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Christopher SooHoo Selected Works 2014


01

PODIUM + TOWER Mixed Use Hotel Harvard GSD Core III | Prof: Mariana Ibanez | Fall 2013

02

THIN EXTENTS Wellseley Greenhouse Facility Redesign Harvard GSD Core II | Prof: John Hong | Spring 2013

03

INFILL / PASSAGE Campus Intervention Harvard GSD Core II | Prof: John Hong | Spring 2013

04

DENSE SURFACE Complex And Developable Surface Integration Harvard GSD Projective Representation | Prof: Cameron Wu | Fall 2012

05

STACKED TIMBER New England Competition Entry Independent Collaboration | Summer 2013

06

RETREAT IN NATURE: HOUSE 22.5 Harvard GSD Retreat in Nature Competition Entry Independent Collaboration | Winter 2013

07

SUMMER AT MASS DESIGN GROUP Summer 2013

08

STEVEN GAYNOR SCHOOL EXPANSION Rogers Marvel Architects | June 2010-August 2012

09

EMERSON PLACE CONDOMINIUMS Rogers Marvel Architects | Oct 2007-Dec 2008

10

SANDRIDGE EXECUTIVE FLOORS Rogers Marvel Architects | Jan 2009- April 2010

11

GOWANUS PUBLIC PLACE RFP Rogers Marvel Architects | Sept 2007- Oct 2007


PODIUM + TOWER Harvard GSD Core III | Prof: Mariana Ibanez | Fall 2013

One of the efficiencies of the podium and tower typology is its ability to absorb difference in diverse urban contexts allowing the tower to act independently. This project seeks to re-imagine this condition by fragmenting and redistributing the podium vertically throughout the tower in order to create new programmatic juxtapositions, continuities, and generative difference.

As a strategy for complex

integration and negotiation of a 28,000 sq meter mixed use building including hotel, gym, pool, and thermal baths, the reorganization of civic and economically driven program generates a woven public and private circulation and public spaces where diversity and difference is confronted amongst users. Sited in Medellin, a city in the throes of urbanization, this re-imagining of the podium and tower acts seeks to leverage of the diverse socio-political condition of the city.


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EE T OS TR ET EX PO SU R

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PLAZA

Seagram Building, New York, Mies van der Rohe, 1958

PODIUM AS STRUCTURAL BASE

PODIUM AS STRUCTURAL PLINTH/CORE

PROPERTY LINE

SKY EXP OSUR E PLANE OW SHAD

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Singer Tower, New York, Ernest Flagg, 1908

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Equitable Building, New York, Ernst Graham 1915

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SHAFT

CAPITAL

Drawings by Hugh Ferriss illustrating impact of 1916 NYC Zoning Code

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TERRACE

PLINTH Lever House, New York, Gordon Bunshaft, SOM, 1952

BASE Prudential Building, Buffalo, NY, Louis Sullivan,1894

PODIUM AS RAISED PLATFORM & STAND TO HOLD BOOKS, NOTES, ETC.

PODIUM AS MODIFYING VEIL

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PRIVATE

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TOWER

TOWER

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CAST

PROPERTY LINE

SHOPS Masonic Temple, Chicago, Burnham and Root, 1892

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SHADOW CAST

PROPERTY LINE

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VIEWING

OFFICE

VISUAL EXPOSURE

PUBLIC Humana Building, Louisville, Michael Graves, 1986

PODIUM AS ELEVATED PLATFORM

PODIUM AS ELEVATED SPACE

A series of diagrams exploring motivating factors for emergence of the podium and tower typology in New York City & multiple understandings of podium in contemporary culture.


SITE ANALYSIS

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A B

Project Site

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BUILDING HEIGHT PLAN & SITE SECTIONS 10-35 FLRS 4-7 FLRS 6-15 FLRS 1-3 FLRS 1 FLR

MEDELLIN | 08

Medellin’s density ranges from tall buildings clustered near the site to dispersed informal settlements at the periphery. Building heights are reflective of the social stratification that still exists in the city where there are clear areas of greater wealth and development. The project site exists near the central area of the city where the topography is flatter while informal settlements are pushed to the periphery occupying steeper terrain at the valley’s edge. MEDELLIN | 09

Site analysis of Medellin reveals a fragmented urbanism in the midst of development. Compared to a matured city such as New York City, the podium and tower typology has not yet become an established model for development allowing an opportunity to re-imagine the tower and podium.


Public OutdoorrPoPool G.2 .2 Wellness n Center G.1 Tr Treatment Roomss

Htl Hotel

HOTEL / HOSTEL

GYM

POOL

LOBBY

H.1 Hotel Rooms H.3 Restrooms H.4 Reception Area H.5 Cafe/Breakfast Room H.6 Kitchen H.7 Business Center H.8 Management Office H.9 Staff Lockers H.10 Security Office H.11 Laundry H.12 Trash Room H.13 Storage H.14 Connection to Gym and Spa Communal Hostel Rooms

G.1 Treatment Rooms G.2 Wellness Center G.3 Yoga Room G.4 Spinning Room G.5 Training G.6 Gymnasium (basketball court) G.7 Squash Courts G.9 Management Office G.10 Changing Rooms Running Track Recreation Center

P.1 Pools for Lap Swimming P.2 Pools for training/phys therapy P.3 Pools for diving Public Pool

Hotel Lobby PoolLobby Gym Thermal Baths Events

Event Trajectory

THERMAL BATHS P.4 Thermal Bath Sequence P.5 Sauna Room P.6 Steam Room P.8 Management Office P.9 Changhing Rooms P.10 Mech Rooms

UTILITY S.1 Loading Dock S.2 Trash S.3 Parking Space

G.6 Gymnasium m a G.7 Squash Courts

Upper perr Lobby Lobb Hotel Reception B

OSTS L HOSTE

RUNNING TRACK R

Training Pools oo

LOWER W R LOBBY

ELEVATED METRO

Hotel Reception A Pool/GYM Reception

OUTDOOR RECREATION Restaurant/Cafe

G.66 Gy G Gymnasium as u b P.5 Sauna Room

PLAZ PLAZA

VESTIBULE ESTIBUL L

P.6 Steam Room

P.4 Thermal Bath

STREET LEVEL E

Dynamic programmatic adjacencies are generated through through the fragmentation and vertical

EGRESS

EGRESS

CORE

CORE

EGRESS

EGRESS

redisribution of public program.

TOWER IS CUT AND FOLDED FOR STO INTEGRATE PODIUM AND STRUCTURE

PLAN OVERLAP OF FOLDED TOWER

CONTINUITY BETWEEN PODIUM FRAGMENTS

PODIUM AND TOWER MUTUALLY SUPPORT EACH OTHER

The formal strategy for the project is based on a folded slab tower which generates structural continuity through the integration of horizontal podium platforms.


Concept and formal explorations through model lead to calibration of proportions and relationships between tower and podium.


UPEER HOTEL ROOMS

TERRACE - WELLNESS / TREATMENT CENTER - BLACK BOX PERFORMANCE SPACE - INDOOR/OUTDOOR EVENT SPACE - SMALL GALLERY - LOCAL COMMUNITY AMMENTIES

MID HOTEL ROOMS PUBLIC SKIP STOP ELEVATOR PRIVATE KEYED HOTEL ELEVATOR

ELEVATD HOTEL LOBBY - ELEVATOR TRANSFER - RESTAURANT/BREAKFAST RM - LOUNGE - BUSINESS CENTER - DIVING AND TRAINING POOLS

LOWER HOTELROOMS

ELEVATED PLAZA - CAFE - TRAINING - BASKETBALL - SMALL AUDITORIUM - INTERNET CAFE - SMALL STOREFRONT - LOUNGE - LAP POOL THERMAL BATHS BEOW GRARDE DISPERSED PROGRAM MIXING

CONTINUITY / DISCONTUINUITY OF PUBLIC & PRIVATE CIRCULATION

Axonometric diagrams (above) showing program distribution/adjacency and public/private circulation. Section (right) shows continuity between the street and podium allowing public space to bleed vertically throughout the project.


OPEN

PERFORATED ALUMINUM LOUVER

SEMI OPEN

CLOSED STATE

CROSS SECTION THROUGH TOWER SCALE: 1:30

UNFOLDED TOWER ELEVATION

Perspective vignettes (left) illustrate a constant relationship to context through views out to the urban landscape. An open louvered enveloped takes advantage of the ideal climate of Medellin for natural ventilation while also modulating view, privacy, and DISTORTION OF DEPTH ACHIEVED BY TWISTING OF LOUVER

natural light. Through twisting and gathering, the louver is able to produce a variety conditions while maintaining aesthetic and formal continuity to maximize natural ventilation and connection to the urban environment.


TRUSSES TRANSFER LOAD HORIZONTALLY

CONTINUOUS BEAM CARRY LOADS VERTICALLY

STRUCTURAL CONTINUITY NVELOPE

Structural Diagram

Diagram and model show the continuous structural strategy that is deployed through a continuous beam that reinforces the integration of the podium and tower.

Section (left) shows the fragmentation and

distribution of the podium vertically throughout the project creating upper, middle, and lower hotel rooms.


PLAN 00: GROUND LEVEL +0.00 m

PLAN LEVEL 01: LOBBY LEVEL +7.00 m

PLAN LEVEL 02: ELEVATED PLAZA +10.00 m

Lower podium plans show continuity with the street level and deploy a formal strategy of volumes within an open plan.


From the west, the project’s form is perceived as two stacked L shaped volumes cofounding a formal reading of continuity between podium and tower.

Physical Model view showing vertical continuity of street through a delaminated plane.


PLAN LEVEL 04: ELEVATED PLAZA +20.00 m

PLAN LEVEL 12: POOL TERRACE +34.00 m

PLAN LEVEL 17: TERRACE LEVEL +55.00 m

PLAN LEVEL 8-10: LOWER HOTEL +24.00 m - +30.00 m

PLAN LEVEL 11: HOTEL RANSFER LOBBY +30.00 m

PLAN LEVEL 20-32: UPPER HOTEL +67.00 m - +123.00 m

Upper floor plans show the oscillation between podium and tower.


From the south, the tower facade produces a strong frontality in contrast to the thinness it expresses from the east and west.

Structural continuity is expressed through revealed structure behind the louvered facade.


THIN EXTENTS: WELLESLEY GREENHOUSE FACILITY Harvard GSD Core II | Prof: John Hong | Spring 2013

Seeking new life for the greenhouse program at Wellesley College, this project draws upon the typology of the orangerie leveraging a linear organization and a single cut into the existing topography in order to generate connectivity and a new landmark for the campus at large. The thin, linear cut into the site allows the architecture to act as an episodic display case for the greenhouse galleries as well as a new accessible pathway and filter. Research labs, and classroom facilities float above the greenhouse galleries so that all program is linked by the exterior views and the greenhouse galleries. The frontality of the architecture gives the greenhouse facility maximum exposure and defines new zones, or quads, around the existing science center. The single cut is reinforced through retaining walls which register existing topographic elevations forming a consistent datum giving visitors greater understanding and engagement with the existing landscape.


This project references the typology of the orangerie which deploys a linear organization and defines space beyond its envelope through frontality and orientation.

A topographic approach to the site is expressed through a single, thin cut through the site that produces a linear organization and generates new spatial organizations for the campus. The section (below) shows the productive contrast between the topographic undulation of the cut and the rectilinear envelope.


UTILITY OFFICES

CLASSROOMS

UTILITY

LECTURE HALL

RESEARCH LABS

GREENHOUSE

A linear cut through the existing science center generates continuity and spatial definition at the campus scale. The bar is embedded into the landscape acting as a thickened retaining wall and a new linear pathway. A variety of cross section conditions integrate academic and research program.


The embedded nature of the bar results in contrasting views from north and south due to topographic change. In this way the architecture serves as a new topographic datum and landmark for the campus.


Lower and upper plans reinforce the embedded nature and linear organization of the greenhouses. The pathway is inflected by secondary north-south circulations through the site. The thinness of the cut generates a dense plan allowing the greenhouse to bleed visually or literally into all spaces.


View within the greenhouse occupying the thin slice juxtaposed with the architectural datum.


INFILL / PASSAGE: THIN BAR CONTINGENCIES Harvard GSD Core II | Prof: John Hong | Spring 2013

Tasked with the generation of an infill project between two existing campus buildings, this project proposes the insertion of a thin bar that appears autonomous in its form, but its interior is actually contingent upon the circulation and program of the existing structures. A new student center takes figure in a loop at the third floor that moves through the new project and one of the existing buildings in order to generate a dynamic and fluid space of circulation and program that subvert the initial reading of a single loaded bar. It’s form responds to the site not by distorting itself to preserve existing conditions, but instead, by dictating new possibilities. The project generates new spatial reading on the campus as well as what is primary and secondary amongst itself and the existing buildings resulting in three different circulations at each level.


SKYLIGHT

GLAZED FACADE TO ALLOW EXPOSURE OF INTERIOR PROGRAM

ENVELOPE

OFFICE SUITE GENERAL ADMIN OFFICES RECEPTION

THIRD FLOOR: ADMINISTRATION

NORTH LOUNGE CLASSROOMS

CENTRAL LOUNGE

SECOND FLOOR: STUDENT CENTER LOOP

BREAK OUT SPACE / STUDY CARRELS

LECTURE HALL/AUDITORIUM

NORTH ENTRY LOBBY

LARGE CONFERENCE ROOM / PUBLIC PROGRAM

FIRST FLOOR: ENTRY LOBBY + PUBLIC PROGRAM SOUTH LOUNGE

ROOF CONTINUITY POINT WEST VALLEY

FACADE CONTINUITY

IINTERIOR PASSAGE + CONNECTION TO EXISTING

SITE CONNECTION + DISTINCTION

EAST PLANE


View of South Approach

Exploded Axonometric Diagram (left) describing contingencies of site, program, circulation, and enclosure. The insertion of the thin bar between two existing buildings expands existing interior program and re-scales the space of the surrounding quad. By lifting the volume of program, the ground plane remains porous producing a new campus gateway.


New continuities described through physical model (above) and varying plan typologies at each floor.


Academic program is concentrated in upper levels allowing for expanded circulation spaces that also act as open social and study space. Vertical continuity is accented by primary stairs and ceiling apertures.


DENSE SURFACE: COMPLEX SURFACE TRANSLATION Harvard GSD Projective Representation | Professor: Cameron Wu | Fall 2012 Collaboration with Jee Hyung Park, Arion Kocani The translation of complex surfaces into for constructibility can be a generative tool that produces new spatial possibilities through processing. The use of the truncated pyramid as a method to estimate a complex surface, is typically non structural, but by through the intersection the complex surface with a second, developable, surface, an interstitial space is produced that also creates a dense, rigid structure. The zone of intersection disrupts an otherwise well behaved grid as the truncated pyramid transforms to based on height and distance from a certain origin. The end result is a generative translation that can be understood at multiple scales.


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x x L1

x

P3=P2x1.2 P4=P3x1.2

x

x

x

x

x

P6=P5x1.2

x

x

1. L3=L2x1.2

x

L4=L3x1.2

P6=P5x1.2

L5=L4x1.2 =L4x1.2 xx

P7=P6x1.2

Complex Surface

=L L2=L1x1.2

P5=P4x1.2

Distanc e

P5=P4x1.2

x x

P1

P2=P1x1.2

x

_ P8=P7x1.2

+

P7=P6x1.2

x

x

L6=L5x1.2

x1.1

x

Lager Grain P8=P7x1.2

x

x

P (U vector segment) L (V Vector segment) D (Distance)

x

L7=L6x1.2

_

x

L7=L6x1.2

Dx1.1 Dx1.2 Dx1.3

Dx1.2 Dx1.1 Dx1.3

Dx1.4

Dx1.4 Dx1.5

Dx1.5

PQ Surface

Dx1.6

Dx1.6

Dx1.7 Dx1.7 Dx1.8 Dx1.9

Dx2.3

Dx2.2

Dx1.9 Dx1.8 Dx2.1 Dx2.0

Intersection

Relationship between two surface

Compound Geometry

The use of the truncated pyramid generates new spatial conditions and a thickened volume derived from intersecting complex and developable surfaces geometry and scalar logic (above).


The truncated pyramid transforms at the intersection of the complex and developable surface generating a unique spatial condition.


TIMBER NEW ENGLAND: STACKED Competition Entry | Summer 2013 Collaboration with Takuya Iwamura

The massive nature of CLT presents opportunities for rethinking how this sustainable massive material can be used to maximize the thermal performance of buildings today. This proposal draws upon New England traditions of timber stacking and the organization of space around the hearth and chimney as a thermal core. The dominance of the surface and high resolution in architecture is contrary to the nature of CLT as a massive timber. Therefore, our proposal does not rely on the articulation of a hyper specific form or plasticity. Rather, this multi valent proposal embraces the massive quality of CLT and New England traditions of the hearth and timber stacking in the development of a method, at both the material and spatial scale, for the formation of dynamic, human scale, space with maximized thermal performance.


EXTENDED TIMBER PIECES TO DISTIBUTE HEAT TO THE COOLER SIDE OF THE SPACE

0%

0%

100%

100%

MAXIMUM SURFACE AREA TO RECEIVE SOLAR RADIATION

Referencing New England traditions of timber stacking and the hearth as the thermal and social center of the home (above). Solar analysis informs the choice of site and form to take advantage of solar energy


TYPICAL CHAIR

20”

TYPICAL LIVING TABLE

24”

48”

X

TYPICAL KITCHEN TABLE

48”

TYPICAL SINGLE BED

39”

The stacked planes at various heights allow for multiple uses dependent on the user creating a free social gathering space around the primary thermal mass.


STACK JOINT, SEE DETAIL A

(2) LAYERS NEW ENGLAND RED OAK FOR INCREASED DENSITY AND DARKER COLOR FOR ADDITIONAL SOLAR GAIN

CLT PANEL (1) LAYER WITH AIR SPACE

(1) LAYER WITH AIR SPACE

THERMAL CANNELS FORMED THROUGH TOTAL AIR SPACE BETWEEN PANELS

MATERIAL WASTE FROM CUTOUTS USED TO CREATE SEATING

(1) LAYER WITH 3 AIR SPACES

AIR SPACE FOR CONVECTION

(1) LAYER WITH AIR SPACE

CLT PANEL WITH RED OAK 7 LAYER CLT PANEL BREAKDOWN WITH INTEGRATED AIR SPACE BASED ON PLANK MODULE

FACE TO FACE JOINT, SEE DETAIL B

AXONOMETRIC B CONVECTION OF HEAT THROUGH AIR CHANNELS IS STORED IN THERMAL CORE 3/8”=1”-0

EXPLODED ASSEMBLY AXONOMETRIC 3/8”=1”-0

Exploded Axonometric Diagrams (above) describe the construction of the CLT panel, containing thermal channels and the assembly sequence. In section, thermal channels and storage modify the surrounding air and space.


Perspective rendering illustrates the dynamic multiple uses produced through simple stacking and the relationship of the human scale and heights.


human being orange herbs onion pepper tomato

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21

24 22.5

27

30 (℃)


RETREAT IN NATURE: HOUSE 22.5 Harvard GSD Retreat in Nature Competition | Honorable Mention | Winter 2013 Collaboration with Joshua Feldman, Takuya Iwamura, Jisoo Kim This project was shortlisted in a competition held within the Harvard GSD for the LIXIL Retreat in Nature International Student Competition. The prompt called for the design of a prototype house that could generate a new sustainable lifestyle in connection to nature. In our proposal, we re-imagine integrated farming for a contemporary sustainable lifestyle through full integration of a productive garden within living space. Our proposal seeks to expose the potential of the intersection between nature and technology. Maximization of the experiential and functional benefits of the garden leads to a rethinking of the normative architectural configurations of space and systems. This approach brings a new lifestyle in which the cycles of man and nature are in sync and interdependent. Juxtaposed against the natural landscape of Taikicho, hybridization of interior living and garden space heightens one’s awareness of the various types of nature that exist as a result of technology. Technology affords us the ability to survive in less than ideal climates. In the same way, technology has given us the ability to extend the growing season of plants, arrange it for our appreciation, and utilize it for the generation of sustainable energy.


share food with local community organic fertilizer

bio-digester MOUNTAIN

FOREST

preserved wildlife

local red pine forestry

INDOOR GARDEN

MICRO FARM

AGRICULTURAL FIELD

LIVING

LOCAL COMMUNITY

domestic farming

local agriculture

lumber

hay

Sectional diagram of site showing integration of proposed house as a new link between nature and the community.

TRADITIONAL JAPANESE NOUKA

REMOVAL OF ENDAWA

COMPACTING THE SPACE

INCLOSURE OF GARDEN

Programmatic development references traditional Japanese farm house typology allowing for an interior garden.

SOUTH EAVE RAISED FOR INCREASED TREE HEIGHT

DOMA LOWERED FOR INCREASED THERMAL MASS

RIDGE SHIFTED FOR GREATER SOLAR GAIN IN WINTER

INSET FOR COVERED ENTRANCE

Formal calibration for interior program, thermal mass, solar orientation, and entry.


View of model showing three zones of interior garden living space, loft space, and recessed kitchen and dining.


WIND STUDY

LANDSCAPE STRATEGY herbs navigates visitors to living space

trees create private living space in garden

wind breaker plants

W

E

W

E expressed visual continuity of garden and farm

S

privacy plants

S

WINTER

SUMMER

To minimize chilling effect of continental winter SW-wind, wind breaker trees are planted at SW corner of the house.

Vegetation at the SE corner of the house protects visual privacy from the main street, allowing eastern ocean breaths to come into the house.

CONTINUOUS BERMS INTO INDOOR SPACE

ARRANGEMENT OF TREES

HERBACEOUS LAYER

CIRCULATION

Planting strategies for wind protection and landscape strategy for interior / exterior garden

slurry/fertilizer

+ waste

crops

harvest

stove hay

methane

consumption

boiler

radiant heat

biodigester

energy

electrical generator

excrement

lighting

Integration of productive indoor/outdoor gardens and a biodigestor produce a sustainable lifestyle where food and energy are mutually beneficial for the site and occupant.

WINTER DAY (22.5℃)

SUMMER DAY (22.5℃)

WINTER NIGHT (14.5℃)

By maximizing perception of solar radiation in daytime, we can minimize the use of radiant heating system.

Windows and ventilation hatches allow ocean breathes to cool down the house without air-conditioning system.

By enclosing garden space with a curtain, we can limit the use of radiant heating system to living space and recycle the heat to maintain gardenspace.

Radiant heating, operable windows, curtains, and thermal mass produce a variety of configurations to achieve interior thermal comfort year round.


SUMMERTIME VEGETATION

GARLIC,ONION, SHALLOT Allium sativum, Allium cepa, Allium cepa var. aggregatum

PEPPER Capsicum TOMATO Solanum lycopersicum POTATO Solanum tuberosum BEET Beta vulgaris BEEFSTEAK PLANT Perilla frutescens

ROSEMARY Rosmarinus officinalis JAPANESE WILD PARSELY cryptotaenia JAPANESE PEPPER Zanthoxylum piperitum GINGER PLANT Zingiber officinale

ORANGE TREE Citrus Ă— sinensis

WITCH HAZEL Hamamelis japonica

PLAN 1: 50

Landscape and food garden bleeds into the interior making an interior garden that is integrated into the living space.


SECTION A-A’ 1: 50 SECTION B-B’ 1: 50

In model (above),section, and interior perspective (right), the presence of the interior garden activates the interior space and promotes a sustainable lifestyle that is in continuous dialogue with nature


SUMMER AT MASS DESIGN GROUP Projects: Kayanja Center | Charettes: AWS Ilima School, Liberia Health Care Prototype Summer 2013 Over the span of thirteen weeks, I worked closely with a small project team of three on the delivery of a design development set for the Kayanja Center in, Mbarara, Uganda and contributed initial concept and design thinking on short term charettes. As a new addition to the Mbarara University of Science and Technology, the Kayanja Center program included a technology research labs, an auditorium, classrooms, cafeteria, and office space. The project anchors a soccer pitch and acts as a flexible venue for research, education, and events. At the ground floor, circulation through he project links it with the site and activates adjacent open spaces. The upper floor contains an open plan for flexible office and research space. A porous envelope define the project’s exterior while leveraging natural ventilation. My work on charettes for the Ilima School in Congo and Liberia Health Care Prototypes helped establish initial direction for concept and program layouts. Both projects were contingent upon specific constraints of economy in regards to site, materiality, and construction methods. Therefore, each approach explores possibilities to maximize a project’s impact through intelligent deployment of design strategies.


Kayanja Center Rendering (Above) illustrates the openness of the ground level. An elevation sketch for correspondence with structural consultants describes development of the facade structure to identify maximum spans and spacing.


Sketches for the AWF Ilima School (Above) exploring a single form’s potential to define adjacent exterior space. Roof studies and plan layout studies (Below) explore options for a replicable model for Primary healthcare centers in Liberia.


Stephen Gaynor School Expansion work completed for Rogers Marvel Architects New York, NY | June 2010-August 2012 | Phase 1-2 Complete This addition to the existing Stephen Gaynor School called for the renovation of the existing, landmarked, 50,000 sf Claremont Stables building and new construction on adjacent carriage house site. This multi phase project includes a new auditorium, early learning center, middle school classrooms, and a rooftop gym. The revitalization of the landmarked Claremont Stables creates a unique environment for learning. As a school for children with special needs, the design is crafted to meet the needs of the children. Working closely with the school faculty and administration, flexible and efficient classroom layouts allow for multiple modes of learning. Circulation zones are also seen as learning opportunities with zones for small classes and comfortable lobby spaces.


IA. CORE & SHELL

LOBBY SERVING UPPER FLOORS MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM ON 3RD & 4TH FLOORS VISUAL ARTS CLASSROOMS ON 4TH FLOOR ELEVATOR UTILITY UPGRADES FOR FULL BUILDING OCCUPANCY ROOFTOP MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

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EAR LY Y CENL E TEL R ARNIN

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MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM ON 5TH FLOOR ROOFTOP ATHLETIC FACILITY STRUCTURAL SLAB UPGRADES TO ROOF GENERATOR, STANDPIPE & HOUSE TANKS ELEVATOR AND STAIR EXTENSION TO ROOF LEVEL BRIDGE TO 90TH STREET BUILDING

MECHA NI BULKHE CAL & ADS

M

OL CHO

EMIC

LOB L BY

LOB BY

The second floor plan (above) is for phase

III. PERFORMING ARTS PROGRAM

- THEATER AT FIRST AND CELLAR FLOORS - PERFORMING ARTS CLASSROOMS AT CELLAR - 1ST FLOOR - CELLAR LEVEL LOBBY WITH OPEN STAIR

2 of multiple phase project. The phasing and schedule of the project necessitated

S ATHLETIC D MID

LE S IDD S

ACAD

R TE EA TH LL E SH

G

Y

IIB. ROOFTOP ATHLETICS AND BRIDGE -

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- ENTRY YARD AT GROUND LEVEL - 1ST - 2ND FLOOR LOBBY WITH OPEN STAIR & LIFT - ECC PROGRAM ON SECOND FLOOR - 2ND LEVEL PLAY YARD EXPANSION

C O R E

C O R E

F A C A D E S

IIA. EXPANSION IN STABLE BUILDING

IB. EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER & YARDS

- EGRESS STAIRS & ELEVATOR SHAFT - BUILDING SERVICES AND FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS - SLAB MODIFICATIONS - COLUMN RELOCATIONS AND SLAB REMOVAL FOR FUTURE THEATER - CARRIAGE HOUSE SITE STABILIZATION AND SHELL - BUILDING ENVELOPE UPGRADES

simultaneous planning, design, and

L GE HOO ICS BRID LE SCADEM AC

administration of documents. LOBB L EXT X EN Y SIO

TH

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MU CLASSIC SR

OO

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TH HEA SU TEER PP R ORT

R TE EA


The entry stair (below) for the early learning center is defined by a partial height wall that integrates handrails, apertures, and scale for the young children. Arriving at the top of the stair, a photo of completed construction shows a glass corner giving transparency to classroom activities (above).


Rendering (below, left) showing design intent and completed construction photos (above, below right) show the activation of the stair as a classroom, waiting area, and circulation.,


Rendering (below) showing design intent and completed construction of a similar classroom (above)


Existing and projected rendering view created for Landmarks Approval to illustrate sight lines.

East and South Elevations with Field House addition set back to preserve autonomy of the Landmarked south facade.


Metal Mesh Screen

Mechanical Units

Play Field Enclosure Elevator Bulkhead Stair Bulkhead & Egress Corridor Aluminum Framed Windows

Terrace

Mechanical Units

Play Field Enclosure Elevator Bulkhead Metal Mesh Screen

Aluminum Framed Windows

Terrace

Diagram of Phase 3 Field House addition housing a new gym and associated support spaces. An expanded metal screen wrapper provides a contrast and continuity with existing materiality.


Completed Boardroom (above) construction successfully reflects original design intent for lighting, furnishing, and overall plan layout as illustrated by rendering and diagrams (below).


Complete central double height stair (above) is accented by custom light fixtures that incorporate the hanging members for the stair in the detail (below).


Emerson Place Condominiums work completed for Rogers Marvel Architects Brooklyn, NY | Oct 2007-Dec 2008 This project called for the design of 90,000 sq ft of new construction including 114 residential condominiums over 16 stories. A distinct floor plan maximizes the allowable floor area while also providing a variety of efficient unit layouts, views to manhattan, and a unique exterior form. Penthouse units and resident amenities occupy the top two floors while the ground floor landscaping incorporates geometry to integrate with the existing site at street level. Building systems were coordinated to achieve LEED certification. Construction is cast in place concrete with masonry cavity wall construction. Due to economic conditions, this project was placed on hold after 75% CD’s were issued and eventually canceled.


The setback fro the street creates a deliberate threshold and allows the geometry of the building to relate to the existing site. Many iterations of process models (above) were built to study the shifting setbacks. The wall section (right) describes the canopy condition at the entrance.


To maximize views for each unit, the plan (left) takes on a distinguished inflected offset form which also allows for the integration of balconies at each offset. Interiors including entrance lobby, multipurpose room, and units were designed and visualized in house.


SandRidge Executive Floors work completed for Rogers Marvel Architects Oklahoma City, OK | Jan 2009- April 2010 | Construction Completed Rogers Marvel Architects was commissioned to review and re-imagine existing plans for the top two floors of a newly acquired building in downtown Oklahoma City. The program includes the company’s executive offices and boardroom on one floor and conference rooms on the floor below, connected by a new two story vertical opening and stair. The completed project successfully adapts the existing design answering the client’s desires for a formal space while also supporting flexibility, openness, and accessibility for a team oriented working environment. Acting as the Tower’s formal reception and conference level, the 28th floor is linked to executive offices and boardroom on the 29th floor through an open glass stair. Custom furnishings and glass partitions imbue the space with a generous transparency.


GOWANUS GREEN: PUBLIC PLACE RFP work completed for Rogers Marvel Architects Brooklyn, NY | Sept 2007- Oct 2007 | RFP winner This proposal for development in Gowanus, Brooklyn integrates the community’s principles and the city’s goal to develop a mixed use extension of the existing neighborhood. The proposal incorporates eight residential buildings with ground floor retail, waterfront open space, public parks, a community space, and a boathouse.

The development is linked together by an integrated landscape

with storm water system and bio swales that signify the revival of the Gowanus waterfront. This project was the RFP winner.


Site model (above) and diagrams (below) showing integration of bio swales and natural ventilation.


The new park provides new active public space (above) and bleeds throughout the development site.


CHRISTOPHER SOOHOO chris.soohoo@gmail.com 646.825.1645

EDUCATION HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN M.Arch I | 2012-2016

PARSONS SCHOOL OF DESIGN BFA in Architectural Design | 203-2007

SOFTWARE Proficency: Autocad, Rhinoceros 3D , Vray, Adobe Suite, 3ds Max, Sketchup Working Knowledge: Grasshopper, Rhino Python, Revit, ArcMap GIS


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

MASS DESIGN GROUP south end, boston | intern architect | 05.2013-08.2013 Kayanja Center, Mbarara, Uganda AWS Ilima School Charrette Liberia Health Care Prototypes Charrette

ROGERS MARVEL ARCHITECTS new york, ny | junior architect | 2007-2012 Stephen Gaynor School Expansion, new york, ny June 2010-August 2012 All Phases SD to Phase 2 completion & development of future phases

SandRidge Energy Executive Offices, oklahoma city, ok Jan 2009- April 2010 All Phases SD to Completed Construction

Emerson Place Condominiums, brooklyn, ny Oct 2007-Dec 2008 All Phases SD to 75% CD, project canceled Public Place RFP: “Gowanus Green”, brooklyn, ny Sept 2007- Oct 2007 Early Design to RFP winner

nARCHITECTS new york, ny | intern architect | 02.2007-05.2007 Library + Cultural Center Competition, Dun Laoghaire, Ireland

GRAY, WATT, & PARTNERS new york, ny | intern architect | 06.2005 – 08.2006 Silverline Mixed Use Development, telluride, co Gray, Watt, & Partners Office, 425 west 13th St, new york, ny


2014 portfolio chris soohoo