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GRADUATION 2017 page 16

CHAMPAGNE MAKING HISTORY AS BOYS’ BASKETBALL COACH

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page 32 JIM ELLIOTT

CELEBRATING 25 YEARS AT BIRDS OF PREY

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features Summer 2017, vol.27 no.2

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Megan Cammer is living her Disney dream 2004 graduate, Cez Champagne, is the only female currently coaching a boys’ basketball team in S.C.

ON THE COVER: Tierrhane Huff, a music education graduate from Inman, S.C., reacts to the crowd at commencement. Photo by Richard Esposito

University photographer, Richard Esposito, captures the campus at night.

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Jim Elliott and Birds of Prey are celebrating 25 years Brian Morton, recent grad, is already making an impact in the field of education

MISSION Promoting Academic Excellence in a Christian environment VISION To be a Christian university nationally recognized for integrating faith in learning, leading and serving FOUNDING PRINCIPLE Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and, lo, I am with you always, even unto the end of the world. - Matthew 28:19-20

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from the president

Dear Friends, Many of you may have heard or read that I will be transitioning to President Emeritus June 1, 2018. This is a plan that the Board of Trustees and I have been working on for some time. Sissy and I have many wonderful memories of our time at Charleston Southern. The best memories involve the thousands of students, faculty, staff and supporters we have been privileged to know. We will continue to be involved in the life of Charleston Southern and look forward to exciting years ahead. Below you will find the copy of the press release the Board of Trustees released: Board of Trustees Announce Hunter Will Transition from President to President Emeritus June 1, 2018 The Board of Trustees announced in March that Dr. Jairy C. Hunter Jr. will transition from the President of Charleston Southern to President Emeritus on May 31, 2018. At that time, he will have served CSU for 34 years. Over the past two years, the Board of Trustees and Hunter have collaborated and developed a Succession Plan to ensure that the university continues to thrive and operate smoothly. Beginning June 1, 2018, as President Emeritus, Hunter will provide consulting and assistance in key areas such as strategic planning, external relations, resource development, enrollment and financial affairs. Additionally, he will continue to teach in the graduate program of the School of Business. Chairman of the Board, Jerry Williams, expressed appreciation to Hunter and First Lady, Sissy, for an exemplary job in leading the university for over three decades. “Dr. Hunter’s visionary leadership, tireless dedication and unwavering commitment to Christian higher education literally have transformed CSU into one of the best Christian universities in the country,” said Williams. “I am gratified that during my tenure thousands of students have received an excellent education in a Christian environment,” stated Hunter. The Board will begin a search process for the next president in February 2018. Dr. Michael Bryant, executive vice president, will assist President Hunter during this transition period. Inquiries may be forwarded to President-search@csuniv.edu.

Sincerely,

Jairy C. Hunter, Jr. President

Photo: President and Mrs. Jairy Hunter express thanks to members of the Board of Trustees after the announcement in March. Photo by Richard Esposito

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

CSU

magazine

A PUBLICATION OF CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

volume 27 number 2 Summer 2017

EDITORIAL STAFF: Jan Joslin ’82, Editor, Director of Publications John Strubel ’11, ’14, Director of Integrated Marketing Jon Merkling, Graphic Designer Richard Esposito, Multimedia Coordinator Warren Peper ’74, Media Relations Coordinator

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: CSU Sports Information

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Josh Montgomery

CSU Magazine is published three times a year by the university relations office for alumni and friends of Charleston Southern University. Address changes should be sent to advancement@csuniv.edu

CSU Magazine on the web: csumagazine.com Email: magazine@csuniv.edu Charlestonsouthern.edu

Design and layout by:

contents LEARNING

4 6 7 8 9 10 10 11 14 15 15

Graduation 2017 Chavez Determined Ellens Heads to Dental School Pressley Looking toward PhD Rose Tisdale on Mission Spring Symposium Highlights Retiring Faculty McCall Leading Music & Worship Arts Week CSI at CSU Sircy Receives Excellence in Teaching

LEADING

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Drafts Inducted Big South Hall of Fame Student Leadership Academy Tuskegee Airmen Speak to Cadets Faculty and Staff Changes On the Road: Seattle

SERVING

32 32 33 33 37

Mead Celebrates 50 Years Walk for Water Dula is Newman Civic Fellow Spring Break Mission Trip Women’s Basketball Honored

SCHOOL TIES

843.324.2004 • www.facebook.com/bobduranddesign

Printed by:

© 2017 Charleston Southern University

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38 Class Notes 40 Memorials 42 Baby Bucs 44 Driggers Impacts Lives 44 Scholarships & Awards 45 Thank a Donor Day 45 Annual CSU Giving Day 46 Foley Speaks at Graduation Luncheon 47 Alpha Phi Alpha Celebrating 40 Years 48 Larry Dupleich – Where are They Now?

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BERRY INSPIRED BY CLASS OF 2017 GRADUATES

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Photos by Richard Esposito

One journey ended and another one began May 6 for 657 Charleston Southern students. The North Charleston Coliseum was packed as university officials and family, friends and relatives celebrated the Class of 2017, the largest graduating class in university history. Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president and general manager of Boeing South Carolina, was the keynote speaker. She said, “As you enter this new chapter in your life, most of you will be continuing the amazing work of the scientists, engineers, doctors and business leaders that precede you.” A native of Hollywood, California, Robinson-Berry earned her bachelor of science from California State Polytechnic University and a master of science in engineering management and business from University of California. She encouraged CSU’s graduating class to: Have faith. Continue to Learn. Take risks. Be Innovative. Embrace challenging jobs. ”Innovative minds are needed to determine the future conditions of mankind,” she said. “By being here today, you have proven yourselves to be intelligent and dedicated enough to do the job. I am inspired by your faith, energy and enthusiasm.” Charleston Business Magazine recently recognized Robinson-Berry as one of the 50 most-influential people in Charleston. She also received the Woman of Distinction and Accomplishment award from Washington State African American Achievement Awards team and the Most Powerful Women in Business by Black Enterprise. “I’m happy to see that the great promise and potential for our future is being placed into good faith-based educated hands,” said RobinsonBerry. Robinson-Berry was awarded an honorary doctor of business, and Kimber Gist ’14 and a current master of criminal justice student, received the distinguished service award. Gist is a corporal with the Berkeley County Sheriff’s Office and recently survived a shooting, never missing a homework assignment during her recovery. Joan Robinson-Berry

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TOP DEGREE PROGRAMS FROM THE CLASS OF 2017 WERE: BUSINESS NURSING KINESIOLOGY CRIMINAL JUSTICE ELEMENTARY AND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PSYCHOLOGY BIOLOGY President Jairy Hunter and Kimber Gist

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Determination Leads to Degree for Chavez

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on’t ever try to convince Angelica Chavez that things don’t happen for a reason. She firmly believes in the biblical statement that “all things work together…” and her life is living proof. Chavez’s parents are both from Mexico. They still don’t speak English, and neither did Chavez when she entered Pepperhill Elementary. As she progressed through the Charleston County school system she moved to Alice Birney Middle and then to Stall High School. As a high school senior, her principal selected her to introduce Stall alum, Sen. Tim Scott, when he addressed the student body. She didn’t know that she and the Senator would also share another experience in a few years. But as she’s quick to tell you, “Hey, things happen for a reason.” The prospect of going to college looked bleak for Chavez. Her test scores were low, and she struggled in writing. Chavez would have to enter the Bridge Program, to improve her abilities in English. She jumped at the

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By Warren Peper Photo by Richard Esposito

chance and now proudly declares, “I made A’s in every English course I took.” Chavez was not going to waste this opportunity. No one else in her family had ever gone to college. Her parents, quite frankly, thought she should get a job after high school and start earning money. Chavez wanted her education, and CSU offered her an opportunity to get it. Ever wonder what a committed and driven student looks like? Chavez is a shining example. Her first semester, she made a B in New Testament and another B in math. “I’ve made nothing but A’s since,” says Chavez through an infectious smile. She’s also accomplished a bit more. Chavez graduated in May with a GPA of 3.94 and was the winner of the coveted Early Childhood Ed award. Her initial desire was to teach in Charleston County schools, with an emphasis in helping students learn English as a second language. During a job fair, though, for Dorchester

District II, she was hired on the spot to teach first grade at Eagle’s Nest Elementary. That particular school, by the way, has the highest ratio of Spanish speaking students in Dorchester County. “Things happen for a reason, right?” Chavez is quick to remind. Chavez constantly sings the praises of the professors in the education program who believed in and encouraged her. She knew there were those who doubted she could be successful at the university level. But there were also some believers, and she believes that’s what will make her a better teacher. “It doesn’t matter how smart you are, but how determined you are. I’m going to prove I am worthy.” Though she didn’t know it at the time, when she introduced Senator Scott, CSU Class of 1988, to her high school assembly, it was one CSU graduate in the company of a future one.

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First Generation College Graduate Headed to Dental School

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arol Ellens’ youth was spent on a Native American reservation in Arizona. Her father was a full-blooded member of the Colorado River Indian Tribe. Upon finishing high school she spent about a year and a half at the University of Nevada at Las Vegas (UNLV), but Ellens wasn’t interested in being a student. She liked college plenty, but not so much the part that required she go to class. This led to a hitch in the Air Force, where she eventually landed in Charleston. Ellens’ job was as a loadmaster on the giant C-17 planes that grace the skies of the Lowcountry. After a seven year hitch in the military, Ellens was ready to become a college student again. She was now married, with two children. Ellens was asked by a professor once if she was a veteran. When she said yes, he said, “I thought so, you’re the only one paying attention in class.” Ellens said the small class settings at Charleston Southern enhanced her learning experience. She noted that the Old and New Testament courses taught her to take a closer look at her personal faith journey. In May, Ellens received her degree in biology. She is a first generation college graduate, and she and her family will soon leave for Minnesota where she’ll enter dental school. She will also experience winter for the very first time.

By Warren Peper Photo by Richard Esposito

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Pressley Looking Toward PhD

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here was no father in Hugh Pressley’s life as he grew up in Durham, North Carolina His mother constantly preached getting an education, though, and Pressley just might have taken her urgings to the extreme. After graduating from UNC in Chapel Hill with a BA in Spanish, Pressley joined the Navy. While stationed in Charleston, Pressley felt like he needed more education. In May, Pressley walked across the stage to receive his second college degree. He graduated from Charleston Southern with a BA in English. He was also given the School of Education’s top award. “CSU fit my needs,” said Pressley. Now 37, married with two children, Pressley will move to St. Louis for his wife’s job. But he’s not done. “I just loved school; I always felt comfortable in the classroom.” Pressley has been accepted into the online program at Texas Tech in order to secure his PhD in English. His goal is to teach high school English and eventually become a college professor.

By Warren Peper Photo by Richard Esposito

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Rose Tisdale: Life on Mission

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ast fall, as Rose Tisdale prepared for her senior year, she began exploring her options for life after college. “Everyone said I should go to grad school, be a doctor, but it just didn’t feel right to me,” said Tisdale, a biology major. “I kept coming back to this idea of serving other people.” Knowing her passion for learning and serving other people, Tisdale said her mom encouraged her to pursue an opportunity with the Peace Corps. So, she began exploring the idea of life on mission. A quick Google search of Peace Corps led her to a two-year teaching and serving opportunity a world away in Tanzania, Africa. According to the Peace Corps website, there are more than 220 volunteers in Tanzania

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working with their communities on projects in agriculture, education and health. The videos, photos and words jumped off the page and into her heart. “I saw unity,” she said. “I saw helping and caring. I love serving people. It makes me really happy.” The opportunity would allow Tisdale to teach (biology and physics), learn (she would be trained to speak Swahili) and serve the community. So, she prayed for discernment. “I had this overwhelming sense of peace,” said Tisdale. “This is going to be out of this world, and crazy, and different, and I don’t know if I can handle it, but it felt right.” Tisdale, a native of Early Branch, South Carolina, officially applied last fall. She was one of 17,000 applicants and one of 4,000 accepted.

By John Strubel Photo by Richard Esposito

“Getting accepted is one step, and you accepting it is another,” she said. “They give you this little box that says, ‘when you check this box you are committing to these people, and they are expecting you, so if you tell us you can’t come, shame on you.’ Essentially.” The next chapter of her journey will begin in July, when Tisdale will board a plane for the first time in her life. Destination: Tanzania, Africa. “I am worried about the small things, like packing, and that’s helping me not freak out about the big things,” said Tisdale. “I can’t control that. It’s going to be an adjustment no matter what my attitude is. It’s going to be hard, but that’s OK.”

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DIVERSITY OF THOUGHTS AND IDEAS AT SPRING SYMPOSIUM By Warren Peper

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SU hosted its annual Spring Symposium in April. The event provides students with an opportunity to share their course research projects across many disciplines. “This is a chance to shine a spotlight on what our students and our colleagues are doing,” said Symposium chair, Dr. Jonathan Sircy. “Even on a small campus, we get in our own bubble.” Sophomore graphic design student Brittany Boyd presented an original, creative logo concept for a cabinet company. Boyd’s presentation took those at the Symposium through her decisions on color, design and type style. She also designed a music poster for her favorite band, NeedtoBreathe. Boyd was sponsored by graphic design instructor, Professor Andrea Glover. Angelina Williams undertook the subject of the Impact of Roller Derby on Self-Efficacy among Participants. Williams particularly zeroed in on its impact on women, who at one point in our culture were excluded from fast-paced, contact sports. Through a survey

Shelby Swegel

and an examination of roller derby, Williams concluded that it created a liberating platform along with an atmosphere of empowerment. Preprofessional biology student, Shelby Swagel’s, research included “A Creative Depiction of the Genetics of Osteosarcoma.” The project is a highlight of the genetics of osteosarcoma in a creative manner. It contains a collage of facts and documents explaining the LSAMP gene and its effects on the progression of osteosarcoma. It also contains a 3D model

Photo by Richard Esposito

of the third human chromosome where the LSAMP gene is encoded for. This project was created as a tribute to her father who passed of osteosarcoma in 1999. Another student, Avery Vista, who came to CSU after serving in the military, presented the idea of Living with Less. His primary message was why we buy stuff we can’t afford. Vista shared his own story about feeling a need to buy a fancy car, only to realize he was much happier riding a bike. In the end, he feels that if we take inventory of our stuff we will find that the less you have, the more you have. He encouraged those in the room to concentrate more on experiences than expenses. Vista was sponsored by Professor Maxwell Rollins of the School of Business. In addition to these oral presentations, there were also visual displays in an adjoining area by students with poster sessions. These topics included Parenting Styles as well as how Health Behavior Improves Academic Performance. The annual Spring Symposium is sponsored by the faculty Publications Committee.

Professors Represent 73 Years of Teaching at CSU

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resident Jairy C. Hunter Jr., on right, congratulates the professors who retired at the end of the academic year. Dr. Don Clerico has been teaching at CSU since 1990; Dr. David Naylor has been at CSU since 1988, and Vera Kling, associate professor of nursing, has been at CSU since 2000. At Commencement, Clerico was named Professor Emeritus of Education, and Naylor was named Professor Emeritus of Sociology.

Photo by Richard Esposito

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McCall Brings New Direction to Music and Worship Leadership Program

By Warren Peper

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oes the style of worship dictate your ability to connect with God in your house of worship? If there are no large screens or praise bands, will your experience be less fulfilling? Are you more comfortable with a traditional service that offers hymn singing and less contemporary efforts to reach you in the pew? All of these questions factor in to Matt McCall’s desire to raise the profile of the Music and Worship Leadership program. McCall, a 2009 alumnus, has been the director of the program since August. He is seeking to recalibrate CSU’s Music and Worship Leadership program to better serve churches across the state. “I want to prepare our students to walk into either format and be successful,” he said. McCall was the product of a traditional church background of piano, organ and choir. As a teenager, though, he grew to enjoy contemporary services more. In many churches, walking this tightrope is awkward. It creates them and us congregations. “Food and fellowship are universal and needed by all Christians,” says McCall. “I don’t want our grads to be one dimensional.” The Music and Worship Leadership degree includes three core areas of emphasis: music, worship and Christian studies. The standard music core, 33 credit hours, includes music theory, music history, basic conducting and voice training. Students receive two years of basic voice lessons prior to one year of commercial voice study. McCall believes, “This is a great way for students to engage and to understand their calling.” Being a successful worship leader involves more than connecting with the congregation through music. New trends in this course of study include administrative initiatives as well as a prudent understanding of technology.

The curriculum seeks to include the various aspects of what this job now requires. The program’s goal is to teach the student to maintain vocal health while singing in a modern style. Students may choose either keyboard or guitar study to complement their voice training. The music core meets the National Association of Schools of Music accreditation standards for a bachelor of arts in music. A second core area is worship studies. In addition to classes in congregational song, church music education and worship

leadership administration, additional courses focus on the history of worship, planning biblically sound worship services, worship technology and contemporary music theory and arranging. A Christian Studies core includes Old and New Testament, systematic theology, Christian leadership and evangelism. Music and Worship Leadership students graduate with a background in Christian doctrine and a solid biblical foundation to support worship planning and song writing.

Matt McCall

Photo by Richard Esposito

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CIRCLE of LIFE FOR CAMMER by Warren Peper • Photo by Richard Esposito

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As a child, Megan Cammer always wanted to be in a parade. She loved to perform, and competitive dancing satisfied that urge until she enrolled at Charleston Southern University. It was during a conversation with theater professor, Thomas Keating, she realized being on stage while singing and dancing might just check all the boxes, so a major was declared.

fter her junior year, though, Cammer was faced with a life-changing opportunity. Her audition had caught the eyes of Disney’s casting team in Orlando, Florida. She was unsure what to do. Her mom wasn’t excited about her leaving school. Her professor, though, provided a different view. “School will always be here, but the opportunity to work at Disney in your dream job may not be,” Keating remembers telling his talented student. Cammer was excited but scared, all in the same moment. She promised her mom she’d complete her degree. Privately, she wasn’t at all sure she’d be able to keep that promise.

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A move to Orlando forced her to grow up quickly. She was a dancer in almost every show that involved The Magic Kingdom. As time went on, she was more and more unsure if she’d ever return home. Then things really got crazy. After about 18 months in Orlando, she was chosen for a position as a character actress at the Disney property in Tokyo. Not only did she have a better job, she’d be moving to Japan. Instead of hanging out with Mickey and Minnie, Cammer now would have acting roles in “Little Mermaid,” “Sleeping Beauty” and “Frozen.” She knew life had changed when she had to sing “Let It Go” in Japanese.

The North Charleston native also learned to live in a different culture in a giant city. Cammer was born in Trident Hospital, across the street from Charleston Southern. Her world had been pretty small. But while in Japan, it was not unusual for someone to stop and ask for a picture, because they’d never seen someone, in person, with blonde hair and blue eyes. The job in Tokyo lasted 14 months. What would be next? She started the usual process of sending resumes and auditioning. Cammer also called Professor Keating. School was scheduled to start in two weeks. What if she came back to finish her degree?

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Could she get in? Was there room in the theatre department for a student who needed one more semester? Keating offered some reassuring words and told Cammer it sounded, once again, like it was good timing. Plus, he needed a good strong performer for a fall production he’d be directing. “Coming home brought me back to earth,” she said. “I grew up a lot in that final semester. I was thankful and grateful and also humbled by the entire experience.” In addition to taking a full complement of hours, she jumped head first into rehearsals for “She Loves Me.” But everything had

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changed. None of the theatre students were familiar. The campus had new buildings. The trees were taller, and parking spaces scarcer. Everything seemed different. Keating was there, though, and thrilled that her talent and tenacity had come home. “Her commitment to excellence onstage certainly rubbed off on others. It challenged them to bring their A game.” Cammer completed her degree in December 2016. Now what, though? What was she going to do? Some of the same anxieties bubbled to the surface that every grad ponders. She did what she’d done before. Auditions and

resumes were once again sent out. In early January, the Disney people reconnected with Cammer. Before she could say Hakuna Matata, she was offered a position with the production company going to Shanghai, China. Cammer is leaving in March. Shanghai Disneyland will soon debut the first Mandarin version of “The Lion King.” “Coming home re-centered me; I spent so much time focused on the future, I didn’t live in the moment,” she said. Cammer’s excited and scared, but so much more prepared to tackle this next challenge.

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ARTS WEEK

Each spring, the fine arts programs sponsor Arts Week to expose the campus to different types of art and all that the arts have to offer. Many projects, such as the Arts Week Mural, are designed to give students a chance to interact and display their talent.

Photo by Richard Esposito

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Charleston Southern University hosted its annual criminal justice summer camp in June. High school students had an opportunity to get “hands-on” training in law enforcement.

SIRCY EARNS 2017 SCICU EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING AWARD

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r. Jonathan Sircy has received the 2017 Excellence in Teaching Award presented by the South Carolina Independent Colleges and Universities. Sircy, associate professor of English, has been a full-time teacher at CSU since 2011. He said that teaching in a Christian environment is unbelievably liberating and allows for constant opportunities to integrate faith in his daily interactions with his students. He teaches British Medieval and Renaissance literature. It takes a little work to understand what was written during this time. This also covers the period of time of the King James Version of the Bible. Again, Sircy is given an opportunity to challenge and personalize his lessons. His greatest desire is to be a better disciple as he guides his students to embrace the importance of reading and writing. Three-

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By Warren Peper

Photo by Richard Esposito

fourths of his students are nonmajors. His underlying hope is that they’ll learn life skills that will serve them beyond his classroom. “His commitment to CSU’s mission is foremost in his professional and personal life,” said Dr. Jacqueline Fish, vice president for academic affairs. Sircy chairs CSU’s Publication Committee, which sponsors an annual showcase of student and faculty research. He serves on the university’s Apple Technology Team and is the co-faculty advisor for the campus chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the International English Honor Society. His educational background includes a BA in literature and creative writing from Murray State, a master’s from the University of Kentucky and a PhD from the University of South Carolina.

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Champagne

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MAKING HISTORY AS BOYS’ BASKETBALL COACH

t took sitting on the bench while at CSU to prompt a coach in rural Charleston County to wonder just how big she should dream. Cez Champagne ’04 has already broken a couple barriers, nothing she ever set out to do, just something that’s happened. At the moment, she’s the only female coaching boys in the county. She’s also the only woman in the entire state coaching a varsity boys’ team. Champagne’s team at Baptist Hill High School was undefeated in their conference this year. The Bobcats lost in the quarterfinals of the state playoffs to the eventual state champs from Hemingway. While that is impressive and noteworthy on its own, it barely scratches the surface for a coach whose players call her Mama Champ. There’s also something these young boys have come to learn about their coach. In the vernacular of the playground—Mama Champ don’t play. Champagne, 38, was like many high school seniors after graduating Middleton High School. She wanted to get away from home and accepted a scholarship to play basketball at East Tennessee State. But like many other college freshmen, she missed her family. An injury kept her from playing that first year and only added to the longing for the Lowcountry. A decision was made to transfer to Charleston Southern so that she could get closer to home.

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by Warren Peper • Photo by Richard Esposito

It didn’t immediately create hearts and flowers and happily-ever-after moments, however. Hardly a year after her transfer, she tore her other ACL and found herself watching from the sidelines once again. This setback created some eye-opening experiences. She thought about just quitting, but her dad wouldn’t hear of it. Champagne began to question her desire to work her way back to the court. Did she love it enough? Those doubts began to evaporate when she found herself not moping or wallowing in selfpity at the end of the bench. Bit by bit, she rediscovered her love of the game by sitting between the assistant coaches. She never once considered being a coach before hearing the passion and commitment these assistants embraced. She would play two more years in a Buc uniform, but she was confident of her plans once her playing days were done. After college, Champagne started coaching in a private school then moved to public schools. She would coach at St. John’s, then James Island and then Military Magnet and eventually at Baptist Hill. At every stop, she would coach girls. When the job as boys coach opened at Baptist Hill, some of the guys on that team encouraged Champagne to apply. The school’s athletic director gave her an interview and later stated, “She was the best candidate, period.”

In Champagne’s first year, the team won just four of their 17 games. This past year, though, things changed. The players started to trust her and bought into her preaching fundamentals and unselfishness. The Bobcats beat North Charleston for the first time in 10 years. It was a major boost to their confidence. In January and February, they won all 12 region games before losing in the state playoffs. She also learned something very valuable this year. “If I trust them; they’ll trust me.” The players also learned something about Mama Champ. If she sees something she doesn’t like, be prepared for The Stare. She won’t yell, won’t verbally embarrass the player, but it’s likely a stone-cold stare will be directed that player’s way that clearly communicates her message. “I want to go farther, I want to win a state title,” declares Champagne. She also believes God has a bigger plan for her, a bigger assignment, as she calls it. It’s Mama Champ’s belief that coaching is all about how you team ’em and how you reach ’em. There are men coaching young women, but that coaching door doesn’t seem to swing the other way, at least for now. Champagne certainly shows that the right person in the right circumstance can be successful. And if you poll those boys in Baptist Hill uniforms right now, they’ll tell you point blank—Mama Champ don’t play!

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Drafts Named to Big South Hall of Fame

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hen Collin Drafts graduated from Charleston Southern in 2006, he was the Big South Conference leader in 13 different statistical categories. Recently, he was the first football player to be selected for the Big South Hall of Fame. Drafts, who was a four-year starter at CSU, remains the only quarterback in Big South history with two 400-yard passing games along with two games where he accounted for five touchdowns.

The impact of being the first football player inducted into the Big South Hall of Fame was not lost on Drafts following the ceremony. “It’s kind of surreal when you talk about being the first football player inducted into the Big South Hall of Fame,” he admitted. “It’s definitely an honor; I know there are a lot of great players that came before me, played with and against me, and played after me, so I know I will not be the only one. It’s kind of neat to hear that for sure, but definitely even

more special to be inducted as a representative of Charleston Southern.” A product of Battery Creek High School in Beaufort, South Carolina, Drafts played in the Arena Football League after college. He recently accepted a high school coaching opportunity in Columbia. Drafts joins four others from CSU in the Big South Hall of Fame: coaches Howard Bagwell and Jim Settle; tennis player, Hans Olsen, and golfer Jim Gardas.

Photo provided

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STUDENT LEADERSHIP ACADEMY

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r. Troy Hall, COO for South Carolina Federal Credit Union, was the guest speaker at the first meeting of the Student Leadership Academy Jan. 18. Hall, a 2011 MBA graduate, explained the role of character in leadership. He said, “If a leader has skills without character, they are a synthetic leader.” Student Leadership Academy is training students in the essentials of Christian leadership and how knowledge, skills and attitudes will connect them to careers.

Medal of Honor recipients speak to AFROTC

Two Medal of Honor recipients from the Tuskegee Airmen spoke to Air Force ROTC Det 772 this spring. Lt Col Enoch Woodhouse and 2nd Lt Dr. Eugene Richardson Jr. joined the first African American division of the United States armed forces in the 1940s.

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JimElliott CELEBRATING

25 YEARS at BIRDS OF PREY by Warren Peper • Photos by Richard Esposito

As a young boy growing up on James Island, Jim Elliott’s playground consisted of the tidal creeks and giant oaks along Harborview Road. In the late 1950s and early 60s, there were very few neighbors. It was a self-contained wildlife experience, and he found himself in the middle of his own natural habitat. Somewhere near those oyster beds and not far from the pluff mud, he developed an interest in birds. He heard their songs, observed their habits and marveled at their aerial acrobatics. Never, though, did he envision where that might take him later in life.

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fter one year at the University of South Carolina, Jim’s father felt his son might need to return to the Lowcountry. Apparently, Jim enjoyed his freshman year, but might not have spent as much time in class as necessary. Jim came home and enrolled at Baptist College (now Charleston Southern University) where he pursued a major in business, graduating in 1975. Entering the world of commercial real estate after college, Elliott landed on Kiawah Island working with some of the area’s successful developers. He loved that type of work and was good at it. But there was something deeper inside that continued its haunting call. At times, people would find different types of birds in need of help. “I had this sort of naïve, if not ambitious idea, of addressing that problem,” said Elliott, now 71. Even though his business card said he worked in real estate, he also became known as the bird guy. He began to realize his ability to make a living and his desire to help creatures unable to help themselves was creating an internal tug-of-war. “Initially, I thought I was bright enough, smart enough, and capable enough to do both real estate and save birds, too. That was 1991.” Birds of a feather By 1994, Elliott was trying to help 100 birds a year, and it was very clear he couldn’t do both jobs. So his life took a turn. His family and friends knew of his passion, so while they weren’t surprised, there was some concern. Chucking aside a 25-year career in one field, he swooped in to attack another. “There were birds of prey being injured, often due to interaction with humans. There was no place for these birds to be treated. Some of those bird populations were at risk,” he said. Elliott decided to establish The Center for the Birds of Prey. He’s been the director of this effort for the last 25 years, and it’s now the gold standard of avian medicine.

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

Nestled in the serene setting of a 152-acre wooded campus in Awendaw, a quiet, spring morning is interrupted only by the chirping, singing and calling of birds both in nature and in the holding cages. There are eight fulltime employees and four who work part-time. The volunteers are called avian ambassadors. There are also volunteers who transport injured birds from all parts of the region. In the last 25 years, nearly 8,000 birds have come through the medical center. Ninetynine percent of the injuries are caused by humans. The goal is to return them to nature, 60 percent of the time that happens. Those creatures that can’t return to nature are kept at the center for training and educational purposes.

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As far as Elliott is concerned, “We treat these birds because we should. These creatures have just as much right and purpose as we do in how it all works.” A purpose driven life Elliott believes every bird has a story. A redtailed hawk is recovering from 20 buck shot pellets in its body. There’s a bald eagle on an operating table receiving surgery for a broken wing. Though under local anesthesia, the regal creature still seems to acknowledge the care he’s receiving. Humans had hurt these birds, but humans were also providing help.

“We’re not trying to be an attraction, a roadside park or a zoo,” says Elliott. “We are a scientific, education, biological, medical facility that is doing work that is important.” As fulfilling as this second career and calling has been, Elliott says he was not prepared to meet the type of people this work attracts. “They’re selfless and giving as any group I’ve met. I try to thank ’em; I can’t. I cry every time I try to do it.” Eagles, kites, falcons, hawks, owls…they’re all being nursed back to health at this center. These creatures are noble, and so is the work that’s happening at this facility.

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“WE’RE NOT TRYING TO BE AN ATTRACTION, A ROADSIDE PARK OR A ZOO. WE ARE A SCIENTIFIC, EDUCATION, BIOLOGICAL, MEDICAL FACILITY THAT IS DOING WORK THAT IS IMPORTANT.” – Jim Elliott

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The Avian Conservation Center The Center For Birds of Prey Address: 4719 Highway 17 N Awendaw, SC 29429 843-971-7474 centerforbirdsofprey.org

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NEW POSITIONS FACULTY AND STAFF CHANGES

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r. Scott Yarbrough and Dr. Marc Embler now hold titles of assistant vice president for academic affairs. Yarbrough, in his 20th year at CSU, is chair of the English department and has also been at the forefront of the university’s efforts in accreditation and retention. His new duties will include academic management of Graduate Studies. In accepting the additional responsibilities, Yarbrough said, “I’ve seen CSU grow a lot in

Dr. Scott Yarbrough

Dr. Marc Embler

the last 20 years, and I hope to help shape its growth in the future.” Embler has been part of the criminal justice program for the past six years, both at the undergrad and graduate level. He’s also the dean for the Center for Academic Excellence. His new responsibilities include growing the online programs while also monitoring grants and academic technology. Embler, a member of the university’s Athletic Hall of Fame for his outstanding track performances, says, “CSU gave me a lot while I was a student, and now I enjoy the opportunity to give back.” Timothy Grant is the school’s new diversity officer. Grant, the assistant dean for residence life, started with campus security more than three years ago. In his new position, Grant will provide guidelines and advise the

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administration on student diversity matters. He’ll also provide input to search committees on recruiting best practices for faculty and staff. Grant said, I’m at peace in my career with the ability to integrate my faith with my job. Latitia Adams is the school’s new Title IX administrator. Previously, the Summerville native worked for the State Department and more recently was the chief administrator

Latitia Adams

for an international nonprofit. In her new position she monitors all aspects of Title IX compliance, serves as an impartial advocate for parties adversely affected and provides training and communication on the university’s policies on sexual misconduct and/or harassment. As for joining CSU, Adams said, “Had it not been for the Lord’s grace and being able to learn from my mistakes, I would not be able to witness His love to others. What keeps me going is my personal desire to please God.” Nick Ballenger has been named executive director of the Whitfield Center for Christian Leadership. As director, Ballenger will provide leadership for all events and activities related to the Center’s institutes: Biblical Worldview

Institute, Faith Integration Institute and the Marketplace Ministry Institute. In addition, he will oversee the newly established Student Leadership Academy, a program designed to teach CSU students the essentials of Christian leadership. “Nick’s passion to promote the biblical worldview in the marketplace and sincere interest in mentoring students will be a great blessing to CSU and its ministry partners,”

Timothy Grant

Nick Ballenger

said Dr. Michael Bryant, executive vice president. Ballenger has been director of biblical worldview at Spartanburg Christian Academy since 2010 where his duties included overseeing the Student Leadership Institute and teaching in the areas of Bible, theology, evangelism and apologetics. Prior to serving at Spartanburg Christian Academy, he worked as assistant director of admissions/ Christian marketing at Charleston Southern from 2005-2010. He has also participated in international missions in Kenya and Peru. Married to the former Brandie Bolduc, Ballenger holds a BA from Charleston Southern, an MTS from Liberty Theological Seminary, and is currently pursuing an MDiv at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary.

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

SEATTLE

On the Road Meet some Charleston Southern alumni living and working in Seattle. CSU Magazine asked several alumni to tell us their favorite places to visit and eat in the Seattle area and some favorite things about their neighborhoods. Read on to discover some things to do if you take a trip to Seattle. The next city we are visiting on our road trip will be Chicago. If you are a BCC/CSU alumnus living and working in the Chicago area, let us know at magazine@csuniv.edu.

MIRKO’S SEATTLE FAVORITES Favorite Museum: The Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI) is our family’s favorite. My wife Ana and I have two boys, Petar (7) and Filip (4), and MOHAI’s focus on Seattle’s history and continued transformation makes it relatable and engaging for the whole crew.

Mirko Mandic ’02 Studying Computer Science and Math at CSU introduced me to the technology’s transformative power. After graduating from CSU, I got a master’s degree in HumanComputer Interaction, and I have been working as a User Experience (UX) Designer since. I now work at Amazon, where I am leading Digital UX Design for Amazon Go, a new physical shopping experience. I provide creative direction to a group of talented UX Designers, and I partner closely with my engineering and business teammates to deliver delightful customer experiences.

Best Place for a Meal: How To Cook A Wolf has become our neighborhood go-to spot. It is always packed and booked well in advance, but my wife and I somehow manage to snag impromptu seats at the bar; eating late dinner helps, I guess.

Favorite Thing about Your Neighborhood: With its good public schools, parks, and playgrounds, Queen Anne is familyfriendly while being close to the city’s urban core and cultural hotspots. Favorite Seattle area Landmark/Tourist Attraction: Museum of Pop Culture (formerly Experience Music Project Museum) is an architectural landmark whose exhibits pay homage to Seattle’s rich musical heritage.

Best Place for Dessert: Mora Ice Cream is worth a ferry trip to the nearby Bainbridge Island. Favorite Free Activity: Concerts at the Mural is a free summer concert series in Seattle Center (also home to the Space Needle) that is expertly curated by our favorite local cultural institution, KEXP radio station. Photos provided above: The Mandics celebrate son, Petar’s, 7th birthday with a soccer themed birthday party. right: The Mandic family, Ana, Mirko, Filip and Petar, outside an Amazon Go store.

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On the Road ANTII’S SEATTLE FAVORITES Favorite Museum: Museum of Flight Best Place for a Meal: Burger, fries and a shake from Little Woody’s on Capitol Hill. Best Place for Dessert: Chocolate Deathcake from Cupcake Royale Favorite Free Activity: Monthly Pioneer Square art walk

Favorite Thing about Your Neighborhood: Downtown Seattle is a real, vibrant, busy downtown with ocean and lake access, theaters, restaurants, shops, great transit, and solid nightlife Favorite Seattle Landmark/Tourist Attraction: CenturyLink Field, your home of the MLS Cup Champions Seattle Sounders FC!

Antti Raty ’08 MBA I work in the aviation industry, as a Project Manager for Alaska Airlines. After graduating with an MBA from CSU and obtaining my project management certification, I have worked for many different companies and government agencies, across a variety of industries. My wife and I have our 15th wedding anniversary this year. She has also selected project management as a profession. Together our careers have taken us from coast to coast, and even to Europe. We chose to settle down in Seattle, after falling in love with the marine coastal weather and the many exciting things that our city and the greater Puget Sound area have to offer! Recognizing the great experiences that my career and Seattle have provided, I want to give back to the industry and to our community. For the past two years, I have been teaching project management at a local college to Bachelor’s degree students. I really enjoy teaching, and wish to continue once I retire from the corporate world. Photos provided

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Amy Doerflinger ’09

AMY’S SEATTLE FAVORITES Favorite Museum: Bellevue Children’s museum Best Place for a Meal: Thai Simple Curry (in the heart of Seattle’s China town, cash only, very limited daily updated menu, only seats 4-6 people, most just do take out for lunch, but amazing curry and thai iced tea) Best Place for Dessert: my house! I make a killer key lime cheesecake

Photos by Amy’s mother-in-law, Kathy Hopp

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Favorite Free Activity: hiking (anywhere and everywhere in Washington! Favorite Thing about Your Neighborhood: Walking distance to restaurants, errands, trails, etc. Favorite Seattle area Landmark/Tourist Attraction: Troll under the Fremont bridge

I am a Project Manager at Boeing and have worked there for just over five years. I earned a finance degree and earned my first professional job as an accounting supervisor at a small local boutique hotel about a year after graduation. I realized accounting was not for me, and after a year and a half there I had the pleasure of going to work for Boeing as a financial analyst. I did that for just over a year and with no room to advance, applied for a job working Business Operations for Boeing’s Shared Services Group. This took me further from a finance role and more towards project management, so I decided to study for a Project Management certificate from a local college. I completed the certificate program and then took a project working in Seattle to build a brand-new building where Boeing Commercial Airplanes delivers the “keys” to the airplanes for customers. That was an amazing project, and I learned and gained a great deal of experience. For the past year and a half, I have been working on an IT business transformation project where I manage multiple midscale projects across many areas of the business. I really enjoy project management and feel as though my time playing softball at CSU helped me prepare for this field. You must be able to manage your time, communicate effectively and not buckle under pressure or stress (just to name a few). These are all things I do well. I grew up in the Pacific Northwest and have been back in the area for seven years now. I have been married for almost four years to my very driven husband, Dustin. He runs his own athletic apparel company, Doerflinger Athletics, from our home, all while taking care of our daughter Julia full time while I commute to work full time about 30 minutes away. Julia just turned one this April, and we are living life to the fullest and bringing her along and hoping to expand our family even more!

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Barbara Mead Celebrates 50 years at CSU

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arbara Mead, associate dean of students, was recognized on Feb. 16 for her 50 years of service to Charleston Southern. She began work on Feb. 16, 1967. At a reception in her honor, President Jairy C. Hunter Jr. said, “Barbara knows what her purpose is, not only for herself but also for CSU.” Sissy Hunter said, “I appreciate all that she has done for CSU. She has such charm and is a Southern lady.” There was laughter and tears. Julia Ard, her longtime assistant, said, “She would give you the shirt off her back – but it would have to match.” Mead said, “The Lord has been so good to me. If I’m successful at anything, it’s because my parents taught me.”

CSU TEAM WALKS FOR WATER

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SU students and faculty joined more than 2,500 walkers in Water Mission International’s annual Walk for Water campaign. Each walker travels 1.5 miles with an empty bucket, then returns that same distance with water in the bucket. The fundraiser raises money to provide more people around the world access to safe water. CSU raised more than $7,400. For the seventh year, professor of education, Dr. Linda Karges-Bone, spearheaded CSU’s involvement. “The Walk for Water is an ideal connection to our mission of engaging students in learning, leading and serving, said Karges Bone. “Learning about the global water crisis and the enormous geopolitical

implications surrounding water resources is critical to the well-informed student. Leading in ways that advocate for social justice is an ethical responsibility, and serving those who suffer, of course, our Christian joy. All of these

merge in the Walk for Water. It is a privilege to lead students in this effort.” One billion people around the globe are without clean drinking water. Thousands die each day to water borne illnesses.

CSU Civic Engagement Team

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

Dula selected as Newman Civic Fellow

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reshman Alexis Annette Dula has been selected to the Newman Civic Fellowship program, a one-year program which recognizes and supports communitycommitted students who have demonstrated an investment in finding solutions for challenges facing communities throughout the country. “One of the many reasons I selected Charleston Southern University was because of the strong emphasis on serving the community,” said Dula, a kinesiology major from Moore. “I wanted to build upon my desire to serve the community while enrolled in college.” Dula wasted no time making an impact in and out of the classroom. She volunteered with the South Carolina Lions Club, The Bowl for Kids Charities, CSU’s Color Run

event, the Salvation Army, and South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind. “Alexis is a leader in and out of the classroom,” said Dr. Jairy C. Hunter. “She is an example of learning, leading and serving, and her leadership future is bright.” Dula is one of 273 students from 39 states and Washington, D.C., selected to the 2017 cohort. The fellowship honors the late Frank Newman, a tireless advocate for civic engagement in higher education. The Newman Civic Fellowship provides training and resources that nurture students’ assets and passions to help them develop strategies and learning opportunities to serve as “effective agents of social change.” The Newman Civic Fellowship is a program of Campus Compact.

Dr. Hester Young, assistant dean for student services, presents Alexis Doula with the Newman Civic Fellowship at the annual awards day. Photo by Josh Montgomery

Place of Hope and Orlando Union Rescue Mission

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udith Caton, who served as discipleship and missions coordinator, said, “Over Spring Break, campus ministries led a mission trip to Florida to work with two fantastic organizations to share the love of Jesus.” The group partnered with Place of Hope in West Palm Beach to host a sports camp for foster children. They then travelled to Orlando to work with the Orlando Union Rescue Mission, playing with kids, working in their restore, cleaning around the campus and working in the tutoring center.

Spring Break Mission Team

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BrianMorton LIVING A LIFE OF SERVICE By Jan Joslin

photo by Richard Esposito

The first time Brian Morton ever saw someone get shot was just a few months ago.

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It was outside his building at Metanoia Youth Leadership Academy where Morton is an instructor in the after school program. Some students were already in the building, but Morton was panicked because he knew the students from Military Magnet would be coming down the street in just a few minutes. The shooting was startling enough, but the nonreaction from the students watching the shooting out the window almost did him in. After the shooting, Morton called his father. “My dad understands stuff,” he said. “He is level headed and intelligent. He is my hero and has always been there for me. He is perfect in my eyes.” Morton asked his father, how do I get in my Jeep and drive back to Charleston Southern and leave these children here? “My dad told me, ‘It’s time for you to make manly decisions and do manly things. You have to make those decisions.’” In the end, Morton decided that since the students couldn’t leave their situation, he wouldn’t leave them. “That’s what made me stay,” he said.

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Different Worlds Less than 13 miles separate Charleston Southern and the Metanoia Youth Leadership Academy, but they are worlds apart. Meshing different worlds is nothing new for Morton, a May 2017 grad. Originally from a small town outside Beaufort, South Carolina, Morton mostly grew up in Japan and South Korea, a world away from his rural upbringing. Morton’s mother and father are both teachers with the Department of Defense and currently teach and live in South Korea. The desire to travel and experience other cultures comes from his Mom. He said, my Mom feels like people get trapped in their hometowns, living in a rural area. “She felt there was so much more than the 10 or 15 miles she saw every day,” said Morton. The influence of his parents is strong in everything Morton does. When he was a child, his father, a retired Marine instructor at Parris Island, was the headmaster of two schools. Morton’s life changed in a big way when his family moved from Beaufort to Japan. In Beaufort, he was surrounded by other African

Americans, but from the minute the Morton family landed in Japan, they were exposed to multiple cultures and backgrounds. And Morton found that he liked it. The family moved from Japan to South Korea when Morton was in the eighth grade, living first in Seoul, then transferring to Camp Humphreys, the largest overseas installation of the U.S. armed forces. After high school, Morton enrolled at New Mexico Military Institute on an ROTC scholarship. He later transferred to CSU to attend school with his brother, Brandon. CSU wasn’t unknown to the brothers. Their mother, Karen, is a 1988 graduate, and their uncle, Charlie Brown, was a left-handed pitcher on the Buccaneer baseball team in the ’80s. “I came to CSU because I wanted to be well-grounded and be somewhere where I could just walk and grow spiritually and get words of wisdom,” said Morton. “I wanted to go to college where I wouldn’t travel far from Christ.” Morton graduated May 6 with an elementary education major. For now, he plans to teach in the U.S., with hopes of teaching overseas eventually.

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Brian Morton recently met Dr. Gerrita Postlewait, superintendent of Charleston County School District, at a luncheon on campus. Pictured are: President Jairy C. Hunter Jr., Brian Morton, Dr. Gerrita Postlewait and Erica Taylor of CCSD. Photo by Jan Joslin

Education with Purpose Charleston Southern education students don’t usually student teach in downtown Charleston due to traffic and travel considerations. However, Morton’s background and his desire to interact with African American children led Dr. Linda Karges-Bone to place him with Kenneth Joyner at Memminger Elementary. Joyner graduated from CSU in 2011. He was instrumental in helping start Memminger’s Boys with Purpose, a leadership program that has gained national media attention. Morton said, “The program is amazing. Young boys are taking ownership of their education. Thursdays are dress up days. The program’s motto is look good, feel good, do good.” Joyner made an impression on Morton, and he looks forward to incorporating things he learned from Joyner into his own classroom. “I trust myself enough to know that I can give children something they will be able to use the rest of their lives and to be a positive influence,” he said. Service Life Morton heard about an after school program in North Charleston that was looking for education majors. Metanoia is a nonprofit Community Development Corporation serving the southern part of North Charleston. Metanoia is a Greek word found in the New Testament and means to make a positive transformation, pushing forward.

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“Metanoia’s program was so attractive to me. Their idea is so great, so needed, I just had to be a part of it,” said Morton. He went to work with sixth graders under the leadership of Stacy Brown ’09, director of operations at Metanoia’s Youth Leadership Academy, and Craig Logan ’12, middle and high school coordinator. Nothing could have prepared Morton for his first day. “The biggest struggle is being accepted by them, at first they are on edge, very protective, want to try you,” he said. “When you enable them, kids will ride it until you stop it. When they really respond is when you put your foot down and set a standard. The backlash is terrible, but they respect you and love you for it,” he said. It took about a month, but after that Morton and his sixth graders were rolling along. The program offers incentives and outings outside of Metanoia. He wanted to give his students something more, a chance to think their reality could be different. He set up a tour of Charleston Southern for his students. “They saw that a person they know is going to school with all different kinds of people. We showed them people are doing it together. People of all colors are going to class together,” said Morton. Morton told his class, “If you want to do better, I need to see that in your actions.” Over time, Morton realized a young man in the fourth grade class, Jackson*, was what he calls a firestarter. “Some people are followers, some are firestarters.”

Morton is president of CSU’s chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha. He and Deondre Street, a fellow CSU classmate who taught Jackson’s after school class, figured out that Jackson was interested in Alpha Phi Alpha and their upcoming step show. Morton told Jackson, “I will put you in the show, but you have to come to every practice, have your homework finished, and be held accountable.” Morton bought Jackson an outfit similar to what the other guys were wearing. “Jackson has a huge influence; he is a natural leader,” said Morton. “It was easier to get other scholars on board because Jackson was doing this.” Morton is conscious of his role as an African American young man and views his time in education as a chance to put a light in front of other young men. “I want to try to make their reality different. That’s why I dress like this and treat them with respect. It’s why I brought them to tour CSU – I wanted them to see college students in a positive light, we are here to learn. One of the biggest things they noticed on our tour is that no one was fighting.” He explains the difference he’s had on his students simply, “I didn’t drop my standard down to theirs.” Logan, Morton’s supervisor at Metanoia, said, “Brian has an awesome impact with the scholars he works with here. As a graduate of CSU, I am especially proud of Brian and his commitment to education and being a positive male role model. Intergenerational leadership is extremely important to me and my role as program coordinator. Brian understands this and encompasses this in his everyday interaction with the scholars he serves.” Morton said, “I want to do what some men and women have done for me. I have a gift of speaking to children, and I want to serve my community and my country.” He seeks to instill in children the idea that they can take ownership of the idea of being successful. He also wants to follow in his Dad’s footsteps. “I knew I was going to be an Alpha since I was eight years old and my dad, an Alpha, told me about it.” Morton’s father, the educator, the Marine vet, the Alpha, is also a pastor. He constantly reminds his son, “When you walk in the light, people are going to see there is a difference in you.” Brian Morton is already shining the light. *name has been changed

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM HONORED WITH SERVICE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD

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he Women’s Basketball team was chosen as a 2017 campus honoree of the South Carolina Student Organization Service Achievement Award as announced by the South Carolina Campus Compact review committee. The award recognizes a student organization that exhibits outstanding leadership and innovative approaches in their community service endeavors both on their campus and within their community, which addresses public issues, effective community building, and integration of civic engagement into the college experience.

“South Carolina Campus Compact review committee was amazed by the level of passion for civic engagement being demonstrated on CSU’s campus,” said Assistant Dean of Student Services Dr. Hester Young. “South Carolina Campus Compact is in awe of the commitment to community engagement and support exhibited by the Women’s Basketball team at Charleston Southern University led by their coach, Fred Applin,” said Executive Director for South Carolina Campus Compact Jessica Lynn. “Seeing a group of students who have such full schedules with academics and athletics spend their free time

to help others in need is inspiring!” “It’s a blessing to receive these awards,” said Applin. “As a team, we are always talking about giving back to the community. I’m so proud of the commitment from the players and coaching staff to make this happen. We know Charleston is a special place, and we are glad to be a part of it.” The Women’s Basketball team was recognized at the CSU Awards Day and at the South Carolina Campus Compact Leadership Summit Reception at Greenville Technical College.

The women’s basketball team was recognized at CSU’s annual Awards Day in April. Photo by Josh Montgomery

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SCHOOL TIES

Class notes 1973

1985

Catherine Hagen and Wade Stowe were married April 8 in Columbia. She retired from Midlands Technical College.

April Almond has joined Jarrard, Nowell & Russell, LLC as a staff accountant in their North Charleston office. She is a member of the American Institute of CPAs, the South Carolina Association of CPAs, and the coastal chapter of the SCACPA.

1974

COMPILED BY JAN JOSLIN ’82

2000

1986 Susanne Sanders owns Turning Pointe Ministries where she runs Turning Pointe Centre for the Arts, Turning Pointe Models & Talent and Turning Pointe Theatre in Lexington. She has performed nationally and internationally as well as traveled internationally on mission trips. To learn more about her ministries, visit susannesanders.com.

Dr. Michelle D. Commander recently published Afro-Atlantic Flight: Speculative Returns and the Black Fantastic with Duke University Press. Duke Press says about the book: “In Afro-Atlantic Flight, Commander traces how post-civil rights Black American Georgia Public Service artists, intellectuals and travelers Commissioner Stan Wise envision literal and figurative has been included in two flight back to Africa as a means by publications. He was named one which to heal the dispossession of 100 Influential Georgians by caused by the slave trade. She goes Georgia Trend Magazine in the on to examine Black Americans’ January 2017 issue. He was also cultural heritage tourism in and Cathy Pruett is the new manager listed in the March/April 2017 of the Johnsonville Public Library migration to Ghana, Bahia, Brazil, issue of James Magazine’s 2016 in Johnsonville. She was formerly and various sites of slavery in list of accomplished individuals the U.S. South to interrogate the youth service librarian in the who are making a difference the ways that a cadre of actors Marion Library System. across the state. Now in a produces ‘Africa’ and contests fourth term as a Public Service master narrative.” Commander is Commissioner, the former Cobb an associate professor of English County commissioner is an at the University of Tennessee. She expert on many government Ron Jaicks, general manager holds an MS from Florida State energy regulations, both local of the Wingate by Wyndham at and an MA and PhD from the and federal, and is respected Charleston Southern, was notified University of Southern California. statewide. A champion of clean, that the Wingate by Wyndham She has received numerous safe nuclear power, Wise last won the Small Business of the Year awards including a Fulbright year testified before Congress on award for 2016 from the Greater Foundation’s Research/Lecturing pipeline safety and serves on the Summerville/Dorchester County Grant in Ghana in 2012-2013. National Association of Regulatory Chamber of Commerce’s Business Utility Commissioners’ Natural of the Year award program. Jaicks Gas Committee. He is the longest is a member of the CSU Alumni serving elected constitutional Association Board and the CSU officer in the state of Georgia. Board of Visitors.

1989

2001 Jennifer Coker MEd is executive director of alternative programs for the Charleston County School District. Douglas Fanelli has been hired at his alma mater, Cardinal Newman High School in West Palm Beach, Florida, to work in the athletic department. He also will continue to act as the football, lacrosse, wrestling and weightlifting coach at Cardinal Newman.

2002 Andre Dukes ‘06 MEd, former principal of St. John’s High School on John’s Island, has been named to Charleston Regional Business Journal’s 40 under 40 list. He is now at Southside High School in Greenville. Eric Gambrell ’05 MAT-S has been named assistant principal of Batesburg-Leesville High School. Previously he was a social studies teacher and has also coached football and track.

1993

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

2004

2005 Trent Drafts ’10 MBA is commercial banking vice president for South State Bank in the downtown Charleston branch.

Matt Alexander, a supervisory committee member of South Carolina Federal Credit Union, and cofounder of OneWorld Health, has been named to the Class of 2018 Liberty Fellows. The Liberty Fellowship class is comprised of 21 individuals, selected from across industries and regions, each exhibiting an understanding of the challenges facing our state and the leadership skills necessary to initiate dialogue, exploration and take action for the good of South Carolina.

Jamie Alutius Kuznik and David Kuznik announce the birth of a son, Logan Scott Kuznik, born June 11, 2016, in Charleston. Logan is the grandson of Wanda Williams Helms ’92. The Kuzniks live in North Charleston.

2006

Richard Gordon MEd is the executive director of career Roger Simpson was a finalist for and technology education for the Lexington-Richland School Charleston County School District Five Teacher of the Year District. He was formerly the Award. He has been director of principal at James Island Charter bands at Irmo High School for five High School. years.

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STAY CONNECTED! Send us news about family additions, job changes and memories of your time at CSU. To include a photo, email a high resolution jpg. (If you send a professional photograph, please include permission to print from the photographer.) Class Notes: Email your news to magazine@csuniv.edu Address change: Email advancement@csuniv.edu Name change: Email register@csuniv.edu Follow the Alumni Association on Social Media: alumni_csu

alumni_csu

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SCHOOL TIES

2007

2009

Leslie Ott Howard is a realtor at Charleston Property Group Keller Williams Charleston. Her husband, Anthony Howard ’12, MSOM ’16, is director of logistics at the Lowcountry Food Bank. Leslie writes, “We love CSU and are proud to be alumni.”

Jewel Larson Sweeney has published a children’s book, The Adventures of Bugaboo & Ladybug: Up, Up & Away. Sweeney, a wife and mother, uses her experience as a mother and educator to capture the power of daydreams and childlike imagination. The book is available from Amazon, Books-A-Million, Barnes & Noble and Mascot Books.

2008 Rich Hutto is a senior solutions advisor in Hampton with the Agape Hospice of the Low Country organization. He serves as an educator with hospice care.

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Darlene Enroth MBA was the guest speaker for CSU’s Sigma Beta Delta spring induction ceremony. Enroth is the sales operations executive for IBM Global Financing Division in North America. She has spent her career at IBM and is a member of Sigma Beta Delta, the international honor society for business. Jennifer Slaughter Miles and Shaun Miles announce the birth of their first child, a daughter, Faith Primrose Miles, born in November 2016. The Miles family lives in Washington, D.C., where Jennifer and Shaun both work for the Navy.

Memorials Benjamin P. Bagwell Sr., age 84, died April 26 in Cumming, Ga. He was a retired journalist and the author of three books. He was a former director of public relations at CSU.

Larry Dean Perry ’74, age 68, died March 1 in Richmond, Va. He was a U.S. Navy veteran and had been an administrator for youth treatment services through Teaching-Family Association.

Lynda Greager Byrd ’77, age 61, died March 1. She had been a school teacher and owner of Byrd’s Specialty Company.

C. Lawrence Simmons III ’86, age 53, died April 16 in Lexington. He was a lawyer.

Veronica Marie Wood Dees ’04 MEd, age 53, died March 2. She was a French teacher. James E. “Jamie” Hiott Jr. ’77, age 64, died March 30 in North Augusta. He was retired from Mead Johnson Nutrition. Kristin Hoff Langdale ’02 MEd, age 50, died March 21 in Dorchester. She was the principal of Harleyville Elementary School in Harleyville.

Anthony Jerome Smalls ’82, age 58, died May 1 in Hudson, Mass. He was formerly a vice president with TJX Corporation. W. Rosser Thrash, age 84, died April 19 in Mount Pleasant. He was owner and president of T&T Sports of Charleston. He was a longtime member of the CSU Board of Visitors and a recipient of a CSU Distinguished Service Award.

2010 Ashley Barton, of Select Health of South Carolina, has been named to Charleston Regional Business Journal’s 40 under 40 list. Megan Bruner Busch has been accepted to the PhD program in English at the University of South Carolina, where she will be provided an assistanceship. She is an adjunct professor at CSU.

Alyssa Clay-Gilmour is a postdoctoral fellow in cancer genetic epidemiology at the Mayo Clinic. Leonard L. Ferdig Jr. is the human resources manager at Arcadia Publishing.

2011 Charles Jeffrey Foster has received a master of arts in Old Testament and a master of divinity from Southeastern Seminary in Wake Forest, N.C.

Steve Gergick MBA is the new recreation director for the Town of Mount Pleasant. He was formerly the assistant recreation director in Mount Pleasant.

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2013 Stephanie Addison and her husband, Ken, announce the birth of their second child, Joseph John Addison, born March 4. Stephanie writes, “He was named after multiple grandfathers.”

2017 Teachers of the Year

2014

Devon Forest Elementary School, Dr. Shelley Matthews ’99 ’04 MEd (Teacher of the Year)

Benjamin “BJ” Catoe is a second-year medical student at Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine.

Stratford High School, Jimmy Cate ’06 MAT (Teacher of the Year)

Rosalyn Rebecca Caudle and Jordan Burrell Keels were married April 1 in Charleston. He is a manager with Scout Boats, and they live in Charleston. Kristi Hixon recently completed her MA in English from Clemson University. She won Clemson’s Shilstone Award for best master’s thesis in English.

2016 James “JJ” Messervy Jr. MBA has joined Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Southern Coast Real Estate in the Summerville office.

2017 Hugh Pressley has been accepted to the PhD program in Rhetoric and Composition at Texas Tech University.

BERKELEY COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

Philip Simmons Middle School, Dylan Hundson ’17 MEd (Teacher of the Year) College Park Elementary, Lauren Sibrava ’16 (Rookie Teacher of the Year) Goose Creek Primary, Justin Lowe ’16 (Rookie Teacher of the Year)

DORCHESTER DISTRICT 2 Flowertown Elementary, Deb Dorris ’93 (Teacher of the Year) Fort Dorchester Elementary, Elizabeth Manning ’95 (Teacher of the Year) Newington Elementary, Angie Green ’99 (Teacher of the Year) Windsor Hill Arts Infused Elementary, Gary Seaboldt ’14 MEd (Teacher of the Year) Alston Bailey Elementary, Regan West-Sullivan ’16 (Rookie Teacher of the Year) Eugene Sires Elementary, Ashley Atkins ’16 (Rookie Teacher of the Year) Ashley Ridge High School, Isaac Lowrance ’15 (Rookie Teacher of the Year) Fort Dorchester High School, Shayla Hoff ’16 (Rookie of the Year)

CHARLESTON COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT Mt. Pleasant Academy, Barbara C. Allen ’04 (Teacher of the Year District Finalist)

LEXINGTON-RICHLAND SCHOOL DISTRIVE FIVE Irmo High School, Roger Simpson ’04 (Teacher of the Year District Finalist)

If we missed your announcement, please email the information to magazine@csuniv.edu.

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SCHOOL TIES

Baby Bucs 2

1

TO SUBMIT YOUR BABY BUCS PHOTO: Email a picture of your Baby Buc wearing the shirt to alumni@csuniv.edu. Pictures should be 1MB in size or larger, in jpg format.

3

4

5 6

7

8

9

1. Joseph John Addison, son of Stephanie Addison ’13 and Ken Addison 2. Hailey Paige Burgan, daughter of Sierra Burgan ’14 and Shayne Burgan ’16 3. Preston Dickson, son of Plowden Dickson III ’96, nephew of Kevin Dickson ’06 and great nephew of Beverly Thomas ’94 and J.T. Thomas ’95 4. Solomon Gibson, son of Carolyn Mills Gibson ’09 and Robb Gibson ’09 5. Logan Kuznik, son of Jamie Alutius Kuznik ’05 and David Kuznik ’05 and grandson of Wanda Williams Helms ’92 6. Faith Primrose Miles, daughter of Jennifer Slaughter Miles ’09 and Shaun Miles ’09 7. Emma Katherine O’Callaghan, daughter of Mary O’Callaghan ’92 and James O’Callaghan 8. Brayden Prince Hopper, son of Bridget Posey ’00 and Delton Hopper 9. David John Wood IV, son of JoBeth Banas Wood ’05 and grandson of CSU employee, Pam Banas

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TO ORDER A SHIRT CSU graduates, if you have a child under the age of 2, let us know at alumni@csuniv. edu, and we will send a CSU onesie for your Baby Buc. The shirt is free; all we ask in return is a photo of your Baby Buc for the magazine.

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BUCCANEER PRIDE LIVES ON Charleston Southern’s Brick Program provides alumni, friends, faculty and staff the opportunity to leave their mark on CSU as well as support the future of CSU students. Help build the tradition today, visit charlestonsouthern.edu/ buyabrick.

GRADUATE E.J. Reddick, Class of 2017, highlighted his time on the Buccaneer track team on his brick.

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SCHOOL TIES

TAD DRIGGERS’ IMPACT WILL LIVE ON By Warren Peper

F

or 23 years, Tad Driggers worked at MUSC. One of his jobs involved tending the animals used for research. Another of his duties included getting to work early and opening the doors for the staff and students. He was never late for work. Tears still moisten the eyes of his parents, Larry and Sallie Driggers, when they speak of Tad. His death, in 2016, at the age of 43, still hurts. Tad never married. He lived at home, and though saddled with a low IQ, lived an active and productive life until he died suddenly of heart stoppage. But the Good Lord seemed intent on allowing Tad to still impact people after his death. While sitting in the pew on a Sunday morning at Highland Park Baptist Church, the Driggers listened to CSU President Dr. Jairy

Hunter deliver a message about the mission and vision of Charleston Southern. Hunter was filling in that Sunday while the church in nearby Hanahan sought a full-time pastor. After hearing Hunter’s description of how CSU’s primary goal was to provide academic excellence in a Christian environment, the words hung heavy on their hearts. They left the sanctuary with a desire to support a school representing their own values that’s essentially located in their backyard. Months later, the Driggers decided that they would honor their son by endowing a $100,000 scholarship. They asked for one caveat. The family wanted the scholarship to benefit worthy students from Hanahan. The Driggers family was thanked with a luncheon on campus on Feb. 2. Larry

Larry and Sallie Driggers, Dr. Jairy Hunter, Dr. Jeremy Wallace, Willa, Eva, Abbott, Ramey and Doug Schutz and Dr. Michael Bryant Photo by Richard Esposito

and Sally invited daughter, Ramey, and her husband, Doug, along with their three children. The new pastor at Highland Park Baptist, Dr. Jeremy Wallace, also attended. To add one more wrinkle to the gathering, Doug is a new faculty member at CSU in the recently added Physician Assistant program. Hunter expressed appreciation for the generous gift and said, “The endowment will help students forever and ever.” Tad Driggers will be opening doors for others thanks to how his parents chose to honor his memory.

SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS

Annual Scholarship Luncheon Honors Donors Tyrell Dukes, a junior majoring in finance management from Surfside Beach, expressed thanks to scholarship donors and the huge impact they have on students’ lives.

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Hogues Join the Executive Level of the Board of Visitors The Hogues’ gift will supply several scholarships to deserving students. Pictured are: President Jairy Hunter, Rev. Richard Hogue and Mrs. Elizabeth Hogue of Summerville.

Harry Scarborough Honored The Rev. Harry Scarborough ’73 was recently honored for 53 years of service in Christian ministry. Scarborough served on the CSU Board of Trustees from 19992003. He is currently the pastor of First Baptist Church of Goose Creek.

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

Annual CSU Giving Day Thursday, April 6 was the annual CSU Giving Day. Over $58,000 was raised for student scholarships in a 24 hour period. CSU thanks YOU for helping make this year’s online giving day a huge success.

Thank a Donor Day The purpose of Thank a Donor Day is to thank the many alumni, friends, parents and university faculty and staff who support Charleston Southern through private gifts. The office of advancement challenged students to celebrate our donors who, through the simple act of giving, make a remarkable difference at CSU.

Dorchester County Medical Society Dr. Andreea Meier, dean of the College of Nursing; Kristie J. O’Rourke of Summerville, scholarship recipient; Dr. Eric Steam of the Dorchester County Medical Society; Allen T. Cooke of Summerville, scholarship recipient; Stephanie Cooke, Allen’s wife; and Bill Ward, executive director of advancement.

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Turner Joins Legacy Society Dr. Geneva Anne Turner ’85, ’89, of Moncks Corner, joined the Legacy Society and through her Legacy Society gift, she will establish an endowed scholarship. She previously established a scholarship named “Cool Beans.”

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SCHOOL TIES

FOLEY ADDRESSES CLASS OF 2017 AT ANNUAL GRADUATION LUNCHEON

T

he Alumni Association honored members of the graduating class and their guests at the annual Graduation Luncheon on May 5. Kate Ramer Foley ’07, vice president of athlete brand strategy for Octagon Basketball, was the keynote speaker. Foley represents clients such as Stephen Curry and is the first female VP in the company’s basketball division, and the youngest person to be named a vice president. After graduating from CSU, Foley worked for Nike before joining Octagon. She told graduates not to forget where they have come from and offered advice:

Tyrese Harris, President Jairy Hunter, Jan Joslin, Dr. Rick Brewer

• Failure is real. Be driven by challenges and obstacles, but don’t let it hold you back; let it recharge you. • When dealing with a setback, try to put things into perspective quickly. • Confidence – there will be times you doubt yourself. But remember that you can handle anything with grace, confidence and faith. Understand that you will continue to learn as you go through life and your career. • Surround yourself with people smarter than you, that will challenge you, teach you and lift you up. There is a great saying that life can be like an elevator, sometimes you have to stop and let people off before you can go up. • Don’t use graduation as a turning point; use it as a new chapter. Every experience you have, every door that you open, every path that you go down is a chapter in your story. It doesn’t define you; it doesn’t represent you or your life as a whole.

• Own your story. Write it. Live it. Share it. At the luncheon, the Alumni Association also recognized alumni who were nominated by their peers to receive annual alumni awards. Tyrese Harris ’10 Community Service Award This award honors an alumnus who goes above and beyond the expectations of a community, church or nonprofit group and recognizes his or her personal sacrifice and exceptional volunteer service to a charitable organization. Harris works for the department of juvenile justice and is an avid volunteer in his community. He worked with flood victims in Orangeburg during the 2015 and 2016 floods that devastated many areas, homes and

Kate Foley

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CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

Alpha Phi Alpha Celebrates 40 Years at CSU communities by providing support through prayer vigils, food and necessities. Harris also mentors youth in the community and as a buddy at Mary Ford Elementary School. He spends his time with young men who need a role model, youth who need to find employment, and some who need basic supplies like food and clothing. Jan Joslin ’82 University Mission Award This award goes to an outstanding alumnus who exhibits the ideals and ethics of CSU. As a CSU employee, Joslin is the bridge to the alumni and the public about the happenings and stories surrounding Charleston Southern University. Her dedication as editor of the CSU Magazine reaches thousands, and she has helped preserve the history of the university with her past leadership of the yearbook and student newspaper. Joslin is a leader to students and coworkers, an avid learner, and a servant to others. Dr. Rick Brewer ’77, ’96 Distinguished Alumnus of the Year This is the most prestigious award given by the Alumni Association and honors the person who has distinguished him or herself in three areas: service to the university, service to the community and achievement in his or her field of endeavor. Brewer is the first Baptist College/CSU alumnus to be named a university president. He is currently president of Louisiana College. Prior to that, he served Charleston Southern University for 28 years of leadership. His love for Christian higher education is clear from his service to students and his educational background in this area of study. His credentials are impressive while his love for Christ and his alma mater are evident in his accomplishments.

T

he Mu Pi chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha celebrated their 40th anniversary at CSU this spring with several events on campus. Alonzo Wilson ’82 said, “The anniversary celebration was the first time in over 30 years many of us had seen each other. It was an awesome and emotional celebration.” Michael Butler ’84 said the group

represented retired military officers, Amtrack management, ministers, Duke Energy management, workforce area directors, the airline industry, and more. The brothers of Mu Pi reached out to the CSU alumni office to plan their reunion, which included a luncheon and a basketball game.

Photos provided

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SCHOOL TIES

Larry Dupleich ’83

Where are they now? Larry Dupleich’s tennis career began in his native Bolivia when he was 10 years old and his grandmother, Mrs. Esther Murillo de Puna, paid his club membership. Tennis has literally taken him around the world. Today, Dupleich has attained the United States Professional Tennis Association’s highest rating of Master Professional and is the CEO and director of the Larry Dupleich Tennis Academy and founder/owner of Larry Dupleich Mobile Tennis in Tokyo, Japan. In Bolivia, Dupleich was ranked third nationally in the 16s and 18s and wanted to play college tennis. His mother, Emma, said she would pay for his plane ticket if he got an offer to play collegiate tennis. He said he typed many letters on his Smith-Corona and received an offer from Baptist College, now Charleston Southern. His mother kept her promise, and he spent his collegiate career as the number one player on the team. He said, “I would like to thank the Lord for giving me my father, mother, siblings, uncle and dear friends who supported me during those wonderful years at BCC.” Q. What are some of your memories of playing tennis for the Buccaneers? Representing BCC as the #1 player during my four years was a great honor and unforgettable one, along with the team spirit and life lessons. But, what sticks in my mind most is that as a team we did the best we could playing for BCC. Coach Chuck Welty and Coach Howard Bagwell did the best with what they had and were very supportive. What more could one ask? This means a lot to me! Q. What was it like attending college with your siblings? My brother, Paul, ’85 and my sister, Jeannette, ’83 came to BCC one year later. And my youngest sister, Jacqueline, came to BCC after I graduated. Attending college with my siblings definitely made me feel not homesick.

My brother was my roommate, and my sister was very supportive. We stuck together in the good times and hard times! Just like the Three Musketeers, one for all, all for one. Q. At what point did you know you wanted to dedicate your career to tennis? From the moment I picked up the racket, I never stopped. But it was not until the end of my senior year, thanks to the good Lord, I had a chance to go teach and practice at the world renowned Harry Hopman Camp in Florida. From then on, I knew it was my career. Q. When did you decide to go to Japan? It was in 1991, an offer came to coach at a Japanese tennis academy for top juniors and professionals in Tokyo. It sounded interesting and challenging at that time. I took it. It started with a three month contract – and I’m still here. The first three month contract in Tokyo played a big role in my life! I was living alone; I did not speak Japanese, so I had a lot of time to find myself. I spiritually got closer to the Lord, read the Bible, finished all my songs, and totally focused on my job. After the three month contract ended, I was asked to come back. I got married and have two lovely daughters. Q. How did you come up with the idea for Larry Dupleich Mobile Tennis?

dents to take my lessons. So, I thought, if you can’t come to my lesson, my lesson will come to you. So Larry Dupleich Mobile Tennis was born. It’s a special program that caters to the student’s own time, place and choice of court surface with a custom lesson plan from a USPTA master professional coach. I think Larry Dupleich Mobile Tennis is unique because it has a multicultural background, and the lessons can be taught in six different languages – English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Italian and Japanese. It is also unique because of the availability and flexibility. Our motto is, You Order, We Deliver. By the way CSU – at your service anytime! Q. Do you consider tennis the ideal sport? I certainly do; it is a lifetime sport. Tennis teaches us a good sense of achievement. It only takes two people to play singles and four to play doubles. Playing singles, one makes his/her own decisions, no excuses. It is self-gratifying. Playing doubles, you and your partner play as a team covering and supporting each other always. No blames. In general, tennis teaches us about life, to respect each other. For recreational adult players, I recommend playing on soft surfaces such as clay or har-tru tennis courts to avoid knee problems. Tennis is a good way to have fun and stay healthy.

There was a lot of interest to take my lessons, but because of the distance and time availability, it was not possible for the stu-

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Transform Our students. Our campus. Our community. Our world. The Campaign for Charleston Southern University CAMPAIGN GOAL: $100 MILLION The first phase of the campaign’s $40 million goal has been surpassed with more than $42 million committed thus far. The campaign is now in its second phase with a goal of raising an additional $60 million. Phase One Achievements:

• Whitfield Center for Christian Leadership • College of Nursing building expansion • Buccaneer Stadium Athletic Complex • Buccaneer Stadium Entry renovation and lighting project • Millions in scholarship aid

Phase Two Goals: The creation of additional major facilities, scholarships and academic enhancements valued at approximately $60 million • Merit and need-based scholarships • Health Sciences building will house the master of medical science in physician assistant studies program and health sciences programs. The building is under construction, and naming opportunities are available. • Athletics - Athletic Performance Center, strength and conditioning center and meeting and office space - Singleton Baseball Complex, named in memory of current team member Chris Singleton’s mother, Sharonda Coleman-Singleton who was killed in the Emanuel AME Church shooting in Charleston. The Complex is under construction, and naming opportunities are still available. - University Center Arena, a 3,500-seat multipurpose arena is planned for the future. • Academic Enhancement, including faculty development, global education, research and activities in the Whitfield Center for Christian Leadership and endowed chairs in specific academic departments

Joyce Mixson and her late husband, Frank Mixson, have been longtime supporters of the university. They established an endowed scholarship in their son’s memory. Charles Neill Moore was a member of the Class of 1969 and died in an automobile accident in 1970. Through the years, Mrs. Mixson said she enjoyed talking with and learning about the students she met at the annual scholarship luncheons.

Mrs. Mixson continues to contribute to CSU because she said, “When you give, you’re the one who is blessed. We were blessed, so we gave more.”

PLEASE CALL 843-863-7513 FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

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Profile for csumagazine

CSU Magazine - Graduation 2017  

Megan Cammer is living her Disney dream. 2004 graduate, Cez Champagne, is the only female currently coaching a boys’ basketball team in S.C....

CSU Magazine - Graduation 2017  

Megan Cammer is living her Disney dream. 2004 graduate, Cez Champagne, is the only female currently coaching a boys’ basketball team in S.C....

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