank and CSU have been instrumental in our ability to expand our high-performing school choices in Cleveland. Support from our business and higher education communities provides additional momentum for the implementation of the Cleveland Plan that complements levy support from citizens to propel us toward our transformation goals.” Both Gordon and President Berkman said the STEM partnership will immerse students in a college environment and prepare them for higher education and careers, while also facilitating collaborations between students

the Cleveland schools are nothing new. In 2010, the two collaborated to create Campus International School, an academically rigorous school that currently serves students in kindergarten through fourth grade. Adding one grade per year, CIS will eventually educate students through 12th grade. With a waiting list of parents eager to enroll their children, CIS has proven so popular that it has already outgrown its original location and moved to Cole Center on the CSU campus this past fall. KeyBank Foundation is a strong supporter of STEM education at CMSD. In 2011, the Foundation awarded $700,000 to CMSD to fund STEM programming and support services at six elementary and middle schools in the district. In total, KeyBank Foundation has awarded CMSD more than $2.5 million to support STEM education initiatives. Key also will donate 1,900 computers to CMSD for use in classrooms and computer labs across the district. “We are proud to invest in a partnership that we believe holds great value for Northeast Ohio as it prepares students for success in education and for advanced careers in a modern workforce,” said KeyBank Chairman and CEO Beth Mooney. “In addition to offering a curriculum that prepares students for higher education, we are introducing them to a college environment, which contributes to a smoother transition after they graduate from high school,” added Margot Copeland, executive vice president and chair of KeyBank Foundation. “And, because the STEM disciplines are so rigorous, they prepare students not only to enroll in a four-year college but also to graduate.”  Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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COLLEGES

SCHOOL OF NURSING

To learn more, visit www.csuohio.edu/nursing

Nursing Leads Mentoring Project to Better Serve Medicaid Population

Getting to a doctor when you have no transportation . . . buying fresh fruits and vegetables when no grocery store is nearby . . . these are among the many challenges that Medicaid recipients face daily. Now assistance is on the way to Cleveland’s Central neighborhood, one of the city’s poorest areas where 55 percent of the population receives Medicaid. The School of Nursing is leading the Medicaid Technical Assistance and Policy Program (MEDTAPP) Health Care Mentor Project, designed to address the shortage of healthcare providers to the Medicaid population. The project is recruiting 50 mentors to work with 50 undergraduate and graduate student mentees from the Schools of Nursing and Social Work to increase service delivery efficiency and improve access for Medicaid-enrolled residents of the Central neighborhood. The School of Nursing was awarded approximately $212,000 in federal MEDTAPP funds secured by the Office of Medical Assistance/ Ohio Medicaid to support the first year of the project. Mentors are nurses and social workers who are currently working primarily in the Central neighborhood with Medicaid clients. Mentees are students in their final semester at CSU who are interested in pediatrics, family health and mental 22

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health. Mentees are working with their mentors on active cases. Participants are required to attend weekly mentor/mentee meetings to discuss client care issues, as well as monthly Saturday meetings that address learning needs related to providing care to the Medicaid population. Mentees will be asked to commit to working with the Medicaid population for one year after graduation. In exchange for participation in the project, mentors and mentees receive a small stipend and access to mobile devices to help them analyze project data remotely and participate in online e-mentoring groups. Partners in the project include the School of Social Work, Sisters of Charity Foundation, St. Vincent Charity Medical Center, CareSource, Care Alliance, The MetroHealth System, University Hospitals, Northeast Ohio Medical University (NEOMED) and the Cleveland Metropolitan School District. CSU’s MEDTAPP Health Care Mentor Project seeks to increase and retain the number of health-care practitioners working with Medicaid populations, facilitate interdisciplinary collaboration on health-care issues related to servicing the Medicaid population, and foster readiness and knowledge of entry-level healthcare practitioners to meet the needs of the Medicaid population. 


 COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS To learn more, visit www.csuohio.edu/sciences

Researcher Studies Diet and Aging He’s not turning back the hands of time. But Roman Kondratov, assistant professor of biological, geological and environmental sciences, is exploring ways to manipulate the internal timekeeping system to delay the aging process and extend lifespan. More specifically, Dr. Kondratov is studying the effects of circadian rhythms (an internal clock) on aging under certain dietary restrictions. Circadian clocks have long been known to govern daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Over the last decade, research has revealed a genetically determined time-keeping mechanism that functions as a key regulator of metabolism, cardiovascular physiology, and the immune and stress response systems. Yet the intersection of circadian rhythms and aging has remained largely unexplored. A leader in the field, Dr. Kondratov has been instrumental in establishing the connection between aging and the circadian system, finding

that circadian disruption accelerates aging, while a strong robust clock is associated with increased longevity. His recent research on the molecular mechanisms of metabolism and aging has found that calorie restriction significantly affects circadian rhythms in gene expression and that a functional circadian clock is necessary for lifespan extension. The ultimate goal is to develop a rational strategy to delay aging through daily dietary regimes. With a better understanding of circadian rhythms, Dr. Kondratov’s work may suggest ways to manage the circadian clock through diet or pharmaceutical manipulations, thereby preventing age-related diseases such as heart disease or osteoporosis, and promoting healthy aging. Dr. Kondratov’s lab at CSU has received funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American Heart Association, and recently received

DR. ROMAN KONDRATOV

a grant of more than $1.4 million from the National Institute on Aging. His research is part of CSU’s Center for Gene Regulation in Health and Disease, which focuses on research to improve understanding of biological processes and how the malfunction of those processes results in various diseases. The center was funded by the Ohio Department of Development’s Third Frontier program and has received more than $6 million from the NIH in the past year. 

CLEVELAND-MARSHALL COLLEGE OF LAW To learn more, visit www.law.csuohio.edu

Professor Advises FAA on Private Space Travel Mark J. Sundahl, a space law expert who teaches one of the nation’s few courses on the subject at C|M|LAW, has been appointed to the Federal Aviation Administration’s Commercial Space Transportation Advisory Committee. The group advises the Office of Commercial Space Transportation within the FAA on developing new regulations governing commercial human spaceflight – a growing enterprise. “The law is lagging a little behind the technology, so the FAA is creating regulations to ensure that space-tourism companies meet certain standards,” explains Dr. Sundahl. “They’ll need to have an atmosphere that sustains life and a properly trained crew. And they’ll need to inform passengers

about the dangers of space flight.” Suborbital space-tourism flights now cost from $150,000 to $200,000. Dr. Sundahl expects the price to drop to $50,000, putting the experience within reach of more people. An associate professor and associate dean of administration at C|M|LAW who holds both a JD and Ph.D., Dr. Sundahl focuses primarily on the business, legal, and policy issues arising from the increase in private space activity. He recently completed a term as assistant secretary of the International Institute of Space Law in Paris, and was the co-coordinator of the 2012 Colloquium on the Law of Outer Space in Naples, Italy.  Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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COLLEGES

MAXINE GOODMAN LEVIN COLLEGE OF URBAN AFFAIRS To learn more, visit http://urban.csuohio.edu

Levin Partners with South China University of Technology

The Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs is expanding its international reach through a new partnership with South China University of Technology (SCUT). An agreement signed in October will make it possible for SCUT students to complete some of their academic program at CSU and receive joint degrees from both universities. The new arrangement is the culmination of two years’ work by Edward (Ned) Hill, Levin College dean; Haifeng Qian, Levin College assistant professor; and Yizhong Zhu, a SCUT professor. The relationship with SCUT evolved after Dr.

Zhu spent time at Levin College and then helped connect CSU and her home university. Drs. Hill and Qian visited China twice to work on the joint program. “This new partnership provides an opportunity for students and faculty of both institutions to gain experience that can benefit themselves and their home cities,” says Dr. Hill, who has been appointed an adjunct professor of public administration at SCUT. “South China University of Technology is located in Guangzhou, China – the first Chinese city to go through economic transition. Officials there believe

much can be learned from Northeast Ohio,” he continues. “In turn, it is important for our urban affairs students and faculty to be exposed to one of the largest economies in the world. We have a unique opportunity to learn from those who come here to study and from studying in China.” The student exchange program begins this fall. “Through academics, research and community involvement, Levin College is advancing effective city management and sound urban policy,” Dean Hill adds. “We are honored to welcome colleagues and students from South China.” 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES To learn more, visit www.csuohio.edu/cehs

Educational Center Reaches Out to Community The Community Learning Center for Children and Youth (CLC) provides an engaged learning experience for CSU education students while performing a valuable public service. Every Monday through Friday year-round, Julka Hall opens its doors to provide free assessment and tutoring services for children from pre-K through high school who are having difficulties with reading, math, or learning in general. Even adults are welcome. The CLC is an integral part of CSU’s teachereducation program, enabling undergraduate and graduate students to interact with children and parents from diverse backgrounds. Each semester, students pursuing licenses and/or degrees in education explore the links between research, 24

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theory and practice as they hone their skills at the CLC, putting into action the teaching methods and instructional strategies they will one day use in their own classrooms. Over the course of a year, some 7,400 youngsters use the CLC. Most come once a week for a tutoring session that lasts 30 to 60 minutes; others come more often. Parents, too, take part in workshops and programs designed for them. “Children who come to the CLC often say ‘we’re going to college.’ Perhaps one day, thanks to the educational boost they received here, they will enroll at CSU,” says Kristine Still, CLC co-director and associate professor of teacher education. For more information or to register for CLC services, call 216-687-4768. 


 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

To learn more, visit www.csuohio.edu/class

Exhibition, Lecture Series Highlight the Renaissance

Cleveland State and the Cleveland Museum of Art are co-sponsoring a series of five lectures in conjunction with the Caporali Missal exhibition. For details on the March, April and May lectures, visit www.csuohio.edu/class

MISSAL, FROM THE CONVENT OF SAN FRANCESCO, MONTONE, NEAR PERUGIA. 1469, ILLUMINATIONS BY BARTOLOMEO CAPORALI (ITALIAN, PERUGIA C.1420-1505) AND GIAPECO CAPORALI (ITALIAN, PERUGIA, DIED 1474). BOUND MANUSCRIPT, 35 X 25 CM, THE CLEVELAND MUSEUM OF ART, JOHN L. SEVERANCE FUND, 2006.154.

The Caporali Missal, a little-known but historically significant illuminated manuscript, is shedding new light on the Renaissance. The manuscript is the centerpiece of a Cleveland Museum of Art (CMA) exhibit, The Caporali Missal: a Masterpiece of Renaissance Illumination, running through June 2. Cleveland State is partnering with CMA on a five-part lecture series in conjunction with the exhibit, as well as on the show catalogue. Revered as both a work of art and an object of ritual, the well-preserved missal differs from other Renaissance manuscripts because it provides exact information about its origins. A colophon, or inscription, on page 400 reveals that the missal was commissioned by a Franciscan friary, the Church of San Francesco di Montone

near Perugia in Italy’s Umbria region, and was completed on October 4, 1469. It was written by Henricus Haring and illustrated by brothers Bartolomeo and Giapeco Caporali, well-known artists of that era. Of primary interest are the illustrations, or illuminations, including what scholars call a masterpiece – a lush, two-page Calvary scene and elaborately decorated letter T, for Te igitur, the first words of the canon. “The missal is gorgeous, with colors so stunning and brilliant, the illuminations actually appear to glow,” says Matt Jackson-McCabe, CSU associate professor and chair of religious studies, who has not only seen, but touched, the precious pages. A liturgical service book, the missal was used on the church altar by priests who recited and

sang its contents during Mass. “This is a very rich artifact, and the exhibition and lecture series are rich with educational opportunities,” notes Dr. Jackson-McCabe. In addition to the Caporali Missal, the exhibition contains related works of art on loan from museums worldwide. CSU classes are visiting the exhibit; Stephen Fliegel, CMA curator of medieval art, is guest lecturing to students; interdisciplinary seminars are planned; and more. “With its fantastic collections, CMA offers a unique classroom to our students,” says Dr. Jackson-McCabe. “With this exhibit, two great Cleveland institutions – CSU and CMA – are coming together in what we hope is a long and fruitful partnership.”  Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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FENN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING To learn more, visit www.csuohio.edu/engineering

Co-op Connects Employers, Engineers

For years, engineering students have jumpstarted their professional careers through cooperative education experiences. Now, with a full-time co-op coordinator on board, the Fenn College of Engineering is revitalizing its program with the vision of offering the best co-op program in the state and one of the best in the nation. “We plan to significantly increase student participation, develop industry relationships, and offer scholarships, guidance, faculty mentorship and recognition for participants to make our 26

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

program more robust,” says Sandra English, co-op coordinator. Fenn co-op is a structured, accredited program that provides engineering students with the tools they need for successful careers by integrating classroom studies with paid, real-life work experiences. Students make a five-year commitment, receiving up to a full year of practical engineering experience while alternating semesters of work and study. While on the job, they meet with a faculty mentor

and document how their classroom knowledge relates to their work. By the time they graduate, students have completed a minimum of three semesters of co-op. More often than not, they’ve fit in so well that they are offered full-time positions by their co-op employer. Through the years, cop-op partners have included NASA, Rockwell Automation, Lubrizol, MTD, First Energy, Sherwin-Williams, Lincoln Electric, ODOT, and others. 


 COLLEGE OF GRADUATE STUDIES To learn more, visit www.csuohio.edu/gradcollege

Engineering Student Receives NSF Fellowship Ali Borazjani, a doctoral student in the Fenn College of Engineering, was a 2012 recipient of the prestigious National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Over three years, this fellowship will provide him with an annual stipend of $30,000, as well as opportunities for international research, professional development and access to the TeraGrid supercomputer, the world’s largest and fastest integrated network for scientific research. CSU also receives a $12,000 cost-of-education allowance. Borazjani, a native of Mississippi, holds undergraduate degrees in bioengineering and biological sciences from Mississippi State University. He enrolled at CSU in 2011 as a Ph.D.

student in applied biomedical engineering, a joint doctoral program between Cleveland State and the Cleveland Clinic. He applied for the NSF fellowship on the advice of his research mentor at the Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute, where he is studying female urology and urogynecology. Borazjani is the chief technology officer of Innometrix, a biomedical engineering firm that he co-founded. He also is the president and co-founder of Global Solutions in Reproductive Healthcare, a nonprofit organization whose mission is to reduce reproductive health disparities in Third World and developing countries. He will enroll in medical school following the completion of his Ph.D. 

MONTE AHUJA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS To learn more, visit www.csuohio.edu/business

Wins Reflect Excellence

Quality programs, faculty and students are a hallmark of the Monte Ahuja College of Business. Most recently: U.S. News & World Report ranked the new Mobile Accelerated MBA program 57th in the nation for online graduate business programs. Faculty credentials and teaching, one of the ratings criteria, ranked 12th. Students receive Apple’s iPad 4G, where all course materials and e-textbooks can be accessed. They complete the accelerated program in one year. Course requirements, such a quizzes and tests, are

completed online through an e-learning platform. Raj Javalgi, associate dean for research and strategic initiatives and director of the Doctor of Business Administration program, received the Ahuja Professor of Research Award. The award is based on a faculty member’s original research published and/or accepted during the last five years. Dr. Javalgi’s articles were published in Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, Journal of Business Research, International Business Review and Journal of World Business – all recognized as prestigious journals by the academic community.

MBA student Niki Zmij won the Business Pitch competition sponsored by the Council of Smaller Enterprises and JumpStart’s Student Business Idea competition. Zmij is working with Professor Majid Rashidi and Terry Thiele, director of sustainable product strategies at Lubrizol Corporation, to commercialize Dr. Rashidi’s wind amplification system. She founded her own company, Amplified Wind Solutions, and hopes to make this venture the first of many start-ups in her career. 

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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Around

CAMPUS

SAM SHEPPARD ARCHIVES

INFAMOUS CASE LIVES ON AT CSU • On July 4, 1954, the beaten body of Marilyn Sheppard was found in the bedroom of her Bay Village home.

the failure of the presiding judge to sequester jurors and shield them from media bias.

• On Dec. 17, 1954, her husband, Dr. Sam Sheppard, was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison.

• In 1966, Sheppard was retried and found not guilty. He died on April 6, 1970.

• In a 1966 appeal, the U.S. Supreme Court determined that Sheppard was denied due process and had an unfair trial, mainly due to the media circus that permeated the original trial and

F

or nearly 60 years, the Sam Sheppard case has captured the interest and imagination of the public worldwide. Now all documentation pertaining to the infamous case – including photos, exhibits and transcripts – resides at the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law and will be made available to the public. Some 60 plastic crates and cardboard boxes overflowing with the treasure trove of Sheppard material were delivered to the College in late September. It was the last official act of former Cuyahoga County prosecutor Bill Mason, who wanted to ensure the materials pertaining to three Sheppard trials remained intact for posterity. Until then, the archives had been kept under lock and key in a county vault. C|M|LAW, which submitted a proposal for the archives, was selected over the Smithsonian Institution, among other bidders. Since then, four librarians have been painstakingly sorting and cataloging the materials dating back to 1954. They’re also trying hard to not become immersed in Cleveland’s most 28

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• In 1996, Sheppard’s son filed a wrongful imprisonment lawsuit. On April 12, 2000, after a 12-week trial, a jury decided against the estate. Higher courts declined to hear appeals.

notorious murder case, but the information is compelling. The inventory includes crime scene, autopsy and exhumation photos, scrapbooks filled with news stories, trial exhibits (including a model of Marilyn Sheppard’s head), video tapes, DVDs, depositions, transcripts, letters written by the public offering theories on the case, and more. The materials, now housed in the Special Collections area, will be organized into searchable categories, digitized, and made available online to researchers and the general public. The College may also set up a traveling exhibit and host symposia on legal issues related to the case. Already, the public is eager for a look. “Researchers, journalists, teachers, lawyers and people who are simply curious want to see this collection,” says Kristina Niedringhaus, law library director. “There are many legal issues surrounding the Sheppard ‘trial by newspaper’ and the civil cases that followed. We are proud that these materials have been entrusted to a public institution where it all happened.” 


APPLAUDING THE ARTS

THE FINE ARTS ARE THRIVING AT CLEVELAND STATE

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ith a new Arts Campus in partnership with PlayhouseSquare and Cleveland Play House, theatre and dance students are performing alongside professionals onstage at the Allen Theatre, while visual arts students are finding inspiration from majestic studio views in the Middough Building.

THE GALLERIES AT CSU PEOPLE’S ART SHOW

With The Galleries at CSU, artists are exhibiting their creative

January 18, to March 2, 2013

works in a magnificent new space.

ANIMATOPOEIA: A MOST PECULIAR (POST MODERN) BESTIARY

With the Dr. John A. Flower WCLV Faculty Concert Series, the late CSU president emeritus is being remembered through beautiful music. And so much more.

THE GALLERIES AT CSU ANIMATOPOEIA: A MOST PECULIAR (POST MODERN) BESTIARY – a thematic exhibition of works by 19 internationally recognized artists in various media, exploring animal imagery in contemporary art, curated by art student Omid Tavakoli

Visit www.csuohio.edu/class/artscalendar for upcoming events and join the audiences that are applauding the arts at CSU.

InThe

RedBrown and

Water

ALLEN THEATRE AT PLAYHOUSESQUARE STUDENT DANCE/THEATRE PRODUCTIONS, THE RED AND BROWN WATER AND A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM, BOLLYWOOD STYLE Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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Advancement

NEWS

2012 RADIANCE MOMENTS 30

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RADIANCE

CSU REALIZING THE PROMISE RADIANCE, CSU REALIZING THE PROMISE IS GROWING IN 2013 – GROWING ITS SCHOLARSHIP FUNDRAISING GOAL TO $750,000

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proven winner, Radiance brought in $504,300 last year, providing scholarships for nearly 200 undergraduates at risk for dropping out of school

because of finances, and enabling them to stay in school and progress toward their degrees. The first Radiance in 2011 raised $377,000. The third-annual Radiance promises to be another spectacular celebration – with some new twists to add to the fun. The business casual, cocktail/hors d’oeuvres reception with short program will be held Friday, May 10, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. in CSU’s Student Center. Long-time University supporters Trevor and Jennie Jones will be honored with the President’s Medal. Jones is a former CSU PATSY AND RONALD M. BERKMAN AT LAST YEAR’S EVENT

trustee; his wife is a well-known Cleveland photographer who donated the collection of her works to CSU’s Michael Schwartz Library. Together, they chaired CSU’s Moses Cleaveland scholarship fundraising event, forerunner to Radiance. You’re invited to join us for this celebration of scholarships, students and donors.

JENNIE AND TREVOR JONES, 2013 HONOREES

For sponsorship information and tickets, contact the CSU Foundation at 216-523-7207 or visit www.csuohio.edu/radiance Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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NEWS

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS

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ome 500 guests could hardly believe the “ballroom” was actually the basketball court at Wolstein Center. But with some sheer, billowing curtains, carpeting, candlelight and a few more strategic accoutrements, the transformation was complete. And dazzling. The capacity crowd was on hand for Cleveland State’s 22nd annual Distinguished Alumni Awards, sponsored

by the University and its Alumni Association as part of Homecoming 2012 festivities. Nine outstanding graduates were honored for their service, leadership and career achievements, with proceeds from the event benefitting student scholarships. Since the awards program began, 169 graduates have been recognized. 

CONGRATULATIONS, 2012 DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD RECIPIENTS MONTE AHUJA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

COLLEGE OF SCIENCES AND HEALTH PROFESSIONS

President, Mayfran Holdings, Inc., Mayfran International

Corporate Officer and Senior Vice President, Human Resources Sherwin-Williams Company, Inc.

WILLIAM J. CENTA, 1977 MBA

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

DANIEL J. KEENAN JR., PH.D., 2005 PH.D., URBAN EDUCATION Superintendent, Westlake City School District

FENN COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

GEORGE J. PALKO, 1988 BS, CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1993 MBA President & CEO, The Great Lakes Construction Co.

CLEVELAND-MARSHALL COLLEGE OF LAW

THOMAS E. HOPKINS, 1982 MA, PSYCHOLOGY

MAXINE GOODMAN LEVIN COLLEGE OF URBAN AFFAIRS

ERIN DEE HUBER, 2009 BS, ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, 2011 MSUS Founder and Executive Director, Drink Local. Drink Tap.

SCHOOL OF NURSING

SHEILA A. NILES, MSN, RN, CS, 1984 BS, NURSING Healthcare Consultant and Educator

LARRY H. JAMES, 1977 JD

THE GEORGE B. DAVIS AWARD

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SOCIAL SCIENCES

1999 HONORARY DOCTOR OF LAWS Former President, Cuyahoga County Board of County Commissioners

Partner, Crabbe, Brown & James, LLP

DR. RUTH D. PETERSON, 1969 BA, SOCIOLOGY, 1973 MA, SOCIOLOGY Professor Emeritus of Sociology, The Ohio State University

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TIMOTHY F. HAGAN, 1975 BA, URBAN STUDIES,


 HOMECOMING WEEKEND

MEMORABLE MOMENTS HOMECOMING WEEKEND

ALUMNI COME HOME TO MAKE NEW MEMORIES “Successful homecomings reflect universities that have come of age and are held in the highest regard by their alumni, faculty, staff and students. Truly, Cleveland State University has reached this milestone. Our homecoming created engagement, kindled warm memories, and strengthened connections to help build our future.”

— President Berkman

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leveland State University’s Homecoming Weekend 2012 was a family reunion that brought hundreds of alumni back to campus. The fun-filled and nostalgic weekend had a little something for everyone, including: • The Distinguished Alumni Awards program that honored nine outstanding graduates and brought more than 500 guests to the Wolstein Center; • Lunch with President Ronald M. and Patsy Berkman, a sold-out event that sparked Viking spirit in everyone from 1943 alumna Alice Ladanyi to youngsters from Village Preparatory School who performed a special CSU cheer; • College events which showcased CSU’s academic program, faculty and students; • The first homecoming parade since 1966, led by grand marshals President Berkman and Cleveland Mayor Frank Jackson, a three-time CSU alumnus; • Reunion events for the Classes of 1962 (50th anniversary), 1987 (25th anniversary), 2002 (10th anniversary) and 2007 (fifth anniversary); • A tailgate party and Viking Madness to kick off the basketball season; • A concert that rocked students and a few hearty alums until the wee hours of the morning, and much more. 

Homecoming 2013 will be the weekend of October 18. Mark your calendar and plan to attend! Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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SPORTS

TWO TEAMS WIN CHAMPIONSHIPS

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ongratulations to the women's volleyball and men's soccer teams. Both enjoyed stellar seasons, winning Horizon League championships and participating in National Collegiate Athletic

Association (NCAA) tournament play. Volleyball highlights included a school-record 13 consecutive winning matches, the fourth consecutive season of 20 or more wins, and the first NCAA tournament

play since 2007. In soccer, it was a first-ever Horizon League championship and first NCAA tournament play since 1980. In addition, goalkeeper Brad Stuver was selected by the Montreal

GERALD HARRIS

WALLY MORTON

Impact in the 2013 Major League Soccer SuperDraft. Volleyball coach Chuck Voss and soccer coach Ali Kazemaini were named Horizon League Coach of the Year in their respective sports. 

HALL OF FAMERS INDUCTED

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ongratulations to the 37th class of inductees into the Cleveland State Athletics Hall of Fame: Jamie Bouyer, volleyball, 2001-04; Gerald Harris, wrestling, 1999-03; Blake New, soccer, 1986-89; Tiffany Stocker, softball, 1999-02; and Wally Morton, swimming and diving, 1981-present. Bouyer is the career record-holder in kills (1,626), hitting percentage (.339), block assists (485), total blocks (558), points (2,033.5) and points per set (4.59). Her hitting percentage, block assists and total blocks are also Horizon League records. Wrestler Harris was a three-time NCAA qualifier for the Vikings, as well as the Eastern Wrestling League champion in 2003. He holds CSU records for career wins (118), single season wins (40) and single season dual-meet victories (18). Soccer player New still holds program records for goals against 34

CSUOHIO.EDU Cleveland State University

average (1.04), shutouts (29), and games started by a goalkeeper (68). New led the Vikings to their first-ever league championship in 1986. A four-year letter-winner in softball, Stocker is the Horizon League career leader with 132 stolen bases, and tops the CSU career record book in at-bats (679) and stolen base attempts (158). Morton began his CSU swimming and diving career in 1974 as aquatics director and assistant coach with the men’s program. He was named head coach of the men’s team in 1981 and took over the women’s program in 2007. The most successful coach in program history, Morton has amassed more than 300 wins, while leading five student-athletes to the NCAA Championships and leading the 2005-06 team to the league title. He has earned nine Horizon League Coach of the Year awards. 

BLAKE NEW

TIFFANY STOCKER

JAMIE BOUYER


Class

NOTES

1950s

■ FRANK SCARPITTI, BA ’58, is the Edward F. and Elizabeth Goodman Rosenberg Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of Delaware and recently presented a lecture recounting his career as an academic and author at the school.

1960s

■ DONALD NOVAK, BS ’62, is a retired teacher and guidance counselor. He lives in Fort Myers, Fla. ■ THOMAS J. SCANLON, JD ’63, was named to the Irish Voice newspaper’s Class of the Irish Legal 100, a list of accomplished lawyers who are Irish-Americans. An attorney with Collins & Scanlon LLP in downtown Cleveland, he and other honorees were invited to a reception at the home of the Irish ambassador to the United States.

1970s

■ DENNIS H. CONGOS, BA ’72, published his second book, Starting Out in Community College. His first book, in 2011, was Starting Out in College. The Orlando resident is a learning skills specialist at the University of Central Florida. ■ LYNN T. DOSTAL, MBA ’73, earned permanent certification as an exceptional student education teacher. He teaches middle-school students and lives in Homosassa, Fla. ■ STEVE SENT, BA ’75, qualified as an affiliate member of the United States Professional Tennis Registry. ■ PETER F. FRENCH, MSUS ’76, teaches criminal justice and general education classes at Remington College’s Cleveland West Campus. His 35-year career in criminal justice includes serving as a probation officer, supervisor and member of the Mayor of Cleveland’s Re-Entry Task Force at the Bureau of Prisons Halfway House in Cleveland, and community resource specialist for the Northern District of Ohio’s Justice Department. ■ MARK BARNES, BSCE ’77, is the author of Role Reversal: Achieving Uncommonly Excellent Results in the Student-Centered Classroom. A teacher for 20 years, he is the creator of the Results Only Learning Environment, a student-centered classroom that eliminates all traditional teaching methods, including grades. ■ MELISSA BALLARD, BA ’77 and MA ’79, a writer and faculty member at Oberlin College, established a scholarship for first-generation students at CSU. ■ MARTY IGNASIAK, BSIE ’78, is the founder and owner of Connectors Unlimited Inc., which received GE Healthcare’s 2012 Appreciation Award for Outstanding Performance and Dedication in the Area of Innovation. ■ CAROLE BALLARD, BA ’79, is a social worker for the Cuyahoga County Board of Alcohol,

 Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services. ■ DANIEL LEE, BSEE ’79, was named a Fellow by the International Society of Automation and received the 2012 Achievement Award from its Power Industry Division for his work in applications in plant-wide automation of industrial and large fossil-fired power plants. He designated his honorarium to be awarded as a scholarship to a CSU engineering student. DONALD NOVAK, BS ’62

1980s

■ CHRISTINE A. HUDAK, MEd ’80 and Ph.D. ’98, is a professor of health informatics in the School of Library and Information Science at Kent State University. ■ JOE MACKALL, BA ’82, presented a reading as part of a Working Writers series at the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts. Dr. Mackall is director of the creative writing program and an English faculty member at Ashland University, and the author of Plain Secrets: An Outsider Among the Amish, and The Last Street Before Cleveland: An Accidental Pilgrimage. ■ KATHY SCHWARTZER, BBA ’82, was named director of finance and business systems for NASCORP, LLC, a subsidiary of the National Association of College Stores. She lives in Westlake. ■ ROSA MARIA DELVECHIO, BA ’82 and MA ’84, was appointed a member of the editorial team at Cyberwit Publishers in India. ■ LOUIS NERONE, BSEE ’82, MSEE ’86 and DrEng ’95, is a principal engineer at General Electric Nela Park and holds more than 100 patents. He lives in Brecksville. ■ STEVE BELOVICH, MSEE ’83 and Ph.D. ’87, is a former Fenn College of Engineering faculty member and founder of IQware. The firm recently partnered with Hewlett Packard to develop a software applications development system for the healthcare industry. ■ JAMES “JAMIE” MILKOVICH, BA ’83 and MEd ’91, was named Division I Coach of the Year by the Greater Cleveland Wrestling Coaches and Officials Association and Lake Erie League Coach of the Year. He is in his 32nd year as a teacher and coach at Maple Heights High School. ■ KAREN JEWELL-KETT, BA ’84, retired after 35 years with CSU’s marketing department. A graphic designer, she most recently served as manager of creative services. The Bay Village resident has started a freelance design business and has an art studio in Lakewood. ■ CARTER STRANG, JD ’84, is president of the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association for 2012-13. A member of the ClevelandMarshall College of Law Alumni Association board, he is a partner with Tucker Ellis LLP. ■ DAVID J. QUOLKE, BA ’84, was elected vice president of the American Federation of Teachers at the 2012 AFT convention.

DENNIS H. CONGOS, BA ’72

CHRISTINE A. HUDAK, MEd ’80 and Ph.D. ’98

CARTER STRANG, JD ’84

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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Class

NOTES

LIOR (LAUREN) JACOBER, BA ’87

LISA RYAN, BBA ’95 and MBA ’98

SANDRA GOLDEN, MEd ’97 and MA ’00

■ TIM L. COLLINS, JD ’85, was named to the Irish Voice newspaper’s Class of the Irish Legal 100, a list of accomplished lawyers who are Irish-Americans. An attorney with Collins & Scanlon LLP in downtown Cleveland, he and other honorees were invited to a reception at the home of the Irish ambassador to the United States. ■ KEVIN GOODMAN, BA ’85, was named an American Red Cross of Greater Cleveland Hero for Community Volunteerism. He has raised more than $100,000 on behalf of the Northern Ohio Chapter of the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, where he serves as vice president of the board of trustees‘ executive committee. Goodman is the managing director of BlueBridge Networks, LLC. ■ ANTHONY MILLER, MEd ’86, joined the Physician Assistant Education Association as senior director of education policy and strategy. His nearly 35 years in the field include serving as a professor and director of physician assistant studies at Shenandoah University in Virginia. ■ WILLIAM ZURKEY, MMusic ’86, is director of choral activities at Avon Lake High School. He also is choral director for the new Cleveland Pops Chorus. ■ BERNARD “BUD” GUNDY, BA ’87, published his first book, Elf Gift. He is an Emmy Awardwinning producer for public television in San Francisco. ■ LIOR (LAUREN) JACOBER, BA ’87, teaches kindergarten through second grade at Oakland Hebrew Day School in California. ■ DAVID A. NOVAK JR., BSME ’87, was named director of service engineering and strategic projects for the Timken Company. ■ DWAYNE BRAY, BA ’88, is the senior coordinating producer of ESPN’s Enterprise Unit. His six-day series, “Football at a Crossroads,” reported on the dangers of participating in football at all levels. ■ SHAWN D. HOOD, BA ’88, is the varsity basketball coach at Westlake High School. He is a former Viking basketball player and former assistant to both the men’s and women’s basketball teams at CSU. ■ WILLIAM C. RIETER, BA ’88, is the chief photographer for the city of Cleveland. He was Cleveland State’s photographer for more than 20 years.

1990s

■ STEVE VARGO, JD ’90, placed third in his age group in the 2012 Eastern Ohio Time Trial Series, part of the Colavita-Zipp Time Trial Series. He is retired and lives in Columbus. ■ CHRISTINE MAUERSBERGER, BA ’92, is one of 20 artists in Cuyahoga County to receive a $20,000 award from the Creative Workforce Fellowship, a program of the Community Partnership for Arts and Culture, in recognition of her outstanding and innovative work. ■ DAVID A. DINUNZIO,

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BSME ’94, works in application engineering at Castrol Industrial North America. ■ CAVANA FAITHWALKER, BA ’94, is the poet laureate for Cleveland Heights. With the nonprofit group Heights Arts, she developed “Pop-Up Poetry” to bring free verse to the community and engage residents and visitors with the literary arts. ■ MICHELE STEVEN MAGER, BBA ’94, is a forensic accountant and terrorist financing coordinator for the U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Cleveland Field Division. In her spare time, the Amherst resident serves as director of the Lucina Slovak Folklore Ensemble of Cleveland, secretary of United Slovak Societies, and is a member of the board of directors for the American Slovak Club in Lorain. ■ HENRY YOUNG, BA ’94 and MACTM ’00, was promoted to associate professor of speech communication at Cuyahoga Community College. A tenured faculty member, he also is the honors program coordinator at Tri-C’s metropolitan campus. Young is a doctoral student in conflict analysis and resolution at Nova Southeastern University. ■ LISA RYAN, BBA ’95 and MBA ’98, released her fourth book, The Upside of Down Times: Discovering the Power of Gratitude. She was a featured extra in the movie The Keeper of the Keys. ■ LONNIE-SHARON WILLIAMS, BEd ’96, is a retired Cleveland teacher and the author of The Healings: Three Stories of Miraculous Healing from Scripture. ■ SONYA PRYOR-JONES, MEd ’97, is director of the Cleveland Central Promise Neighborhood Initiative, an anti-poverty program. She also has her own business, Sychronicity Consulting LLC. ■ SANDRA GOLDEN, MEd ’97 and MA ’00, received tenure and was promoted to associate professor of education at Defiance College. She also serves as associate provost of graduate studies and professional development. ■ ROGER GIDDEN, MEd ’98, earned a master’s degree in special education from the University of North Texas and is certified to teach. He lives in Carrollton, Texas. ■ MATTHEW K. HLAVIN, BA ’98, was included in Crain’s Cleveland Business’ 40 Under 40, recognizing young professionals who have made a mark on Northeast Ohio’s business community. He is president of Thogus Products Company and a member of the CSU Foundation board of directors. ■ BRYAN OSTROWSKI, BA ’98, is a global continuous improvement leader in human resources at Cargill Inc. in Minneapolis. ■ GRETCHEN L. SCHULER, BA ’98, was included in Crain’s Cleveland Business’ 40 Under 40, recognizing young professionals who have made a mark on Northeast Ohio’s business community. She is vice president of insurance risk management and technical documentation at Invacare Co.


 and a member of the Mount Union University board of trustees. ■ SANDRA HAYS-FLYNN, BA ’99, is a patient education coordinator for the Cleveland Clinic’s Sydell and Arnold Miller Family Heart & Vascular Institute. ■ MICHAEL A. PETROCHUK, DBA ’99, graduated from Bexley Hall Episcopal Seminary and was ordained to the transitional diaconate. He is director of the MBA program and professor of business at Walsh University in Canton, Ohio.

2000s

■ KENTON GRIMES, BA ’00, and his wife started their own company, Kinetic Ideas & Concepts. Their first product is a mount that magnetically holds an iPad to a metallic surface. ■ SCOTT LONGERT, MA ’00, is a park guide at the James A. Garfield National Historic Site in Mentor. ■ DINA FERRER, BA ’00 and MEd ’06, was recognized by Leadership Lorain County as a Difference Maker for 2013. The coordinator of Lorain County Community College’s Learning Center is also president of the Lorain Rotary, and co-founder of Students Taking a Renewed Interest in the Value of Education. ■ LEON T. MASON, BA ’02, was the keynote speaker for the Lorain branch of the NAACP’s Freedom Fund banquet. He is a grant coordinator for U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown. ■ LEE CHILCOTE III, MA ’02 and MPA ’03, is a news editor for Fresh Water, a weekly e-magazine and website that reports on technology, innovation, diversity, food and entrepreneurship in and around Cleveland. ■ ASHLEE McLAUGHLIN, BA ’02 and JD ’06, is Council president for the village of Linndale, Ohio, and an attorney specializing in felony criminal matters. ■ TRICIA HEISE CRANE, BA ’04, is minister of youth and music at Divinity Lutheran Church in Parma Heights. She also works with the church’s popular praise band, Chosen. ■ DREW KOPAS, BA ‘05, is an actor who recently appeared as Archidamus in The Winter’s Tale at Great Lakes Theater. While in town, he spoke to STAGES, CSU’s theatre student organization, which he founded. ■ ROBERT H. LEONARD, BA ’05, is an office manager for Hills Stern and Morley, LLP in Washington, DC. ■ CAROL WALLINGTON, BA ’05, is the Newman Campus Minister at CSU. ■ IAN CRANE, BA ’06, works in the music department at Holy Name High School. ■ MICHELLE RANKINS, MA ’06, received the Early Educator of Color Award from the National Council of Teachers of English. ■ KATELYN CORNELIUS, BA ‘08, is an actor and teacher at Great Lakes Theater. ■ RYAN DENNIS OTTO, BA ’08, graduated from Ashland Seminary with his master of divinity degree. ■ MEGAN K. LALLEY, BA ’10, is visual

communications manager at JumpStart Inc., a nationally recognized nonprofit accelerating the success of diverse entrepreneurs and their high-growth companies. ■ JESSICA MALICKI, BA ’10, received her master of letters in Shakespeare performance from Mary Baldwin College in Virginia. She is the programming coordinator of Arts in Education at the Virginia Repertory Theatre in Richmond. ■ KATHRYN PIKE, BEd ’10, teaches at Village Preparatory School in downtown Cleveland. She decorated her classroom with CSU photos and other paraphernalia to help her kindergarten students aspire to attend college. ■ MATTHEW SKITZKI, MMusic ’10, produced and presented Jazz at Severance Hall, a firsttime event showcasing nine of Cleveland’s up-and-coming jazz musicians. He is the owner of Professional Piano, specializing in events, lessons and accompaniment. ■ CHEANNA HUDSON, BEd ’11, is a human relations analyst. ■ TANIA BENITES, BA ’12, is an artistic associate at Talespinner Children’s Theatre. She has been involved with Summer Stages Repertory Theatre and Cleveland Public Theatre’s Brick City Program. ■ MATT WINTERS, BSCE ’12, completed an internship in Hawaii with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The recipient of a prestigious Science, Mathematics and Research for Transformation (SMART) scholarship from the U.S. Department of Defense, he is now completing his master’s degree at Stanford University. As president of Engineers Without Borders at CSU, he helped build a school/ hurricane shelter in Belize. 

MICHAEL A. PETROCHUK, DBA ’99

MICHELLE RANKINS, MA ’06

KATHRYN PIKE, BEd ’10

Six alumni struck a chord with GuitarMania, a Greater Cleveland community public art project benefitting United Way of Greater Cleveland and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum education programs. The following used their artistic talents to decorate 10-foot-tall Fender Stratocaster guitars for auction: GEORGE KOCAR, BA ’77, JOSEPH BORSUK, BA ’87 (above), DANIEL E. LOY, BA ’05, GIL REIS, BA ’06, ERIC ORTIZ, BA ’11, and NICK DIGIORGIO, MEd ’11. The guitars were on display in and around downtown Cleveland from May to October 2012.

Cleveland State University CSUOHIO.EDU

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Class

NOTES

IN MEMORIAM CSU DEATHS ■ JOHN PURCELL in June 2012. During his 33 years at CSU,

■ JAMES FLAHERTY in November 2012. The professor emeritus

Dr. Purcell taught Spanish and chaired the foreign language department. He retired in 2003.

of law retired in 2000 after 31 years with Cleveland-Marshall.

■ ROBERT HARTLEY in August 2012. A professor emeritus of

business, Dr. Hartley retired in 1998 after 26 years with CSU.

law retired in 1995 after 20 years with Cleveland-Marshall but remained involved with the College and its students.

■ EDWARD F. BELL in September 2012. Mr. Bell served on the

■ EDWIN LONDON in January 2013. The professor emeritus of

CSU board of trustees from 1986 to 1995.

music retired in 2004. During his 26 years at CSU, he chaired the Music Department and was the founder/conductor/artistic director of the Cleveland Chamber Orchestra. 

■ HAROLD DAILEY in September 2012. Dr. Dailey was an associate

professor emeritus of English.

■ JOAN BAKER in December 2012. The professor emerita of

■ ANA BEGOVIC-JUHANT, BA ’96 and MA ’00, in November 2012.

She was an assistant professor in the School of Health Sciences.

IN MEMORIAM ■ GLENN HEIDELOFF, BS ’43, in August 2012 ■ CHARLES A. LENT, BBA ’43, in June 2012 ■ HERBERT RUDY, JD ’44, in July 2012 ■ DOROTHY A. KOONTZ, BA ’45 and MA ’72, in April 2012 ■ LEONARD STONE, BS ’47, in June 2011 ■ RALPH HENNIE, BS ’47 and JD ’53, in June 2012 ■ LAD ROTH, BBA ’49, in November 2011 ■ ROBERT PAPPAS, BS ’50, in July 2012 ■ PATRICK GALLAGHER, JD ’53, in June 2012 ■ THOMAS MEEHAN, BBA ’53, in August 2012 ■ ROBERT HICKS, JD ’54, in August 2012 ■ CALVIN W. KNOWLTON, BA ’54, in May 2012 ■ GEORGE MARCH, JD ’54, in November 2012 ■ JAMES CONWAY, JD ’55, in October 2011 ■ ALICE DIMACULANGAN, BSN ’55, in July 2011 ■ CARROLL DUNNE JR., BS ’55, in November 2011 ■ JOSEPH CATERINI, JD ’56, in November 2012 ■ DANIEL BACHKIN, BSME ’57, in October 2010 ■ LOUISE RIZZOLLA, BBA ’57, in July 2012 ■ CAROL DOSKOCIL, BBA ’58, in July 2012 ■ HOMER INGMIRE, BSME ’58, in November 2011 ■ CAROL PORTMANN, BS ’58, in July 2012 ■ JAY ELLIS, JD ’59, in January 2012 ■ KARL WARE, JD ’59, in September 2012 ■ WILLIAM YOUNG, BBA ’61, in November 2012 ■ JOHN P. McCLOY, BS ’62, in November 2011 ■ DANIEL NIEBOER, BCHE ’63, in July 2012 ■ MARK TILLMAN, BS ’65, in April 2012 ■ JAMES F. BARTA, BBA ’67, in December 2012 ■ MARTHA MERSEK, BBA ’67, in September 2012 ■ LESTER NEEDHAM JR., JD ’67, in July 2012 ■ JOSEPH ZELEK, BS ’68, in July 2012 ■ NANCY RESNICK, BA ’69, in September 2012 ■ MARGARET STANDINGER, BA ’69, in November 2012 ■ RONALD KLIMA, JD ’70, in September 2012 ■ CHESTER MAZAR, BA ’70, in October 2012 ■ DANIEL NUDELMAN, BBA ’70, in November 2012 ■ RONALD ZUPANCIC, BS ’70, in November 2012 ■ HARRIET SANNER, BEd ’71, in January 2013 ■ JEFFREY SAXON, BSME

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’71, in August 2012 ■ KAREN MARTTALA, BBA ’72, in May 2012 ■ DANIEL O’HEREN, BBA ’72, in July 2012 ■ PETER GOULIS, BA ’72 and MEd ’80, in April 2011 ■ JOHN KOLOSAI, BBA ’73, in July 2012 ■ JOHN SIDLEY, BA ’73, in November 2012 ■ JOHN TARNAI, BA ’73, in May 2012 ■ PHYLLIS PAYNE BROWN, BEd ’74, in September 2012 ■ DAVID HANYCH, BS ’74, in September 2012 ■ RITA CHANNAS, JD ’76, in July 2012 ■ KIM DELLINGER, BS ’76, in September 2012 ■ JUDITH KEAN, BS ’76, in July 2012 ■ CHRISTINE PISAREK, BA ’76, in November 2012 ■ RITA BETH WHATLEY, JD ’76, in July 2012 ■ SCOTT JOSEPH, BBA ’77, in October 2012 ■ WILLIAM KAMAN, BS ’77, in October 2012 ■ JANET KRONENBERG, JD ’78, in June 2012 ■ PETER SCHWARTZ, BA ’78, in October 2012 ■ DONNA HUNT, JD ’79, in December 2011 ■ JUDGE KATHLEEN O’MALLEY, BA ’79, MA ’89 and JD ’89, in October 2012 ■ ELISABETH ENGELBACH, MSUS ’86, in March 2012 ■ ELMA CORAM, BA ’87, in July 2012 ■ MICHELE PEACE, BBA ’88, in November 2012 ■ CHARLES RHODES III, BA ’89, in November 2012 ■ RICHARD LEGGOTT, BA ’90, in July 2012 ■ RHONDA HOPSON, BBA ’90 and MEd ’00, in June 2012 ■ SUSAN MIGALICH GLAVAN, MEd ’91, in June 2012 ■ JAMES McFADDEN, MEd ’91, in January 2011 ■ JOHN CATUOGNO, JD ’93, in July 2012 ■ MICHELLE RESSLER, BBA ’93, in July 2012 ■ CHARLES ADAMSON, MA ’98, in May 2012 ■ ARTHUR FOTH, BA ’98 and JD ’03, in July 2012 ■ RAYMOND DUGGER, JD ’99, in August 2012 ■ HARRY DECKER, BS ’01, in September 2012 ■ CHRISTINE WILSON-CROUGH, BSN ’02, in August 2012 ■ MILDRED BAILEY, BA ’02 and MEd ’06, in January 2011 ■ JOHNNY BRAWNER, BEd ’09, in October 2012 ■ MICHAEL AGNICH, BA ’12, in January 2013. 


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Did you know?

CSU’S PARKER HANNIFIN HALL was the setting for an episode of the television series Route 66 in 1962. At the time, Vixseboxse Art Galleries occupied the building known as Howe Mansion, which was remodeled, expanded and renamed as part of CSU’s campus makeover.

JOE SHUSTER,

IT’S A SURE BET!

AMERICA’S NEXT TOP MODEL,

CONGRATS TO

illustrator of the Superman comics, took a freehand drawing class at CSU in 1942.

look out! Enthusiastic students, “discovered” during open calls on campus, serve as the face of CSU in print and television ads.

PROMINENT CLEVELANDERS Steven A. Minter and Albert B. Ratner received honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degrees at December’s commencement; 2,000 CSU students also received their diplomas.

PROFESSOR EMERITUS

Allan Waren still visits Monte Ahuja Hall daily to work on academic research. In 14 years, he’s never taken the elevators ­— always the stairs — to keep physically fit.

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CSU’s deck of cards app puts info on 200-plus academic majors as close as your phone.

Vikings men’s basketball head coach Gary Waters for his 300th career win in December.

URBAN PLANNING for Dummies (of the well-known Dum m ies s er ies ) by Levin Co l l e ge faculty member Jordan Yin was named among the 10 best books in urban planning, des ign and develo pm e nt published in 2012.


JENNIFER CHAMBERS URBAN AFFAIRS

INVEST IN STUDENTS WHO ARE CHANGING THEIR LIVES THROUGH EDUCATION.

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Cleveland State Magazine Winter 2013