Issuu on Google+

ISSUE

17

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

December 2012

Page 1

Inside this Issue

Warm Wishes

CDA Livestock Disease Recap .......... 4 & 5

After much thought and consideration, I will be leaving my position with CSU Extension in Pueblo County. I leave after learning so much from this community and I will miss so much. I hope my time here made a positive impact on Pueblo and I wish you the best in the future. Hopefully, my position will be filled soon. If you have comments or suggestions for how Extension can help the agricultural community, please let the Regional Director and Pueblo County Extension’s interim director, Bill Nobles know. You can reach him at 719-545-1845.

Rocky Ford Diagnostics Lab................... 6

I hope my absence is filled with lots of well timed precipitation.

Message from Emily ............................. 1 Rangelands Fall/Winter ................... 1 & 5 Drought Monitor................................... 2 Know a Native ..................................... 2 Tamarisk Beetle Map ............................ 3 US Seasonal Drought Outlook ............... 3

CO Water Quality Division Survey .......... 6 CoCoRaHS ........................................... 7 USDA Ag Census .................................. 8 Event Announcements ..................... 9-13

Many thanks for your generosity and kindness. Best of luck in the future! Best wishes,

Calendar of Events ............................. 14 Office Hours: Monday—Friday 8 a.m.—5 p.m. (excluding holidays) CSU Extension Pueblo County 701 Court St., Suite C Pueblo, CO 81003 Phone: (719) 583-6566 Fax: (719) 583-6582 http://pueblo.colostate.edu

www.facebook.com/ CSUExtensionPueblo All articles written by Emily Lockard unless otherwise indicated.

Emily Lockard Extension Agent Range and Natural Resources Management

Rangelands in the Fall and Winter By Dr. Casey Matney, Rangeland Management Specialist Fall brings a great number of changes to Colorado rangelands. Fall brings cooler temperatures, decreases in rainfall, and waning daylight. These changes signify the end of the plant growing season, which results in plants going dormant. Below are a few changes to rangelands you can expect to occur during the fall/ winter. Most grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees prepare for fall and winter by storing carbohydrates in their roots. Plant photosynthesis decreases or halts completely, while plant respiration continues through the fall and winter. Many plants will shed their leaves. Continued page 5

Emily Lockard is the Extension Agent for Range and Natural Resources Management in the Colorado State University Extension Pueblo County office. She can be reached at (719) 583-6566 or Emily.Lockard@colostate.edu. Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 2

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

Continued Drought Update

The following are maps from the U.S. Drought Monitor http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu

As of December 4th most of Pueblo County is classified as being in an extreme drought and an eastern part of the County is categorized as being in an exceptional drought. This map is updated weekly and can be viewed at http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/ DM_state.htm?CO,W From this website, if you are viewing the US map, click on the state of Colorado to view a more detailed map of Colorado.

Know a Native— Prairie Junegrass Koeleria macrantha Native, cool season, perennial General nutrient values, mature plant: Dry matter 100%, Crude Fiber 38.6%, Protein 5.8%, Digestible protein (cattle) 2.8%, Digestible energy Mcal/kg (cattle) 2.31 Starts growth early in spring, flowers June/July, produces seed through September, may re-grow in the fall if soil moisture is adequate. Reproduces from seeds and tillers. Excellent forage for livestock , good for wildlife,. Production is relatively low. Fair to good as hay. Sources: Jurgens, Marshall H. Animal Feeding and Nutrition. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, 2002. Stubbendieck, James, Stephan L. Hatch, and L.M. Landholt. North American Wildland Plants. Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 2003. Simonin, Kevin. 2000. Koeleria macrantha. In: Fire Effects Information System, [Online]. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fire Larry Allain @ USDA-NRCS Sciences Laboratory (Producer). Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/ [2012, Database December Colorado 4]. State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to allPLANTS without discrimination.


Page 3

Arkansas Valley Tamarisk Beetle Distribution Map

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

The past few years has seen increased success in the distribution of the Tamarisk Leaf Beetle. To the right is the Tamarisk Leaf Beetle Distribution Map for 2012 created by the Tamarisk Coalition. This year, with the help of 28 partners they were able to monitor over 1,000 points for beetle establishment within seven states. If you have further questions, please contact the Tamarisk Coalition. www.tamariskcoalition.org/

US Seasonal Drought Outlook

For more details and maps go to: Coloradohttp://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov/products/expert_assessment/seasonal_drought.html State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 4

Colorado Livestock Disease Recap—CDA Update

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

The Colorado Department of Agriculture and Colorado producers have had a busy summer protecting livestock from diseases that affected this state’s largest agricultural sector – animal industry. “The collaboration between livestock producers, private practice veterinarians, our veterinary diagnostic laboratories and our Department were important in reducing the risks and mitigating the effects of livestock disease in our state,” said CDA’s State Veterinarian, Dr. Keith Roehr. “In the EHV-1, EHD and anthrax disease investigations, the timely and effective laboratory diagnostics at the Colorado State University’s Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory were vitally important.” Overall update for 2012 to date: ANTHRAX This investigation began in August, 2012. In all, approximately 55 cattle died due to an anthrax outbreak; four Logan County premises were quarantined and subsequently released after fulfilling disease control requirements. Anthrax can develop naturally in soil; the spores can become active in association with periods of marked climatic or ecologic change such as heavy rainfall, flooding or drought which can then expose the anthrax spores to grazing livestock. In these areas the spores apparently revert to the vegetative form and multiply to infectious levels so that cattle, horses, mules, sheep and goats may readily become infected when grazing such areas. BOVINE TRICHOMONIASIS The Department sends monthly updates on “trich” in the state. As of 10/25/2012, there are currently two positive trich locations in two Colorado counties: Las Animas and Pueblo. So far this year, there have been 12 trich cases in eight counties: Conejos, Kit Carson, La Plata, Las Animas, Montezuma, Pueblo, Weld and Yuma. Monitoring and testing herds is a vital step in preventing this disease; in 2008, 43 locations tested positive for trich compared to 13 locations in 2011. Trich is a costly, yet preventable, infection that can affect dairy and beef cattle. If bulls become infected, the percentage of open cows in a herd can increase from 5 to 30 percent. It is always important for producers to consult with their herd veterinarian on best management practices for disease control. EPIZOOTIC HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE (EHD) Yak and cattle at seven locations in Colorado tested positive for (EHD) which is a viral disease that affects deer, cattle and, most recently, yak. Signs of EHD include fever, loss of appetite, weakness, respiratory distress, and swelling of the tongue, and erosive lesions in the mouth. The disease cannot be transmitted by direct contact and is spread by insects, most commonly midges or gnats. EQUINE HERPES VIRUS (EHV-1) In early May, one Colorado horse tested positive for EHV-1. Prior to exhibiting signs of disease the affected horse had recently traveled to Colorado from Iowa. This Douglas County horse was euthanized after showing severe neurological signs associated with the disease. After the initial case was diagnosed, several exposed horses were monitored closely and fortunately there was no further spread of disease. Good preventative disease measures instituted by the horse owners helped to control any possible disease spread. EHV-1 is not transmissible to people; it can be a serious disease of horses that can cause respiratory, neurologic disease and death. The most common way for EHV-1 to spread is by direct horse-to-horse contact. The virus can also spread through the air, contaminated tack and equipment, clothing and hands. VESICULAR STOMATITIS (VS) Two quarantines were issued in August after two horses in Las Animas and Conejos County tested positive for VS; the quarantines have now been lifted. The State Veterinarian’s Office continues its travel requirement for horses, mules, cattle, bison, sheep, goats, swine, and camelids entering the state from states Continued page

Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.

5


Page 5

CDA Update continued

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

with confirmed cases of VS. This requirement states that health certificates should include the following statement from the issuing veterinarian, “I have examined the animal(s) represented on this Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) and have found no signs of vesicular stomatitis and they have not originated from a premises under quarantine for vesicular stomatitis." WEST NILE VIRUS The number of equine cases of WNV increased in 2012. The 14 cases were spread throughout a wide area of Colorado as there were horses diagnosed in Delta, Fremont County, La Plata, Larimer, Mesa, Montrose, Pueblo and Weld County. Horse owners should consider vaccination and insect control as effective tools to prevent disease. “Livestock move throughout the state and across the country on a daily basis making investigating and monitoring livestock diseases an enormous task but the State Veterinarian’s Office is committed to doing our best to protect the health of the animals and the economy of the livestock industry,” said Dr. Roehr. For more on CDA’s State Veterinarian’s Office, visit www.colorado.gov/ag/animals or you may contact nick.striegel@ag.state.co.us. Thank you.

Rangelands continued Evergreen plants will retain their leaves, and grasses will dieback to their crown and grow new leaves in the spring. The forage quality of most shrubs and trees remains quite high through the fall and winter, while the forage quality of forbs and grasses decline. Forbs decline in forage quality the fastest, while the forage quality declines more slowly for dormant grasses. Crude protein levels of dormant grasses may be reduced to as low as 1% to 2% by the time spring arrives. Livestock subsisting only on dormant rangeland grasses during the fall and winter often benefit from protein and mineral supplementation. Aside from providing protein and minerals, supplementation often increases forage intake and digestibility of dormant grasses. Animals grazing dormant grasses (eating forage lacking in green leafy material) for more than three to four months may begin to suffer from vitamin A deficiency. Most grazing livestock and wildlife consume about 2% of their body weight per day in forage (dry matter). A 1,000 pound cow will need to consume about 20 pounds of forage (dry weight) per day, while a mature pronghorn antelope weighing 120 pounds will consume about 2.5 pounds of forage dry matter per day. Grazing animals eating low quality forage or eating less than 2% of their body weight a day will begin to lose weight. Wildlife such as deer and elk often lose weight during fall and winter, and they can go 30 to 60 days with little to no food as long as they start out the fall/winter healthy and with adequate fat reserves. Litter from dormant plants, when it falls to the ground and covers the soil surface, helps reduce evaporation and store soil moisture for the spring. The freezing and thawing process helps weather and incorporate plant litter into the soil. It also helps improve the seedbed for seeds that fell off plants during the summer and fall. Additionally, freeze, thaw, soil movement, and weathering during the fall and winter help to weaken the seed coat (scarification) of seeds, which breaks plant seed dormancy and improves rates of seed germination in the spring. If you have questions about changes taking place in the fall/winter on rangelands and how these changes can affect grazing animals or your livestock operation, please contact your local livestock/rangeland extension agent. Please visit the Colorado State University Extension Directory to find an agent near you. Or, if you are looking for more online information regarding rangelands, visit the Within Range website http:// range.colostate.edu Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 6

Update on Rocky Ford Diagnostic Laboratory Director

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

Dr Gene Niles became the Director of the Colorado State University Diagnostic Laboratory in Rocky Ford in mid-September filling the position left vacant due to the sudden and untimely death of Dr Jim Kennedy in December 2011. Dr Niles received his Veterinary degree and Masters of Veterinary Science from Oklahoma State University. His master’s research dealt with Sulfur-Induced Polioencephalomalacia in Beef Heifers fed Corn Gluten. He became a Diplomat of American Board of Veterinary Toxicology in 2004 following a residency at the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. All the time he was completing his post veterinary degree training, Dr Niles was the owner of Niles Animal Clinic, a solo predominantly large animal practice in Konawa, Oklahoma. For the last ten years Dr Niles has been the Director & Toxicology Supervisor at Centralia Animal Disease Laboratory, Illinois Department of Agriculture, Centralia, IL Dr Niles and his wife Kathy, a retired junior high school teacher, have 2 daughters and 3 grandchildren. His primary interests include beef cattle, but most importantly, fishing with his grandkids! Please feel free to call him at the Rocky Ford Laboratory. He is anxious to meet everyone and do what he can to help. His number is (719) 254-6382 and email is Gene.Niles@colostate.edu. Learn more about the services offered at the lab at www.dlab.colostate.edu

CO Water Quality Control Division Survey Colorado's Water Quality Control Division is proposing revised surface water standards for molybdenum as part of the 2013 review of water quality standards for the Arkansas and Rio Grande River Basins. The Division is proposing these changes to protect cattle and other ruminants from the effects of molybdenosis. Chronic symptoms of molybdenosis in cattle include weight loss, diarrhea, anemia, hair coat depigmentation, ataxia, and bone and joint deformities. However, cattle ranchers can mitigate the effects of copper deficiency caused by excess molybdenum by giving copper supplements. In order to ensure that the proposed water quality standards are protective of livestock, the Division is asking you for your input regarding livestock, forage, and management practices in our area. Have you experienced problems with molybdenosis in your herd? Have you experienced problems with copper deficiencies in your herd? Do you supplement with copper or a supplement that contains copper? If so, what type of supplement and dosage do you use? Have you had your hay or forage analyzed for copper or molybdenum? If so, what were the concentrations? Please submit your responses to Blake Beyea of the Water Quality Control Division's Standards Unit at Blake.Beyea@state.co.us or 303-692-3656. This survey is also available online at http://tinyurl.com/WQCD-Livestock-Survey Thank you for taking the time to help protect water quality in Colorado!

Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 7

The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

What is CoCoRaHS? The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network, is a non-profit community based, high density network of volunteers who take daily measurements of rain, hail and snow in their backyards. A brief History. CoCoRaHS came about as a result of a devastating flash flood that hit Fort Collins, Colorado in July 1997. A very localized storm dumped over a foot of rain in several hours while other portions of the city had only modest rainfall. The ensuing flood caught many by surprise and caused $200 million in damages. CoCoRaHS was born in 1998 with the intent of doing a better job of mapping and reporting intense storms. As more volunteers participated, rain, hail, and snow maps were produced for every storm showing fascinating local patterns that were of great interest to scientists and the public. By 2010 CoCoRaHS became a nationwide volunteer network. Volunteers of all ages welcome! The foundation of the CoCoRaHS network are individuals and family volunteers of all ages, from all walks of life, willing to spend a few minutes each day measuring and reporting precipitation. This is a project we can all help with. Why is there so much interest in rain, hail and snow? Precipitation is essential for life. It varies greatly with topography, storm type and season. It really is true that it may pour on one side of the street and be dry on the other. A portion of a field may be pounded by hail while others nearby receive no damage. Snowfall may pile up in one neighborhood and only dust another. Rain, hail and snow are fairly easy to measure, and the data collected are very important. Meteorologists, hydrologists, engineers, builders . . . you name it, everyone seems to care about rain, hail, and snow. And for some, like farmers, it is their very livelihood. What will our volunteer observers be doing? Each time a rain, hail or snow storm crosses your area, volunteers take measurements of precipitation from as many locations as possible (with 4� diameter rain guage). These precipitation reports are then recorded on our Web site www.cocorahs.org. The data are then displayed and organized for many of our end users to analyze and apply to daily situations ranging from water resource analysis and severe storm warnings to neighbors comparing how much rain fell in their backyards. Join CoCoRaHS Today! CoCoRaHS is a practical, enjoyable and useful activity. If you have an interest in weather and would like to help your local community, as well as scientists and others interested in precipitation, then CoCoRaHS is for you. It only takes a few minutes a day and gives you the chance to participate in real hands-on science. You’ll be amazed at what you learn as you become more aware of the variable weather that impacts you, your neighbors, your state and our entire country.

Map of Colorado from the CoCoRaHS website. The dots indicate reports from CoCoRaHS volunteers.

For more information contact CSU Extension in Pueblo County or go to the CoCoaHS website at http://www.cocorahs.org Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 8

Tri-State Cow/Calf Symposium Jan. 8 in McCook

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

Dec. 5, 2012 LINCOLN, Neb. — Successfully Managing the Cow Herd in the Course of Drought will be the focus for the 2013 Tri-State Cow/Calf Symposium and Trade Show Jan. 8. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. Central Time with opening remarks beginning at 9 a.m. and the program concluding around 4:30 p.m. at the Red Willow County Fairgrounds Community Building in McCook. The symposium is held in conjunction with a trade show featuring regional vendors. Attendees will have time throughout the day to visit displays. The symposium is an every other year effort between Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska and is held in cooperation among Colorado State University Extension, Kansas State University Research and Extension and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension services. The keynote speaker will be James Robb, director of the Livestock Marketing Information Center in Denver. Robb will provide participants with an economic update of the droughts impact on cattle numbers and provide a current market/situation outlook for the upcoming production year. "Three concurrent educational sessions will be available throughout the day as well and participants will have the opportunity to pick and choose which topics they want to attend," said Brian Strauch, UNL Extension educator. Aaron Stalker, UNL Extension beef nutritionist, will discuss Beef Cow Nutritional Implications During and Following Drought; Rick Rasby, UNL Extension beef specialist, will discuss Feeding and Grazing Cornstalks and Alternative Rations During Drought; and Richard Randle, UNL Extension beef cattle veterinarian will be talking about the recent decline in conception rates and some preliminary results of a UNL survey. Other topics of the concurrent educational sessions include: Good Beef Production Practices, Beef Cow Genetics Advances and Economic Implications of Herd Management Decisions during Drought. The free symposium is sponsored by McCook National Bank, AmFirst Bank-McCook, First Central BankMcCook, Furnas County Livestock Association, Farm Credit Services of America, Ag Valley Coop, Adams Bank and Trust, Frenchman Valley Coop and DuPont. Registration is required by Jan. 2 to secure proper quantities of drinks, rolls and the noon meal, as well as handouts from presenters. Vendors are welcome. Contact Brian Strauch at 308-345-3390 or 877-674-6947 to learn more. For more details or to register for the symposium, contact the UNL Extension office in McCook at 877-6746947 or email red-willow-county@unl.edu or contact Strauch at brian.strauch@unl.edu.skarstens2@unl.edu

USDA Ag Census – Help Grow Your Farm Future America's farmers and ranchers will soon have the opportunity to make a positive impact on their communities by taking part in the Census of Agriculture. Conducted every five years by USDA's National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), the Census captures a complete count of all U.S. farms, ranches and those who operate them. Please start promoting to your farmer and rancher clientele that their responses to the Census may help to shape farm programs, boost services and validate trends in food systems. NASS will mail out Census forms in late December, and responses are due by February 4, 2013. Producers also have the option of completing their forms online. For more information about the Census, visit www.agcensus.usda.gov or call 1-800-4AG-STAT (1-888-424-7828).

Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 9

Southern Colorado Ag and Range

Event Announcements

Arkansas Valley Farm • Ranch • Water Symposium & Trade Show February 7, 2013

Save the Date

8:00 a.m.—4:00 p.m. William L. Gobin Community Building Rocky Ford, Colorado

Topics will include pertinent and up-to-date information that will affect your farming and ranching operation. NEW AND IMPROVED SOUND SYSTEM!

Go to: www.farmranchwater.org for more information. http://www.facebook.com/farmranchwater Sponsored by Colorado State University Extension, City of Rocky Ford, USDA Farm Service Agency, Lower Arkansas Valley Water Conservancy District, and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Services

Turkey Creek Conservation District Noxious Weed Control Program for Pueblo County Troubled with noxious weeds on your property? We can help!  Free Property Evaluation  Free Comprehensive 3-Year Noxious Weed Management Plan

 Cost-Share on Expenses for Controlling Weeds  Professional Herbicide Application Available

 Free Follow-Up Inspection and Recommendations

Contact Turkey Creek Conservation District at 719-543-8386 ext. 116 or email: info@puebloweeds.com website: www.puebloweeds.com

Save the date! Pueblo County Stockmen’s Annual Meeting When: Saturday, February 2, 2013 Time and Location: TBA

● Educational Presentations ● Annual Meeting ● Dinner ● Silent Auction For more information contact Dan Henrichs 947-3579 or 251-7891

Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 10

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

Event Announcements

7th Annual Western Landscape Symposium Save the date! March 16, 2013, 9:00 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Pueblo Community College, Fortino Ballroom, 900 W. Orman Ave., Pueblo, CO. Join us for this educational forum to promote the creation of appealing and sustainable landscapes in southeastern Colorado, incorporating water-wise garden practices and plants adapted to local conditions. David Salman will be the keynote speaker for the 2013 Symposium. David is the Founder & Chief Horticulturist at High Country Gardens. He has spent over 26 years in pursuit of better plants for eco-friendly landscapes. He is a recognized expert in the field of waterwise gardening and xeriscaping. For more information call (719) 583-6566 or go to www.westernlandscape.org

Gear for Working Smarter with AgrAbility Friday, February 8, 2013 Pueblo Zoo, 3455 Nuckolls Avenue, Pueblo, CO 81005 9 - noon Lunch (12:00-1:00 pm) is provided for everyone who pre-registers at least 5 days before the workshop.

Workshop Topics Introduction to AgrAbility  What is AgrAbility?  AgrAbility’s role in helping Colorado farm & ranch families  What can AgrAbility offer you? Gear for Working Smarter  Roll vs. Stroll – utility vehicles, wagons, carts   Push vs. Pull – tractor modifications, hitching, gate wheels   Smarter vs. Harder – tractor steps, gardening tools, ramps, mirrors, shop lift   Gear vs. Steer – livestock handling, feeding equipment, health equipment, fencing   Working vs. Torqueing – swivel seats, manure vacuum, hydraulic jack   Suicide/Risks/Injuries……..

Working with AgrAbility  Site visit process, case examples, other Assistive Technology  Review of behavioral health resources, other local and state resources  Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation  USDA Farm Service Agency Additional Discussion  Group questions & answers  Program evaluation  Schedule individual consultations.

12:00-1:00 Lunch

About the Speaker Robert J. “Bob” Fetsch, Ph.D. is an Extension Family Life Specialist and Professor Emeritus with Colorado State University Extension. He was born and raised on small farms in the Midwest. His father had a serious farm accident several years ago. Bob has presented hundreds of workshops for farm and ranch families during the past 32 years. He will present current information that ranchers and farmers with disabilities and their families can use to improve their quality of life.

To pre-register by phone or email, please contact: Carolyn Valdez (719) 583-6574 carolyn.valdez@colostate.edu Bob Fetsch (970) 491-5648 robert.fetsch@colostate.edu Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 11

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

Event Announcements SEEDLING TREE PROGRAM

CSU Extension – Pueblo County has applications available for the 2013 Seedling Tree Program offered through the Colorado State Forest Service (CSFS) Nursery. Interested individuals must own at least ONE acre of land. Nursery stock must not be used in ornamental or landscaping plantings. No plant purchased from the CSFS may be resold. Bare root trees are available in multiples of 25 per species. Potted trees are available in multiples of 30 per species. Orders accepted until March 30. More information can be obtained by contacting Colorado State University Extension – Pueblo County at 583-6566 or visit http://www.coopext.colostate.edu/Pueblo/nat/seedling.shtml The Western Colorado Research Center, CSU Extension and the Western Colorado Horticultural Society are cosponsoring a oneday course on the basics of tree fruit production: Tree Fruit for Beginners What: A short course class for new commercial growers (5 years or less) on growing tree fruits. Emphasis will be on peach, apple, pear, cherry; limited coverage of apricot and plum. There is a $50 registration fee. When: 8:30 am - 4:15 pm, January 14th, 2013 Where: Western Colorado Research Center – Orchard Mesa, 3168 B ½ Rd., Grand Junction, CO. Go to http://www.colostate.edu/ programs/wcrc/pubs/information/ treefruitBeginnersreg% 202013.pdf for a class agenda and registration information.

Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 12

Event Announcements

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

2013 Spring Yard and Garden Classes  Tree Care Tips for Pueblo, Tuesday, January 22, 6-9 p.m.,

CSU Extension, $15.00  Growing Roses in Pueblo, Saturday, February 23, 9 a.m.-12 p.m.,

SE Colorado Water Conservancy District, $15.00  Vegetable Gardening for Beginners and Experts, Saturday, March 30,

9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., SE Colorado Water Conservancy District, $25.00

 Growing Healthy Turf Grass, Saturday April 6, 9 a.m.-12 p.m., SE

Colorado Water Conservancy District, $15.00 Registration Due one week before class. Contact CSU Extension (719) 583-6566 for more information.

Extension had a lot to offer…. The CSU Extension Family and Consumer Sciences program has many interesting upcoming classes.

Master Food Safety Advisor Do you enjoy the art and science of food preservation? Would you like to develop expertise in food preservation and food safety? Become a Master Food Safety Advisor! For more information, contact Lois Illick at 583-6566 or visit www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/mfsa.pdf . MFSA classes begin April 6.

Cottage Food Producer Would you like to sell food products made in your home? The Cottage Foods Act (described here: http:// tinyurl.com/cottagefd) allows some homemade food products to be sold directly to the consumer. CSU Extension-Pueblo County offers the safe food handling program, ServSafe™, that meets the food safety requirements of the Act. For more information contact us at 719-583-6566.

What if you could improve your health and your wealth at the same time this year?? Because financial problems can negatively affect health and poor health can negatively affect personal finances, a new program being offered by Colorado State University Extension, called Small Steps to Health and Wealth. The program is designed to help you discover links between your health and wealth habits, and learn simple ways to start making small changes that can make a big difference in BOTH! Call 719-583-6566 to register for this free class series to be held January 7, 14, and 23 from 6:00-8:00 p.m. For more information on these programs, check out the full flyers on the web at http://www.coopext.colostate.edu/ Pueblo/fam/fami.shtml or contact CSU Extension at 719-583-6566.

Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 13

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

Event Announcements Pesticide Applicator Continuing Education Credit Workshops Southeast Colorado

Colorado State University’s Southeast Area Extension is offering two Pesticide Applicator Continuing Education Credit Workshops on December 2012. The workshops provides all 7 core credits required for both private and commercial applicators to be re--certified and renew their licenses. The training is aimed to provide new information on pest control, health and environmental safety, pest management technology and changes in pesticide laws and regulations. In addition, commercial applicators will earn continuing education credits in the following categories: 101 Agricultural Insects; 102 Agricultural Plant Diseases; 103 Agricultural Weeds; and 107 Rangeland and Weed Control.

Dates and Locations December 11, Ordway, Senior center December 12, Cheyenne Wells, CSU Extension Office Registration Deadline: December 10, 2012

Cost: Private Applicators $35 (Morning Sessions) Commercial Applicators $ 75 (All day Program) Contact: Wilma Trujillo, Prowers County Extension 1001 S Main Street Lamar, CO 81052 Phone: (719) 336-7734 Fax: (719) 336 2985 E-mail: wilma.trujillo@colostate.edu

Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Page 14

Calendar of Events

Southern Colorado Ag and Range Newsletter

December 11, Pesticide Applicator Continuing Education in Ordway, contact Wilma Trujillo, Prowers County Extension (719) 336-7734 for more information. 12, Pesticide Applicator Continuing Education in Cheyenne Wells, contact Wilma Trujillo, Prowers County Extension (719) 336-7734 for more information. 22, Tree Care Tips for Pueblo, Tuesday, 6-9 p.m., $15.00 registration due one week before class. Contact CSU Extension (719) 583-6566 for more information.

January 4, Last day to sign up without a late fee for CO Master Gardener classes. For more information contact CSU Extension (719) 583-6566. 7, 14, and 23, Small Steps to Health and Wealth, contact CSU Extension Pueblo County for more information. 14, Tree Fruit for Beginners, go to http://www.colostate.edu/programs/wcrc/pubs/information/ treefruitBeginnersreg%202013.pdf for a class agenda and registration information.

February 2, Pueblo County Stockmen’s Annual Meeting, for more information contact Dan Henrichs 947-3579 or 251-7891 7, Arkansas Valley Farm/Ranch/Water Symposium and Trade Show at the William L. Gobin Community Building in Rocky Ford from 8:00 a.m.—4:00 p.m. For more information go to www.farmranchwater.org. 8, Gear for Working Smarter with AgrAbility, To pre-register by phone or email, please contact: Carolyn Valdez (719) 583-6574 carolyn.valdez@colostate.edu or Bob Fetsch (970) 491-5648 robert.fetsch@colostate.edu 23, Growing Roses in Pueblo, 9 a.m.-12 p.m., SE Colorado Water Conservancy District, $15.00 registration due one week before class. Contact CSU Extension (719) 583-6566 for more info. March 14, Intro to Colorado Energy Masters Program, contact CSU Extension Pueblo County for more information. 16, Western Landscape Symposium, contact CSU Extension Pueblo County for more information. 30, Vegetable Gardening for Beginners and Experts, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., SE Colorado Water Conservancy District, $25.00 registration due one week before class. Contact CSU Extension (719) 583-6566 for more information. 30, Last day to order Seedling Trees, contact CSU Extension Pueblo County for more info. Monthly meetings: Pueblo County Stockmen’s Association meets the first Thursday of each month at Mesa Vet Clinic at 7 p.m. Turkey Creek Conservation District meets the 2nd Tuesday of every month, Time: 2:30 p.m. Location: 200 S. Santa Fe Ave., 4th floor, Call: (719) 543-8386 Ext. 116 for details. South Pueblo Conservation District meets the 3rd Thursday of every month, Time: 7:30 p.m. Location: 200 S. Santa Fe Ave., 4th floor, Call: (719) 543-8386 Ext. 3 for details.

Colorado State University, U.S. Department of Agriculture and Pueblo County cooperating. Extension programs are available to all without discrimination.


Pueblo County Extension Ag and Natural Resouces Newsletter