BA Architecture Degree Show Catalogue 2018

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Catalogue 2018

BA (Hons)

Architecture


Contents BA (Hons) Architecture ARB/RIBA Part 1

Introduction 06 BA (Hons) Architecture Stage 1 10 Stage 1 Introduction 12 Stage 1 Design Studios Stage 2 and 3 34 Stage 2 Introduction 36 Stage 3 Introduction 38 Studio 1: The Yard 56 Studio 2: Other Spaces / Social Places 74 Studio 3: Second Nature 92 Studio 4: Obsolescence 110 Studio 5: Productive Exuberance 128 Studio 6: The Island 146 Studio 7: Radical Arts, Critical Architecture 164 Studio 8: Lonely City 184 188 196 208 212

Contextual Studies Dissertation Technical Studies Professional Practice Making Week

226 238

Live Projects Public Lectures

246 248

Acknowledgements Admissions


2017–18 has been an exciting and eventful year, both inside the college and out. The last twelve months have been a period of change, refinement and consolidation. Alex Warnock-Smith Course Leader


Introduction

BA (Hons) Architecture Alex Warnock-Smith Course Leader

As another fast-paced, intense and extraordinarily productive year has come to a close, this catalogue records and celebrates the creativity and industry of students and staff during 2017-18.

Making and Building: We support not only the development of radical ideas, but also the radical potential of making and building. Endowed with a kaleidoscopic array of creative disciplines, extensive workshops and specialist technicians, our art school environment encourages us to place emphasis on the practical and organisational arts of building and constructing which hold powerful, and often neglected, potential. We draw reference from the first Principal of the Central School, the architect William Lethaby, who sought to promote the ‘practical arts’ through builderly workable skills, drawing on vernacular adaptation and pragmatic crafting knowledge: “Train us to practical power, make us great builders and adventurous experimenters.” Rethinking the Profession: We share a commitment to the importance of socially engaged practice. We want to ask how, as a profession, we can start to reclaim political and social agency; how students can form critical and independent positions which produce conscientious practitioners– practitioners not only concerned with the formal aspects of architecture but also the social, political, economic and environmental forces which shape it. Social, Political, Economic and Cultural Engagement: We believe that architecture is always political. The space of the city is charged and shaped through the play of multiple dynamics and tensions. 6

Stage 1, led by Ruth Lang, Amanda Hopkins and Stuart McKenzie, is an intense introduction to the study of architecture and emphasises personal and social creative exploration – experimenting with the tools and techniques of architecture, re-discovering the immediate and broader environment and re-imagining how one might intervene in it materially and spatially. Led by Gregory Ross, Stage 2 is driven by the development of a integrated approach to architectural design, combining technical, theoretical and aesthetic concerns: a way of thinking and designing spatial and architectural projects that hold transformative potential for the context in which they are situated. Working in vertical studios with final year students, Stage 2 benefits from exposure to advanced levels of production and critique, while maintaining the space to develop skills and take bold, experimental risks. In Stage 3, led by Oscar Brito, students engage directly with the complexity of the city as an experiential space, developing individual, multi-scalar design theses that explore the relationship of social, political and economic structures to spatial structures. Supported by the intellectual and theoretical agendas of the course, graduating students develop a position on the role of the architect, and put forward challenging architectural proposals that have real agency. Eight design studios in Stage 1, and eight vertical studios between Stages 2 and 3, present different agendas and methodologies within and across the years of study, exploring radically different approaches to the architectural project. 2017-18 has been an exciting and eventful year, both inside the college and out. The last twelve months have been a period of change, refinement and consolidation. We have undertaken a detailed reflective review of our structure and syllabus – a healthy and constructive exercise through which we have addressed our own pedagogical ‘architecture’.

We have taken the opportunity to scrutinise who we are and what we are doing as an architecture course in a world-leading, critically engaged art school – what it means to study, learn, and teach architecture today. This has allowed us to build upon the core values of Spatial Practices at CSM, consolidating our commitment to the present and to the role of architecture as a mode of critical enquiry and experimentation – a way of making sense of the past whilst we embark on constructing the future. Labour, including the politics and patterns of creative production, has been a pressing and common concern this year as we address the city, the discipline and the profession. During 2018, the Spatial Practices programme at CSM collaborated with Oliver Wainwright, architecture critic for The Guardian newspaper, to host the second series of ‘Fundamentals’ public debates, subtitled ‘The Way We Work’.The debates focussed on issues of labour and cultures of work in architecture and construction industries, addressing sold-out audiences of professionals, students and general public alike, and culminating in a lively two-day symposium with international contributions from Who Builds Your Architecture (New York University and Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation); The Architecture Lobby and Peggy Deamer (Yale University); Counter Conducts (Escola de Cidade, Sao Paolo) and Reinier de Graaf (OMA), as well as Adam Kaasa (RCA), Concrete Action, the Precarious Workers Brigade and other participants from UAL.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture at Central Saint Martins is poised at a unique moment in the context of architectural education in London. The course is swift developing a reputation for challenging the norms of architectural pedagogy and education, rethinking the boundaries of architectural practice and the profession, and for an intellectual commitment to engaging with ‘real-life’ sites and situations.

Intervening in these complex dynamics demands design approaches that are open to more democratic forms of space-making. The how and what of architecture continues to be our chief concern – how we act and what we produce, and this catalogue illustrate many such experiments.

As course director, it only remains for me to say a big thank you to everyone who has contributed to the course this year, for the hard work, passion, dedication and good humour that comes together in our thriving creative community. We hope you agree that the work and ideas gathered here and produced on the BA (Hons) Architecture at Central Saint Martins represents an undeniably exciting and optimistic future for architectural culture and learning!

Alex Warnock-Smith 7


Supported by the intellectual and theoretical agendas of the course, graduating students develop a position on the role of the architect, and put forward challenging architectural proposals that have real agency. Alex Warnock-Smith Course Leader


Stage 1

Introduction to Stage 1 Ruth Lang, Amanda Hopkins, Stuart McKenzie Stage 1 Leaders

Stage 1 Leaders Ruth Lang Amanda Hopkins Stuart McKenzie Studio 1 Stuart McKenzie Studio 2 Tom Fox Studio 3 Charlotte Grace Studio 4 Douglas Murphy Studio 5 Rubén Everett

Studio 7 Sakiko Kohashi Studio 8 Donald McCrory Stage 1 Students Ilham Abdulahi Blu Affleck Akraam Ahammed Nadera Ahmed Najd Al Bulushi Layane Al-Madani Diana Al-laham Ahmed Alattar Shinya Ali Issa Almannai Yara Alsharif Yasemin Aslan Aadhila Azar Shenique Bass Yanice Begar Serra Bilgincan Ashley Bissell Bareera Borhan Emily Brown Alice Cabecadas Elif Cecen Chun Man Chan Si Jeoi Chan Shikha Chawda Hongyi Chen Junyu Chen Lefeng Chen Justin Cheung Leona Chulani Blanka Ciborowska Charlotte Cocking Charlie Cockrell Charlie Cole Finn Crawford Zhaojing Deng Tea Dimitrova 10

Melissa Eagleton Mariam Fawaz Elizabeth Ferial Valentin Fomin Chet Foster Lily Foster-Grellis Paolo Garcia Sarah Ghulam Zac Grego Anika Guha Sasha Guminilovych Tong Hao Emilie Harvey Nicholas Hasbani Timothy Hatch Jake Hines Alexandru Hosu Wilber Ilett Kamran Ayyoob Iqbal Kaloyan Todorov Ivanov Izzy Jaggs Amelia Jhangir Perona Jiang Tharim Lubaba Adelaide Kenny Abdo Khanachat Tiffany Ki Nesrin Kianni Gwanghoon Kim Wan-Chi Lai Katrina Larsen-Kittle Joseph Law Isabel Liu Sut Kuan Lo Hubert Mikolajczyk Rebekah Mithinji

Alice Mohan Ka Cheng Mok Jeet Mori Elena Newell Mingzi Niu Steven Op Sevgi Oskar Belinda Parker Alex-Linh Pham Decarla Phillip-Riley David Plaskitt Maximilienulysse Remondiere Adam Riley Anna Roumpaki Denisa Sandu Nimra Shahid Juanxi Shen D’relle Small George Smith Jonathan So Phoompathai Sutjaritworakul Julia Trudu Hui-Tzu Tsui Naomi Velez Nikita Velichko Wei-Tse Wang Tim Webster Terrence Wu Hongtai Yang Kai Hang Yang Euphenia Zeng Meilin Zhang Daniel Zhuo Laura Ziemele Fatima Zoughy

Thank you: Eddie Blake, Ash Fridd, Tom Atkinson, Nina Gerada, Peter Hinchliffe, Alex Holloway, Sean Rafferty, Alicia Argüelles, Georgie Day, Laura Evans, Amritt Flora, Sam Brown, Georgia Steele, Alaistair Steele, Valerie Palmer, Tilly Beck, Allan Atlee, Sam McElhinney, CherngMin Teong, Conrad Cherniavsky, Rhianon Morgan-Hatch, Ana Alonso Albarracin, Ed Crooks, Kate Tiernan, Rachel Lillie, Viv Eades

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Studio 6 Rob Brown

As the first phase of architectural education, Stage 1 establishes the key values, skills and working practices from which to explore the many considerations of designing for the built environment. Students join Central Saint Martins with a broad range of talents, which are augmented and developed over this first explorative year. The course is structured to enable inferences to be drawn between the historical and the contemporary, the personal and the societal, the theoretical and the applied. In providing, from the outset, the opportunity to apply and test the multi-faceted requirements of architectural practice within real world scenarios, students are encouraged to consider their burgeoning talents in a manner that reaches beyond the academic: aesthetics and ethics become part of the question. We value the development of personal interests, positions and characteristics, and the first year of study seeks to nurture and stimulate a confident yet conscientious approach to design and research practice. Situated within the environment of a vibrant, exhilarating and internationally leading art school, BA (Hons) Architecture is able to call upon a breadth of disciplines and practitioners, aware of the many and broad means by which we might consider architecture in terms of spatial, tectonic, social and experiential design. The varied practices and practitioners at Central Saint Martins provide support for developing new talents; in representation and making, in guiding the first tentative steps into contextual analysis, and in understanding the rigours of practice. Design studies remain at the core of all student activity, complemented by fruitful and diverse formats of teaching and learning, including not only lectures but also seminar sessions, exhibition visits, guided walks, tutorials, debates and group projects. Work may be developed independently, but never alone. Over the course of the year, the design briefs confront ever-more complex issues, shifting scales between the human body and that of the city. Student projects highlight political issues and social intentions; others focus on environmental concerns, often confronting the material demands of architectural design. Such challenges call upon the three inter-related modes of study introduced in parallel to the design studio – professional practice, technical resolution, and contextual enquiry. Initially these modes are discussed individually, before being integrated by students into refined and rigorously considered design proposal. The courage and dedication evident in the students’ early work enables these concerns to be synthesised into a fertile grounding for their future studies, and in their establishment as architectural practitioners in their own right.

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Stage 01 Design Studio

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01 / Finn Crawford S01, Sectional study for a pattern cutters’ studio in King’s Cross. 02 / Diana Al-Laham S01, Model study of canal side womenswear fashion studio. 03 / Yasemin Aslan S01, Conceptual montage for a proposed hairdressing studio in CSM’s Granary Building. 04 / Abdo Khanachat S01, Initial concept image for a proposed womenswear studio. 12

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05 / Julia Trudu S01, Development technical section of a ceramics studio proposed for next to the Regent’s Canal. 06 / Chun Man Chan S01, Section of knitwear design studio by the St Pancras Cruising Club. 07 / Diana Al-Laham S01, Model study of canal side womenswear fashion design studio. 07

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01 / Zac Grego S01, Final model of a canal side furniture designers’ studio. 02 / Mingzi Niu S01, Section of 4D artists’ studio above the mainline railway corridor at King’s Cross. 03 / Paolo Garcia S01, Diagrammatic analysis of possible structural arrangements of canal side knitwear studio. 14

04 / Mingzi Niu S01, Exploded axonometric of 4D artists’ studio above the mainline railway corridor. 05 / Jonathan So S01, Section through textile designers’ studio next to St Pancras Cruising Club at King’s Cross. 05

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01 / Ryan Chen S01, Internal atmospheric studies for a proposed photography design studio. 02 / Brian Yang S01, Analysis of possible occupation on the canal side towpath at King’s Cross. 16

03 / Diana Al-Laham S01, Analytical taxonomy of womenswear fashion design studio at CSM. 04, 05 / Wilson Wang S01, Models examining atmosphere and material testing for a textile design studio.

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01 / Mel Eagleton S01, Sectional site model photographs from Making Week. 02 / Charlotte Cocking S01, Testing inhabitation through plan drawing for a furniture design studio. 03 / Terrence Wu S01, Technical elevational study in pencil 18

of a proposed acting studio next to the Regent’s Canal near King’s Cross. 04, 05 / Hubert Mikolajczyk S01, Model studies for an installation on a small public space near the Regent’s Canal.

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01 / Charlie Cockrell S01, Sectional model on site for a fine artists’ studio above the mainline railway at King’s Cross. 02 / Isabel Liu S01, Concept montage for a proposed bakery in CSM. 03 / Wilber Illett S01, Test model for an underground character animation studio. 04 / Wan-Chi Lai S01, Section of a 3D fine artists’ studio with external exhibition space.

05 / Tiffany Ki S01, Sketches for a proposed installation in the entrance of CSM’s Granary Building. 06 / Tim Hatch S01, Concept models for an elevated graphic design studio located near King’s Cross. 07 / Max Remondiere S01, Structural model studies of columns for a proposed innovative pattern cutting studio.

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01 / Junyu Chen S01, Exploded axonometric of canal side character animation design studio. 02 / Adelaide Kenny S01, Exploded axonometric of a graphic design studio analysing the relationship of spaces. 03 / Hongtai Yang S01, Elevation and section of a proposed ceramic studio. 04 / Layane Al-Madani S01, Elevational composition study of jewellery design studio at King’s

Cross. 05 / Perona Jiang S01, Section of a 3D fine artists’ studio analysing spatial relationships. 06 / D’relle Small S01, Conceptual montage for a proposed textile design studio. 07 / Max Chen S01, Internal atmospheric studies for a photographic studio. 08 / Hubert Mikolajcyk S01, Model installation study by the Regent’s Canal. 09 / Brian Yang S01, Model study for a photography studio.

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01 / Anika Guha S01, Concept sketches of a textile design studio above the mainline railway at King’s Cross. 02 / Blanca Ciborowska S01, Site axonometric for a photography studio over the King’s Cross mainline railway. 03 / Alice Mohan S01, Site plan of a character animation studio near Regent’s Canal, King’s Cross. 24

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04, 05 / Serra Bilgincan S01, Internal studies for a proposed canal side jewellery studio. 06 / Charlotte Cocking S01, Inhabited sectional study for a canal side furniture design studio at King’s Cross. 07 / Aadhila Azar S01, Section exploring wall thickness for a photography studio by the St Pancras Cruising Club.

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01 / Charlotte Cocking S01, Inhabitated sectional study for a canal side furniture design studio at King’s Cross. 02 / Isabel Liu S01, Concept montage for a proposed bakery in CSM. 03, 04 / Charlie Cockrell S01, Internal studies for a canal side fine artists’ studio. 26

05, 06 / Wilson Wang S01, Elevational and sectional studies for a textile design studio. 07, 08 / Timothy Webster S01, Development model of a proposed canal side fashion print studio.

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01, 02 / Steven Op S01, Atmospheric model studies for a fashion print studio. 03 / Jeet Mori S01, Technical section of a proposed acting studio next to the Regent’s Canal. 04 / Alex Pham S01, Plan identifying the process of a proposed salmon smokery in CSM’s Granary Building. 05 / Tharim Kazi S01, Section through a proposed vertical sauna in CSM. 28

06 / Finn Crawford S01, Exploded axonometric analysing material for a pattern cutters’ studio at Kings Cross. 07 / Zhaojing Deng S01, Sectional model of a proposed knitwear design studio investicating structure. 08 / Zhaojing Deng S01, Development model of a proposed canal side knitwear design studio. 07

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01 / Gwanghoon Kim S01, Exploded axonometric of a jewellery studio next to the Regent’s Canal at King’s Cross. 02 / Yara Al-Sharif S01, Analytical plans of pattern cutters’ studio. 03 / Yanice Begar S01, Measured taxonomy of equipment for a knitwear designer. 30

04, 05 / Nadera Ahmed S01, Programmatic research analysing the equipment in CSM’s fashion studios. 06 / Julia Trudu S01, Development technical model of a ceramics studio proposed next to the Regent’s Canal near King’s Cross. 06

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01 / Katrina Larsen-Kittle S01, Internal atmospheric studies for a high level swimming pool above ‘the crossing’ in CSM’s Granary Building. 02 / Bareera Borhan S01, Measured movement studies of a butcher for a proposed butchery school. 03 / Euphemia Zeng S01, Mixed media section analysing the relationship of a proposed photography studio with the existing context. 32

04 / Kate Hao S01, Exploded axonometric drawing of a proposed furniture design studio. 05 / Crystal Mok S01, Site plan of a character knitwear design studio next to the Regent’s Canal, King’s Cross. 06-09 / Becki Mithinji S01, Measured taxonomy analysing the process of tailoring for a menswear design studio. 10 / Mel Eagleton S01, Site mapping drawing analysing local inhabitation.

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Stage 2

Introduction to Stage 2 Gregory Ross Stage 2 Leader

Stage 2 Leader Gregory Ross

Stage 2 or the second undergraduate year is a great period in a student’s architectural education – they have just enough skill, newly acquired, combined with enough openness to be genuinely experimental and creative in their design process. In the design studio, which forms the core of the year, we nurture an experimental spirit, guiding students with just enough structure to enable them to continue to develop their projects with a measure of control and criticality whilst maintaining the necessary space to allow for personal interpretation and direction.

Technical Studies is integrated with design studio activities: technical precedent studies are chosen by the design studio tutors and all studios require 1:50 scale sectional models as part of the portfolio submission. The 1:50 scale section allows students to develop a fragment of their project at which spatial and material qualities, as well as structural and constructional design, are expressed and explored. We actively try to break the artificial distinction between technical development and design development, encouraging students to view these as parts of a whole – essentially design, applied from a different point of view or scale.

Stage 2 Students Huda Al-Yaqobi Leen Alidelbi Lamya Fahad S Alsheaibi Ogechukwu Maria Goreti Amuta James Andrew Annis Sabina Balcaityte Alberto Bautista Hernaez Alexander Berger Sandhofer Anna Konstantinovna Bolotova Lou-Elena Bouey Tre-Vaughn Wayne Caines Camillo Cavarretta Lauren Sarah Cowl Lawrence Joson Del Rosario Laurianne Tra My Ducasse Laura-Larisa Dumitru Esma Duzgun Agata Dydak Marta Escribano Cunat Jerry Florez Vasquez Mariia Galiullina Narinder Kaur Gill Beata Halka Sean Danial Douglas Hamilton Zuliya Heydarova Hengmo Hu Weihang Hu Yuqi Huang 34

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Building on drawing and modelling skills acquired in first year, Stage 2 includes a substantial media curriculum in the form of a digital drawing and modelling course which ranges from CAD and three-dimensional modelling, to cross-platform working where students are encouraged to work across a range of digital software tools to help them construct high quality forms of representation and final portfolios.

Yasin Hassan Hussein Hayden David James Amirali Kalantari Krystian Filip Kliber Arina Kondrashova Max-Antoine Lalande D’Anciger Lucia Lanzalaco Pham Duc Minh Le Holly Rebecca Le-Var Yibeijia Li Ivana Linares Parra Yu Sum Kristy Lo Laurene Marie Alice Lucy Weining Luo Maximilian Chandra Master Murtaza Mohebi Harry Charles Stockton John Mortimer Adam Joshua Muscat Katherine Anne Nelson Izabel Ortenblad Sigaud Isabell Young Park James Charles Parkes Jacob Phil-Ebosie Dominika Elzbieta Pilch Charles Henri Ashley Plet Gareth Angelo Pontipedra Milo Joseph Pyrah-Bernstein

Miroslav Radu Joud Mustafa A Reda Yu Ren Laura Barrero Robles Marie-Helene Isabelle F. Rynwalt Leena Sahloul Jalal Aleksander Subzali Sajan Jerick De Castro Seruelas Morgane Sandrine Lara Sha’ban Yuxuan Shi Enija Skeltona Jiaqi Sun Jevgenija Tocilina Tiphaine Christine Marie Varigas Tanavej Vejaphan Bixuan Wang Jessica Paige White Hiu Ying Wong Tongtor Wongtanapruk Jhineil Kerri-Gaye Wright Xing Yang Yichen Yang Zhicheng Yang Mat Lam Yeung Jia Qing Yue Isabella Mary Yurtsever Runlin Zhao

This past year has seen the introduction of ‘vertical’ design studios, in which Stage 2 students work with or alongside final year students on similar studio briefs. We are already seeing the positive results of this – peer-to-peer learning occurs more naturally, and second year students acquire skills and develop their critical awareness to a higher level, above previous horizons. All in all, this has been a successful and enjoyable experiment, which the course and faculty hope to consolidate and improve in the coming years. I’d like to thank the all the design studio tutors and Stage 2 students for joining in and rising to the challenge – it’s been a great year, laying new and exciting foundations for the future.

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Stage 3

Introduction to Stage 3 Oscar Brito Stage 3 Leader

Stage 3 Leader Oscar Brito

Stage 3 of BA (Hons) Architecture is the most intense part of the student journey. The explorations from previous stages are now consolidated and enhanced with a critical perspective based on extensive research, rigorous analysis and reflective experimentation, on the relation between architecture and its cultural and physical context and how these may reciprocally influence each other.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

The programme of Stage 3 is designed in order to support our students to further defining their own concerns and professional approaches related to architecture and spatial practice. Four strands of study are tightly intertwined: the Design Studio, including research, analysis, conceptualization and design development; Contextual Studies, which yields a substantial, original and rigorous dissertation; Technical Studies, which enables the development of design proposals and addresses the material, structural and environmental concerns that inform it; and Professional Practice, focussed on helping students with the development of their unique career paths in the imminent future. All these strands are woven together by each graduating students’ individual constructions of their own position, as future practitioners. Stage 3 emphasises the development of a critical understanding of the strategic role that architecture may have in the development and implementation of site-specific conceptual, programmatic, spatial and material agencies. Through the integration of spatial, theoretical and technical investigations, the aim of Stage 3 is to promote the development of conceptual, contextual and methodological approaches to construct the students’ individual position as strategic designers, empowering them as active and critical agents in an increasingly complex social, economic, political, and professional scenario. Stage 3 Students Dalia Maryam Amellal Valentina Antollini Sarah Mathilde Clementine Aulombard Sooyoung Bae Roxane Baillet Ben Jamie Ken Bradford Sean Ying Ho Brown Krittika Burintaragoht Tanit Elizabeth Cabau-Wolf Tze Wei Brenda Chang Ziwei Cheng Taekeun Cho Niall Joseph Coleman Cinla Illiyyin Narin Deger Xiang Ding Ziyang Dong Roya Edde Jinming Fan Alece Justine Foden Rafael Garcia Turegano 36

Filippos Nikolaos Georgeoglou Isabella Haddad Domingos Roshna Kamal Hassan Peng He Shijia Huang Shu-Ming Hung Alexia Iborra Wicksteed Alba Imeri Zeena Jamil Elnaz Karoubi John Anthony Langran Marie Anne Therese Le Rouzic Keun Lee Shutong Lin Louis Simon Lupien Sijie Lyu Mariam Saja Fouad Madi Aslihan Belis Memik Lucy Sky Moore-Clube John Theodore Moran

Sersah Namoglu Jennifer Billie Nibbs Maria Papadimitriou Ophelie Dimitra Juliette Prevesianos Taro Sakamoto Takeuchi Amar Sall Lok Yi See Jiesoo Shin Dahlia Subasi Belen Toker Xavier Ulibarri Meade Christopher John Wall-Hayes Qinxue Wang Tang Xiao Riichiro Yamamoto Zixin Yao Dahye Yi Kaidan Zhao Rafaela Zincone Albieri Muhammad Ashraf Zul Parquear

We promote a direct engagement with the context of investigation and the varied situations, narratives, conceptual or material approaches put forward in each of the eight vertical studios, which in turn inspire outcomes that venture beyond immediate preconceptions. Students develop a detailed design-research project exploring the potential effect that architecture, as an expanded practice, may have in generating exchanges between different spatial, social, economic and cultural conditions that compose and characterise the contemporary phenomena.

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Studio 1

The Yard Gregory Ross, Ashley Fridd Studio 1 Tutors

Studio Tutors Gregory Ross Ashley Fridd

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 2 Students Leen Alidelbi Oge Amuta Sabina Balcaityte Alberto Bautista Hernaez Alexander Berger Sandhofer Narinder Kaur Gill Zuliya Heydarova Ivana Linares Parra Charles Plet Miroslav Radu Joud Mustafa A Reda Stage 3 Students Tanit Cabau-Wolf Taekeun Cho Ziyang Dong Rafael Garcia Turegano Keun Lee Jiesoo Shin Riichiro Yamamoto Thank you: Grace Richardson (Technical Tutor), Jason Chan (Support Tutor), Miraj Ahmed, Serhan Ahmet Tekbas, Thomas Atkinson, Ruben Everett, Marta Granda Nistal, Carsten Jungfer, Flavie Karoukis, Carlotta Novella, Tom Raymont, Luiz Rocha Pereira Queiroz Conceicao, Emory Smith, Amarasri Songcharoen, Alex Sutton, Keita Tajima, Alex Warnock-Smith Isabel Albiol Estrada, William Dickinson, Lara Smithson, Georgia Jacob, Karina Lee, Abdul Mohammed, Rebecca Price, Catriona Robertson

This year Studio 1 investigated yards and spaces of making. Inspired by ideas that emerged from a survey of contemporary maker spaces and working yards in London, students’ design projects speculate on visions of future forms living and making in the city. Central to the design projects is a focus on the potential of the yard, as a shared space and a place of activity, to integrate the often-hidden cultures of making into the public realm and to activate and enrich our civic space. We started with a walk in Dungeness, an endless terrain of indeterminate spatiality, reading the landscape through physical experience, drawing and sampling. We searched for a line in the landscape, identified boundaries and thresholds, and looked for spatial definition amongst the scattered artefacts on the pebble flats. Our tool of investigation was forensic methods of drawing and sampling, recording fine details while simultaneously mapping the broad spatial terrain. This resulted in some beautiful large format drawings, which capture the quality and details of this open and expansive landscape. We took tactile samples – models and casts – which interpret and convey the material sensibility of the place. Intervening directly into this landscape, students were challenged to define and create a yard and a form of minimal dwelling for living and working, carefully deploying physical and time-based interventions to create a sequence of internal and external dwelling and making spaces in the landscape. Having established methods of reading and representing a site, of ordering sequences of spaces and spatially defining the yard, we brought these methods back to the dense post-industrial urbanity of London, focusing on a goods yard and the last remaining open site in the King’s Cross masterplan. We embarked on a collective master-planning exercise, which allowed each student to define an individual site in relation to a common public space – a new urban yard. Individual projects then responded to the urban yard and developed strategies for internal yards as various scales within their buildings. Studio 1 continues to experiment with methods of making in the studio: we use modelling as a primary tool for design development and spatial investigation. The workshop is where we translate between mediums, work iteratively, make discoveries and create collaboratively. We use the studio as a drawing space, a place to reflect on what has been made and to develop future projections. We treat drawing as a physical object too – something to be worked on endlessly, revisited and refined. We believe that establishing an attitude to the things we actually make ultimately embeds itself in the kinds of spaces we produce.

Tanit Cabau Wolf S03, ‘Fishing the Vernacular’ in Dungeness’ 38

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Vertical Design Studio 1

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01 / Charles Plett S02, ‘Dungeness Shelter’ 1:50 tonal section. Digital print on wallpaper. 02 / Ziyang Dong S03, ‘Yard Survey Canalside Studios’, 1:500 pigmented plaster cast. 03 / Ziyang Dong S03, ‘Yard Survey: Canalside Studios’, 1:500 scale model (left) hybrid 3D print & laser cut positive (right) silicone negative plaster and hemp mould. 04 / Riichiro Yamamoto S03, paper chasing spatial moment, 1:50 scale, digital print on wallpaper. 05 / Rafael Garcia Turegano S03, ‘Yard Survey: Perserverance Works’, 1:200 hybrid plan and elevation, digital print on paper. 40

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Vertical Design Studio 1

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01-04 / Tanit Cabau Wolf S03, ‘Finding the Vernacular’ explores and takes inspiration from the vernacular at different levels, from materials, making, site (Dungeness and King’s Cross), history and context. My project asks “How do I take inspiration from the vernacular, proposing a project which reflects it, but also challenges and re-invents it?” The proposal is a makers’ space that re-instates a disused railway line, to ship in hulls of narrow boats 42

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and carriages to be fixed or fitted out on site and then redistributed using the transport network. Using the site’s distinct terraced and linear character to propose a design that negotiates these difficulties but also enhances its unique qualities of landscape in the city. The proposal has a dual program, addressing the needs of making, whilst at the same time offering a space to live. 04

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01-07 / Riichiro Yamamoto S03, ‘Circular Café-onomy’. A majority of public waste is transported outside of the Kings Cross and either recycled or thrown into a landfill. Kings Cross should be a circular economy instead of the current one-way system. The first step toward the circular economy is to educate people about the production, consumption and incineration/recycling process. Coffee is a great example of a ubiquitous product with the clear 44

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production process. It is also consumed by a wide range of people every day. Coffee grounds are a recyclable waste material and have been receiving attention as a potential material resource. This project aims to provide Kings Cross with a pedagogical example of the circular economy and sustainability by creating an interactive recycling plant of coffee waste, which is gathered from all over London.

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01-05 / Ziyang Dong S03, ‘Celebrating Fashion’ is a platform for the customer and designer, a making space for craft and a sharing community to celebrate fashion events. Located near King’s Cross, the site has the potential to connect users of various backgrounds and business opportunities. With physical closeness to Central Saint Martins and its world class fashion courses, ‘Celebrating Fashion’ engages designers and industry people with visitors interested in fashion—it uses fashion to encourage students and industry to 46

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encounter one another in a co-working space and to build up bonds. 06–08 / Jiesoo Shin S03, ‘Beer Laboratory’ The project aims to aid the interaction between new residents of the KX masterplan and the existing local community. To support this idea, this maker space performs a dual role: it is a space of production and research as well as also a socialising space. The project borrows from the established culture of the public house—a social meeting place that becomes an indoor and outdoor room for the community.

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01-05 / Takeun Cho S03, ‘Tiny Farm’, a hybrid garden and maker space in the city, creates a new green pedestrian link between Caledonian Road Station and King’s Cross. Processes involved in growing and nurturing plants inspire the design of the spaces as well as the types of making processes available—there are kilns in the protective earth and light filled greenhouses where floriculture is practiced within indoor yards. Artefacts, such as pots, pedestals and paving made at the farm begin to populate the new route and perhaps even the connecting parks nearby. 48

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06-11 / Keun Lee S03, the ‘Synergetic Studio Village’ is a complex of small design and making studios. The project aims to improve the working environment of small design studios by integrating making and studio spaces. The space is planned to encourage the collaboration: separate design studios are connected under overtly covered, and coloured, protective ‘umbrella’ roofs which provide opportunity for spilling out of activities, interaction and unexpected results. The architecture seeks to achieve a harmony of a lightness and informality.

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01-05 / Rafael Garcia Turegano S03, The ‘King’s Cross Light Art School’ consists of facilities for artists who create artworks and installations in which light is the main material. The main challenge is to design spaces for experimentation with natural and artificial light, therefore, the project becomes an investigation on spaces that allow the artists to control the light conditions of their working spaces. At the same time, the building itself becomes a canvas for artists to play around with. The architecture creates and celebrates the Yard as a making and social space within the city. 50

06 / Alberto Bautista Hernaez S02, ‘Double Yard’. 07 / Narinder Kaur Gill S02, ‘Co-Making Student Space. Design students studying the same course but at different universities lack a place to co-make. The main work space environment will be open access to the public who will be able to watch the production of products later to be displayed and sold on site. It will provide makers with subject specific equipment who will also have access to a canteen, smaller office like rooms for project meetings and a private outdoor courtyard for students to enjoy during breaks.

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01–02 / Alberto Bautista Hernaez S02, ‘Double Yard’ is a place activated by entrepreneurs, free-lancers and students who make. Intense activities within the building spill out and activate two new public yards for King’s Cross. In the first yard the architecture merges with the landscape in and creates a new elevated green place for people to enjoy. This elevated soft yard space gently surrounds and overlooks a second harder public Yard which is there for the everyday use makers, inhabitants and people passing by. See also previous page, image 06.

03-05 / Zuliya Heydarova S02, ‘Bio Lab’ is a space focusing on the production of environmentally friendly and sustainable materials made from plants. The place will be used by specialists who are skilled in biology and in ecology and local residents who are interested in strengthening their communities by developing their ecological awareness. There is a hierarchy of yard spaces and different levels of privacy. The space includes a main workshop that will be open to the public to attract passers-by as well as private spaces such as research zone, equipment room and garden.

06-08 / Oge Amuta S02, ‘Performative Yard’ casts dispersed symbols of ritual (the temple) and performance (the ancient theatre) in the public space. These symbols and their associated set of spaces, each with an individual moment and feeling, are linked through a processional route. The theatre takes you on a journey and awakens a ‘déjà vu’ moment, ‘like you’ve seen and been there before’. By using predominantly mud–concrete, brass–copper and a green-emerald glass, everything feels surreal, like you’ve stepped away from reality and into a fantasy world.

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Joud Mustafa A Reda S02, ‘ReMake’ is a bridge between academic studies and professional practice for recent design graduates. Subsidised affordable studio space and well-equipped workshop facilities are open to both graduates and local residents—resulting in a sharing of skills and creative spark. The building is organised around an internal yard and studios open onto the public space. Sustainablity is implicit through re-use and the value placed on materials—the materials ‘store’ is in fact an exhibition space, immediately visible from the entrance. 53


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02–03, 09 / Ivana Linares Parra S02, the ‘Makers Playground’ is an open space where the community is free to take part in the process of making and focusing mainly on letting children create or contribute to the process. People learn from each other and enable children to design their imaginary playgrounds and turn them into reality. The building is formed of four main spaces: an exhibition and office space; a drawing space; two workshops—a public one to test prototypes, and a private one, for staff members to build the playgrounds which will be exhibited and used. 54

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01, 04 / Charles Plet S02, ‘Kings X Hacks’ was informed by my Hackspace survey, identifying a self-resilient management revolving around co-working, mutual respect and a strong sense of community. This proposal aims to provide an infrastructure where maker-specific workshops can develop and expand over time, together with communal space for interaction. Management of space is controlled and decided by makers themselves, who know best about the requirements for different types of making. A community will form through the ongoing co-building of workshops.

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05 / Alexander Berger Sandhofer S02, ‘Communal Backyard’ is a semi-shared mixed-use project that offers a unique image of a self-growing backyard in the city. The project engages with the local community by incorporating publicly accessible space facilities and yard space. The vision of the private area is to combine office, maker and academic space in an open and transparent way thus facilitating communication and access. The canteen a shared space for public and the employees and promotes use of the communal backyard.

06-08 / Sabina Balcaityte S02, ‘2 Seconds Gallery’ is a mix of photography studios and exhibition space. The sculptural exterior creates shadows, frames, views and inspires an elegant photography. The building is seen from the trains and creates three main public experiences: the long view from Eurostar with screen façade; the close-up view from the underground allowing commuters; the one to one experience of walking through the spaces. To catch the best sense of the project, you must take a train and explore the building through movement. 55


Studio 2

Other Spaces / Social Places Oscar Brito, Clio Capeille (with Mikel Azkona) Studio 2 Tutors

Studio Tutors Oscar Brito Clio Capeille with Mikel Azkona Stage 2 Students Lou Bouey Jerry Florez Vasquez Max Lalande D’Anciger Kristy Lo Katherine Nelson Dominika Pilch Jalal Sajan Ivy Wong Lamya Alsheaibi

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 3 Students Valentina Antollini Sarah Aulombard Brenda Chang Alba Imeri Louis Lupien Sersah Namoglu Dahlia Subasi Belen Toker Thank you: Federico Wulff, Mikel Azkona Uribe. Our guest crits: Matthew Brown, Amanda Callaghan (All Architects), Lara Belkind, Nick Woodford, Andre Hoelzle, Jack Idle, Chris Kennedy (Kennedy Woods Architects), Francesco Montagnani (SOS Ballaro), Carlotta Novella, Benjamin Perrot, Sabrina Puddu, Duarte Santos, Katherine Spencer, Carlos Villanueva Brandt, Paolo Vimercati (Grimshaw Architects), Francesco Zuddas, Place Department at London Borough of Croydon: Anisha Jogani, Matthew Rust, Tom Shelby, Technical Tutors: Matthew Duckett, Amanda Sexton (Make Architects) Our engagement with Palermo is the product of collaboration with the MArch Unit EMUVE at the Welsh School of Architecture, Cardiff. 56

(social) space is a (social) product Henri Lefebvre (1974) The Production of Space

Studio 2 explores how architecture, as an extended practice, could facilitate inclusive processes of social and urban regeneration. Studio 2 promotes the development of strategic engagements with the complex interactions between multiple agents, networks and processes related to specific physical and cultural contexts and their contingent situations. The design investigations of Studio 2 are focussed on the role that urban, architectural and temporal interstitial conditions could have as terrains for urban and social cohesion. We understand the production of social space as a process in which local and emergent communities might develop their civic identity and their rights to the city. We approach the production of architecture as a process, and not just as an outcome. We have been exploring how the principles of tactical placemaking and tactical urbanism could be reframed and expanded as comprehensive strategies for the development of incremental programmatic and architectural interventions. This year, our studio agendas have been developed and tested, in two different yet somehow similar contexts, both affected by issues of social inclusion of marginalised local and migrant communities and processes of top-down and bottom-up regeneration: Croydon in London, UK; and Albergheria in Palermo, Italy. Croydon is a large southern borough of London. It is one of the most populated metropolitan areas, with a rich ethnic diversity but with social issues that triggered some of the biggest riots in London in 2011. The headquarters of the UK Visas and Immigration are located at Croydon, often making it a mandatory place of passage for migrants and refugees. A particular aspect of Croydon nowadays is the spatial and temporal gaps between the different models and stages of urban development. Palermo, the capital of Sicily, Italy, is a city with complex urban and cultural issues, product of the layering of different cultural exchanges and historical circumstances. The social, urban and architectural fabric of its historic centre is still affected by war damages and decades of institutional disinvestment. The recent exponential increase of the migration flux from Africa and Asia, represents a huge challenge for the local resources, but also a great potential for a proactive approach towards processes of social inclusion and urban regeneration. The design proposals of Studio 2 have been informed by immersive contextual investigations, that combined hands-on, empirical experimentation and tactical on-site actions to reveal and understand the specific social, economic, political, material, spatial and urban issues and potentials that characterise the context of intervention. The design approach of Studio 2 emphasises an engagement in processes of consolidation and production of social and contextual networks, and how these could promote the social inclusion and the urban agency of marginalised local and migrant communities. The design proposals of Studio 2 have been developed as a series of strategic and tactical interventions of an incremental material and temporal scale, in order to develop a specific contextual relevance and sustainability.

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LEARN / Grow the seeds of your city — Sarah Aulombard, Brenda Chang, Alba Imeri & Dahlia Subasi

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Open Croydon: six months meanwhile projects at Croydon Orchestrated around three hubs: Speak, Learn and Make, Open Croydon is a participatory program that celebrates the Borough’s potentials. By providing inclusive spaces for knowledge sharing, craft learning and free creative expression we are aim to encourage 58

alternative ways of imagining Croydon for current and emerging communities through different ways of sharing. A self-initiated collaborative project by Alba Imeri, Belen Toker, Brenda Chang, Dahlia Subasi, Louis Lupien, Sarah Barlondo, Sersah Kombos, Valentina Antollini. 59


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01-03 / Louis Lupien S03, ‘Open Croydon’ This proposal is not a project, but an investigation based on comprehensive research, analysis and experimental processes. The study has been developed as a series of attempts at trying to bring life into Croydon’s New City, an urban area that was designed following the principles of modern urban planning, conducting multiple experiments in order to explore the complexity of this part of the city. Croydon’s New City is surrounded by many upcoming master-plans that are promising (again) to reshape Croydon for the better, stands centrally within this regeneration context with its gaping voids between its towers: underused car parks.

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An area that could potentially find its life through reclaiming the plurality of realities that exist within the two Croydons, the walking and the driving one, offering a new, inclusive sense of place for the dislocated local social agents that are being threatened by the topdown redevelopments. The centrally located parking, a redundant flagship of the modernist post-war ideals, could provide with a set of opportunities to foster the intensity of Croydon to animate this area, reconnecting it with its past (both modernist and pre-war) by celebrating its monumental structures whilst creating a comfortable, wind free, user generated sense of place, rehabilitating this part of Croydon to “a state of completeness that may have never existed”.

04-07 / Alba Imeri S03 ‘The Performative Factory’. This proposal is performance spaces for local organisations, supporting the about a public assembly that would allow residents to have visibility participation and involvement of local and transient communities of Croydon’s formal and informal performances that characterise (such as refugees), blurring the boundaries between actors and its lively urban scene. This proposal investigates the potential spectators. The Factory allows the audience to peer into the world relation between Croydon’s explicit and implicit landmarks such as of performance arts and productions from the exterior and from 02/ Alba Imeri S3, ‘The Performative Factory’ Fairfield Halls (a large theatre under reconstruction), and the stock within, through a layering of materials and spaces. The Factory offers This proposal is aboutspaces a public that would performance for local organisations, supporting the of neglected (carassembly parks), exploring how toallow respond to the a multiplicityspaces of performative devices, from its facades being used residents to have of Croydon’s formal and and and transient communities post warvisibility ‘failed urbanism’. This proposal is aninformal investigation on how participation for projections to involvement its base used of as local an outdoor amphitheatre and existing urban fabric and its residual can be activated skateboarding turf. blurring These spaces enable the creation of aactors public and performances that characterise livelyurban urbanspaces scene. This (such as refugees), the boundaries between as settings forthe happenings performances, space in anThe unutilised area as well asaudience facilities toto accommodate proposal investigates potentialand relation betweencontributing Croydon’s to spectators. Factory allows the peer into the placemaking processes. The Performance Factory holds multiple creative activities of the neighbouring colleges.

explicit and implicit landmarks such as Fairfield Halls (a large theatre under reconstruction), and the stock of neglected spaces (car parks), exploring how to respond to the post war ‘failed

world of performance arts and productions from the exterior and from within, through a layering materials and spaces. The61 Factory offers a multiplicity of performative devices, from its


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1 ‘Confrontation’ The first pavilion which is based around female group therapy allowing women to confront their problems with a group of respectful listeners who can equally learn from each-other or share with each-other. This room will be opened and closed only at the beginning and the end of each session allowing for a closed off group to give the women more confidence in sharing their stories.

A proposal aimed toward women in need living in Croydon. Women of refuge refers to any and all women seeking help , safety , shelter and guidance in the setting of Croydon. This project aims to give women an outlet to share experience, to shout loud so that unheard voices can become heard. . . .

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2 ‘Bodily Awareness’ 2(a) A classroom atmosphere to teach women about sexual health as well as the law and their rights amongst other things. This is a private room exclusively used to make women more aware of their bodies if they want to learn. 2(b)Wide open space used for exercise, dance, self defence classes etc. This room can be booked by anyone willing to teach a class about the body or a class which exclusively uses the body. This is to make women more comfortable with themselves and with physicality with other people making the woman one with their body after an event that may have left them feeling detached. 2(c)This pavilion is where all physical amenities lie including showers and bathrooms placing all programs relevant to the human body in one space. 3 ‘Security’

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A proposal INTO aimed toward in need living in VIEWS THE women LIFE OF THE SCHEME Croydon. . . and all women seeking Women of refuge refers to. any help , safety , shelter and guidance in the setting of A proposal aimed toward women in need living in Croydon. VIEWS INTO THE LIFE OF THE SCHEME Croydon. This project aims to give women an outlet to share Women of refuge refers to any and all women seeking . . . experience, to shout loud so that unheard voices can help , safety , shelter and guidance in the setting of become heard. Croydon. A proposal aimed toward women in need living in . . . This project aims to give women an outlet to share Croydon. experience, to shout loud that voices can Women of refuge refers toso any andunheard all women seeking become heard. help , safety , shelter and guidance in the setting of . . . Croydon. This project aims to give women an outlet to share experience, to shout loud so that unheard voices can become heard. . . .

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A safe homely feeling to aid women in opening up about their emotions and traumas. 1 ‘Confrontation’

Constructive classes with information surrounding the body and making women more aware of their anatomy 2(a) physical ‘Bodily awareness’ and health.

A safe homely feeling to aid women in opening up about their emotions and traumas. 1 ‘Confrontation’

Constructive classes with information surrounding the body and making women more aware of their anatomy and health. 2(a) physical ‘Bodily awareness’

A safe homely feeling to aid women in opening up about their emotions and traumas.

Constructive classes with information surrounding the body and making women more aware of their anatomy and physical health.

3(a)The entrance to the private area where you can meet with someone who can direct you to the desired help. 3(b) Private rooms in which a woman can have 1:1 meetings with actors in Croydon, including Crisis, Refuge, the sexual health clinic and the police service amongst others.

1 ‘Confrontation’

2(a) ‘Bodily awareness’

A safe homely feeling to aid women in opening up about their emotions and traumas.

Constructive classes with information surrounding the body and making women more aware of their anatomy and physical health.

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4 ‘Comfort’ A pavilion tucked away beneath the others providing silence, the allowance for different types of lighting and a relaxing space for prayer or self reflection. Many women may come into the site from various religious in which they need space fro prayer. Likewise many women will be traumatised and find the overpowering nature of the scheme too much at times, this is the space to remove yourself and take time for yourself, for reflection and for relaxation.

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5 ‘Physical Touch’ 5(a) A green wall limiting sound into the site and creating infrastructure to place the circulation of the building.

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5(b) Balconies inside the green-wall that allow for views over Croydon looking out towards box park and East Croydon station.

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5(c) Two sets of ramps going up and down to all three levels of the program allowing for complete access to all entering the site especially for women with physical disabilities and women with small children in strollers.

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Open plan room for sports, yoga, self defence and all other social and physical activities. 2(b) ‘Bodily awareness’

Wash-room facilities for after classes and toilets all located within the bodily awareness sector of the build2(c) ‘Bodily all awareness’ ing relating aspects of body together.

Open plan room for sports, yoga, self defence and all Wash-room facilities for after classes and toilets all lo2(c) ‘Bodily awareness’ other social and physical activities.2(b) ‘Bodily awareness’ cated within the bodily awareness sector of the buildingallrelating aspects of body together. Open plan room for sports, yoga, self defence and Wash-room facilities for after classes and toilets all lo2(b) ‘Bodily awareness’ 2(c) ‘Bodily all awareness’ other social and physical activities.

Open plan room for sports, yoga, self defence and all other social and physical activities.

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5(d) Bridges which run alongside the ramps to allow access tot he buildings from different levels.

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cated within the bodily awareness sector of the building relating all aspects of body together.

Wash-room facilities for after classes and toilets all located within the bodily awareness sector of the building relating all aspects of body together.

6 A large overpass leading into a multi-storey car park provides a constant sound strain to the site, the green-wall should quieten this and help to distract the users inside the space from the harsh reality 5(b)of car and concrete Croydon. 7 The entrance to Croydon college lies close to the site allowing the scheme to be visible to young women drawing this demographic into the site due to conveni5(b) ence.

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8 Fairfield hall and the entrance to the cultural quarter of Croydon lay close to the site allowing for partial visibility and giving the program a place in this part of the 5(b) city.

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9 Nearby construction sites giving loud noises and the opportunity of more high-rise and less light.

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Private rooms for women to meet with Officials in a

5(a) Circulation Open views to the city celebrating aspects of Croydon

safe environment from their personalOpen life. the way to the programs. Private rooms for women to meet with Officials inremoved a views to theoncity celebrating aspects of Croydon safe environment removed from their personal life. on the way to the programs. 3(b) ‘Security’ 5(a) Circulation

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Private rooms for women to meet with Officials in a safe environment removed from their personal life. 3(b) ‘Security’

Open views to the city celebrating aspects of Croydon on the way to the programs. 5(a) Circulation

Private rooms for women to meet with Officials in a safe environment removed from their personal life.

Open views to the city celebrating aspects of Croydon on the way to the programs.

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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01, 02 / Katie Nelson S03, ‘Women of Refuge’ refers to any and all women seeking help, safety, shelter and guidance in the setting of Croydon. The proposal is split up into five ‘rooms’ each demonstrating a layer of the recovery process relating mainly to that of psychological, physical and sexual violence against women. These steps in the process are taken from Neinke Helder’s ‘Sexual healing project’ and are as follows: Physical touch, Confrontation, Bodily awareness, Security and Comfort. Arguably the most important of 62

these steps is ‘Physical touch’ which lies in the public realm. The Journey begins with a long sheltered and winding walk through the air, a public walk way made of timber shrouded in greenery, emphasising the need for physical touch in the recovery processes both through the public realm and sensation of material. It was my hope to find a way of dealing with traumatic events outside of the unwelcoming and generic environments that often characterise the public provision, making recovery a journey and not a destination.

03-05 / Belen Toker S03, ‘CR-room’ Shared Offices Project is a social enterprise that aims to encourage, motivate and empower the youth of Croydon, nurturing their involvement in activities and social networks related to making, technology and enterprise. By bringing the youth and the business communities to shared spaces and facilities, the project aims to use public spaces as places of social vibrancy where social and motivational interactions might happen between different user groups. ‘CR-room’ offers a grid system made

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of glulam columns and beams, which will be filled out in time with modular CLT pieces that will be available to order on the website of the project, allowing the users to customize their office spaces and even submit their own designs. Connecting the wood structure with steel joints, and using modular CLT boards to create the boundaries of the office spaces, the building offers a lego-concept where each piece can be added in and taken out, allowing it to be moved to another place once the lend is over. 63


Vertical Design Studio 2

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03-05 / Kristy Lo S02, ‘Zero Waste, Zero Discrimination’ aims 02 to support the inclusion of increasingly marginalised communities such as homeless people and smokers. The design of the proposed building emphasise an internal and external environmental 01, 02 / Ivy Wong S02, ‘The BeeHive’ is an investigation on the performance. Internally, it would enable an environmental cycle of Croydon’s Saffron Central, an urban farm. The proposal intends to potential relations between apparently disparate ecological and how a cigarette could be recycled to support urban farming, and reinforce the potential that Queen’s Gardens might have to further social subjects that face environmental displacement in the urban therefore, food production that would provide job and support to support these displaced beings by providing a structure that would conditions, homeless and bees. The chosen site, Queen’s Gardens, the local homeless population. The proposal also aims to attenuate foster a productive relationship between them that, at the same time, 6 / Kristy Lo S02, ‘Project Title’. A complete cycle of a cigarette to less. Emphasizing the more benefiting perspective of these two acis a central location at Croydon adjacent to the main institutional stereotypical prejudices against its two main user groups, as both could promote their of interaction with larger communities. Thisand project a plate food. Providing pleasure for smokers offering jobs tions – Second hand smoke to support the crops to grow with the landmarks of the area, already host supporting structures and are subject to environmental discrimination. The use of modular aims to facilitate ecological interactions that could foster and social a skill and set for the homeless in Croydon. This will help attenuate help of the homeless. The combination of the high-tech elements of 6 / KristyaLo S02, ‘Project Title’.and A complete cycle of environment. a cigarette to less. Emphasizing the more benefiting perspective of these two ac- and construction techniques as services for the homeless population, with Croydon Nightwatch, architecture, sustainable materials a more inclusive sustainable urban the common stereo typical view of these two groups of users. An my design completed the ‘Green’ original concept. Dust Absorbers plate tions – Second hand smoke to support the charity providing evening meals; and for the urban bees, awith theof food. Providing pleasure for smokers and offering jobs wellthe as crops the usetoofgrow dust with and pollution absorbent materials enhance unwelcomenesss as acts of discrimination is always experienced and transparent solar panels reduces the electricity needs as well and a skill set for the homeless in Croydon. This will help attenuate help of the homeless. The combination of the high-tech elements of by these two groups of users which in this multi-function building, as the polluted air around the structure. the common stereo typical view of these two groups of users. An my design completed the ‘Green’ original concept. Dust Absorbers 64 the tension will be eased. unwelcomenesss as acts of discrimination is always experienced andwill transparent solar panels reduces the electricity needs as well Designed for the community of Croydon, this project aim to EL

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the environmental performance of the structure. The proposed design emphasises an internal and external environmental performance. Internally, it enables an environmental cycle of how a cigarette could be recycled to support urban farming, and therefore, food production that would provide job and support to the local homeless population. The proposal aims to attenuate stereotypical prejudices against its two main user groups, which are subject to environmental discrimination. The emphasis on modular architecture, sustainable materials and construction techniques as well as the use of dust and pollution absorbent materials enhance the environmental LO_16474771 functions of the structure.

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Vertical Design Studio 2

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Max Lalande D’Anciger Albergheria Grandioso

Brenda Chang Community Kitchen

Dominika Pilch Ballaro’s women

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018 01

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01-03 / Sarah Aulombard S03, ‘The Nest’. What does it mean to flee your home to seek safety? What does it mean to be a refugee? Today, 50% of the world’s refugees are women and girls. Between 2000 and 2015, the number of international migrants has increased by 41 per cent to reach 244 million. In Croydon, over 52% of the population is composed of women and people of ethnicities other than “British White”. This project aims to offer women refugees and migrants the opportunity to connect, exchange and empower each. The Nest provides a safe and inclusive environment for women 66

03

to speak up about their issues via a free program of workshops hosted in collaboration with local volunteers. The program includes English classes, women’s education and citizenship preparedness which are crucial to a healthy cultural integration. The building offers flexible levels of privacy with a double-skin facade and timber louver panels adjustable at the users’ discretion. While being a sustainable solution, the double-skin timber facade provides the users with the best possible experience and comfort.

Lou Elena Bouey Workshop of the Transient

Jerry Florez Vasquez The Flea Market

Valentina Antollini Piazza Laboratorio

67


Vertical Design Studio 2

Vertical Design Studio 2

the promenades

the social space

the library

the workshops

the classroom

could the council invest in a new machine? if the workshop can provide furniture for piazza carmina, yes

timber weathers better and is cheap...

make sure you protect your fingers! Mia could you grab some wood?

06

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

MOMENTS OF LIFE IN THE BUILDING

01

timber or birch? what thickness?

02

ENCOURAGING INTERRACTION THROUGH SPACE AND PROGRAMME the gardens and open bench workshops allow visual transparency between spaces and actors

03

BRARY

01-04 / Lou-Elena Bouey S02, ‘WofT – Workshop of the Transient’. ries are shared and exhibited Palermo is a goldmine as much as it is a minefield; it is the home of a vibrant, diverse, resourceful population, a head-spinning mix of cultures and traditions, while having, against its own will, situations of illegality that slip their way into the everyday life of the city. The challenges it faces: from increasing overseas immigration, decaying urban landscape and economic poverty have informed this proposal. Defined process of research that included situated actions linked to critical analyses of current and potential networks, 68

04

05

ZOOMING INTO THE WORKSHOPS

this proposal explores potential thatasthe collective in the main workshop isthe a social space as much a learning space forinvolvement the students making may have as an agent of social inclusion, vocational and job skilling, as well as an agent of urban regeneration. The WofT aims to provide support to marginalised groups, such as young locals and unaccompanied migrants, as well as to local makers, creating a social and urban network and programmes to trigger collective city hacking, pride in one’s heritage, skill sharing and an architecture best possible experience and comfort.

05-07 / Brenda Chang S03, ‘The Community Courtyard’. The Albergheria district in the historic centre of Palermo affected by an urban decay produced by war damages and long-term abandonment. There are many structures in a derelict state that contribute to a low civic pride. Besides the material decay, there are other related issues such as a lack of adaptation to the current circumstances that render the structures obsolete, further affecting the possibilities of regeneration. The Community Courtyard is a public social venue which provides a space for gardening, cooking

07

and learning. It aims to provide a space where locals and migrant communities may interact, celebrate diversity in Palermo and promote a healthy neighbourhood atmosphere. The Community Courtyard is conceived as a social enterprise working as the epicentre of a network of urban farming, providing workshops, education and social spaces to complement the adjacent Centro Astalli, a charity that provides a wide range of support to refugees, whilst collaborating with other local social and cultural enterprises.

69


3. Courtyard 4. Workshop 5. WC Vertical Design Studio 2

Vertical Design Studio 2

1F 6.Laundromat 7.Co-Working 8. Kitchen

1

02

2

01

03

1:100

05

Aim

Programmatic Strategy

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

1, Co-working 2. Workshop

Program Requirements

Providing management and training jobs for already skilled people

Economic Regeneration: Aid the generation of training and jobs

Providing training and transferable skills

1 Workshops

for traders and apprentices to be trained by other craftsmen and professionals (FGAmbiente), who can gain experience to find jobs in relevant fields.

Creation of transitional exposure space

Project Aims

Social Regeneration: Providing leisure space and support for those who need it

Urban Regeneration: Celebrating the existing historical architectural context

Creation of leisure space to satisfy local demands

Creating the conditions necessary to promote pride and care for the built context.

2

Leisure spaces

for traders and young people, as well as promotional cultural events, where they are exposed to workshop spaces, support classes and an ambitious enviornment

Improving the ecological situation in the area by giving opportunities and hope to locals, something to be proud of

Promoting Existing Local Systems

Redistribution of Recycled and Upcycled Items

06 04

01-04 / Valentina Antollini S03, ‘Piazza Laboratorio’. This project is aligned to the mission and work of the local organisation SOS Ballaro’ that actively intervenes in the degraded public spaces in Palermo by offering adequate structures for waste management, urban furniture and greenery. The proposal is conceived as a series of incremental interventions aimed to regenerate the urban and economic tissue of Piazza San Pasquale in Palermo, which is currently occupied by an informal market that prevents the fulfilment of its role as a key public space in the area. The first intervention is 70

focused on providing an adequate public space for the immigrants that currently run the informal market to perform recreational activities. The second intervention is based on replacing the site’s degraded structures with spaces for productive activities. These interventions follows the examples of Zisa Creativa (Palermo) and Arci Fieri (Catania, Sicily), two social enterprises that engage immigrants with recycling, making and trading activities. The intervention aims to include the current immigrant traders on site in the processes of urban regenration whilst offering them a diversity of job opportunities.

05, 06 / Jerry Florez Vasquez S02, ‘The Flea Market’. The proposed programme is a market space for the traders and craftsmen of the area, as well as workshop facilities. This would function as an informal recycling hub, or an ‘upcycling’ hub, working with the existing entrepreneurial spirit and a local will for recycling. The traders and craftsmen would deal with local materials and clients to reuse and repurpose discarded items ranging from clothes, to white goods and pieces of carpentry. The hub would encourage skilled traders to share knowledge for those looking to

3 Classrooms

to teach skills and offer advice for those seeking support

learn the skills of the trade, as well as offering support workshops and life skills classes, collaborating with local organisations such as FG Ambiente, Zero Waste Italy, SOS Ballaro, Moltivolti and the Municipality of Palermo. FG Recycling is a company in Catania that works specifically with the disposal and recycling of electronics and furniture, a common process on site, occurring informally in small workshops and open spaces. This company could also offer professional training as an apprenticeship, in order to give locals the opportunities to find stable jobs. 71


Vertical Design Studio 2

Vertical Design Studio 2 04

loud wooden workshop

0

1

2

3

4

piazza, for sprawl of the workshops and events from the social pavillion

social pavilion, social events, gathering space

quiet pavilion, for contemplation

market piazza, selling products of the shop - produce from the workshops

5m

01

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

contemplative garden

06 quiet workshop

loud workshop

shop

piazza, for the usage of the social pavilion and workshops

social pavilion

piazza, for the usage of the shop

sanctuary - accommodation space to the proposal

02

03

05

07

01-03 / Dominika Pilch S02, ‘Ballaro’s Women’. The focus of this proposal derives from the lives and stories of many migrants coming into Europe in search of a new life, especially into Italy, Palermo. The project aims to provide help migrant women in a difficult life situation, such as seeking refuge, supporting their integration in the largely diverse community of Palermo. This project will aim to create the catalyst for improving their social and economical possibilities,

providing social support and training in skills such as crafting and carpentry, as well as creating a network of individuals that would foster their empowerment. The proposal creates an articulated arrangements of speces and functions responding to the diverse needs of the women, promoting interactions with the context Ballaro Market and Albergheria.

04-07 / Max Lalande D’Anciger S02, ‘Albergheria Grandioso’. How to work around the tight spaces within the intrincated centre of Albergheria? In what way can the Senegalese community promote their culture? How can a space be designed to accommodate the kids of Palermo? Grandioso is a project with the intention of answering and helping in some way to address these questions. Through the use of parasitic interventions that playfully enhance the architectural features

of the ex-convent of Santa Chiara, a social centre supporting local and migrant communities. The project engages with two local groups, the Senegalese community, giving them the space for their love of music, and the kids of Albergheria, giving them a much needed playground. This project propose an urban playground where the different communities may develop their rights to the city while finding unusual ways of experiencing and activating this urban and social landmark.

0

72

1

2

3

4

5m

73


Studio 3

Second Nature Silvana Taher, Inigo Minns Studio 3 Tutors

Studio Tutors Silvana Taher Inigo Minns Stage 2 Students Anna Bolotova Laura Dimitru Yasin Hussein Krystian Kliber Laurene Lucy Runlin Zhao Yuxuan Shi Jane Tocilina Murtaza Mohebi

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 3 Students Fern Burintaragoht Alexia Iborra Wicksteed Rafaela Zincone Albieri Ophelie Prevesianos Ash Zul Parquear Marie Le Rouzic Jinming Fan Emily See Thank you: Ryan Dillon, Conrad Koslowsky, Myongjae Kim, Michela Mangiarotti, George Moussad, David Patterson, Elena Palacios Carral, Theo Spyropolous, Manijeh Verghese

In today’s urban environment, nature plays a distinct but somewhat rudimentary role. It is a beautifying ornament, a security border or in certain moments of conscientious planning, a pocket of green – providing a necessary albeit tenuous link to ‘greener pastures’. If we move beyond the city, we find the discussion of nature in an even more troubled state. Scientists and economists alike have hailed the arrival of the anthropocene – the troubled and current geological age wherein human activity has become the dominant force impacting on the Earth and its ecosystems – with some trepidation. Global warming has been making occasional headlines for well over five decades, and whether scientists have got it 100% right or just a little bit right, one can’t help but wonder if something has gone wrong. Our relationship to nature today is not hard to understand if we delve into the history books. Aristotle wrote “Nature has made all things specifically for the sake of man”. The Bible decreases that man has “Dominion over every living thing that moveth upon the earth”. Centuries later, René Descartes wrote that man is “the lord and possessors of nature”. If these statements were about any other type of relationship, we would undoubtedly agree that this is a relationship in trouble! Studio 3 engages the topic at the scale of architecture, asking why we build the way we build. Is there a way to incorporate natural growth and natural systems into an architectural project, whereby it is not an afterthought, but rather a key formal and programmatic driver of the project. More specifically, what would happen if we imagine ‘nature’ to be our client? How would our buildings and our cities change? This year, the studio focused its work in and around Hampstead Heath. In order to fully engage in the potential rethinking of nature as a driver of architectural production, students were asked to begin by studying a series of urban typologies within this area. Several students chose to work with the domestic, while others opted to work with either production spaces or spaces of consumption. The only prerequisite was that in studying their chosen typology they explore its relation to nature and to any moments of programmatic clash that may occur within the given type. The resulting projects show what architecture can achieve when it puts it mind to the problem of nature in the city.

Name Lastname Image Credit 74

Jinming Fan S03, ‘Another Cloud’ 75


biologists

‘‘But what is nature? Why is custom not natural? I greatly fear that this nature is itself only a first custom as custom is a second nature.’’

Blaise Pascal

attract

adap t at io n is called Pheno t ypic Plast icit y w hic h gives nam e f or t he phenomena of adap t ing t o s it e condit ions.

It ’s been discovered plants t hat ha ve been alive f or half a million

ye ars,

Par t of plants d e f e n c e system when under attack is not only smells or repulsive elements suc h as spikes but t hey also send hormones that

‘‘Man has a prejudice against himself; anything which is a product of his mind seems to him to be unreal or comparatively insignificant. We are satisfied only when we fancy ourselves surrounded by objects and laws independent of our nature.’’

the predator of the insect that is attacking the plant to help them out in combat.

no

i ndi re ct c o m m u n i c a t i o n t h a t h a p p e n s t o aler t also the s ur ro u n d i n g s p e c i e s .

rain.

p ro t e ct Sout h Amer ica from ha v ing a massive deser t and from ha ving hur r icanes.

Jon Krakauer, Into the Wild

Also the man-made.

Run back into the woods for reconnection?

t im ings so t he n t hey c an be f e r t iliz e d by dif f e re nt plant s m akThi s i s a

M os t era D el ic io sa a plant that a d a p t e d i t ’ s l e a fs with gaps so the others bellow could receive equal a mo u n t o f s u n a n d survive

The Amazon is t he biggest biodiversed f orest in t he wor ld. It ’s exist ence af f ects t he whole wor ld and happen t o

“The trip was to be an odyssey in the fullest sense of the word, an epic journey that would change everything.”

Plan ts promo t e

Some plan ts h a ve bo t h masculin e an d f emin in e g ame t es w h ic h mean s t h at t h ey can self f er tiliz e, but t h ey adap t ed t h eir str uctures t o release t h eir g ame t es in dif f e re nt

W it h out plan ts t h e re ’ s

A p p a re n t l y p l a n t s s pre a d i n f o r m a t i o n

Henry David Thoreau, Walden

Collage City

d i ve r s i t y.

ca n a l so b e nef i t f ro m i t .

t h ro ug h t h e wi nd , w h e n p re p a r i n g f o r a ce r t a i n s i t ua t i o n t h e i r s m e l l s a n d h o r m o n e s a re b l ow n i n the wind and it became an

‘‘I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived.’’

George Santayana, The Sense of Beauty

catalogue

are cur rent tr ying t o underst and how longivity wor ks in plants so us humans

Vertical Design Studio 3

Vertical Design Studio 3

Plant s can ha ve dif f erent c haract eris t ics w hile being from t he s am e s pecie due t o w here t hey grew up at . This environm ent al

ing t he m

s t ro ng er .

What is Nature?

Do we have to reconnect or it is a problem of perception?

The belief that earth can exist without man and that all the other animals are fundamental for nature’s balancae it is a possible explaination on why we feel out of the terms when trying to relate humankind to nature.

Everything

evo l ut i o n.

disconnection

the greenhouse effect

The greenhouse effect occurs when certain gases in the Earth’s atmosphere (the air around the Earth) entraps infrared radiation. This makes the planet become warmer, similar to the way it makes a greenhouse become warmer. The effect is caused by greenhouse gases; the most important greenhouse gases in Earth’s atmosphere are: water vapor, carbon dioxide, and methane. When there is more greenhouse gas in the air, the air holds more heat. This is why more greenhouse gases cause global warming. The greenhouse effect is natural. It is important for life on Earth. Without the greenhouse effect, the Earth’s average temperature would be around -18 or -19 degrees Celsius (0 or 1 degree Fahrenheit). Earth would be locked in an ice age. Because of the greenhouse effect, the Earth’s actual average

‘‘ G r e e n h o u s e ’’ a t e r m t h a t a r c h i t e c t u r a l l y m e a n s flourishing nature an engineered boost of agriculture also means the devastating ter m of global war ming.

temperature is 14 degrees Celsius (57 degrees Fahrenheit). The problem is that recently, the greenhouse effect has become stronger. This is because humans have been using large amounts of fossil fuels, which release carbon dioxide when they are burned. Since carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas, it has caused the planet to warm over the past 150 years. About ten thousand years ago, before people started burning large amounts of fossil fuels, there was 260 to 280 parts per million (ppm) of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere. In September 2011, the figure was 389 ppm. Most scientists say that having 350 ppm or less is safe for the environment and that species on the planet can adapt to this level. Higher levels can make severe problems for animal and marine life that are already being seen today, such as ocean acidification.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Is mankind Nature?

Ecopsychology

studies on the relationship between man and nature.

Many theories on the starting point of the feeling of disconnection.

Edward Wilson, 1975 & William Allman, 1994. The separation from more-than-human nature is seen as rooted in the very nature of humans.

+

+ plant type

temperature

=

size

materials

greenhouse

brainstorm concept 02

in 1972 ect with ely interng point ing both the farm boration here the

Even S p a n :

Se l f-s up p o rt i n g c o mme rc i al g re e n ho us e an d i s t he mo s t c o mmo n t y p e.

Gable

Skillion

Uneven

Flat Arch & Dome

Tunnel

Igloo

Ri d g e- a n d - f urrow : T wo o r mo re

e v e n -s p an g re e n ho us e s c o n n e c t e d t o g e t he r at t he e av e s .

Ecopsychology is a field of study on the relationship between man and nature. It advocates the idea of an existing disconnection in the relationship where many theories attempt to acknowledge the starting point. Yet, it is no longer an idea but a factual belief that a disconnection exists. Following the belief that nature creates everything and therefore a manifestation of nature is man. Man becomes part of nature and thus the man-made is also a tangent of nature.

day Men was walking with no set place to go when encountered ‘‘Nature is ahe matter of perception.’’ a wild park. Inside of the park ther My definition One of Nature was an opening in a hill, Men then had to make a choice either to continue into Wilderness or enter this mysterious path.

Co n ti g uo us : T wo o r mo re e v e n -s p an g re e n ho us e s wi t h i n n e r wal l s s e p arat i n g e ac h g re e n ho us e.

e of difone and commuing with has be-

Sawtooth

Ridge & fur row

Lean-to

Gothic

A-frame

Bringing together these two beliefs (the disconnection and that nature produces man who produces natural things), one can justify the other, in the sense that the reason why humans feel disconnected to nature is because of the common belief that the man-made is not natural, it is a problem of perception and misrepresentation.Taking nature as a man constructed term of a concept, the term nature becomes then different points of view over a reality. In conclusion

Tr i-prenta

01

01-04 / Rafaela Zincone Albieri S03, ‘The Path’ is based on a personal criticism of the relationship between Mankind and Nature. From the first day visiting Hampstead Heath it’s been possible to notice the ambiguous relationship in which the human being seems to have taken distance of and assumed a place where mankind is some¬thing else than Nature. The area is well known for it’s park,

ponds and hills. Hampstead Heath holds a green reputation, but the park is completely controlled by Men. The proposal involves an underground passage that connects two important stations and extends the Heath. Above the passage a wild forest contrasts with the proposal, in which nature is often framed. The project contrasts the chaos of Nature with Man’s desire for order.

03

04 Walking further Men found another exit, he was excited because he could go back out again if he wanted to, but he also could decide to stay.

76 Men chose the path. There, he crossed others just like him, confused and intrigued. Men still had the choice to walk back to the wilderness but instead he kept walking to the interior of the path.

77


Vertical Design Studio 3

Vertical Design Studio 3

IN BETWEEN THE SAUNA AND THE GARDEN

MATERIAL TEST: RESIN BRICK WALL - TRANSPARENCY - LIGHT - PRIVACY

FIRST DESIGN ITERATION

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

01

7

4.5 ADDING AND FINISHING Phase 4

F lo o r f i n i shi n g p la st e r p li n t h (a d d i n g p la st e r t o t h e e x i st i n g co n cr e t e a n d se n d i n g ) .

Location

C i r cu la t i o n A r e a

Tools

W o o d e n f o a m bo a r d m o ld

Material W hi t e p la st e r

6

03

NEW FLOOR WALL EXPERIMENT (FAILED)

5

56

4

02

01-05 / Ophelie Prevesianos S03, ‘Freeing Architecture’. When Marcel Duchamps transformed an ordinary urinal into a piece of art he caused a shockwave that still impacts art and architecture to the present day. The already existing and the everyday object became art and revalued with his “objets trouves” (found objects). In opposition to the modernist functionalist planning, my approach 78

04

NEW FLOORING MATERIAL

VIEW FROM THE FOURTH FLOOR STAIRCASE

is to revitalize and transform the already existing city - between the past and the future that doesn’t conform to any master plan. In the longest post-war housing of Europe, this project explores ways to create a plan much freer than the typical Corbusier Maison Domino and the possibilities of architectural destruction and decay onto already existing buildings.

75

05 INTERIOR VIEW

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Vertical Design Studio 3

Vertical Design Studio 3

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

01

Exchanges between Dunboyne Road estate and the gardens

3

2

2

3

3

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5

02

01-04 / Marie Le Rouzic S03, ‘The suspended gardens of Hampstead Heath’. In a world where the natural environment has been entirely altered by human populations, I propose that we embrace this “manufactured” nature and shed light on the natural processes that have been evolving through a mutual interaction with human activity. A series of interventions, containing hydroponic

s of the resin test in context

80

03

Detail section - exchange around the plants 1:5

gardens and a production of micro algae, rises up above the modernist Dunboyne Road Estate in Hampstead Heath. These elevated platforms, linked by a privilege pedestrian circulation, reconnect the estate and the city. The introduction of a new ecosystem within the estate blurs the limits between alive and inert, artificial and natural processes. 1

Tomatoes collected and distributed in the market and cooked in the restaurant

2

Air rich in CO2 from the dwellings

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Clean air rich in O2 that can be redistributed in the dwellings

4

Grey water to which micro-algae have been added to use as fertiliser

5

Clean reusable water

Marie Le Rouzic BA (Hons) Architecture

04

Marie Le Rouzic BA (Hons) Architecture

81


Source: Digest of Waste & Resources

Vertical Design Studio 3

Vertical Design Studio 3 The little and the big

01

MUTATION CITY

Hampstead Heath Park

PUBLIC INTEREST HOTSPOTS

Green spaces: In Hampstead there is over 790 acres of park and meadows. Nevertheless, considering the past of the Heath, it is noticeable the reduction in its size. The connecting and entry points to the park are strictly delimited by gates and others. There are hardly any indications of the connection there used to be between the area and nature, until the point which it seems somehow an alienated green spot on the map. Other small parks may be found outside the park but they are not used although its potential.

EXPANDING THE VISION

Victorian terraced houses do tend to have a private garden space on the contrary, council estate blocks don’t. Despite having open to the public gardens, they are not used.

Parliament Hill Fields Athletic Track

A

DESIGN RATIONALE

PARK

Public Transport: There is a good range of public transport in a 10-minute walk radius distance. The closest underground station is Hampstead, which is on the Northen line. Nevertheless, there is also good Overground connections: Hampstead Heath Overground station and Gospel Oak Overground station. In addition, buses run through the site. Public space: The largest public space in Hampstead is the park. Nevertheless, as you leave the park behind, the amount of public space is reduced and not in use.

05

The streets: Mansfield Road represents a social and physical division for pedestrians. The value of the properties on the upper side of the road is much higher than in the lower side. This main road is full of cafes and local stores, while in the rest of the streets we find a much more relaxed atmosphere. Pigeons and Wrens are the most common birds in the Heath. Hampstead Heath Overground Station

Moss growing on humid places such as water pipes.

B

Plants taking over the pavement space

Gospel Oak Overground Station

Savernake Rd

Church

alk nw 5 mi

££££

VICTORIAN HOUSING

Grass. Frontyards in Savernake Rd. are eather abandoned or perfectly organized.

C

Moss growing on steel structures due to weathering.

DESIGN THEORY

E ££

58-60 Savernake Rd.

Wood Field council block.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

sfield

B ££££

Rd

Terrace House

Under the Heath’ s ground there is a complex

AK

MUTATION CITY

As the Camden Council data indicates, the area of Hampstead Heath sees a range of building heights. Nevertheless, the prevailing heights are found between 2 and 5 storeys. This is due to the surrounding conservation areas which are typically 2-4 storey Victorian terraces. These generate a consistent townscape.

Man

Under the Heath’ s

RN

1628 Kg of waste per day

SOCIAL TENSION THROUGH BUILDING TYPOLOGIES

Random weeds between pavement tiles.

SA VE

Existing building analysis: The upper side of Mansfield Road, despite traditionally being a working-class housing neighbourhood, inevitably through gentrification from about 1980 onwards it has been transformed, and is now a popular residential area by young professionals. Therefore, we find different building typologies such as Georgian houses to large Victorian terraced housing. Under Mansfield Road, the panorama changes and we find Council Estate housing.

£££

Dandelions usually seen under the trees on the street.

16

Demographics: There is a large variety of ethnic groups as well as a wide age range. 55% of the people living in Hampstead was born in England. A 34.9% of the population is Christian and the average age is between 25 and 44.

infrastructure.

ER

d

MUTATION CITY alk in w 11 m

Random weeds between pavement tiles.

D

Mold and moss growing between tiles.

COUNCIL ESTATES

Waxham Council Estate

££

C £££

DESIGN THEORY

The final iteration considers access routes, natural push back and the relationship of the intervention with the above, existing space and the juxtaposition of such a situation with hidden features. Features such as critical infrastructure a city hides below ground.

Y.

Scale:

06 Scale

1:50

1:100

DESIGN PROMPTS

Lismore Circus

A. Framed A window frames the flora hiding behind a wall. However its view is technically not accessible at street level (Dotted Line) due to its height on the wall. Creating a sense of boundary.

Hampstead Heath Shirlock Rd.: Victorian Terrace housing faceing each other. There is no tension.

D ££

Bus stops

B. Variety

Building typologies

E

14

Wood Field Council Estate

n mi

Mansfield Rd creates a division between two very different social economies. Maximum confrontation. Noth of Mansfield Rd there is Victorian terrace housing whereas the South is known by a set of council states.

lk wa

5 mi

alk nw

Belsize Park

03

A

Parks

Sports facilities/playscapes

The brick wall is permeated by the window and class door. To the left it opens out and leads into the flora and space behind. Creating viewing points and access ways across the collages facade.

E

B

C. Division

02

Assuming the dotted line represents a street. It becomes the dividing space between both sides and its elements. Aggressively Intersecting human life (built fabric) and natural life alike.

D. Functionality

04

01-04 / Alexia Iborra Wicksteed S03, ‘Nexus’. There is a silent war. This war is about the constant confrontation between the urban fabric and nature. We have distinctly eradicated nature from our daily routines, to the point that we have had to start to allocate, artificially, a place for parks in the city. Located in Hampstead Heath, ‘Nexus’ wants to resolve the lost connection between nature and Londoners. 82

Savernake Rd. Wall between Hampstead Heath adn the urban fabric

This is achieved by the implementation of two programmes: fixed public spaces and privately owned spaces. The grid engages with every element of the urban fabric that it meets. It is for this reason, that it must be both permanent and flexible in it structure allowing an easy assembly and disassembly as well as a huge variety of programme.

A car stands idle. Indicative of how the city must serve the functions we require in our daily lives. However it begs the question of how to best accommodate this factor efficiently and conveniently.

Y

07

08 E. Organic Structure

05-08 / Ash Zul Parquear S03, ‘Mutation City’. Mutation City is A solid mass of organic plant life engulfsurban and a critique of the contemporary space. It seeks to challenge covers a structure and built fabric behind. our current understanding of who the city is for, what it does and Mining Waste Reaffirming the deployment how it functions. To the project first intends to of achieve nature as athis toolagency to hide and cover objects. develop attitude thatKgcomprehends nature, or more specifically How can we access thean 3,565,320 of waste produced by these 7 homeswhat on onenature year? Can a hidden, determine is. This is the projects primary driver and is on site system succeed in lowering costs, creating Absence of Form effective outputs and reinterpret F.our understanding The absence of volume. of the urban spaces?

The lack of construction or life highlighting the

to be explored by defining what nature is and how can it be used to reinterpret the city. This logic is then further driven by adhering to the following, “alternatives to the current situation”. This should create a formulaic approach which can guide the project to explore new HIDDEN NATURE design strategies and take what we assume is natural and then flip Thus nature is further revealed to be at the it into something and new.context. mercy of unnatural our intentions in the urban

D

Even in spaces where we assume it is free. It is cultivated, maintained and used to serve a purpose for us rather than its own self.

C

F

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Vertical Design Studio 3

Vertical Design Studio 3

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

01

03

02

01 / Fern Burintaragoht S03, ‘Second Nature’. The beginning of this project is the theme of second nature. The meaning of this word is the presence of animals and nature. We are the same, even though most people think of themselves as superior to animals. But what if we lack five important factors to make our lives complete? We need water, soil, air, trees and space. 84

These are the origins of everything in this world, our offices, our schools, and our homes. This project takes these five original elements, and re-interprets them. Creating a series of alternatives origins to our own repertoire of park space.

04

05

02-05 / Emily See S03, ‘Under Nature’. The lawn is an architectural feature which exists in all types of both urban and domestic spaces. However, when it is publically owned, it often fails to gain the attention it deserves. The concept of my project is to design an interesting lawn, and to address this issue. The basic premise of the proposal is to bring other functions to the site, without loosing

the open space of the lawn itself. The project aims to create a series of underground spaces which provide a series of key programs, while maintaining and enhancing the lawn space, by transforming it into an undulating landscape of curves.

85


Vertical Design Studio 3

Vertical Design Studio 3 01

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

05

02

03

04

06

07

01-04 / Laurene Lucy S03, ‘The Ballade’. In today’s interlinked global economy, consumers are used to seeing products and produce from every corner of the world in their local malls and stores. However, while products are travelling, often the cultural practise involving them isn’t, losing all their meanings on their way. Creating some space for the consumers to reinterpret the way of

eating or drinking them but also, regularly, generating meaningless consumption. This project is a propositional critique of these trends, contributing to a discussion on bringing the challenge of production into the city focusing on reassemble the rituals and the processes. The depicted processes of producing and serving tea explored in this project are questioning the consumption of our resources nowadays.

05-07 / Yuxuan Shi S02, ‘The fourth bridge in Blackfriars’. There are three Bridges in Blackfriars; the Blackfriars bridge, a new railway bridge and a half disappeared old railway bridge. As infrastructure, these bridges connect the two banks of the river Thames, and water is just an obstacle that needs to be crossed. But, what if we see process as purpose?

What if a bridge does more then just function as crossing? What is we see water as the purpose and ignore the horizontal two sides. The Fourth Bridge tackles these questions and proposes a vertical bridge in Blackfriars connecting water and sky.

86

87


Vertical Design Studio 3

Vertical Design Studio 3 ATMOSPHERIC COLLAGE

LOOKING OVER HAMPSTEAD

01

Parasite outcome BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018 02

03

04

05

01, 02 / Murtaza Mohebi S02, ‘Second Healer’. Throughout centuries, people of various cultures have relied on what western medicine today calls ‘ alternative medicine’. This term covers a broad range of healing philosophies, approaches, and therapies. It generally describes those treatments and health care practices that are outside “conventional” Western health care. People use these

treatments and therapies in a variety of ways. Some therapies stay aside of accepted Western medical theory and practice, while others, like chiropractic treatments, are now established in mainstream medicine. Second Healer is a new space, annexed to the Royal Free Hospital, which allows for such treatments.

CLASS ROOM 03, 04 / Yasin Hussein S02, ‘Vegitecture’. A parasite is an organism that grows, feeds and is sheltered by its host while contributing nothing to the host’s survival. A parasite is also an architectural intervention that materializes and transforms the built form. This project explores how people and nature can be brought together using a parasitical structure that lives off of the existing urban fabric.

88

05 / Anna Bolotova S02, ‘Playscape’. Playground and nature centre integrates into Hampstead Heath landscape. This playground provides an innovative and contemporary take on play spaces through its use of combination of natural and artificial materials. Plants and natural landscapes become the playground.

89


Chapter Two

Roof Station One

04

05

90

03

02, 03 / Krystian Kliber S02, ‘Off and Below’. Off and below is a critique on the way we live today. What would happen if we could no longer enjoy the ground plain living with which we are accustomed? With the worlds population spiraling out, this dystopian future may be closer then we anticipate. ‘Off and below’ suggests an alternative form of living; one which takes place 40 meters underground.

04 / Runlin Zhao S02, ‘False Nature’. The project is about three roof stations above our original city, using three different main materials and creating three fundamentally different experiences of light playful spaces. It is called ‘false nature’ because the whole project doesn’t use natural plants at all, but instead creates a new material language to define a ‘second nature’.

06

Section Stage 3 1:50

Laura Dumitru Studio 3 BA Architecture Portfolio

01 / Jane Tocilina S02, ‘A concrete jungle through the Heath’. Leisure center in Hampstead Heath leading from the city to the depth of the park. Consists of 14 zones that correspond to the leisure activities and relationships between natural and built environments. The key driver of the project is the balance between the two.

Section Stage 1 1:50

Laura Dumitru Studio 3 BA Architecture Portfolio

02

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

01

Vertical Design Studio 3

Vertical Design Studio 3

Activities

05, 06 / Laura-Larissa Dumitru S02, ‘Metamorphosis of Urban Decay’. This project rejuvenates derelict buildings by introducing programmes that will make them functional structures. The bracing structure supporting the old building will then become the new building skeleton.

91


Studio 4

Obsolescence Mo Woonying Wong, Christopher Thorn Studio 4 Tutors

Studio Tutors Mo Woonying Wong Christopher Thorn Stage 2 Students Mariia Galiullina John Mortimer Maximilian C. Master Harry Charles Stockton Tre-Vaughn W. Caines Jerick De Castro Seruelas, Yibeijia Li Tongtor Wongtanapruk Gareth A. Pontipedra Jacob Phil-Ebosie Tanavej Vejaphan BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 3 Students Niall Coleman Cinla Deger Shutong Lin Adrian Peng He Tiffany Zixin Yao Vivian Kaidan Zhao Thank you: Keita Tajima, Ivana Sehic, Punya Sehmi, Jeffrey Blaylock, Chloe Phelps, Sophie Roycroft, Carsten Jungfer, Adam Cheltsov, Kunwook Kang, Colin O’Sullivan

Studio 4 continues its examination of the condition of the ‘in-between’, this year addressing the notion of obsolescence in architecture and urban forms. Exposed to the political, economic and social forces that underpin the metabolism of the city, architecture appears perennially slow to react. Studio 4 engaged in this battle against time and desire to speculate on transitional, flexible and ambiguous forms of architecture that embrace obsolescence. Rather than a cycle of demolition and replacement (expendability) or permanence (conservation), the specter of obsolescence inspires a new system in which architecture remains contingent. That is ‘contingency’ beyond the technophilia of physical change and variation to a condition of porosity, openness and ambiguity. Spaces that incorporate the misused or disused as marginal variables, demanding constant interrogation and negotiation; creating spaces and forms that can expand, transform and enhance future uses. Studio 4 began by identifying and cataloging the spatial components of ‘contingency’ through the analysis and interrogation of architectural examples – transitional moments. We developed techniques of drawing as tools for investigation, translation and construction into scale models. This phase produced a series of spatial strategies, lenses through which to examine the site and an index of pliant design devices. The site for our investigation into obsolescence lies along the railway viaduct in London’s Bethnal Green, centering on Three Colts Lane. Extending east from the city fringe, this urban line has seen the propagation of residential and retail-led gentrification. This re-modeling has progressively displaced lower socio-economic production and serving businesses that offer necessary functions for the operation of London. The shelter of the viaduct no longer protects its community of users from the same pressures facing nearby occupiers, with rising rents and the impending wholesale disposal of the arches by Network Rail. Our studies dissected the knotted mass of occupiers nestled together and encrusted around, on and within the viaduct, understanding their operations, interwoven connections, negotiated territories, temporal occupation, relationship to the neighbourhood and the wider city. Through these studies we celebrated and restated their social and economic value whilst speculating on their future existence. The students final proposals imagined strategies and designed contingent structures that integrated existing occupiers and negotiated future uses. The proposals considered a range of responses to obsolescence in Bethnal Green: creating shared space as part of a hybridised building; programming temporal territories within ambiguous, threshold-less space; providing infrastructure as a backbone for supporting changing uses; layering uses vertically to retain the value of the ground plane to businesses; introducing collaborative programmes that add value to existing occupiers; creating modular transformable structures able to shrink, expand and adapt; inventing dissolvable temporary structures that accommodate reuse once obsolete; and providing communal spaces for common exchange and sharing beyond the measures of obsolescence.

92

Name Lastname Image Credit

Jacob Phil-Ebosie S03, ‘Photo documentation of site’ 93


chosen chosen for for spacial spacial and and visual visual studies studies (see (see p.5) p.5) and and explores the volume that you is taken from level main from This model explores thethe volume that you would would isThis takenmodel from the the level above above the main floor floor from the dining Because of the gets experience when looking the the dining room. room. Because of that thatthrough the front front wall wall gets transitional experience when looking through the main main transitional distorted and, volume. distorted and, therefore, therefore, its volume. wall. Initial position its is the same as chosen for spacial

The drawing below explores the relationship between the elements of the transitional space and its materials. The volume diagram represents how the volume of the room is transformed by the central wsall. The level diagram also shows how the circulation connects various levels within the same floor.

Vertical Design Studio 4

Vertical Design Studio 4

Tu rn

Transitional moment

wall. Initial position is the same as chosen for spacial and and visual visual studies studies (see (see p.5, p.5, 6--) 6--) and and is is taken taken from from the the level level above above the the main main floor. floor. Because Because of of that that the the front front wall wall gets gets distorted distorted and, and, therefore, therefore, its its volume. volume.

Dining room interior/exterior boundaries plan

Extruded volume

en d

ov er a

ll

st ru ct ur e built-in furniture limiting inhabitant view

exterior space when living room is occupied

interior space when living room is occupied

Viewing Viewing position position

Case study Circulation

Model space, Viewing Model of of the theposition space, 1:50 1:501:50 Viewing position 1:50

Transitional Transitional wall wall elevation elevation

Front Front wall wall Case study

Case study

Living room interior/exterior boundaries plan

Ex pl o

de d

dr aw i

Dining room interior/exterior boundaries plan

ng

Viewing Viewing position position Transitional space

Projection Projection of of the the wall wall at at aa viewing viewing angle angle

Distorted volume 1:50 Distortedof volume (front) 1:50 (front) Model the volume Model of the(front) volume (front)

Distortion Distortion of of the the wall wall at at a a viewing viewing angle angle Children’s bedroom - tight space, lit-

Living Area - Small enough to bring

tle room for play

family together, or small enough to seperate them into their own rooms?

1-1

1-1 C’’

C’’

B’’’

B’’’

7

6

pivot

1-2 1-3

1-2

4-4’

4-4’

1-1

pivot

4’

7’ 2

2

1-2 C-C’-C’’

AD/DE/GF/HG/HD’/HI axis D-D’

Ma te r din

ing

roo

m

ext erio

r pro

jec

1-3 ia l

tion

it y

ing

al y

F

D

E

E

D

AD/DE/GF/HG/HD’/HI axis

FG/GH axis

GF/FI axis

E’

45/32/21/13/18 axis GF/FI axis

E-E’

6-6’-6’’

E-E’

roo

ext erio

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tion

A

B’

45/32/21/13/18 axis

7-7’-7’’ 6-6’-6’’

axis

pivot 6’

8

axis b-b’ ae/ad’/ac’

a

6’’

AC/AD/AE/ED/FG/FI/IH axis

B

axis

4-4’

04

1-3

1-3

1-1

axis

cut H mountain fold score

1

2

3

dini ng

O

D’ room

terio

r pr

ojec

4

5

O ME/MF/MT’’ N-N’ axis D’N/EM/MT’’/N’T’’/O’T’’/O’Q/PQ/PB’ axis N

D’

N

tio

E

D

ME/MF/MT’’ N-N’ axis D’N/EM/MT’’/N’T’’/O’T’’/O’Q/PQ/PB’ O-O’-O’’/C-C’ axis

I

C’’

K

J

C H G

B O’

F

A

K

I

C H G

O’

F

E

third floor -

EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/PB C-C’’ axis

EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/PB axis

Dining room view 3d explanation F-F’ G-G’ livin

g roo

m

ext

H-H’

erio

r pro

jec

tion

I-I’ J-J’ K-K’ L-L’

6-6’-6’’

E-E’

Q S R

7-7’-7’’ The courtyard

Q’ S’ R’

Living Area - Small enough to bring

Children’s bedroom - tight space, lit-

family together, or small enough to

tle room for play

axis

EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’/TJ’/TI’/TH’/TG’ EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’/TJ’/TI’/TH’/TG’ F-F’ axis axis L’ EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’/TJ’/TI’/TH’ EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’/TJ’/TI’/TH’ K’ G-G’ axis axis EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’/TJ’/TI’ EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’/TJ’/TI’ H-H’ axis axis EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’/TJ’ EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’/TJ’ J’ I-I’ axis axis EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’ EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’/TK’ J-J’ axis axis EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’ EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT/TL’ T K-K’ axis axis I’ T’ EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP/QS/SR/RA’/AT G’H’ L-L’ axis axis pivot pivot F’

Dining room volume 1-1.2.3 towards south side (the garden) Exploring

Volumetric

Relations

scale 1:300

c

b 3’ 2 3 e

A

1 3’’

e’

e’’ 5 4’ 4

B’

cut mountain fold score

3’’

3’ 2

A

25/51 axis

5

4’

C

A

4 B

25/51 axis

12/15/14’/25 axis

3-3’-3’’

3

4-4’

ab/bd/da e-e’ axis 12/15/14’/25 3-3’-3’’ axis

4-4’

B

f’

ae’’/ad/ab/ac/cb AC/AD/AE/ED/FG/FI/IH f-f’-f’’ axis

2-2 axis 2-3

position after fold on plan movemnet step

2-3

B

Master Bedroom - Slightly Bigger Living Area - Small enough to bring

Children’s bedroom - tight space, lit-

Entrance/Exit - The only part of the

tle room for play

house with a door, connecting enclo-

family together, or small enough to

sure and exposure

seperate them into their own rooms?

A’

scale 1:300 K’

T G’H’

I’

1-1

scale 1:300

Master Bedroom - Slightly Bigger

model’s paper weightmodel’s 200gsm/300gsm paper weight 200gsm/300gsm

Entrance/Exit - The only part of the house with a door, connecting enclosure and exposure

J’

T’

family together, or small enough to seperate them into their own rooms?

Living room volume 2-1.2.3 Living room towards volume east2-1.2.3 wall and towards bed room eastarea wall and bed room area

L’

03

Living Area - Small enough to bring

tle room for play

pivot

f’’

e’

A

1-3

Children’s bedroom - tight space, lit-

model’s paper weight 200gsm/300gsm a

d

2-2

Q S R

- In between walls but

exposed to the outer environment. A small space feeling large and free

Children’s bedroom - tight space, lit-

seperate them into their own rooms?

B’

A’

c

tle room for play

Master Bedroom - Slightly Bigger

Q’ S’ R’

a

45/32/31/38/85’/81/87’

1-2

B

A

pivot

f-f’-f’’

45/32/21/13/18 axis

Mezzanine platform on the Tight space, no freedom to

B

Third Floor

P

A

interior space when living room is occupied

B-B’-B’’-B’’’

B’

EF/FM/MT’’/T’’N’/T’’O’/O’Q/QP axis

axis b-b’ ae/ad’/ac’

6’ 6’’

E’

pivot

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d

axis ae/ad’

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f’’

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J P

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c-c’

b

Fifth Floor

e’’ e

B

T’’ L

8

1

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f

b

C’’

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T’’

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A

B

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pivot

pivot

d c

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pivot

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1 O’’

A

3

2

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f

N’

A-A’/B-B’

B’’

c’

e

AD/DE/GF/HG/HD’/HI axis

A

E

M

B

b’

sure and exposure

10

n

D

house with a door, connecting enclo-

32/31/38 5-5’ axis

pivot

C-C’-C’’

ex

Levels

Entrance/Exit - The only part of the

4’

I

A

C’

2-3 2-1

5

4

Master Bedroom - Slightly Bigger

N

C’

2-3

6 Distorted volume 1:50 Distortedof volume (back) 1:50 (back) Model the volume Model of the(back) volume (back) 1:50 1:50

1:200

1-1

exterior space when living room is occupied

2-2

7

7’

Floor position after fold position on plan after fold onFourth plan movemnet step movemnet step B

Second Floor

ure limiting t view 2-2

02

Original Original position position

pivot

First Floor

axis

D-D’

tion

Distorted Distorted position position

c

Elevation Elevation of of a a distorted distorted wall wall 12/23

B

jec

b

45/32/31/38/85’/81/87’

cut mountain fold Bedroom interior/exterior boundaries plan score

BOUNDARY DEFINITION

r pro

B’’’

7-7’-7’’

D’

erio

a

C’’

C’

AC/AD/AE/ED/FG/FI/IH

B-B’-B’’-B’’’

0

ext

c

Distortion Distortion of of the the wall wall

1-2

Scale

m

d

e

scale 1:300

B’

C

C

Dining room volume model

g roo

axis ae\eb

model’s paper weightmodel’s 200gsm/300gsm paper weight 200gsm/300gsm A

r pro

Dining room view 3d explanation Dining room view 3d explanation

livin

d-d’

d’

b

1-2

pivot

pivot m

si s

B

2-1

c’

d

7’’

45/32/31/38/85’/81/87’

scale 1:300

B-B’-B’’-B’’’

01

b’

d’

axis c-c’ ae/ad’ e

pivot

FG/GH axis

D-D’

1

6’’

axis ae\eb

Dining room volume 1-1.2.3 Dining room towards volume south 1-1.2.3 side (the towards garden) south side (the garden)

din

an

FD’ E’ G

d-d’

5’

axis b-b’ ae/ad’/ac’

7’’

G

C-C’-C’’

6’

8

pivot

Dining room volume model D’

c’

32/31/38 5-5’ axis

axis ae/ad’

pivot

pivot 1

Dining room volume model

b’

32/31/38 7’ interior space when bedroom is 5-5’ axis 3 3 occupied 5’ c-c’

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

exterior space when bedroom is occupied B’’ I

B’’

5

4

4’

built-in furniture limiting C’ inhabitant view I H H

C’

6

12/23 axis

5

4

1-3

7

pivot

12/23 axis

B

cut mountain fold

cut mountain fold

valley fold

valley fold

score

score

05

A

position after fold position on plan after fold on 01 / Adrian Peng He S03, Identifying boundaries between living 02, 03 / Jacob Phil-Ebosie S02, Sound mapping in relation movemnet step movemnet step room and bedroom, kitchen and courtyard spaces at Turnend by to volume and materials in Gaasbeek Chamber Music Hall by Living room view 3d explanation Living room view 3d explanation Peter Aldington. Reconstructing view lines in plan and 2-1 planes in three2-1 Robbrecht en Daem. dimensional models. Detailed drawing translated three dimensional space into unfolded plans. F’

Plans

-

1:50

plan

05

04 / Mariia Galiullina S02, Study of transitional moment, exploring the relationship between rooms, levels and divisions of the raumplan in Villa Muller by Adolf Loos. The abstract exercise explored the volume of space experienced when looking through the articulated wall. Section

AA

-

05, 06 / Jerick De Castro Seruelas S02, Catalogue of volumes extending between levels in Tower House by Takamitsu Azuma.

1:50

Exploring the different volumes of the residential spaces

Mezzanine platform on the

The courtyard - In between walls but

Mezzanine platform on the

The courty

third floor -

exposed to the outer environment. A

third floor -

exposed to

Tight space, no freedom to

small space feeling large and free

Tight space, no freedom to

small spac

Master Bedroom - Slightly Bigger

Entrance/Exit - The only part of the house with a door, connecting enclosure and exposure

94

Mezzanine platform on the third floor -

Exploring

Tight space, no freedom to

Volumetric

The courtyard - In between walls but

R e l a t i oexposed ns to the outer environment. A small space feeling large and free

95 Exploring

Volumet


Vertical Design Studio 4

Vertical Design Studio 4

Transitional Experiences of three characters in the Pavillon de l’Esprit Nouveau,

Character 1(Visitor)

His aim is going to the yard of this pavilion.

Third floor (Roof )

Character(visitor):

His aim is going to the yard of this pavilion.

Character 2(Visitor)

His aim is coming for exhibition.

ase)

e stairc utsid a are nce (o Entrag to outside Facin

Gallery Area

Viewing of

the

1st Floor

Second Floor

The area highlighted in yellow shows the total perceived volume experienced by an individual who is entering the Tower House. This volume has then been abstracted to form a 3D object as seen on the right.

ea all ry ar d w alle rve f g Cu wing o

or

t flo

firs

Entrance threshold

Staircase (For gallery

First floor

6.

7.

8.

9.

The Public visiting the Music Hall for a concert

) w ide vie uts park a(o ide Are outs Yardcing to

7.

9.

8.

e. ac

2.

6.

Her aim is going back to home and rest in the winter.

sp

1.

5.

4.

Character 3(Owner of the pavilion)

Musicians performing for the public

rd ya

Fa

3.

space)

area first floor

1st Floor

1st Floor

ERCEIVED VOLUME A

2ed Floor

2ed Floor

5

Curved Corridor Gallery

Yard

Section Drawings 5-8 Fellow musicians can meet and prepare in the living space

Floor One Private Area

Floor Two Private Area

Yard

03

e.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

5.

Different Users of the Chamber Music Hall

Viewing of gallery

ut

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

01

Musicians performing for the public

Fo

The Public visiting the Music Hall for a concert

o e) ab sid iew (in e v w nc vie ntra rd e e Ya r th

Different Users of the Chamber Music Hall

Gallery Area

Vie

Azuma was particular about the placement of windows and voids and he used them to create a feeling of openness in what would otherwise be a cramped environment.

rculation through Public and Private spaces of e Chamber Music Hall

2ed Floor

04

Section Drawing 9 - Kitchen and utilary room

Section Drawings 1-4 The musician enters the ground level, through (2) threshold and into the living space.

Section Drawings 5-8 Fellow musicians can meet and prepare in the living space

Section Drawing 9 - Kitchen and utilary room

.

10.

02

11.

12.

Section drawing 12 - Musician begins the concert in front of the public

01 / Maximilian Master S02, Study of transitional space and perceived volume at the main entrance to Tower House by Takamitsu Azuma. 02 / Niall Coleman S03, Reconstructing sectional sequence along a journey between public and private spaces at the Gaasbeek Chamber Music Hall by Robbrecht en Daem. Section drawings 10- 11 - Musician exits the kitchen and continues their 96

way into the Music Hall

13.

03-06 / Tiffany Zixin Yao S03, Study of curved wall and reconstructing the spatial experience from Pavilion de l’Esprit Nauveay by Le Corbusier. Speculating thea potential for new continuous spaces through reconfiguring devices discovered in the Pavilion. Section drawing 12 - Musician begins the concert in front of the public

05

06

97 Project 1 - Building Studies


Rosso corse motorcycles (motorcycle repair store)

Not occupied

Banned because of illegal gambling

Arches Boxing Gym

KO Gym

opening hour weekdays 7am-9.30pm weekends 10am-3pm

opening hour weekdays 7am-10pm weekends 9am-4pm

opening hour (sunday and monday closed) 10am-8pm

car parking extention 1-3 cars

parking extention

parking extention 1-3 cars

Wood workshop

Garage service

opening hour weekdays 7am-9.30pm

opening hour weekdays 8am-6.30pm

parking extention 1-2 cars / 1 motorcycle (front gate side and

parking extention 1-2 cars (front gate side and

vatican rehearsal recording studio

Final drawing

Vertical Design Studio 4

Vertical Design Studio 4

Three different ty pes of progra m mes was choosed to be m apped. Two of them, which are gallery and library, are per1 plot 4 Arch plot 5 Arch plot 6 plot 7 Arch plot 8 Arch plot 2 Arch plot 3 m anent prograArchm plot mes, and the fitness areArchwould be the temporary progra m me Arch existing in the new building. Based on the mapping library mapping Local gallery mapping existing relevant businesses or spaces, this analyLocal tic diagra ms shows the refor m ation of the local activities spaces of young generation splitted into sopt 1,sopt 2,sopt 3 along the viaduct through g y m, local resident’s relevant gallery and library. This three high rate of crime spot is choiced to refresh the local with a hedonic atmosphere. cul-de-sac not in use

opening hour weekdays 10am-11pm

parking extention 1-2 cars

cul-de-sac driveway

carriageway

through footpath

cul-de-sac front footpath

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Bethnal Green Library Tower Hamlets Local History Library and Archives Claire De Rouen Books

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V & A Museum of Childhood

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13 mins walk

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This spot, which is between viaduct and a demolishing 3-4 storeies high building(a primary school behind), ad ro is a through footpath connecting two dead-end ft ro nc carriageways. TheBa east side of footpath end is back of ad storage for garage. this street arrangement and buildro ft ro nc ings layout creats a narrow criminal spatial condiBa tion. offenders would flee through two sides driveway and carriageway. two side nearest car repair shops’ undesired sound would cover the criminal sound in a way. t

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11

es of young generation splitted into sopt 1,sopt 2,sopt 3 along the viaduct through g y m, local resident’s relevant gallery and library. This three high rate of crime spot is choiced to refresh the local with a hedonic atmosphere.

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reen is always in contact with Box- ing. Nu m erous boxers, the m ost Bancroft Raod e called Da niel Mendoza, have been associated with the area, a nd the ure cen- tre, York Hall, re m ains nota ble for pres- entation of boxing ing was a way to release the in ner violence not only vis- ually but Local gym mapping Local library mapping Local gallery ically. To d istill this violence m e m or y of Beth nal Green, the new ould take the physical par t to con- trol the cri m e issue at present. - cific, when I visited Beth nal Green, one of the g y m activities, Three different ty pes of progra m mes was choosed to be m apped. Two of them, which are gallery and library, are perged the boxing nowad ays, the r u n ning m achine has the fu nction of m anent progra m mes, and the fitness are would be the temporary progra m me existing in the new building. Based on the Local gym nce, mapping library mapping Local gallery existing businesses this analyLocal tic diagra ms shows the refor m m ation of y. the local activities spacr veilla atrelevant the sa m e ti more,spaces, to apotheosize the violence e m or ers mat

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

meters

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Central court yard

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

8 7 8

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4 mins walk 12 mins walk 3 mins walk

Energie Fitness V & A Museum of Childhood Crossfit London FighterFit Ladies Gym and Health Club CrossFit London KO Gym / Arches Boxing Gym Qmotion Sport and Fitness Centre

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Bethnal Green Library Tower Hamlets Local History Library and Archives Claire De Rouen Books

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Compared with other two, this one is more complex. five different types of roads construct this spot. We can experience from public-semi public-semi private-private in both business viaduct side and residential side. At another side of this spot is a secondary school. this street arrangement and buildings layout creats a narrow criminal spatial condition between the arches businesses and residential yard fences. and also some parked vehicles and business’s facilities place on this dead-end driveway, which also creats plenty of smaller and secludeder spaces. offenders could have the superiority of no surveillance to take the crime.

rs

14 15 15 16 13 7 11

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on, especially Shored itch which is the gateway to London’s East occu- pied by working class a nd industr y neigh bour during 19th After the w w2, east fac- tories a nd warehouses were re m ained a nd ed. A nd then,in a few decades, you ng ar t- ists swar m ed into East r the cheap rent for their stud ios. In past 20 years, it beco m es m ore d iverse decoration on city’s skin. The youth a nd ar tist all ved in this progress. They ex press, they show off, they fou nd on the street. This is a really inspira ble thing to ju m p into the n initial progra m m e, gathering the ar ts all arou nd the build ing. 780 meters

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Spot 2 62 crimes form 2016 to 2017 happened in spot 2.

Spot 3

7

Arts→Anarchy→Apotheosis

6

From boxing to gym

From back of house service to art

through carriageway

From back of house service to art

East London, especially Shored itch which is the gateway to London’s East 1 bour End, was occu- pied by working class a nd industr y neigh during 19th centur y. After the w w2, east fac- tories a nd warehouses were re m ained a nd a ba n- doned. A nd then,in a few decades, you ng ar t- ists swar m ed into East Elevation B-B London for the cheap rent for their stud ios. In past 20 years, it beco m es m ore a nd m ore d iverse decoration on city’s skin. The youth a nd ar tist all get involved in this progress. They ex press, they show off, they fou nd this way on the street. This is a really inspira ble thing to ju m p into the site as a n initial progra m m e, gathering the ar ts all arou nd the build ing.

GROUND FLOOR VIEW

Bancroft

SITE ELEVATION ANALYSIS From violence to surveillance

Timber deck Seat Pool area In-between pathway

Bancroft

1 2 3 4 5

Central Yard

road elevation

road elevation

through footpath

6 7 8 9

AXO DRAWING AND ELEVATION

EAST WING Entrance Lift Parking Car Entrance

PROGRAMME MAPPING AND EXPLANATION

10 11 12 13

Spot 1 through carriageway

04

01-10 / Adrian Peng He S03, ‘Spot Two Centre’. The viaducts indiscriminant path through the urban fabric leaves awkward, incongruent voids, venerable and attractive to fly tipping, misuse and crime. Spot Two Centre proposes to use Bethnal Greens boxing gym heritage to provide an active surveillance skin that watches From over theto gym boxing

98

In this spot, it is less road typology here but only the higher residence compared with housing in this area. the dead-end driveway and in-between through footpath for 7-8 storeies residence blocks are able to increase the crime rate. less strangers are on the street, meanwhile, 1 typical criminal dead-end driveway and two through footpaths to the park benefiting AXO DRAWING AND ELEVATION for the criminal. retreat routes

cul-de-sac carriageway

WEST WING

Beth nal Green is always in contact with Box- ing. Nu m erous boxers, the m ost fa m ous one called Da niel Mendoza, have been associated with the area, a nd the local leisure cen- tre, York Hall, re m ains nota ble for pres- entation of boxing bouts. Boxing was a way to release the in ner violence not only vis- ually but also physically. To d istill this violence m e m or y of Beth nal Green, the new build ing would take the physical par t to con- trol the cri m e issue at present. To be spe- cific, when I visited Beth nal Green, one of the g y m activities, which m erged the box- ing nowad ays, the r u n ning m achine has the fu nction of street sur veilla nce, at the sa m e ti m e, to apotheosize the violence m e m or y.

Final drawing

Final drawing

Entrance Reception Office room Private circulation staircase/lift Private resting room

From boxing to gym

129 crimes form 2016 to 2017 happened in spot 3.

Compared with other two, this one is more complex. five different types of roads construct this spot. We can experience from public-semi public-semi private-private in both business viaduct side and residential side. At another side of this spot is a secondary school. this street arrangement and buildings layout creats a narrow criminal spatial condition between the arches businesses and residential yard fences. and also some cul-de-sac parked vehicles and business’s facilities place on this dead-end driveway, which also creats plenty of smalldriveway er and secludeder spaces. offenders could have the superiority of no surveillance to take the crime. 08

site, deterring crime and protecting community uses. Over time the outer cladding dissolves allowing the internal programmes to expand. The building is raised above the ground and polarised to either end of the site framing a new yard space for the arch occupiers. From back of house service to art

58 crimes form 2016 to 2017 happened in spot 1.

DETAILED CRIMINAL CONDITION ANALYSIS cul-de-sac carriageway

through footpath

09 cul-de-sac driveway

Spot 2 62 crimes form 2016 to 2017 happened in spot 2.

10

This spot, which is between viaduct and a demolishing 3-4 storeies high building(a primary school behind), is a through footpath connecting two dead-end carriageways. The east side of footpath end is back of storage for garage. this street arrangement and buildings layout creats a narrow criminal spatial condition. offenders would flee through two sides driveway and carriageway. two side nearest car repair shops’ undesired sound would cover the criminal sound in a way.

99


OPENING TI

Wednesday 10am–10pm Wednesday 10am–10pm Thursday Thursday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm Thursday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm FridayThursday Friday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm Friday 10am–10pm Friday 10am–10pm Saturday Saturday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm Saturday 10am–10pm Saturday 10am–10pm Sunday Sunday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm Sunday 10am–10pm Sunday 10am–10pm

Tuesday 9am–4pm Wednesday Wednesday 9am–4pm 9am–4pm Wednesday 9am–4pm Wednesday 9am–4pm Thursday Thursday 9am–4pm 9am–4pm Thursday 9am–4pm 9am–4pm FridayThursday Friday 9am–4pm 9am–4pm Friday 9am–4pm Friday 9am–4pm Saturday Saturday CLOSE CLOSE Saturday CLOSE Saturday Sunday CLOSECLOSE CLOSE Sunday CLOSESunday Sunday CLOSE

Wednesday 10am–10pm Thursday Thursday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm 10am–10pm FridayThursday Friday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm Friday 10am–10pm Saturday Saturday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm Saturday 10am–10pm Sunday Sunday 10am–10pm 10am–10pm Sunday 10am–10pm

Wednesday 9am–7pm Thursday Thursday 9am–7pm 9am–7pm 9am–7pm FridayThursday Friday 9am–7pm 9am–7pm Friday 9am–7pm Saturday Saturday 9am–5pm 9am–5pm Saturday 9am–5pm Sunday Sunday 10am–5pm 10am–5pm Sunday 10am–5pm

Thursday 9am–7pm Friday 9am–7pm Saturday 9am–5pm Sunday 10am–5pm

Vertical Design Studio 4

Vertical Design Studio 4 2

OPENING TIM OPENING TI

10pm 0pm m 0pm pm

CITY TYRES SHOP SPACE ANALYSIS AND CAR MOVEMENT

1

1 1

2

2 2

3

3

3 3

4 4

4 4

City Tyres Car Repair and Maintenance owner

Anaysising the key car repairing shop is define the movement ofAnaysising cars the key car repairing shop is defin and how the local using of the arches, though interview of owerand of the how the local using of the arches, though car reparing shop that heAnaysising mention belong to thethis key cararches repairingwere shop is all define the movement of cars car reparing shop that he mention this arche howjust the local using ofthese the arches, though of ower of the eastern natwork reailway. and they renting space forinterview business. eastern natwork reailway. they just renting th

City Tyres Car Repair and City Maintenance Tyres Car Repair and Maintenance owner

car reparing shop that he mention this arches were all belong to eastern natwork reailway. they just renting these space for business.

owner

03

Final Sharing arrangment with each time Section 1:200 2

0

1

2

4

6

8

9

10

4 2 1 Section

17:00pm Monday

1

17:00pm Monday 10

14

16

24 Canteen Space

Canteen Bar at nightime

dwgmodels.com

Elderly Womens Tea Club

Baitul Aman Mosque & Cultural

After School Club Bangabandhu Primary School

17 17

Baitul Aman Mosque & Cultural

24

17

Daily evening Madrasah for children

Event Space

14-

19

dwgmodels.com

Baitul Aman Mosque & Cultural’ -At 17pm Tansfering all programme into sharing centre.

Sharing Centre

1

Residential housing

Event Area

-Sharing canteen space for the ‘Elderly Womens Tea Club Baitul Aman Mosque & Cultural’ -Sharing event space for the ‘Baitul Aman Mosque & Cultural Daily evening Madrasah for children’.

Canteen

Section

Hadleigh Street

World Tyre shop -At 17pm car shop closed

14:00pm Wednesday

12

Maureen Paley KAYE DONACHIE: SILENT AS GLASS

Technical Report YAO14413489

18

This car repairing shop used the wahole arches which is not usually that we can see. most of business only can rent half of these arches. Baitul Aman Mosque & Cultural

17

Daily evening Madrasah for children

19

London Buddhist Centre

Tuesday & Wednesday Evening Class

St. John on Bethnal Green

19.

6

21.45

21

10

Private Gallery

Belfry Exhibition: Mundane Mantra

16

Live Art UK Announcing Diverse Actions Leader-

Section

World Tyre shop -At 14pm car shop opening

Sharing Centre

Canteen -World tyre Car reparing shop workers lunch time

2

13:00pm on Saturday

Private galley space -Sharing this space for ‘St. John on Bethnal Green Belfry Exhibition: Mundane Mantra’ with’Live Art UK Announcing Diverse Actions Leader’

Residential housing

13:00pm on Saturday

Event Space -Shaing ‘ London Buddhist Centre Tuesday & Wednesday Evening Class’with’ Maureen Paley KAYE DONACHIE: SILENT AS GLASS’.

SIMPON HOLD-DOWNS INSTALLED TO EACH TOP PLATE AT EACH TRUSS OR JOIST LOCATION

V & A Museum of Childhood

11

13.30

Story Drawing Fashion Illustration Workshop

4

reinforced concrete (STAGGER JOINTS) PRE-TREAT SURFACE IN DIRECT CONTACT WITH CON2 CRETE

Clube

Conclusion of traditional and modern making testing

Hadleigh Street

13

After School

Baitul Aman Mosque & Cultural’ -At 14pm there have day man paley and evening section of childern class

Technical Report YAO14413489

21

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

14:00pm Wednesday

Event Space

04

After School Club Bangabandhu Primary School

1 250

Conclusion of traditional and modern making testing

100 250

dwgmodels.com

Technical Report YAO14413489

01

cerment

modern making

cerment

London clay – a dense clay formed in a sea that covered much of southeast England

modern making

Lambeth Group

Modern technique more powerful and can reduce the thickness. In the traditional experience, the use of red sugar soup and sticking rice soup instead of cement in the modern way, however, this is a very appropriate Modern technique powerful reduce the more thickness. In the trasuccess more in my test.andItcanmay need thickness for the tradiobal test, ditional experience, the use of red sugar soup and sticking rice soup because in the hakka case study, the earth wall is 1.8 meters thick. instead of cement in the modern way, however, this is a very appropriate success in my test. It may need more thickness for the tradiobal test, becauseso in i thewill hakka use case the study, the earth wall is 1.8 to meters thick. modern making way nuild my rammed

earth wall in my design and base on this way to contunie to do the futher testing. will use the modern making way to nuild my rammed earth wall in my

EXTERIOR

INSULATION 100mm RAMMED EARTH WALL -600MM THICKNESS in total

CAR MOVEMENT PEOPLE MOVEMENT MacBook

MacBook Pro

dwgmodels.com

Wessex Community Centre

05

Hadleigh Street

Sharing Centre

Residential housing

After School Club -Sharing this space the ‘Bangabandhu Primary School’ with ‘V & A Museum of Childhood Story Drawing Fashion Illustration Workshop’

Inside Play Space - Public to everyone

STIRRUPS

Outside Play Space - Public to everyone

CONTINUOUS

so i design and base on this way to contunie to do the futher testing.

This car repairing shop used the wahole arches which is not usually that we can see. most of business only can rent half of these arches.

Thanet sands

4

4

2

Cerment

1

Red Clay

2 1

taditional making

taditional making

Adding matel Columes in plan

02

Using Columes to push pressure (Man Power)

Adding water

Mixing sand, Clay, Soil, Cement

Red Sugar Soup

Red Sugar Soup

Glutinous rice

Soup

Glutinous rice

Soup

01-06 / Tiffany Zixin Yao S03, ‘The Bridging Hub’. Beyond a geographical divide the viaduct separates the socio-economically different wards of north and south Bethnal Green. The thickened boundary of the viaduct and a disused connection through provides the opportunity to coalesce arts, cultural, educational and religious programmes as a community hub strengthening the connection 100

between the wards. The fluid, continuous and curved spaces create 33 ambiguous and undefined thresholds accommodating different scales of occupation tied into the urban timetable of Bethnal Green.

CAR MOVEMENT PEOPLE MOVEMENT

33

06

This car repairing shop used the wahole arches which is not usually that we can Thissee. car most repairing shop used the wahole arches which is not usually tha of business only can rent half of these arches. of business only can rent half of these arches.

101


facade panels are later installed.

20+ Years

1. Construction of the Structure along the Yard. The assembly of the columns, beams and concrete slab floors. Pre-fab panels and facade panels are later installed.

2. Front Elevation of the facade once the construction is completed

20+ Years

Vertical Design Studio 4

Vertical Design Studio 4

Short and Long term vision of my proposal

0-1 Year

20+ Years

1-20 Years

SECOND FLOOR - COURTYARDS

Final FinalElevation Elevationand andCross CrossSection Sectionofofthe theProposal Proposal

Final Literation of the Plans

3. Front Cross-section of the Building showing the activities and programmes within. 2. Front Elevation of the facade once the construction is completed

1. Construction of the Structure along the Yard. The assembly of the columns, beams and concrete slab floors. Pre-fab panels and facade panels are later installed.

4. After 20 years, it’s likely the industries related to the programmes the proposal holds will change. The flexibility of the structure can adapt to the change in requirements by rearranging the column and beam sizes. Technical industries might require officethe space, therefore ceiling height per roomsthe willproposal be reduced per room and more levels. of the 4. After 20 years,more it’s likely industries related to the programmes holds will change. The flexibility

3. Front Cross-section of the Building showing the activities and programmes within.

Final Elevation from Malcolm Road Ground Ground Floor Floor of of the the Proposal Proposal

02

structure can adapt to the change in requirements by rearranging the column and beam sizes. Technical industries might require more office space, therefore ceiling height per rooms will be reduced per room and more levels.

3. Front Cross-section of the Building showing the activities and programmes within.

4. After 20 years, it’s likely the industries related to the programmes the proposal holds will change. The flexibility of the structure can adapt to the change in requirements by rearranging the column and beam sizes. Technical industries might require more office space, therefore ceiling height per rooms will be reduced per room and more levels.

20+ Years

Conclusion Made Conclusion Made

It’s important to consider that the industries that occupy the surrounding area might change over the next decade or two, therefore my structure should to adapt to the change It’s important to consider that be theable industries that occupy the in requirements different programmes. surrounding areaofmight change over the next decade or two,

STRUCTURE - PRE-CAST COLUMNS AND SLABS POLYCARBONATE SHEETS

therefore my structure should be able to adapt to the change in requirements of different programmes.

Researc

Researc

Hightlighting the short term and long term process relation to the project’s them

Hightlighting the short term and long term process relation to the project’s them

Conclusion Made

It’s important to consider that the industries that occupy the surrounding area might change over the next decade or two, therefore my structure should be able to adapt to the change in requirements of different programmes.

3. Front Cross-section of the Building showing the activities and programmes within.

4. After 20 years, it’s likely the industries related to the programmes the proposal holds will change. The flexibility of the structure can adapt to the change in requirements by rearranging the column and beam sizes. Technical industries might require more office space, therefore ceiling height per rooms will be reduced per room and more levels.

FIRST FLOOR - LEARNING ROOMS AND CONFERENCE HALL

Research of the site

Conclusion Made It’s important to consider that the industries that occupy the surrounding area might change over the next decade or two, therefore my structure should be able to adapt to the change in requirements of different programmes.

2.2.

Hightlighting the short term and long term process of my proposal in relation to the project’s theme of obsolescence

3. 3.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

FIRST FLOOR - LEARNING ROOMS AND CONFERENCE HALL

Hightlighting the short term and l relation to t

1. 1.

GROUND FLOOR - MECHANICAL TRAINING WORKSHOP PUBLIC LIBRARY AND COMUNUAL SPACE

03

Key Key

Ground Floor - Outdoor Public space the public gather and interact 1. 1. Ground Floor - Outdoor Public space forfor the public toto gather and interact Ground Floor - Public library 2. 2. Ground Floor - Public library

3. First Floor - Conference Hall for meeting between housing residents and 3. First Floor - Conference Hall for meeting between housing residents and social club for mechnics and residents social club for mechnics and residents

4. First Floor - Teaching rooms providing lessons and social care for residents 4. First Floor - Teaching rooms providing lessons and social care for residents 5. Second Floor - Private Allotments for Housing residents 5. Second Floor - Private Allotments for Housing residents

Key

Kiosk installed for the the public communal area - Passage to the conference positioned near the wall, encourage the public to gatherarea underneath --Kiosk installed for public communal Library size reduced - New entrance from Malcolm Road via the viaduct -- Library size reduced Clearer passageway through the the ground ground floor floor - New Public Gallery for the Hallthrough --Clearer passageway

1. Ground Floor - Outdoor Public space for the public to gather and interact 2. Ground Floor - Public library

3. First Floor - Conference Hall for meeting between housing residents and social club for mechnics and residents

4. First Floor - Teaching rooms providing lessons and social care for residents 5. Second Floor - Private Allotments for Housing residents

01

01-04 / Niall Coleman S03, ‘Civic Growth’. Residential population growth, changing demographic and evolving employment opportunities in Bethnal Green have outstripped the provision of community support space and adult education services. The project includes education spaces where digital skills are taught to 102

mechanics to service the next generation of cars and community spaces for local housing association residents. The buildings robust modular frame allows volumes to be reconfigured over time adapting to future demands in employment and residents organisations. 04

103


in the market. in Depending on dimensions ofin the thewall market. Depending dimensions of the wall the market. in Depending the market. on Depending dimensions on of dimensions the wall ofonthe wall blocks the the blocks way it is varies. Different blocks the the way it is occupied theoccupied the blocks way it the is the occupied way it is varies. occupied Different varies. Different varies. Different types of brick types bondings aretypes also allocated types based ofon brick bondings also allocated based on of brick bondings of brick arebondings also allocated are also based allocated on arebased on the function ofthe each block.the the function function of each function block. of each block. of each block.

Stack bond soldiers

Herringbone bond 90° bond 90° Herringbone bond Herringbone bond 90°1Herringbone Flemish bond 1 90° 1/2 Flemish bond 1/2

Lower elements act as Lower market elements stalls where act aspeople marketcan stalls where people can buy fruits and vegetables. buy fruits and vegetables.

Running bond

Running bond Running Header bond bond Running bond Header bond

The parts of walls thatThe areparts a bit of taller walls and that have are an a bit taller and have an opening are used to create opening and areintimete used toseating create and intimete seating area. It ialso cntrols the area. dialog It ialso between cntrolsthe the dialog between the exterior and interior ofexterior the market. and interior of the market.

Lower blocks act as seats Lowerand blocks act as seats and benches. benches.

Stack bond stretchers Stack bond stretchers Stack Stack bond bond stretchers stretchers Stackbond bondstretchers stretchersStack

Running bond

05

Some parts of the market act asofseparating elements between Some the parts inside of between and the market outside of asbetween separating Lower the elements and act outside as market ofelements where people can Lower elements actused as market stalls where Some parts theSome market parts act of asthe separating market act elements as separating elements theact inside and outside the elements inside of andbetween outside of inside Lower act Lower as market elements stalls act where as market people stalls canwhere people can The partspeople of wallscan that a bit taller and have The parts of walls areana bit Lower taller blocks and act as an seats blocks and lowest Lower blocks act as Theare parts ofand walls The thatparts are Lower aofan bit walls taller that and are have a bitan taller and have Lower act Lower as seats blocks and act as seats and There are alsostalls some stalls There that are are also still some used stalls for that placing are still for placing Lower wider stalls are used and wider for selling stalls things are used at athat for selling things at a have The and widest The parts lowest are and useful widest for selling parts heavier areseats usefuland for selling heavier market so that a trnsitional relationship can so be relationship achieved. market so that a trnsitional relationship can be achieved. buy fruits and vegetables. buy fruits and vegetables. market so that a trnsitional market that a trnsitional can be relationship achieved. can be achieved. buy fruits andbut vegetables. buy fruits and vegetables. opening are used toopening create intimete seating opening used to create and benches. intimete seating benches. are used opening to create are and used intimete to create seating andare intimete seating benches. goods on them having goods a on storage them but space having inside. a storage space inside. tooland market tool market car parts so it is easier cartoparts lift them sobenches. itand is easier place to onlift the them and place on the area. It ialso cntrolsarea. the dialog the area. It ialso cntrols It ialsobetween cntrols area. the It dialog ialso cntrols between the the dialog between thethe dialog between the stalls. stalls. exterior and interiorexterior of the market. and interior of the market. and interior exterior of theand market. interior ofexterior the market.

Vertical Design Studio 4

Vertical Design Studio 4

Stack bond soldiersStack bond soldiers Stack bond soldiers

Some parts of the market Someact parts as separating of the market elements act as between separating theelements inside and between outsidethe of inside and outside of market so that a trnsitional marketrelationship so that a trnsitional can be achieved. relationship can be achieved.

Running bond

The tallest parts of the The walls tallest have parts of the walls have shelves inside them for shelves storing inside tools.them for storing tools.

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Flemish bond 1 1/2 Flemish bond 1 1/2 Flemish bond 1 1/2

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Stack bond stretchers Stack bond stretchers Stack bond stretchers Stack bond stretchers

Running bond

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Running bond

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08 Transitional wall

In this excersise I was making sectional collages using photographs of Villa Muller, my models and the site to demonstrate the internal space of the proposed building. They also show the atmosphere and materiality of arethe space that I for want to create and There are also someThere stallsare thatalso still used placing There areare also some that are still used Lower for and placing wider stalls areand used for selling things at for a stalls Lower and for wider stalls are used for lowest selling and things widest atThe a parts areand useful selling heavier lowest and widest partsheavier are useful The for tallest selling parts heavier of the tallest some There stalls arefor that also are some stillstalls usedthat placing still usedstalls for placing Lower wider Lower stalls are and used wider selling arethings used at aselling things at aThe lowest widest Theforlowest parts and are useful widest The for parts selling are useful heavier for selling The walls tallesthave parts of The the tallest wallsparts have of theThe walls haveparts of the walls have goodsthe on them but having a storage space inside. goods on themspace but having a storage space tool inside. market tool market car parts so it is easier to lift so them place so it is easier to lift shelves place inside on the themshelves for storing tools. goods on them having on athem storage but space inside. a storage inside. tool market tool market car parts it isand car easier parts to on lift so the them it is easier and car place to parts lifton them the and place on thethem and inside them shelves for storing inside tools. them forshelves storinginside tools. them for storing tools. how structure isbutgoods related tohaving the viaduct. stalls. stalls. stalls. stalls.

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A staircase connecting the ground floor and the vieweing platform.

Experimenting with the perspective spaces and the light qualities in my potential design.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

09 Transitional space study of market

Potential roof or a facade consrete structure.

Incorporating a raumplan principle to create a dynamic space.

Using principles from Villa Muller to control the space by creating different different shaped openings..

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A possibility of having a11 viewing platform at the higher level. It might also have window to allow a nice view.

Incorporating the materials found on the site with the potential design. Thinking about the light qualities of the building.

Applying different materials to certain parts of the structure on its inside and outside.

Transitional wall controls the relationship between interior and exterior of the building.

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01-04 / Harry Mortimer S02, ‘Pedway Plus’. The value of the ground is highlighted in the interwoven relationship between taxi repair, hire and storage businesses overflowing from the viaduct along Three Colts Lane. The project introduces a raised structure supporting future uses and businesses ancillary operations above the arches at the level of the station platform, releasing the ground

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plane to expand the business operations below. The proposal becomes a piece of infrastructure that can be extended to connect into the surrounding network and plugged into other occupiers. A dialogue between the levels is established through framing views toward the interior space created between the pedway and viaduct.

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05-11 / Mariia Galiullina S02, ‘Brick Market’. The proposal is for a food and tool market that caters both for the community of car repair and mechanic businesses housed under the viaduct, DIY mechanics. The design and arrangement of the market stalls and roofs are used as a field of devices negotiating exchange between users within the market and its relationship with the neighbourhood. 1.Flower shop 2. WC 3.Tire shop 4.Car repairs 5.Viewing platform 6.Loading place 7. Storage 8. Car park 9. Vegetable stalls 10. Food stalls 11. Tool market 12. Bakery stalls 13. Bar

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Rubber Rubber Tyres +Tyres Petrol Cans

PLywood + Wood Pallets + Granite Cardboard

Rubber Tyres + Car Doors

Rubber Tyres + Petrol Cans

PLywood + Granite

Vehicle Repair Vehicle Repair

Vehicle Repair Vehicle Repair

Furniture Retail Vehicle Repair

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Vehicle Repair

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THE MAIN SPECTACLE OF THE FACILITY IS A GRAND VOLUME DIRECTLY UNDER THE THE LARGER ARCH, DUG 7.5M BELOW GROUND LEVEL. WHAT WAS ONCE A HUMBLE SPACE HAS NOW BEEN ELEVATED TO THAT OF A CATHEDRAL. THIS SPACE IS TO PROVIDE A NUMBER OF DIFFERENT USES. IT’S MAIN USE IS TO BE AN EXHIBITION SPACE, WORKING WITH THE PUBLIC TO DISPLAY WORKS THEY HAVE CREATED USING MATERIALS FROM THE FACILITY. ANOTHER USE COULD BE A RETAIL SPACE TO SELL FURNITURE AND OBJECTS MADE BY THE USERS OF THE FACILITY. IT COULD ALSO BE HIRED OUT FOR OTHER EVENTS, FOR EXAMPLE, DURING THE DAY IT COULD BE USED AS AN EDUCATIONAL CENTRE, HOSTING LECTURES AND WORKSHOPS, WHILST AT NIGHT IT COULD HOST A LARGE GATHERING FOR A PARTY OR CONCERT.

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FuelRubber Cans +Tyres Rubber Tyres + Car Doors Petrol Cans

Vehicle Repair Vehicle Repair Vehicle Repair Weekly +Daily Daily + Every 2Every Weeks2 Weeks

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Rubber Tyres + Plywood + + PLywood CarScrap DoorsMetal Granite

Fuel Cans + Car Doors

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Retail Vehicle Repair Retail Furniture Refurbishment Furniture Retail Furniture Company Daily Daily2 +Weeks Weekly Weekly + Every Every 2 Weeks Monthly

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OWN INTERPRETATIONS OWN INTERPRETATIONS OWN INTERPRETATIONS

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TOFOR FIND A DISCARDED POTENTIAL USE FOR THE DISCARDED MATERIALS TO FIND A POTENTIAL TO FIND A USE POTENTIAL THEUSE FOR THE MATERIALS DISCARDED FOUND MATERIALS ALONGFOUND ALONG FOUND ALONG Yngve HolenYngve Holen Yngve Holen VIADUCTTHAT IARTISTS RESEARCHED THAT FOR USE SIMILAR THE VIADUCTTHE I RESEARCHED VIADUCT ITHE RESEARCHED ARTISTS USE SIMILAR THAT ARTISTS USE MATERIALS SIMILAR MATERIALS FORMATERIALS FOR THEIR WORK.THEIR WORK. THEIR WORK.

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01-09 / Jacob Phil-Ebosie S02, ‘Three Colts Recycling Hub’. The accumulated byproduct of production and service operations along the viaduct occupy every available corner. The project proposes a central recycling, sorting and distribution hub for waste materials and a space for creating and exhibiting recycled art. The arch is extended down creating a dramatic cathedral-like volume for the gallery. 106

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Plywood MOHOLY-NAGY ARTIST EXPLORATION

Plywood Pallets (Wood + Plastic)

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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Vertical Design Studio 4

Vertical Design Studio 4

Rubber Tyres + Plywood + Cardboard Car Doors

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I THEN MADE OWNUSING SCULPTURES MATERIALS I 09 THEN MADEI MY THEN OWNMADE SCULPTURES MY OWN SCULPTURES USINGMYMATERIALS THAT MATERIALS I USING HAD THAT I HAD THAT I HAD COLLECTED ON MYWHERE SITE VISITS, SHOWING WHERE EACH COLLECTED ON COLLECTED MY SITE ON VISITS, MY SITE SHOWING VISITS, SHOWING EACH WHERE MATERIAL EACHWAS MATERIAL WAS MATERIAL WAS Virginia Overton Virginia Overton Virginia Overton ON THE MAP BELLOW. FOUND ON THE FOUND MAP ON BELLOW. THE FOUND MAP BELLOW. MATERIAL MAPPING MATERIAL MAPPING MATERIAL MAPPING

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10-16 / Tanavej Vejaphan S02, ‘Knowledge Sharing Academy’. The project investigates the potential for creating moments of intensity and interaction within an ambiguous series of interlocking spaces and volumes. The Knowledge Sharing Academy is linked to the surrounding network of schools and residential estates. Generated to be deliberately undefined it can accommodate

flexible use and adopt multiple meanings. The lightweight framed building straddles the viaduct encouraging exchange and movement across the site.

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Vertical Design Studio 4

Vertical Design Studio 4

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Current parking

Accessiblity Brainstreet estate has many entrances for cars from the main road, wich caused the issue such as children's safety. Proposed parking area There are am under use space beside the viaduct about 100m long and 20m width which has the potential to be the future parking area Learning from Corbusier's pavilion, a curved wall is introduced at the Southside of the tunnal function as leading the direction according to its gesture, secondly functions as a device for lights.

The issue of rising number of LOCAL AROUND THE SITE AND PROPOSAL cars is challenging the compacity LOCAL TRAFFIC AROUND THE SITETRAFFIC AND PROPOSAL

of parking space, thus cars Accessiblity are parked right outside the recidential Brainstreet estate has many entrances for buildings. cars from the main road, wich caused the issue such as children's safety.

Current parking The issue of rising number of cars is challenging the compacity of parking space, thus cars are parked right outside the recidential View from the arch space towards A the buildings. public passagy and seeing the cooking space. Beyound cooking space as the material glass is introduced the playground can also be spotted.

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Accessiblity Brainstreet estate has many entrances for cars from the main road, wich caused the issue such as children's safety.

Accessiblity Brainstreet estate has many entrances for cars from the main road, wich caused the issue such as children's safety.

Proposed parking area There are am under use space beside the viaduct about 100m long and 20m width which has the potential to be the future parking area

Proposed parking area There are am under use space beside the viaduct about 100m long and 20m width which has the potential to be the future parking area

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Current parking The issue of rising number of cars is challenging the compacity of parking space, thus cars are parked right outside the recidential buildings.

Current parking The issue of rising number of cars is challenging the compacity of parking space, thus cars are parked right outside the recidential buildings.

Exhibition Space 3

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In these collages, I was focusing on creating qualities such as chang1 - Cafe Area

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es in levels and viewports from one level to the business other. As well as

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children using the first floor

8 - Volumetric change within the walk on the ramp

13 - Exterior platform looking down onto the courtyard 14 - small courtyard for children to play in while they’re parents or

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12 - Timber interior and exterior wall for a softer touch for teh

9 - Current taxi hire/rental business is kept within this courtyard

Iter ation 10 - Cafe access for

5 - Interior atrium connecting the users of the Gallery, Office and

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Public spaces

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Model

the taxi drivers and current business owners

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teachers are having coffee 15 - Bethnal Green Overground Station

1 East entrance 2 Dinning space 3 Juice shop 4 Cooking studio 5 24H public passage 6 Playground 7 Vegetable garden 8 Educational Space 9 Public passage 10 Gym

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01-05 / Jerick De Castro Seruelas S02, ‘Three Colts Children’s Gallery’. Three Colts Lane Children’s Gallery forms an addition to the surrounding network of schools and nurseries in Bethnal Green. The building forms connections though a series of openings and fissures. Amassed layers of materials built-up, added, overlaid and encrusted on the viaduct overtime inform the bricolage approach.

06-08 / Yibeijia Li S02, ‘Bethnal Green Community Kitchen’. Designed as a communal kitchen and dinning space it can be used everyday for the residents of the Bancroft Estate and for festival and religious gatherings for the local community. Connecting through the viaduct to the open space of Bethnal Green Gardens the buildings are staged within a landscape that curates visitors approach

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and relationship with the interior. The curved plan is used a scenographic device alluding to a continuity of space and framing prescribed views.

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Studio 5

Productive Exuberance Adam Nathaniel Furman, Julika Gittner Studio 5 Tutors

Studio Tutors Adam Nathaniel Furman Julika Gittner Stage 2 Students Sean Hamilton Amirali Kalantari Arina Kondrashova Minh Le Pham James Parkes Yu Ren Enija Skeltona Jhineil Wreight Zhicheng Yang Xing Yang Candy Yeung BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 3 Students Roxane Baillet Sean Brown Isabella Haddad Domingos Roshna Hassan Elnaz Karoubi Daisy Lyu Mariam Madi Thank you: Paul Simms, Orla Kelly, Georgie Day, Alex Scott-Whitby, Emma Woodward, Zahra Rida, Costandis Kizis, Bianca Thelmo, Jordan Hodgson, Monia de Marchi, Naiara Vegara, Skidmore Owings & Merril London, Finn Macleod

Studio 5 explores architecture – one typology at a time, year by year, site by site – as the spatial manifestation of identity and culture, both individual and collective, in the urban environment. 2017-18 was the year of the Skyscraper Highrises and skyscrapers are the typology of modernity. They have defined the romantic image of the metropolis from its very inception in the late 19th Century, and continue to embody the drama and tumultuous expansion that define our current era of re-invigorated urbanisation. They encapsulate the lofty human urge to free itself from the forces of gravity, whilst also symbolising the raw power of speculation and capital, and in the past, have represented the might of the state, and its ability to provide housing for the people. They are buildings which have complex and intricate relationships with the streets in which they are located, but they are also visual beacons, icons on the skyline that are read as markers of urban identity, signifiers of individual and shared values -or otherwise. They are highly defined machines of incredible efficiency, with tightly prescribed relationships of parts, but they are also amongst the most expressive of buildings forms, with their volumetric similarities generating endlessly comparable variations. “The facades separate artists from the hacks, the radicals from the conservatives, and the poets form the hired guns. They show us that the history of the skyscraper, which is also the history of this century and which is like so much of that history - is a search for identity.” – Ada Louise Huxtable, The Tall Building Artistically Reconsidered London is one of the most multicultural cities in the world, one of the most connected, creative, globalised and diverse. It is colourful, full of stories, and peoples. Its cuisines span five continents, and its art comes in a thousand forms. Its architecture fails to ever represent this. In fact it never even tries. London is undergoing the second high-rise boom in its history, and Studio 5 set out to transform its towers into aesthetic beacons of London’s wild and brilliant diversity. Productive Exuberance sees Skyscrapers as potent agents of symbolic and aesthetic, as well as operative change. Rather than inward looking, hermetic tubes of commerce or privacy, the studio investigated bringing together the civic, the symbolic, and the profitable, within the same building envelope, looking at how towers can simultaneously be agents of profit, agents of public service, and agents of celebratory signification. “The amount of eccentricity in a society has generally been proportional to the amount of genius, mental vigour, and moral courage it contained. That so few now dare to be eccentric marks the chief danger of the time” – John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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Daisy Lyu S03, ‘Ark’ 111


Vertical Design Studio 5

Vertical Design Studio 5 01

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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01-09 / Roxane Baillet S03, ‘Mind the Tower!’. Placed on a border site between the City of London and Tower Hamlets, between the extreme speed of the finance industry and the slower paced smaller trades and residential areas of Tower Hamlets. One thing unites these two areas: they both suffer from an epidemic of loneliness resulting in substance abuse. This project bridges between these two worlds. The tower is both a physical and metaphorical bridge between the rich and the poor, white collar workers and the blue collar workers, 112

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the City and Aldgate, the Corporation of London and Tower Hamlets. Mind the Gap! unites by bridging borders, lifestyles and cultures, using the 13 steps of a unique hybrid architecture to create a sense of togetherness. Separated internally into two towers in constant dialogue, the City and Tower Hamlets evolve through their journey as they rise, always seeing each other, and eventually meeting at the top, in the gardens of Valhalla where complete togetherness and mindfulness are achieved.

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1. The panel is coated with layers of gesso 03

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01-07 / Sean Brown S03, ‘Fashion Epicentre’. A tower which brings the entire fashion ecosystem together. From the silkworms that create the fibre for the textiles, to the fashion designer’s themselves, all the way to the fashion critics at Vogue, this project is a radical proposal offering a permanent space for production to exist within the city of London, and be represented on the skyline. A skyscraping fashion epicentre, it challenges the notion of what fashion, from production to retail to design, could and will become. Fashion is a deeply influential and necessary part of culture, and should have a space which represents it as such. This tower 114

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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3. Patterns are painted on top 06

provides space for experimentation at all levels which is enabled through the constant fostering of economic exchange. The facade serves as a visual emblem of these interactions and processes. Overlapping, intertwining, expressive textiles and garments produced within the skyscraper are used to generate the facade. This expression continually evolves and grows over time. The communities and individuals that participate in this trade will progressively take over the premises, adding their unique stories and aesthetics to the facade, leaving a strong ad permanent legacy for the area they were once a part of.

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Final Evolution

Allotments

Vertical Design Studio 5

Vertical Design Studio 5

Concept Stage

Programme Allotments

After the research of the community garden, city farm and some markets around my site. I started to explore my own programme which could bring more benefit to local residences and also the people from all over the world.

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018 01

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01-06 / Daisy Lyu S03, ‘Ark’. Ark is a radical proposal to bring the entire gamut of natural, animal, plant, pleasure and food-based processes and experiences back into the heart of the city, and onto the skyline, for everyone, in the most spectacular fashion possible. From petting zoos, to farmer’s markets, allotments, flowers markets, herbariums, slaughterhouses, community centres, pet centres, aquariums, veterinary clinics, playgrounds, educational areas, its all here, working with, and accelerateing tendencies already existing in the local area, with its thriving small group of community farms 116

and allotments. The form of the tower is a triumphant return to the stimulating image of the hanging gardens of Babylon, the tower of Babel, the coloseum and Roman aqueducts, forms that speak of ambition, endurance and pride in communal infrastructure, as well as hinting at the romance of nature, decay and ruins. The tower has been carefully crafted through an intense technical exploration of the flow of water (the building is a spiralling aqueduct, with water flowing to all parts from a reservoir-pond at the summit) and the material strength of concrete and masonry.

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01-10 / Minh Le Pham S02, ‘Leather Leather Lust Dust’. Taking the local area’s fashion and leathermaking tradition, this project proposes to harness London’s local and visiting wealth, and the burgeoning contemporary passion for crafted luxury items, and bring them together in one self-supporting experiential ecosystem that harnesses the city’s incredible wealth to support and grow ancient traditions in new and unexpected ways. The base is a carefully sculpted and spectacular public realm that creates new routes across the site, and generates thrilling views up through the

building. As guests arrive inside the retail area, they consult with local designers to create their own bespoke products. While the guest goes up the tower to the client hotel, their unique product makes its way up through the building in its spiralling production facilities, eventually being handed to the customer at the ceremonial roofspace. The facade was developed based upon an exhaustive exploration of the folding possibilities of leather, and then this was translated into a language of pleated anodised aluminium panels.

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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01-04 / Sean Hamilton S02, ‘Dog City’. Dog’s are man’s best friend. They are scientifically proven to reduce loneliness, stress, depression, and even to significantly reduce levels and incidences of heart disease... London NEEDS more dogs, and some parts of the city are far more equipped for this than others. Aldgate has virtually nowehere for humans to rest and play with their animals, so what better than to institute a Dog paradise on a plot of land that is currently porposed to become just another collection of

brick-gridded luxury highrise apartments. A secret walled garden of rolling hills and play-pavilions undulates through the whole site, rising up and down to accomodate the various needed logistical service, parking, storage, waste and access, and lifts up to become a huge ramp that brings owners and dogs up into every part of the tower, which itself is a mixture of open-air and enclosed spaces of play, rest, medical care, community and training, the form of which has been carefully molded by studying its daylght effect on neighbours.

05-07 / Candy Yeung S02, ‘The Exotic Bazaar’. Building on Brick Lane and Aldgate’s heritage of street, covered, retail and wholesale markets, this project proposes to triumphantly bring back all kinds of markets into one building envelope. Carefully studying both the existing and lost markets of the area, and Hong Kong’s vibrant vertical market buildings, the Exotic Bazaar brings together a wholesale market, pop-up food stalls, fixed mall-type retails spaces, covered stall-markets and residential space, in a proud

megastructural expression of the vitality of London’s retail tradition, at all price points, and catering to all classes. A wide range of colours help accentuate and express across the city the building’s bustling atmosphere, with a range of different types of fritted and coloured glass having been developed through technical studies, and used to clad every shimmering, technicolour square inch of the tower.

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018 1.Kitchen 2. Stairs 3. Woman Toilet 4. Man Stairs 5. Restaurant

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01-09 / Yu Ren S02, ‘The Aroma: Ambrosia’. Eating together is important. Brick Lane and Aldgate have a rich tradition of immigrant communities setting up numerous culinary enterprises that share and popularise their cooking traditions. This project proposes to extend this ecosystem vertically, to provide new space and infrastructures for the continued sharing of food cultures into the 21st century.

The beginning of the 21st Century has seen London’s ethnic diversity explode in a way rarely seen in an city on earth before, and this tower aims to be a catalystic container for spaces that foster the sharing, and entrepreneurial harnessing of, the multitude of food types, traditions, inventions, and ideas that are bubbling up in the multicultural city that is Lonodn in 2018.

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10-16 / James Parkes S02, ‘Hestia’s Skirt’. The United Kingdom has the smallest new households in square meters in the developed world. This project takes Hestia, the greek goddess of the home, as its guiding metaphor, and constructs a new typology of tower for London which is not private, and not public, but an agglomeration of different kinds of domestic and semi-domestic spaces, shared

and semi-private spaces, for families and individuals who wish to live more communaly, but also those have the potential to partake in an expanded range of domestic activities that are no longer possible in the home environment. Organised into “introvert” and “extrovert” villages of three floors each, the tower is lifted up creating a fabric enclosed, semi-concealed space of quiet public interaction.

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Vertical Design Studio 5

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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01-04 / Zhicheng Yang S02, ‘Seller’s Depot’. Aldgate East is at the junction between London’s most famous markets: Old Spitalfields Market, Brick Lane market, Sunday upmarket, Backyard Market, The Vintage Market and the Boiler House Food Market. Seller’s Depot is a combination of accomodation, storage and workshops for the sellersof all the markets in and around Aldgate. It is separated into 124

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four parts, as reflected on the facade. An automatic shelving system is used for storage, creating a bric-a-brac display on the skyline. The workshop spaces are customizable to meet each marketer’s need. By facilitating marketer’s lives, and celebrating them in the cityscape, Seller’s Depot is contributing to the cultural development and integration of Aldgate, bringing communities together through trade.

05-08 / Xing Yang S02, ‘The TMB Tower’. The Top Middle and Bottom is a giant hi-tech disco-ball celebration of how an incomegenerating tower can contain, emphasise and spectacularise functions that are to the benefit of all local residents, with the whole footprint of the plot being turned into a civic plinth for city life to utilise, the middle being a sports centre for the local youth

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community, providing dramatic juxtapositions of program, and the top of the tower being an unprecedented sky-amphitheatre for events, plays and performances. The form of the building has been sculpted by aerodynamic and environmental factors, moving dynamically in response to every gust of wind, turning the whole tower into a shimmering festival of light conditions. 125


Vertical Design Studio 5

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01-05 / Enija Skeltona S02, ‘Wonderlust’. A world for children and a place for triggering and fostering the imagination. There has been a trend over recent decades for children’s stories and spaces to be sugar coated to an extreme degree, with happy bright colours and candy-shapes, with all stories having happy endings. The enduring popularity of the brothers Grimm and other older tales, as well 126

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as the aesthetics of Tim Burton, are that children respond greatly to the awesome, the strange, the subtly scary ad the mysterious Wonderlust creates a vertical fairytale children’s world that is full of wonder, and designed to be an intriguing and dark forest-themed system of spaces. It is the ultimate lighthouse of strange stories and endless play, inviting children to dream and imagine.

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06-08 / Arina Kondrashova S02, ‘’Electropolis”. The car in the city has been demonised for some time now, but what if it were taken as a positive generator in the dense city centre, if cars were occupants in new multi-functional buildings that brought in from around the country in their cars, mingling with every program that makes East London such a dynamic and exciting zone.

09, 10 / Isabella Haddad Domingos S03, “Temple of Leaves”. Taking its cue from London’s great tradition of temperate greenhouses containing plants from around the world in delicate and considered architecture, the Temple of Leaves proposes a vertical garden with a series of filigree-covered zones cantilevered off of a central tower, each with flora from a different region of the planet. 127


Studio 6

The Island David Chambers, Kevin Haley Studio 6 Tutors

Studio Tutors David Chambers Kevin Haley Stage 2 Students Hayden James Morgane Sha’ban Holly Le-Var Lucia Lanzalaco Hengmo Hu Izzy Park Lauren Cowl Yuqi Huang Bixuan Wang

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 3 Students Amar Sall Chris Wall-Hayes Zeena Jamil Roya Edde Tang Xiao Xiang Ding Alece Foden Taro Sakamoto Thank you: Sam Brown, Thomas Klassnik, Agnieszka Glowacka, Lewis Paine, Shumi Bose, Xavier Llarch Font, Lubbins Primary School, Ray Howard, Alan Reed, Rodney Bishop, Joan Liddiard, Darren Bowen, Lisa and Paul Pain, Joan Liddiard, Malcolm Tugwood, Graham Stevens and the members of the Canvey Island Rotary Club.

Narratives are a basic human strategy for coming to terms with experience, such as time, process and change. In Studio 6 we use storytelling to examine the context of the Thames Gateway and estuary region, focussing on the site of Canvey Island in Essex. The Thames Gateway describes an area stretching along the River Thames and Thames Estuary, spanning urban, suburban, brownfield and greenfield sites across three ceremonial counties. There has been a long and historically charted inequality in London’s development. To the east of the City of London, the River Thames becomes wide and hard to cross; the flat lands were reclaimed from marsh, making them susceptible to flood. Those communities who settled there lived adventurously and this idea of radical independence and freedom for individual forms of life remains strong in the area. Over time, the shifting shores of the Thames Estuary, the low-lying Canvey Island and parts of the Essex countryside have developed a strong identities and a layered history of cultural narratives. Canvey Island itself is a reclaimed island, built up by filling in parts of the surrounding water bodies, and made fit for habitation and production. In other words, Canvey Island is a deliberate construction. Amar focusses on the dynamic, Riparian landscape of tidal zones; his programme brings together the skills of the older and younger generations, through a programme of maritime and ecological education. The ecological fragility of the Estuary has also been explored by Alece. Chris proposes new version of the Essex ‘Plotlands’ targeted at a new wave of London exodus; his development includes a civic town hall which helps inhabitants learn to reuse materials to construct a new habitat. Ciel has considered the cultural specificity of the Jewish community in Canvey, and both Tang and Taro have been exploring leisure and entertainment facilities, layering pragmatic and cultural uses in lighthouses and parking structures. Roya has extended the London riverboat service from the centre of the city to the Estuary, utilising disused piers to create an artery of connectivity, while Zeena has studied urgent predictions for rising sea levels; her proposal accommodates leisure and hotel facilities, imagining the possibility of a habitable sea defence. Urban regeneration plans rely heavily on the ability to think about a place in a different way, to attract investment, residents, life. Our studio proposes the architect as narrator, engaging with the eclectic, multi-layered experience of the contemporary world – using films, exhibitions, books and buildings to project ideas for the future, and producing architectural propositions that respond creatively to these new stories.

Amar Sall S03, ‘Marina-Ville’ 128

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Vertical Design Studio 6

Vertical Design Studio 6 01

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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01-05 / Amar Sall S03, ‘Marina-Ville’. The concept of maritime is etched into the fabric of Canvey Island. Traditional nautical themes still resonate around Canvey, yet over the years, the impact has diminished and now fades into obscurity. Marina-Ville will change that. This proposal, aims to target the distancing generations and regenerate the Marina environment by reviving a forgotten community. Island seniors can help share knowledge of craft and history, through construction and archiving, teaching new skills to engaged youths. In turn, youths will help maintain the area, through 130

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the management and development of new skills, helping run the area and preserve the “reviving” maritime tradition. This agenda aims to set up several spaces enforcing a generational bridge featuring Tidal Pool Classrooms (extracting educational potential of the natural environment), Boat and Mechanical Workshops (providing jobs and opportunities such as apprenticeships) surrounded by Tidal Social Spaces. Focusing on The Point of Canvey Island, the proposal will address making and learning within a natural and artificial landscape. 05

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Minimal Brick Wall

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Additional ropes keep the base of the tent tense and rigid, providing stability and resistance to elements Wooden pegs tie-down the canvas to stop environmental factors from lifting it up. They can be replaced with scavenged timber.

The interior of the tent is made from durable canvas which has minimal insulation ability but is sufficient at keeping water out

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The base of the tent is an external ground sheet, which can be removed and replaced.

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The structure of the tent is made up of 3 timber main upright poles, 6 smaller ones for the walls and poles that run between them all. The poles could be replaced with scavenged wood as necessary

This is the result of experiment looking at how minimal mortar could be used alongside waste material, such as broken bricks, to create an external wall that required less use of harmful or wasteful materials such as cement and concrete. The result resembles an almost ruin like finish and allowed me to see how using a wooden formwork to layer rubble and mortar would result in Air vents provide exits for a perfectly symmetrically sided 6 built up moisture and natural form using materials that are ventilation odd shapes and conventionally ropes provide tensile thrown away or sent to landfill. 7 Guy strength by stopping the ten from twisting

Totem Drawings:

Final Totem Design

The drawings below document the development of the totem design. Initially as a material pallette and a way of showing examples of work and then developing into a 1:1 experimental section using reclaimed materials which are synonomous with self-build architecture

04 around the world. I chose to use materials that were free, readily available from the site, and suitable for the projects reclaimed ideol-

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ogy. The totem not only set out my intentions materially for the project but also for the programatic intentions as I built the totem at 1:1 to discover the challenges of building by myself, the limits of the materials and processes as well as issues of using workshops, finding ample storage, and moving and sourcing materials.

Materials: - Cement - Waste Hardcore - A wooden former

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01-08 / Christopher Wall-Hayes S03, ‘The Canvey Wick Co-Operative’. The Canvey Wick Co-operative builds on the heritage of Canvey Islands plotland history, in which poor Londoners who wished to escape the overcrowded and polluted city bought plots on Canvey Island to self-build. The Canvey Wick Co-operative attempts to recapture the radical self-build spirit of the original plotlanders through a master plan which creates affordable plots on a site which is dilapidated and unused, with the plan allocating space for selfbuild plots, community spaces, and essential infrastructure. 132

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The C.W.C. is focused around a community centre designed to inspire and facilitate all manor of self building, acting as a living archive and tapestry of techniques and materials. As well as, being home to workshops, an Architect in residence, and community spaces so self-builders with minimal previous experiences can build on their skills. The C.W.C. allows people who cannot afford to own their own home in London the chance to build a home and community as a collective in a safe and inspiring environment.

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CANVEY ISLAND East Tilbury

LONDON Isle of dogs

KENSINGTON CHELSEA FULHAM

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Vertical Design Studio 6

Vertical Design Studio 6

South Benfleet

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Derelict Thames map mapping locations of abandoned sites

‘A series of disused and decaying industrial jetties along the river Thames’

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01-04 / Zeena Jamil S03, ‘As the Sea Rises’. The project explores the unexpected reading of the built environment in order to deal with climate change. Set in the Thames Estuary in Essex, the project envisages a system of flood defences known as breakwater that perform multiple functions. In addition to Protecting the island from flooding,the breakwater is designed to catalyse a new form of waterfront occupation that would propose a new relationship between the islanders and their favourite seafront. The proposal

offers the prospect of restoring the native Canvey Island holiday destination through the inhabitation of the breakwater. The structure houses a hotel embedded within the defence system along side public facilities targeting tourists and native islanders. The hotel offers a unique experience to it’s visitors driven by the design constraints of the project : building architecture whiles till maintaining it’s defensive role in the water.

05-08 / Roya Edde S03, ‘Down by the Jetty’. The proposal focuses on the creation of a hotel program on the jetty for both the locals and the tourists of the Thames River. Proposing an extension of the riverboat services from the Woolwich station, it aims to make the jetty a new stop for the tourists and smoothly integrate them into the island. On an urban scale, the jetty becomes a tool for both exposure of the local community and local skills as well as a tool for integration of tourists into the island. The site becomes a

social hub reviving Canvey Island and making it more renowned on a larger scale. Echoing the existing decay site on water, the design of the project thus creates itself. Elements of architecture are synthesised,multiplied and created out of the existing site features. The program is divided into a system of spaces plugged into the jetty in order to integrate the new while preserving the old. The design of the hotel thus centres around building interventions centred in preservation through the use of plug-ins and material coherence.

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Concept Collage Key 1 Wind

Vertical Design Studio 6

Vertical Design Studio 6

1.1 Many of us were taught how to fly a kites by a parent/ grandparents. This shows the programme of the design in action, where the young and old are interacting through the making and flying of kites.

1.2 The celebration of wind and its great potential for energy is evident on a beach. Could this be used to power the building?

1.3 fabrics and objects could be hung to blow and swing with the wind like a wind chime.

1.4 The facade could become kinetic. Wind could stimulate movements by hanging a canopy of shells for example (influenced by Ned Kahn’s wind Veil). This will also produce sounds/ chimes.

Project Title

2 Sound 2.1 Harnessing specific sounds around the site such as ‘The Hear Heres’ by Studio Weave amplifying nature sounds to the ear.

2.2 Sound domes harnessing the water’s beautiful sounds (Influenced by the St Pauls Whispering Gallery, Richard Serras Whispering walls and the ‘listening ears’ in Dungeness).

2.3 ‘The Singing Ringing Tree’ by architects Mike Tonkin and Anna Liu illustrates that there is a potential to the make the structure create its own sounds. Like an instrument.

3 Play 3.1 Make the building playful for both seniors and youths (image from XS architecture vs XL furniture by Worapong Manupipatpong)

3.2 Using natural forms to make the site a playground for all uses (influenced by George Mitchell’s climbing wall and Aldo Van Eyck’s post war playgrounds)

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

4.1 Natural materials from the site, could br used to produce the structure and facade (influenced by Design studio Atelier NL use of sand from around the world to produce glass, Agar and Plasticity; seaweed packaging by AMAM) Morgane Shaban

4.2 In contrast to the surrounding industrial structures and harmonising with the site’s natural aspects this shows an organic form (influenced by Santa Fe, New Mexico’s traditional architecture, “Pueblo Revival”)

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4.3 Consideration of the access point onto the beach. This is important as the next exit is around 200 metre down the beach. How could this be made exciting?

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01-05 / Morgane Sha’ban S02, ‘The Flying Project’. Through direct engagement with the community on Canvey Island, I discovered the wonderful potential it offered; to bring together the younger and older generation. Whilst uncovering the sites opportunities the project manifested into a space facilitating storytelling, learning and making. From the distinctive nature of narrative, the rich local stories of Canvey Island play an important role throughout the project and became of high value within the design. As the narrator of this story, I responded to the site and its conditions to inform the programme 136

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as well as the design. Beaches are one of the few places that wind is celebrated; pin wheels, wind chimes, and of course kites. Many of us have experienced memorable moments shared with a parent or grandparent through the flight of kites. A kite workshop allows the youths an opportunity to learn different craft skills whilst tackling the growing issue of isolation of the elderly. This is a unique collaborative space where Canvey Island’s youths and elderly would be able to learn from each other and flourish within a new cultural platform.

parafoil

The myths and legends of Canvey Island was where this project’s journey started. Storytelling will also be the beginning of the kite craft process. The kite folklore, history, tradition, religion and superstition all played a part in the development of the kite as a indigenous art form influencing many cultures. Traditional tales speak of kites as divine scared instruments. Whether its local tales, personal experiences or kite history, this space will encourage the sharing of all stories. 2 designing From the surroundings, the people and the stories exchanged a design will form. This space should encourage creative thinking through hand drawing and computer drawing. The aerodynamics of the kite as well as its illustrated story will be designed in parallel to each other. 3 making While aerodynamic qualities should not be sacrificed the kites aesthetics have always been important for a kite craftsman. Pattern and decoration on paper and fabric is in itself art. Kite painting is a traditional art in Japan. Painting, dyeing, screen printing are some of the techniques that can be used to portray a story or simply create a pattern. 4 assembling The aim is always to make a lightweight structure. The basic essential materials used to do this have stayed the same for centuries; wood, fabrics or paper and string. After a frame is built, the covering is sewn or glued on and then brindled and flown with string. Modern materials can now be used to develop more efficient kites, such as plastic cloths and aluminium rods however this workshop will revert back to and celebrate the traditional ways of kite making. 5 flying Wooden Park and Thorney Bay beach are open windy areas to fly a kite. I considered how the design will not hinder this but celebrate this.

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nt Golf Course and Model Association eek D Creeky Wood gby Union Rugby Club es Pre-School mbers b CIMA Members Commuters d Cyclists rs f Flower Pickers / ldren Crabbing mbers i Quad Bikers Wildflower meadow / Canvey Walk Route rabbing 6 Houses 12, 13, 14 Objects

Vertical Design Studio 6

Castle Point Golf Course

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F 01-05 / Holly Le-VarLittle S02, ‘A Walker’s Passage’. Nature hides Tewkes Pre-School behind the wall. Located in the northern marshlands of Canvey island and one of the stops along the 14.5 mile Benfleet Circular walking route, Tewkes Creek is mysteriously named “England’s little rainforest”. Even with 1,300 species, including 30 on the UK endangered “red list”, the site is surprisingly sparse, with more common sightings of drive-through eateries, oil refineries and dense housing. Fly tipping around these marshlands is crushing the nature and disrupting the minerals needed to preserve it. This presented an

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opportunity to educate incoming visitors and existing residents by shining a light on the precious wildlife hidden behind the wall. In the form of a “Walker’s Passage”, the programme of my final proposal encourages the inhabitant to take shelter via a series of navigational moments. Using the idea of nostalgically “passing through” and the comfort of rituals, 7 actions were applied to guide the user: Wash, rest, reflect, collect, exchange, plan and fill. The narratives of local typologies, poetry and found objects weaved into the facade aim to preserve a sense of imperfect place, and educate those inside.

one long walkway, 2 forms either side, a further 4, a boat at high tide

one long walkway, 2 forms either side, a further 2, a view

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Vertical Design Studio 6

Vertical Design Studio 6 01

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

The Cost of Living in London 82 Percent Of Londoners don’t know their neighbours occupation.

Average cost for a two bedroom flat in east London is between 500 and 750 pounds a month.

The average 2 bedroom flat in London has only 32 meters squared of habitable space.

T h e Mo d e r n “C opy an d Pa ste” Hou s i ng E st ate “We move homes more frequently, spend a lot less time communicating face to face and are more cautious about who we welcome into our homes” - Martin Scott (Head of Churchill Insurance)

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13 per cent of people said they distrusted, disliked or deliberately avoided people they lived next to.

51 per cent said they wouldn’t ask their neighbour for help with anything, while 70 per cent admitted they didn’t even know any of their neighbours’ names.

B u i l d Yo u r s e l f I n t o Yo u r H o m e

Bedroom The upstairs master bedroom was modified by Dawn in-order to improve the meeting in the house. The Powers mainly use their wood powered fireplace to heat the house, burning wood that dawn collects from her job as the owner of a demolition company. By rearranging upstairs so that the chimney ran through the centre of the room it enabled for heat from the fire to also warm the bedroom.

Office Dawn and her Son, Connor, run the demolition business from home. To keep their work away from their rest she converted the unused garage into an office. This has enabled the expansion of the business and allowed her to hold meeting away from the house while not having to travel.

Balcony While working on a demolition job in 2017 Dawn noticed a balcony was being thrown away which she could fit to her house. She took it home and added it to her bedroom. This provided her with a view down her road to the sea-front. “Even in winter it brings a smile to my face.” The brightly decorated balcony is visible from the front of the house and defiantly expresses her character to the street.

Cactus House “When a friend in the community passed away she left behind this cactus. It had been in her porch ever since i had known her and it never grew any bigger. We took it in and put it in our living-room and within a month it was touching the celing! we decided to ask a local carpenter to build us an expandable greenhouse to keep it warm in the winter and leave room for it to grow.” This cactus is one of the first things you see from the street and lead to me knocking on their door. This is Roys Passion, gardening and DIY. It has enabled them to landscape and modify their house and garden.

Doors “when i first saw the house, before I brought it, I thought it looked like a mid-west American church so i took influence from that and tried to make the doors match. I think they make it feel homely and cosy.” The act of ducking through the low arched doors makes the house feel smaller and forms a very friendly and close family atmosphere.

The Powers: Right to left, Dawn Power, Roy Power, Connor Power

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01-05 / Hayden James S02, ‘The Wall’. The sea wall defines Canvey from its marshy foundations. Dividing marsh from land, the wall creates an interesting condition where the island’s safety from the sea is dependent on a single architecture. Prominently the selfbuild/self-design architecture of Canvey uses traditional construction techniques and is ignorant to its condition making its context invisible from central Canvey. This is unlike many other examples of tidal inhabitation, where the architecture brings water into it’s vernacular. This project aims to produce an exemplar sustainable platform for 140

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the islands future inhabitation which encourages continuation of DIY architecture and community while embracing Canvey’s aquatic nature for beauty and vernacular potential. By extruding the language of the sea wall into the marsh, the design rises houses, footpaths and streets above hightide lines and rising sea levels. Through the provision of utilities, foundations and circulation creating your perfect home becomes affordable encouraging long-term residence creating closer ties with neighbours. 05

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Vertical Design Studio 6

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THE CARAVAN LIVING AT THE CANVEY ISLAND Road to Railway station and London

Caravan Park is a very interesting housing in Canvey Island, there is numbers of Caravan park around Island. The Caravan park which I choose located in south part of island, it close to the Seafront Walkway on Canvey. On the other side of the park is the Petrochemical industry site, which is most dangerous part of the island. It is kind of in between space in residence area and the industry area of the site. Although it is a caravan park, it still got lot of people living there. All the property on this park could for sell or rent. The price of this type of house is cheaper than the other type of house on the island.

Canvey Twon Center

People come from other part of Canvey

People come from London and Essex

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Lobster Smack

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Examples of noise sources near the site and how loud the noises are. Mapping of sound based on the on-site research and personal obervations and an APP testing the intensity. However the sound is not static and the diagram shows a overall intensity of the sound.

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01-04 / Tang Xiao S03, ‘The Lighthouse’. This project rebuilds a landmark for Canvey island in Thorney Bay area. The new landmark located inside the river, connecting to the coastline by a pier structure. The building itself has several functions, a gallery space, outdoor activity space and viewing platform. Even more, the building has a tide pool. To remember the old lighthouse, on the top of the building is a light navigation structure. This navigation light could be visible in the most place cross both riverside and estuary. As the landmark located on west side of Thorney Bay area, it could see as

an attraction to encourage more people to discover the west side of Thorney Bay. The new landmark also offers a relax and activity space for the resident in the caravan park. Inside the building it has the commercial space which for the restaurant and gift shop. Also when they are leaving they can buy some gift and clam, oyster collects from the tide pool. It also can hold some exhibition from outside the Island. The Viewing platform gives a unique view of the Thames estuary, which could be attracting people come to visit the building.

05-07 / Hengmo Hu S02, ‘Canvey Island Hill’. In late 2016, the first family moved to Canvey Island Hill and they bought a big house there from Stamford, where Europe’s largest ultra-Orthodox Jewish community locates since 1800s. Till the beginning of 2018, 50 houses have been bought by Jewish families.Through spiritual space and activities, my proposal is to provide space with can make them together and to stay in the same place. Through reading space, gathering space and exhibition space and so on, the building is to create space for interactivities.

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Vertical Design Studio 6

Vertical Design Studio 6

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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01-03 / Bixuan Wang S02, ‘Welcome Station’. This is a Welcome station for traveling at Canvey Island which located at the Benfleet Station. From the result of interactive posters I have collected from Canvey, this location got the most feedback that means it is lack of relaxing space for people to use the waiting time. This Welcome station conclude Cafe, Lobby, Information reception, Canteen, Cafe making, Kitchen, Outside Terrace, Reading room and Quiet space for sleeping and relaxing. A part of the Welcome station is landing on the Eastern Heaven Creek that means the Creek will produce a

changeable viewing with rising tide. And another part of the Welcome station is landing on the ground with a bicycle and walking path. The entrance of this Welcome station is at the first floor that avoid the big amount of people traffic standing at the ground floor to influence the bicycle and walking path. This can provide a convenient environment for people to come and leave. The whole building is built by steel with circular structure. This provide a good visual aspect for viewing distant Canvey Island.

04-06 / Yuqi Huang S02, ‘Visitor Centre’. Based on the engagement strategy results and from interviews, over half of the local and tourist enjoys the seafront the most so that they spend lots of leisure time at the seafront. Therefore, my focus area is around the seafront. My site is located at the small front point where is on the beach and west to the paddling pool. It is clear to be seen from both the eastern and western beach that it can be spotted by the walkers easily. The site is facing the paddling pool and the connection to the surrounding environment is made when the moveable roof move

towards to the paddling pool, creating combinations of enclosure, open-air and framing of views according to position. My design’s aim is to offer the visitor the experience to enjoy and discover Canvey Island’s seafront landscape and identity in a different natural way. Moreover, the strategy is to reinforce and empower the sites characteristics, without damaging it. Depending on site’s position and surrounding facilities, the building is designed to adapt and blend in the natural space.

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Studio 7

Radical Arts, Critical Architecture Dr. Ursula Dimitrou, Dejan Mrdja Studio 7 Tutors

Studio Tutors Dr. Ursula Dimitrou Dejan Mrdja Stage 2 Students Marta Escribano Cuñat Lou Ducasse Agata Dydak Weihang Hu Adam Muscat Laura Robles Tiphaine Varigas Jessica White Brian Yue Isabella Yurtsever

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 3 Students Dalia Amellal SooYoung Bae Ben Bradford Lucy Sky Moore-Clube Shijia Huang John Langran Belis Memik Quinxue Wang Thank you: Jason Alderson Kyveli Anastasiadi Rebecca Bogue Jane Chew Anat Ben David Anne Heloise Dautel Carl Fraser Corinna Dean Nikoleta Gkoka Marko Jobst Lottie McCarthy Gaoqi Lou Elina Loukou Jorge Martin Andrew O’Donnell Eliza Soroga Erika Suzuki Andrew Taylor Emma Twine Serhan Tekbas Sophie Yetton Nissrin Zaptia

‘The architect’s only option is to find a course for revolutionary praxis outside the traditional boundaries of his field.’ – Joan Ockman, Architecture, Criticism, Ideology, 1995 Studio 7 explores causalities between design and alternative political futures. We approach design as a creative and critical tool that connects social practices with building materials to imagine a future of social relationships, built on communication, and forge common goals to empower local communities, resisting their erosion and expulsion. This year’s brief asked the students to envisage new spatial tactics, arrangements and typologies that support cultural production related to radical creative practices. We looked at the specificities of local and international artistic groups that challenge social conventions and existing power hierarchies. Students were invited to take the neighbourhood of Brixton as their context, a diverse and multifaceted area of London with a long and exciting cultural history. The name of the area is synonymous with AfroCaribbean cultural practices, large housing estates, drug dealing and gangs, punk rock and reggae scene, social upheavals, political activism, pulsating markets and nightlife. Yet, the area’s vibrant ambience, the once cheap rents and good housing stock and even the areas notoriety have turned it into a prime development opportunity that threatens the local communities and cultural practices with segregation, increased rents and dislocation while the recent cultural practices and spaces like POP Brixton and Brixton Village are targeting the affluent new classes. While the local planning authorities ‘protect’ the diverse and multicultural character of the area, soaring housing and commercial property prices are forcing the low-income local population to move away, leading to protest demonstrations by numerous collective practices. Can culture build resilience? Is gentrification unavoidable? Can we imagine self-managed, non-hierarchical common spaces of cultural production? The students immersed themselves in Brixton, producing a group installation composed of physical models, in-situ interventions and videos. In order to emphasise the crossing boundaries between body, movement and space the students took part in a performance workshop. They investigated ways in which design can use the body as an instrument of thinking, sensing, drawing and sculpting space. The workshop challenged what is considered notions of the ΄normal’ and the ‘possible’ in design and spatial representation. The proposals on the following pages are cultural spaces built around art practices of social character, engagement and communities of artists; spaces that house radical cultural performances while being critically situated in the socio-political context of Brixton. Through this process, students are awakened and engaged in the process of discovering their own critical practice. Quinxue Wang S03, ‘A Happening Performance Factory’

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Workshop Performing Architecture: Body, Movement, Space with Kyveli Anastassiadi, Eliza Soroga, Ursula Dimitriou (February 2018). This workshop was aimed at and tailored for students of architecture and spatial design. Its purpose was to reactivate a way of designing that uses the body as an instrument of thinking, 148

sensing, drawing and sculpting space, accessing an intelligence that is spherical rather than linear. The workshop combines architecture with other disciplines including art, cinematography and performance with the aim to inspire, broaden and challenge what is possible and what is considered ΄normal’ in design and spatial representation. 149


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01-07 / Lucy Sky Moore-Clube S03, ‘The Brixton Carnival: A Pageant of Protest.’ This project is an architectural manifestation of the radical art of carnivals and protests, which is used to retain and amplify the unique idiosyncrasies of Brixton’s cultural practices in the face of biased, prejudiced and austere regeneration. It is a proposal which offers Brixon’s already prevalent activist voice a platform to 150

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inspire, develop and produce a different form of protest which utilises the positive, celebratory nature of Brixton’s carnival history. The roots of carnival stem from a fight in the face of racism and slavery: carnival became a mode of protest. Again, it shall become this along the notorious Coldharbour Lane.

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08-11 / Ben Bradford S03, ‘LEAK’. As a society we are processing more and more information into the digital world. Leak is a project that aims to re-engage people with the physical, to remove the filtration and expose the raw, detailed, emotive and even futile

information that the digital doesn’t know of. Leak takes you on a journey of discovery, exploration and exposure. Using poetry as its driving force, it aims to evoke the human and rekindle the relationship with others and ourselves.

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01-05 / Quinxue Wang S03, ‘A Happening Performance Factory’. Happenings, first used by Allan Kaprow during the 1950s to describe a range of art-related event, occur anywhere and are often multidisciplinary, with a nonlinear narrative and the active participation of the audience. Urban public life was itself a kind of Happening. The design is aimed to propose a self-managed, non-hierarchical 152

performance space where artists and local youth collaborate together to produce art productions which are consumed by public outside Brixton. The loop of this economic chain is architecturally defined by oblique functionalism and cinematography ambience.

06-08 / Dalia Amellal S03, ‘Fight Club’. Fight club is a boxing club and drama therapy centre located on the roof of Southwyck House, Brixton. The project offers a safe place to channel aggressive temptations and impulses. The architecture creates a unity by combining the spaces in which these activities occur and playing with the exchange of emotional qualities and perceptions. Fight club

benefits the Brixton youthful community in particular, merging both programs in a derelict context; it constitutes a social hub that aims to rid inhabitants of negative impulses. The project seeks to unify the community of the estate through the implementing purpose and intrigue to the existing architecture.

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01-04 / SooYoung Bae S03, ‘The Zone Of Peace’. This project implements a steady change on anti-social behaviours to be decreased through the application of art therapy. The design of gallery should meet the requirements of planning permission in this premise and the targeted customers, more likely female adults who possess anti social behaviours. The construction of The zone 154

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of Peace from a lean approach so that the tasks of solving learning difficulties should be maintained proactive participation such as full efforts from art therapists and raising government funds. After all, this project will encourage to find more practice ways of reducing the level of anti-social behaviours in Brixton.

05-09 / Belis Memik S03, ‘Trust Exchange’. This proposal will push the boundaries of our existing system, proposing a new currency that is void of class systems and privilege. In this talent exchange market, currency is not a valid way to pay, you can only make exchanges happen through exchanging your talents (skills) and knowledges. The market was removing the aspect of currency and educating the

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creative sector indirectly, preventing a creative diaspore and tackling with the two main issues on site. The design of the market purely reflects the idea giving its users the right context and the right tools to create (exchange).

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01-03 / Shijia Huang S03, ‘The Weaving Theatre’. The Weaving Theatre is an atypical theatre which include local shops and performance space. The whole project was developed with the focuses of gender issue, trauma, informal therapy, movement etc. The building includes the spaces for different people and can satisfied with different requirement. From public to private, from 156

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quiet and intimate to open and sharing spaces. The theatre was designed based on a process of healing programmatically spatially. Weaving is a service in hair salon for men or women to make their hair look better, which at the same time represents the process of “weaving” the life, to make their life better.

04-07 / John Langran S03, ‘SW9 Symbiotic Brixton’. The aim of this project is to create synergy between two communities that coexist in Brixton through acts of both play and work. The two communities consist of new “hipster” people who have moved to Brixton within the past 10 years and the youth that live on the estates that are susceptible to being enticed into gangs. These groups

were identified because of the gentrification that has been taking place in Brixton over the past 10 years causing a growing divide between the two groups. This in turn makes the youth from the estates more likely to turn to other ways of feeling empowered. This is also Symbiotic Brixton aims to accomplish.

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01-05 / Brian Yue S02, ‘Brixton Writer’s Tea Club’. Taking form as a tea house this project focuses on creating a new urban oasis above bustling activities in the heart of Brixton. Following the axis of Electric Lane, the 5 pavilions house a collective of writers for the production and propagation of their work. These pavilions are categorised in function and form, each having a visual and spatial relationship with

each other, linked together to form a visual story arc. The program mashes together workspace with leisure space to produce a new situation for the exploration in storytelling and writing. This creates an environment of Brixton’s multicultural make up and entrenched through the production of literary works.

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06-09 / Laura Robles S02, ‘Brixton In Progress’. This project focuses on approaching design as a creative and critical tool that aims to connect the material with social practices imagining a future of social relationships. Through dancing we find a resource of social inclusion, this helps to know other cultures and understand them, avoiding discrimination a racism. Spatially this Dance School is

conceived as a fluid building where its curves imitate the movements of a body dancing and at the same time guides you intuitively to the different areas.

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01-03 / Marta Escribano Cuñat S02, ‘Brixton Designers Also, this project creates a public space in the form of a piazza, as Collective.’ The objective of this project is to create a space to bring well as an exposition space. These are free open spaces that have no together the community with local artists and at the same time join rules and everyone is invited to. artists and designers to make collaborations between each other. Art would be a medium to fight against crime, violence and abuse and transmit a message.

04-06 / Jessica White S02, ‘CrickEAT: A Brixton Bug’s Life’. This project aims to uncover the neglected corners of Brixton, introducing a new way life and a new way of eating into the heart of the community. Where the locals can get hands on in the making, it isn’t the usual livestock that they’ll be rearing. By integrating the consumption of insects into their lifestyles as a primary source of

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protein, the people of Brixton will learn how these tiny bugs, will be saving the earth, one leg at a time.

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01-04 / Adam Muscat S02, ‘Softly Softly Brixton.’ Softly Softly Brixton is a psychedelic relaxation space in the heart of Brixton - St Matthews Church. It aims to help re-introduce past soft drug policies which were implemented within Brixton to relax the laws on drugs such as cannabis and other natural substances.

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05-08 / Lou Ducasse S02, ‘The Path’. The Path is a public performance space to empower the local community of Brixton through music performance in an inside and outside relational space. Enhancing creative opportunities and generating a path for experimental rhythm.

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09, 10 / Agata Dydak S02, ‘Leftover Pavilion’. The building actively responds to the problem of poverty in Brixton area. Based on he pay-as-you-feel idea, the concept creates community symbiosis, where customers can determine the price in correspondence to their income.

11, 12 / Tiphaine Varigas 02, ‘Listen to the Toaster: The Importance of Rituals.’ This project focuses on rituals, how they are engrained in every day’s life and how twisting our perception of them can lead to a whole new perspective. Cooking and the sound of making food are vital to a person’s life. Scaling up those rituals is what is radical.

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Lonely City Anthony Staples, Daniel Marmot Studio 8 Tutors

Studio Tutors Anthony Staples Daniel Marmot Stage 2 Students Huda Al-Yaqobi James Annis Camillo Cavarretta Lawrence Del Rosario Esma Duzgun Beata Halka Weining Luo Leena Sahloul Izabel Sigaud Jiaqi Sun Yichen Yang BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 3 Students Orange Cheng Filippos Georgeoglou Shu-Minh Hung John Moran Jennifer Nibbs Maria Papadimitriou Dahye Yi Thank you: David Knight, Sam Potter, Suzanne O’Connell, Emma Tubbs,Jane Hall, Alan Beveridge, Rosalind Peebles, Ruth Lang, Jay Morton, Frank Filskow, Kathryn Timamins, Carlos Jiminez, Stuart McKenzie

Cities offer unparalleled opportunities for the intermingling of people from different cultures and backgrounds, for the cross fertilisation of ideas, for creative expression and moments of communal celebration. They are places of chance encounter, of excitement, awash with stories, surprise and mystery, layered with history. Yet increasingly they are also a cause of isolation, heightened by the presence of so many others in close proximity. Cities can be places of financial exclusion, of social anxiety and cultural alienation. In London, as our population expands, we are living in ever closer proximity to our neighbours yet we are increasingly disconnected emotionally. It is a very distinctive urban phenomenon to be lonely in a crowd. This year, Studio 8 explored architectural responses to the problem of loneliness in the city. Projects focused around Poplar, a marginalised residential pocket of East London. Set against the shiny towers and glossy developments of Canary Wharf, we set about questioning the stereotype of an economically peripheral and socially marginalised inner city, aiming instead to celebrate the locality; its chaotic range of histories and programmes, ethnicities and narratives, economic and urban ecologies. In Project 1, students were invited to delve into Poplar, unearthing stories from its eclectic urban fabric and examining its rich history and potential future development through the production of large-scale detailed line drawings. These highly site-specific pieces of observational research formed the background to Project 2, proposals for co-living communities that explore the potential for shared facilities and the opportunities for architecture to provide the necessary frameworks for individuals and communities to flourish. Each project considers the potential of co-living as a response to growing loneliness in the inner city and the increasing strains placed on our mental and physical well-being. In Studio 8, we are concerned with the radical potential of building as an opportunity to respond to economic, social and political change. Architecture is paradoxically both a reflection of changes in society, and a counterpoint to the speed and transience of the modern digital age. An app may flourish and disappear within the time it takes to produce a building. Our built environment bridges fashions, outlives individuals and survives several generations of technological change. In the information age, architecture plays an increasingly important role in mediating between the abstract world of ideas and the concrete world. We see the craft of buildings as inextricably linked to the production of culture. Buildings reflect the spirit and ideals of the society in which they are created. If architecture is a built embodiment of our wider societal values, what do today’s cities say about our values in the 21st century? MALAM GARDENS

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Jennifer Nibbs S03, ‘Malam Gardens’ 165


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01-06 / Orange Cheng S03, ‘The Peach Collective’. A co-living community for visually impaired artists, creating a series of multisensory spaces to accommodate and celebrate the creative occupants. Colour is used to signify the changes in materials and surfaces to help guide the user; from the public plaza at ground level, into the sunken public gallery, up to the living area and bedrooms. 166

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PROJECT ONE: POPLAR SITE DRAWING (IDA STREET) Project one consists of a site drawing that presents a detailed analysis o f a k e y s p a c e i n P o p l a r. T h e d r a w i n g p r e s e n t e d i s a c o r n e r i n I d a s t r e e t , where the focus was on understanding the users, circulation, relationship with the context.

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01 / Maria Papadimitriou S03, ‘The Sabbarton Arms’. 02 / Orange Cheng S03, ‘The Festival Inn’. 03 / Shu-Ming Hung S03, ‘Ida Street’. As students of architecture we must learn to act simultaneously as urban explorers, detectives and storytellers. At the outset of the year we visited Poplar together, tracing a line through this historical neighbourhood; from the Limehouse Cut 168

canal, past Victorian terraces, post-war estates and modernist masterpieces, into Chrisp Street Market, across the A12 and finally emerging amidst the glass towers of Canary Wharf. Each student was invited to identify a fragment of the urban environment. We aimed to produce a series of individually crafted observations, represented through writing, photography and detailed line drawing.

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A taxi drove by, the driver was a middle-aged men, wearing glasses and a blue striped polo shirt.

A mom crossed Ida street, holding her daughter’s hand, while another handholding on to a cake.

Around the corner of the street was ‘Hing Cheong’ Chinese Food Take Away. I saw a women peeking out the window

A white car passed by, windows rolled down, and drove towards Brownfield Street.

A little black cat slowly crawled out from one of the ground level yards of the private residence along the street from

A little girl holding a small birthday balloon was accompanied by three other men as they walked towards their car,

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The Breakfast ro o m By th e en d of this pro cess i had a much stro nger s en s e of what the pro ject wo uld beco me .

In thi s m od el i d evel oped the i d eas of the d efensi ve wal l as wel l as that of the open space bri ght spaces, a ori entated the bui l d i ng wi th i ts focus to the east on the park and the m orni ng sun wi th the heavy west faci ng wal l acti ng as the strong backbone .

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Final massing model

This was the more successful layout of the whole scheme in relationship to light and space

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01, 02 / James Annis S03, ‘Our House’. 03, 05, 06 / Lawrence Del Rosario S03, ‘The Artist Colony’. 04 / Camillo Cavarretta S03, ‘A Place for All’. 07 / James Annis S03, ‘Our House’. A home for single parent families designed to alleviate the challenges of bringing up young children alone through collective living. The plan of the building is carefully curated around the daily routines of young

parents, providing space for communal eating, safe playspace, quite retreat, sleeping and washing. 08 / Lawrence Del Rosario S03, ‘The Artist Colony’. Accommodation and studio space designed for artist residencies. Taking advantage of the green parkland setting, two blocks are arrange in an L-shape around an inner courtyard, maximizing on natural light and controlled views.

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Final Elevation of the family buildings (1:50)

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01, 03 / Camillo Cavarretta S03, ‘A Place for All’. Multi-generational housing designed to ensure both young families and the elderly can continue to live within the local area. Units are arranged around a south-facing courtyard with shared gardens, terrace, kitchens and dining space. 172

02 / Maria Papadimitriou S03, ‘Asylum Seeker’s Garden’. A temporary home for asylum seekers where the garden and its plants are the permanent residents. Planting, gardening and cultivation are encouraged as therapeutic shared activities within the sheltered walls of the multi-occupancy proposals.

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

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01 / Esma Duzgun S03, ‘Home for Nocturnal Fishmongers’. A home for fishmongers from Billingsgate Market whose unsociable work hours mean that they must wake at night and sleep through the early part of the day. The house provides quiet dark spaces to sleep during the day, communal laundry facilities to wash after work, and a shared kitchen, garden and dining room.

02, 03, 04, 06 / Weining Luo S03, ‘Shared Retirement Living’. A home for the elderly on the edge of the Poplar Recreational making process Ground. Communal spaces at ground level are conceived tomodel mediate between the park and a quite semi-private interior courtyard garden. Above, the living accommodation includes balconies and shared entrances providing moments for neighbours to talk and live together.

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Proposal model (third edition)

model making process 05 / Jiaqi Sun S03, ‘Artists in Residence’. A live work space for artists which employs a series of courtyards and a massive curved dividing wall to mediate between the various functions. An art gallery at the public corner of the site raises the profile of the building within its urban context and encourages further engagement with the Proposal model (third edition) area. surrounding

1: shared dining room 2: shared kitchen 3:main entrance 4: shared living room

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07 / Yichen Yang S03, ‘The Yang People’. A dense high-rise typology for student housing in Poplar which uses glass facades, shared access galleries and communal facilities to encourage face to face engagement between its residents.

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1:50 THE FAMILIES SHARE AN ENTRANCE THAT OPENS UP TO THEIR LAUNDRY ROOM SO THAT THE WORKERS CAN CHANGE AND WASH BEFORE THEY ENTER THEIR HOMES. THIS PROCESSION OF SPACES CREATES AN EASE IN THEIR POST WORK RHYTHM TO ENABLE A CALM ATMOSPHERE BEFORE DESCENDING TO THEIR QUIET ROOMS.


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The Proj e c t and t he Cit y This Two Point Perspective Collage intents to place the project within the city landscape and surrounding buildings, almost as a view from the Market.

Inter ior F low The programmatic intention is to connect the residents with the comunity of Poplar, having food as a common ground. The landscape is the architectural response to the flow and connections between private and public, interior and exterior.

Izabel Sigaud - BA ARCH - Studio 8

Izabel Sigaud - BA ARCH - Studio 8

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01-06 / Izabel Sigaud S03, ‘A Dining Room for Poplar’. A communal dining room for Poplar located opposite Chrisp Street Market and alongside the DLR rail lines. A giant roof provides shelter and creates a landmark in the urban setting, beneath which a landscaped public plaza provides a home for the communal life of the local area centred around the growing, eating and sharing food.

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01-06 / John Moran S03, ‘A Community Without Doors’. Communal living for the elderly of Poplar. On a linear site, between Chrisp Street Market and the DLR, a series of buildings arranged around courtyards of various shape and size carefully mediate between the public street outside and the private life of the elderly residents within. 178

The courtyards, porticos, colonnades and balconies create opportunities for chance encounters and shared activities, encouraging social interaction and helping to foster a sense of community and belonging as an antidote the potential isolation of old age. 04

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T h e s e c o n d k e y r e f i n e m e n t i s t o r e f i n e t h e l i v e a n d w o r k d e s i g n s t r a t e g y, e s p e c i a l l y to find a method to refine the way live and work units are shared, this is developed through adding a second layer of smaller studio spaces on the first level.

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First Level Development Plan

Co-Housing Unit: Designer Flatshare

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Co-Housing Unit: Single Designer Apartment

This is a refined key space design model aimed to understand the spat i a l a r r a n g e m e n t , s t r a t e g y, a n d r e l a t i o n s h i p b e t w e e n t h e k e y p r o g r a m s (co-housing units, central open square, and the fashion studio spaces).

Co-Living Living Room: Key space for designers in the residence to socialize and interact

Private space:

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(Isolated timber housing units within the building provide private spaces for the residents to rest in a better thermal insulated and soundproof room)

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BYRON STREET Ground Level Development Plan Overall layout of the initial key space design model, showing measurement and potential program arrangement.

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Initial Development plan of the overall spatial arrangement

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private backyard spaces are , and a new linear route is pen square.

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‘3-point connection’ design strategy connects the co-housing units, central open square, and the priv a t e m a ke r y. T h r o u g h a r r a n g i n g t h e p r o g r a m s i n a 3 - p o i n t t r i a n g u l a r c o n n e c t i o n , t h e u s e r s a r e c o n n e c t e d closely despite the large site.

‘Open corner strateg towards the centr

Key first level co-living interior visualisation:

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

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T h e i n t e r i o r p r i v a t e t i m bB eY Rr Os N p aScTeRs E aE rTe e s s e n t i a l t o p r o v i d e a n e x t r a d e g r e e o f p r i v a c y with the external spaces which are shared First Level Development Plan

Steel truss portal frame provides a lightweight framework with the integration of purlin and braced frame for a d d e d s t r u c t u r a l s t a b i l i t y. T h e s t e e l elements are prefabricated, which ens u r e s t r u c t u r a l a n d c o s t e f f i c i e n c y.

Visualisation of the central open square, with the bridge crossing along the central space, functioning as a T s oi m c i abl ei rn tfear b a cr ti icvae t eelde ml ievn itnwg i tuh nwi tosr k s p a c e s . O n g r o u n d l e v e l , t h e c u r t a i n p r o v i d e s t h e f l e x i b l e u s e o f s p a c e , p r o v i d i n g d i f f e r e n t l e v e l s o f p r i v a c y pt hr o r ovui gdhe sc l oas iw n ga rom r om p eant ienrgi at hl ep caul ret ta ti ne s .

suitable for the living units. Units as formed as a pitched roof shape to reflect correspondingly with the exterior steel framework.

Co-Housing Units Double Height Open Space Green Space

Co-Living Units are located on first level, with the bedrooms and bathrooms formed within timber fabricated rooms. Living spaces are open and connected to the overall building.

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Private Makery/ Fashion Studio on ground level, enclosed by a lightweight steel framework. This creates a space that is open and lightweight, which is suitable for the needs of designers. Langdon Park

ral space, the central courtdes of the surrounding units.

Structure 1

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Private Makery/ Open Fashion Studio Double Height Open Space Green Space

1. Construct the internal first living units as a seperate layer from the outer structural steel framework.

3 . Two s e p a rate st r u c t u re s n ow m e rge i nto a b u i l d i n g .

2. Insert the first level living units into the structural steel framework. Initial Development plan of the overall spatial arrangement

Initial key space design model indicating spatial relationship, main access,

Bright Street

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:100 Final design model demonstrating potential lighting condition 01-06 / Shu-Mig Hung S03, ‘The Maker’s House’. A community of makers’ homes and studios conceived as a city within the city, with its own streets, squares, gardens, housing and work-spaces. A series of live work units are designed for both individuals and young families with workshops and studios at ground level and residential accommodation above.

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dense and smaller in scale, aces are formed.

Each unit is carefully arranged in relation to its neighbours in order to create shared spaces, allow overlooking, foster collaboration and encourage the cross fertilisation of ideas. Byron Street

Pitched roof allows more natural lighting into the interior space from above, this is an efficient and cost-effective method that works better than normal daylighting from windows. In this

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Architecture does not sit in isolation – it is contingent upon a set of relationships within contexts and cultures. Shumi Bose Contextual Studies Co-ordinator


Introduction

Contextual Studies

Contextual Studies

Shumi Bose Contextual Studies Co-ordinator

Co-ordinator Shumi Bose Stage 1 & 2 Tutors Shumi Bose Francesca Dell’Aglio Konstantinos Kizis Sabrina Puddu Alex Warnock-Smith Francesco Zuddas

Guests Mike Althorpe Richard Wentworth Tom Wilkinson

Contextual Studies is interested in revealing the concepts and strategies behind the appearances, understanding design as the product of complex systems of relations between different cultural layers. These systems are tightly connected to broader societal and planetary issues, and our dependence upon mechanisms of exchange that condition the conception and production, experience and understanding of design. This strand of the course supports students in exploring the ways in which we derive meaning in and from architecture. Through a thematic exploration of history and theory, students consider the contextual forces that shape architecture as the product of a specific zeitgeist, from the past to the present. Yet Contextual Studies is not simply a didactic study of the historical past; rather it aims to provide students with the intellectual equipment, research skills and analytical tools to understand the relations between cultural, social and political contexts, and architectural production. During the first year, students are introduced to key historical eras, concepts and themes, from the origins of civilisation, through Classical antiquity, the emergence of the architect as a professional figure, to the concerns of industrialisation. This is accomplished through a programme of wide-ranging thematic lectures in the first term, and a strong focus on the rich context of London in the second term, explored through series of guided walks, exhibition visits, seminars and film screenings. Students are encouraged to develop primary observation, secondary research, visual presentation methods, academic writing and verbal debating skills. The second year of Contextual Studies sees a definite focus on the 20th and 21st century discourses in architecture, that is to say, the theoretical and social paradigms which continue to shape the world around us today. An intensive programme of lectures presents canonical buildings and figures from 1850 to the present day, as well as radical, speculative and theoretical developments. Buildings, publications, artworks and other manifestations of architectural production are recognised as vital components to a broad interrogation of disciplinary discourse. Students also engage in close-looking historiographical studies of a range of critical texts, in conjunction with specifically relevant architectural projects, thus developing confidence in discussing complex theoretical positions.

Lectures and debates allow the cohort to critically assess buildings in light of the disciplinary and cultural discourse around them, analysing, comparing and challenging historical narratives, particularly in written form. Beyond historical fact, Contextual Studies sessions are concerned with the propositions around architectural narratives and polemics: who makes these, what and how are their agendas set forth, and what analytical tools can we use to address their impact on practice today? The third and final year of the course gives each student the opportunity to crystallise and aspect of theoretical and critical research, in the form of a substantial written dissertation.The dissertation allows students to stake a position as a practitioner: demonstrating thorough research, interrogating history and theory, contributing original analyses and culminating in the production of an object of unique and individual pride.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Dissertation Tutors Allan Atlee Eleni Axioti Shumi Bose Oscar Brito Tom Dyckhoff Sabrina Puddu Alex Warnock-Smith

Architecture does not exist in isolation – it is contingent upon a set of relationships within contexts and cultures. Regardless of scale or period, architecture has an indissoluble relation with the culture in which it is produced, and this implies a relation with politics, sociology, philosophy, economics and technology, which may be more or less explicit.

Key to the success of each dissertation is the identification of an astute and compelling research question: these are neither exhaustive narratives nor indulgent polemics, rather they aspire to be academically rigorous contributions to contemporary and forward looking architectural discourse. Self-selected by the individual students and guided by a specialised team of dissertation tutors, topics include an exciting and urgent range of spatial concerns, across various global, political, cultural, socio-economic and aesthetic contexts of architectural production. From intuitive and impassioned beginnings, final year students will progress through the development of theoretical frameworks, historical studies and the selection of visual and supporting materials, to articulate their arguments and to present them as a structured, well designed, formatted and rigorous piece of writing. As the climax of undergraduate studies in architecture, it is deeply satisfying to see students produce a spectrum of architectural dissertations which represent the emergence of highly individual, confident new voices and positions, across a future cohort of spatial practitioners, makers and thinkers. The questions they raise and explore are, at their best, thoughtful, provocative, sincere and exciting contributions to contemporary architectural discourse.

Across the first and second year, thematic connections are identified across time and space. Though the syllabus is broadly chronological, students debate the various tensions and disjunctions between styles, movements and polemics, using thematic, formal and material concerns are used to slice through time. 184

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Architectural dissertations 2017-18


Dissertation

Alex Warnock-Smith

Allan Atlee

Dissertation Supervisor

Dissertation Supervisor

Contextual Studies – Dissertation

Dissertation

Adrian Peng He Residential burglary and the civic-spatial configuration: an investigation

Taekun Cho The diversity of contemporary architecture

Shijia Huang How can residential architecture foster a sense of belonging?

Belis Memik Urban planning in Istanbul: local definitions of neoliberalism and alternatives for the future

Daisy Lyu How would a centralised model allow for a more equitable growth of Beijing?

Emily Lok Y See How could Hong Kong continue its development using mixed use strategies? Dahlia Subasi Ageing in the city Zixin Yao Co-Living systems

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Jennifer Nibbs Rethinking transparency

Sky Moore-Clube Out of Context: 1:1 scale architectural preservation in the city Sersah Kombos What can contemporary city design learn from the Ghost City phenomenon Riichiro Yamamoto A wall between Human and Nature Dahye Yi From children: Architecture in Denmark Rafaela Zincone Albieri A tool to design the self

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Dissertation

Eleni Axioti

Oscar Brito

Dissertation Supervisor

Dissertation Supervisor

Contextual Studies – Dissertation

Contextual Studies – Dissertation

Dissertation

Valentina Antollini The influence of computational processes on decision making in architectural design

Ziyang Dong What are the values of remaining Hutong districts in contemporary Beijing?

Sarah Aulombard Forensic Architecture: from destruction to reconstruction – an archaeology of the present

Roya Edde Ruins, root shock and genius loci in post-conflict cities Rafael Garcia Turegano Cities by people, for people Alexia Iborra Wicksteed A broken dream, new possibilities

Filippos Georgeoglou The spirit of Cycladic vernacular architecture

Alba Imeri Cultural resilience in the city: reinventing a city of conflict and hope

Marie Le Rouzic Living Architecture

Zeena Jamil Planning coexistence

Keun Lee Changing Architecture: the fourth industrial revolution and the impacts of Artificial Intelligence in the architectural field

Shutong Lin Community resilience in Seven Sisters Mariam Madi Does the Israeli occupation of Palestine use architecture as a political weapon of colonisation?

Belen Toker Beauty Machine

Maria Papadimitriou Participatory architecture and social resilience

Ash Zul Parquear Power Struggle

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Tanit Cabau Wolf Vernacular Architecture and the Balearic Islands: a reflection, a thesis, a claim, an analysis

Dissertations

Dissertations

Photo of dissertations

Photo of dissertations

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Dissertation

Sabrina Puddu

Shumi Bose

Dissertation Supervisor

Dissertation Supervisor

Dalia Amellal New social condensers Roxane Baillet How not to kill your chess partner with an ice axe Cinla Deger Fluctuated by Politics Ophelie Prevesianos The Grand Paris: Spectacle or reality

Jiesoo Shin The impact of Parametricism on the environment Vivian Zhao The obsolescence of Carchitecture

Fern Burintaragoht Selective Memory: future possibilities for urban reconstruction in the contemporary city Orange Ziwei Cheng Castle of dreams: the authenticity and purpose of fantasy architecture Niall Coleman High Rise: the only problem? Isabella Hadid Domingo Permeable boundaries: an analytical framework of life within the São Paulo peripheries

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Taro Sakamoto Adaptive architecture: How we could relate to the world we live in

Contextual Studies – Dissertation

Contextual Studies – Dissertation

Dissertation

Roshna Hassan Reflections on high rises: thestigma surrounding high-rise towers Shu Ming (Annie) Hung An investigation on the role and impace of culture-led urban regeneration in Bilbao, London and Taipei John Moran The urban countryside & the rural city Chris Wall Hayes The British and Architecture: a study of national identity and architecture in Britain 1951–1909

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Dissertation

Contextual Studies – Dissertation

Contextual Studies – Dissertation

Dissertation Tom Dyckhoff Dissertation Supervisor

Sooyoung Bae Socio cultural spaces of gentrification: a reading of urban revitalisation in London Sean Brown Architecture of monstrous men Brenda Chang Sense in a quality of life

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Xiang Ding The ritual space of Jewish communities John Langran Architecture in concert Louis Lupien Are great streets romantic streets? Amar Sall Visions of the future in Blade Runner Qinxue Christina Wang Art museums in the late 20th century: mediating the connection between art and its audience

Dissertations Photo of dissertations

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Introduction

Technical Studies

Technical Studies

Adrian Robinson Technical Studies co-ordinator

Co-ordinator Adrian Robinson Stage 1 Tutors Ruth Chislett Nick Francis Ciaran Malik Honore van Rijswijk Ajay Shah Oliver Stross Ashley Thomas Stephan WassermannFry

Technical Studies in Stage 1 is comprised of two major assignments. A case study component allows for primary observation of existing structures in London, enhancing analytical skills, building familiarity with the core principles of building technologies and promoting an understanding of the successful integration of best design principles. Students are asked to determine the rationale behind building form, site location, use of materials and construction arrangements.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 2 & 3 Tutors Jeffrey Blaylock Matthew Duckett Orla Kelly David Knight Lottie McCarthy Michela Mangiarotti Greg Nordberg Grace Richardson

Technical Studies operates a dedicated unit of study across all stages, while also integrating closely within all aspects of learning, including studio and contextual work. A focussed, progressive curriculum across three years provides students with a deep insight into the qualities of human environment and material culture. A combination of lectures, practical seminars and workshops allows for a guided and dedicated study of materials, structural behaviours, environmental analyses and construction detailing as part of a substantial grounding in architectural technologies.

This is followed by a detailed technical site analysis which is first developed through contextual studies and making exercises, integrating theoretical and practical knowledge. Students produce a report on sites selected in the locality of Kings Cross, addressing solar orientation, sound and wind profile and micro-climatic effects. This is followed by an analysis of the material context, environmental strategies and construction modelling of their situated design proposals. Students in Stage 2 develop a strong sense of integration of technical studies within their design work. Looking at structural and material technologies across a set of cultural contexts, students carry out precedent studies combined with 3D visualisations, before developing detailed individual site analyses for their own projects. The site analyses involve an investigation of tectonic and environmental factors through a phased sequence of activities: initial analysis, hierarchy and integration. The final technical designs are refined through a 1:50 sectional model to show the constructional development. Detailed and specialised drawings are used to demonstrate structural behaviour and environmental performance. The main focus of Stage 3 studies is a technical thesis where the students develop a theoretical perspective on a technical subject, related to specific areas of interest in their design project. Students begin with explorative research, which is refined into a hypothesis. Such explorations encourage students in developing critical positions for their design work in relation to materials, tectonic form and environmental control. The students are encouraged to be explicit in their research methodologies so that can clearly articulate an iterative, research-led design processes. Alongside dedicated lectures, studio teaching also instigates a strong lead for and integration of technology. This produces design proposals with a depth of thinking and improved clarity in their technical resolution, allowing materials, tectonics and environmental systems to relate more closely to the overriding social agendas in their designs.

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Name S03, ‘Title’

Minh D. Le Pham S02, ‘Pleating - the forgotten trade’ 197


Technical Studies

Technical Studies 02

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02-09 / John Moran S03, ‘A Community Without Doors’.

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Technical Studies

3.1 MATERIAL STRATEGY 3.1.1. ANNOTATED DRAWINGS

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03, 04 / Laura-Larissa Dumitru S02, ‘Metamorphosis of Urban. Decay’. 05 / Jerry Florez Vasquez S02, ‘The Flea Market’.

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Understanding in particular the roof’s structure through model making

Sway frame diagram. Stablising the stilted building with a sway frame

TECHNICAL STUDIIES

Technical Studies

Technical Studies 01

PART 3: TECHNICAL STRATEGIES material strategy

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Morgane Sha’ban S03, Taxonomy of sectional model


Professional Practice

Professional Introduction Practice Gregory Ross Professional Practice Co-ordinator

Co-ordinator Gregory Ross Stage 1 Tutor Stuart McKenzie Stage 2 Tutor Gregory Ross Stage 3 Tutor Gregory Ross

Stage 1 Professional Practice is an introduction to the profession of architecture. Students begin this unit by asking what it means to be a professional, discussing concepts such as the role and agency of the architect. Students are also introduced to more specific professional concepts such as codes of conduct and duties of care, creating individual codes based on their personal experiences. In Stage 2, students examine the professional landscape in more detail including an analysis of the regulatory context – the planning process, Building Regulations, health & safety – as well as learning about professional organisational structures. The dialogue between the profession and studio work is maintained and students develop an understanding of ethics, conduct and professional standards in more detail. Relevant concepts are applied and further queried through design work; this evidenced in the submission of a comprehensive professional report that accompanies their studio output. In Stage 3, students begin to plan for a future in practice developing and refining their previous understanding, further adopting an individual position as a designer and further synthesising this critical position with their creative process and outputs. Students apply learning to both academic work and their emerging professional profiles. The RIBA Mentoring Programme is an important feature of the final year, providing students with the opportunity to shadow an architect in a London-based practice. This introduces students to the professional contexts they are likely to encounter on their year out, encouraging them to build relationships and a vision for their professional development following graduation. A warm and sincere thank you, from students and faculty alike, to all the practices to have accommodated and supported our students in their journey. Critical Practice: Architecture and Professional Experience This year, we are launching a part-time year out course, which is designed as a bridge between BA Architecture (RIBA Part I) and M:ARCH Architecture (RIBA Part II). The course provides Part I graduates with a Professional Studies Advisor to validate Professional Education and Development Records. The course also consists of a short series of evening lectures, which will help students contextualise their experience by looking at the creative and regulatory processes of the architectural profession, examining the circumstances in which architectural projects are created and developed in terms of practical, legal and ethical challenges.

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

RIBA Mentoring Practices 2017-18 AD Architects, AHMM, Avanti Architects, Bennetts Associates, Carl Turner Architects, Donald Insall Architects, East Architects, Founded Studio, Grimshaw, Haverstock Associates LLP, John McAslan and Partners, Lipton Plant Architects, MAE, Penoyre & Prasad, Pollard Thomas Edwards, Rick Mathers, Sanya Polescuk Architects, Simpson Haugh, Studio RHE, van Heyningen and Haward Architects, Waugh Thistleton, Woods Bagot

We treat all of our BA students as spatial practitioners from their first day. Accordingly, Professional Practice is a space for students to reflect upon their own studio output whilst developing a parallel understanding of the professional landscape.Students call upon the CSM Spatial Practice Manifesto - which sets out the spatial, social and political agendas of the overall programme – as a flexible framework. around which they make formative investigations beyond the traditional boundaries of the profession. Our students engage critically with the manifesto, questioning the norms of the existing architectural and spatial practice and going on to contribute to the profession in diverse ways. Collaborative work is integrated across our curricular activity: in everyday studio activity, in explicitly collaborative projects such as Making Week, as well as through extra-curricular Live Projects. Professional practice activities call on students to consciously reflect on and further develop their collaborative working practices both within and beyond traditional disciplinary limits.

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“Train us to practical power, make us great builders and adventurous experimenters.� RIBA Journal Vol 24, 1916 p256 Cited in Rubens G (1986) William Richard Lethaby, The Architectural Press


Making Week 2018mm

Making Week

Making Week

Gregory Ross Making Week Co-ordinator

Co-ordinator Gregory Ross Guest Makers Andrew Friend, Carlotta Novella, Jeffery Lambert, Juan Montero, Benjamin Perrot Studio 1 Tutors Ashley Fridd, Gregory Ross Studio 2 Tutors Oscar Brito, Clio Capelle

Studio 4 Tutors Mo Woonyin Wong, Christopher Thorn Studio 5 Tutors Adam Nathaniel Furman, Julika Gittner Studio 6 Tutors David Chambers, Kevin Haley Studio 7 Tutors Orsalia Dimitriou, Dejan Mrdja Studio 8 Tutors Daniel Marmot, Anthony Staples Making Week Blog Dalia Amellal at www.makingweek. myblog.arts.ac.uk Thank you: Alex Warnock Smith for his support and a good critical eye; Dr. Mel Dodd, and the Spatial Practices Programme for financial, material and general support; Pete Smithson and his team in 3D Large workshops, specifically Mark Laban and Savvas Papasavva for CNC support with 1:1 modelling & fabrication; William Dickinson and all in the Digital Fabrication Bureau for great support with 1:6 and 1:15 scale modelling; Karina Lee for excellent administrative and pastoral support. 212

Second and third year BA Architecture students, working in their vertical design studios, were asked to design and make prototypes for a single pavilion to house all the design studios for the Degree Show – as well as a system of for the display of work, tailored for each studio space. In keeping with the design approach for Making Week, students started the week working from the detail, modelling a constructional joint at 1:1 scale, and then working up to 1:6 or 1:15. Students were also challenged to work within certain constraints, from material to technical and environmental. All structures were designed and built in sustainable softwood ply, using timber connections wherever possible and considering an easy, glue-free system of assembly and disassembly. Digital fabrication was kept to an intelligent minimum, as well as general machine time, energy use and waste. Re-use, transportation (sizes being restricted to fit a standard van) and storage were also key considerations in evaluating each proposed design.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Studio 3 Tutors Sylvie Taher, Inigo Minns

Making Week is an intensive, immersive and celebratory event in the middle of the academic calendar: a hands-on, 1:1 scale collaborative design and making project involving MA and BA Architecture students across all years in the Spatial Practices programme.

Fabrication was hybridised such that digital tools were used for complicated and repetitive elements, demanding a higher degree of accuracy whereas traditional analogue carpentry techniques could be used for larger elements. Relative values of skills and technology are contrasted and evaluated through practical experience. The eight design studios work with guest tutors and instructors, designing and making in the north end of the College’s internal ‘street’ and in the 3D Large workshops. Making Week is a highly collaborative, demanding and visible exercise, an almost carnivalesque event which on the final day culminates in a street full of large-scale architectural fragments, a review, a party, and four-day exhibition of the work produced.

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Making Week

Making Week

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Making Week S02 & S03, The eight studios work with guest makers – designing and making in the north end of the College’s internal street. 214

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Making Week

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Making Week S02 & S03, Students showcase their constructional joints.

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Making Week Stage 1

Making Week

Making Week

Ruth Lang, Amanda Hopkins, Andrew Sides Stage 1 Leaders

Co-ordinators Ruth Lang Amanda Hopkins Andrew Sides Collaborators Sam Trice Lyndon Jones Benjamin Perrot Honore Van Rijswijk Ashley Thomas

As a transitional junction in the middle of the academic calendar, Making Week in Stage One provides students with an opportunity to translate, in collaboration with industry practitioners, the more academic site readings, mappings and surveys undertaken in studio through the application and development their practical and workshop skills. In one intensively focused, hands-on week, the understanding of the constructional reality of a series of sites around Kings Cross – which also provide the location for design projects that term – is translated into a series of large scale sectional models, from which to explore propositional designs and relationship to context. Calling upon newly acquired skills exploring the potential of the workshop facilities available at Central Saint Martins, the process questions the world we see around us, how we might best explore and represent it, and what techniques are most applicable to the purpose. BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

The research, design and construction process is developed through exploring considerations of coordination, collaboration, communication, project programming, efficient consultation, and presentation, in much the same manner as would be undertaken in the environment of a professional practice. Making at scale not only enables the creation of some spectacular design tools, but also pushes beyond the surface to provide a greater depth of understanding to the physical world at large.

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Making Week

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BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Making Week S01, The research, design and construction process is developed through exploring considerations of coordination, communication, efficient consultation, and presentation. 220

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Making Week

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Making Week S01, Students translate the constructional reality of a series of sites into large scale sectional models, from which they then explore propositional designs and relationships to context. 222

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What began as an academic project for students of Central Saint Martins’ Spatial Practices Programme has been realised as a civic space in the heart of central Croydon. Croydon’s College Square One of the outcomes of “Transient Assemblies”, a curricular project developed by Stage 3 during the academic year 2016-17.


Introduction

Live Projects – LVMH

Live Projects

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

The academic environment nurtures students and provides a safe space within which to explore and test creative freedoms. However, in preparation for the professional sphere of employment, students on BA (Hons) Architecture are often given the opportunity to participate in Live Projects. Live and Sponsored projects arise from collaborations and partnerships which Central Saint Martins and the University of the Arts London (UAL) is able to negotiate with commercial and industrial partners, many of whom approach the college in the hope of working with some of the most exciting young creative minds on innovative and creative solutions to real life problems and ongoing projects. Such collaborations can yield programmes that are presented to students either through curriculum briefs – worked out in the studio, and intended for the full cohort – or through extra-curricular projects, run on weeknight evenings and outside of programmed hours. Projects range from the production of research for charitable organisations, to designing new retail experiences for food or fashion brands. Live Projects, then, give students a varied range of unique opportunities to apply their ideas and skills – largely confined within the academic realm to scale models and speculations – to existing, real-world design problems with genuine commercial clients. They are exposed to industry expertise, protocols and challenges; they receive expert feedback which differs vastly to that given by tutors and fellow practitioners; they experience at least some of the constraints of the professional realm: live projects may include concerns around absolute timeframes and budgets, client-facing exchanges and not least, a sense of responsibility in balancing the obligations of live projects against the priorities of academic studies. During the year 2017-18, students on BA (Hons) Architecture have worked with Croydon Council, Space10, LATRA and Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy (LVMH); previous collaborators and clients include Bouygues, Bloomberg, Crisis, Google, Camden Council and Sephora, among many others.

CSM + Space10, photo by Rory Gardiner 226

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kick-start (c3) 09:30

fruit and vegetable market

Space 10

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Live Projects – SPACE 10

Live Projects

youth centre learning exchange (c1) lecture series: preserving cultural heritages

community garden peer-to-peer (c2) 16:00

the guest house street party

garden maintenance workshop

19:30

Tutors Alex Warnock-Smith Jona Piehl Tom Dobson Andrew Belfield Group 1: Subscription Neighbourhood Josh Mallins (MA Architecture) Ivy Wong (BA Architecture) Junlan Zhang (MA Narrative Environments) Orange Cheng (BA Architecture)

Group 3: Guest House Holly Le Var (BA Architecture) Janila Castañeda (MA Narrative Environments) Mark Freeman (MA Architecture) Rafael García (BA Architecture)

Through a team-based approach, students got crucial insight into current housing issues affecting Londoners and first-hand experience of drawing on the multi-disciplinary skillset required when working with real clients. Additionally, each team was required to perform and then draw upon situated social research to understand the needs of young people in Forest Gate. Mixed teams of students and Spatial Practices staff worked together to investigate and propose a range of concepts for the site, adjacent to a new Crossrail station. Each scheme was chosen to represent a typical peripheral neighbourhood offering the potential for affordable co-living; the project culminated in an exhibition of design proposals held in December 2017. The project, with its relatable and urgent concerns, had much resonance with several studio briefs, while the friction of a real client and critical comments from industry professionals provided valuable real-world testing for the students’ innovative design strategies.

welcome to forest gate!

today: film club screening (c1) imparted by magnolia

youth center (c1)

community garden (c2)

street market (c3)

lecture series: preserving cultural heritages imparted by magnolia

textiles workshop imparted by jamie

arts trail led by magnolia

book club led by amanda

beginners garden workshop imparted by magnolia

film club led by jamie

mosaic workshop led by rob

18:30 l youth center

this week:

mon-fri l 18:30

wed l 16:00

thu l 20:00

sat l 11:30

wed l 16:00

sat-sun l 12:00-13:00

community market by the guest house sun l 10:00-14:00

crafts market by the guest house

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fri l 14:00

thu l 16:00

CommunicARe help us find morris

magnolia’s cat is missing since last week.

anyone looking for a babysitter? + info here

CommunicARe

join our christmas market!

food, crafts, and live music!

Beth, Forest Gate.

the pod

the notice board

Here is where the guest house model expands into the wider community. Promoting an incentive for people to engage, weekly/monthly activities and event schedule will be displayed in the form of a facade. This way, a network is formed at a greater scale and partnerships are made between those that would not otherwise meet.

Every symbolic human accomplishment is the result of people working together. With the possibility of being placed in locations around the community, the pod consists of three spatial components (c): learning exchange, peer-to-peer and kick-start. These can be used simultaneously or in isolation. What the users chose to do with these tools, wholly depends on the demand. “..Yeah, the past four months have been great, seeing friendly faces every morning brightens my day..”

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Kei, Shanghai.

c1: learning exchange

c2: peer-to-peer

c3: kick-start

The accessibility of resources and knowledge mitigates feelings of alienation from the existing communities. Knowledge is then able to be passed on casting an even larger network through activities like local night classes, guest-run lecture series, a mentorship curriculum, film and reading clubs.

The act of making creates ownership and worth whilst providing a skill. The peer-to-peer locally run workshops will help create and recover a sense of place between the existing and incoming population. The activities will be designed to answer upcoming community needs and could include gardening, ceramics and wood-work.

Components (c) 1 and 2 are translated into a strategy for expansion and income. Food an arts markets, business and entrepreneurship programmes exhibitions may occur as a resu knowledge and making, answer to other people's needs outsid the community.

“...it’s amazing seeing how other cultures come and shake up our daily routines..”

“I love that we get to see each other every day... shall we go to the concert at the Circle later?

“..Yeah I’m really enjoying it here, seeing friendly faces every morning brightens my day, and it’s amazing seeing how other cultures come and shake up our daily routines..”

“Is it warm there?… I love that we get to see each-other every day now, even for a five minute chat, you know?...

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Live is a shared living space for Communicare/Forest

Gate residents to enhance social experiences – in which

Live -

the AR/Communicare residents from around the world can enjoy their daily routines from breakfast to yoga, reading

Communicare/Forest Gate residents share living spaces to enhance social

experiences – in which the AR/Communicare residents from around the world can enjoy

and more. This scenario imagines a group of residents

their daily routines from breakfast to yoga, reading and more. This scenario imagines a

casting a yoga session in the mountains with a top yoga

group of residents casting a yoga session in the mountains with a top yoga instructor,

instructor, while Jake spends time with his girlfriend

while Jake spends time with his girlfriend through AR. We also see two residents con-

through AR. We also see two residents conversing from the Live space to one of their bedrooms. Residents have

Communicare/Forestgate

constant opportunities for social interaction with one

Group 4: Off-Grid Neighbourhood Deheng Liu (MA Narrative Environments) Leonie Dong (BA Architecture) Marta Escribano (BA Architecture) Dominika Pilch (BA Architecture)

Jake, Forest Gate.

and AR/Communicare

another, through real world lenses and AR.

versing from the Live space to one of their bedrooms, - Residents have constant opporEntertain Together Dine Together tunities for social interaction with one another, through real world lenses and AR.

Residents

Group 5: CommunicARe Jennifer Nibbs (BA Architecture) Morgane Sha’ban (BA Architecture) Kara Andarini (MA Narrative Environments)

05

04

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01, 02, 03 / Space 10 Student group work. 04, 05 / Photos by Rory Gardiner Students present and exhibit their work at Central Saint Martins. 229

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Group 2: Network Living John Moran (BA Architecture) Christian Richards (MA Architecture) Yibeija Li (BA Architecture) Zhe Wang (MA Narrative Environments)

Space10 is the external futures laboratory exponent of IKEA, the large Scandinavian home and lifestyle brand. The 2017–18 live project collaboration between Space10 and CSM sought to examine the growing phenomenon of co-living, in response to the challenges, changes and pressure to contemporary domestic life. A collaboration between undergraduate and Masters students, the project demanded the design of five innovative, experimental co-living scenarios for young people set within the context of Forest Gate in East London. The wider goal of the project was to solicit research thinking and designs that could deliver a meaningfully better and more sustainable way of living.


Design For Peace

Find out more: www.latra.gr www.design4peace.org

Established by LATRA, an innovation studio specializing in circular design, environmental engineering and big-data digital applications for the humanitarian sector, DESIGN FOR PEACE is a series of international knowledge intensive events, which explore how innovation, technology and entrepreneurship, can create socially impactful solutions that succeed in addressing global humanitarian and environmental challenges.

facebook: designpeace instagram: design_for_peace

Live Projects – ATRA

Live Projects

The DESIGN FOR PEACE Humanitarian Summit involved a series of key-note presentations interspersed with panel discussions, from the world’s most prominent humanitarian, social innovators, entrepreneurs, design pioneers and global makers including Techfugees, Save The Children, British Red Cross, ARUP, LATRA, WAAG Society, Makers Unite, STBY, Urban Projects Bureau and many more. BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

The Summit was followed by a two day Hackathon dedicated to representatives from the Creative Industries coming up with solutions on creative humanitarian challenges we have identified. Speakers: Alex Glennie (Principal Researcher, Nesta) Josephine Goube (Ceo, Techfugees) Jago Boase (Shelter Technical Advisor, Save The Children) Radmila Fortune West (Refugee Support Restoring Family Links Development And Fundraising Advisor British Red Cross) Charlot Boonekamp (Archipreneur, Better Future Factory) Oscar Brito-Gonzalez (Senior Lecturer, Central Saint Martins) Marcin Dawydzik (Structural Engineer, Ramboll) Daphne Stylianou (Design Researcher, Stby) Kathleen Aberson (Creative Director, Het Proces) Dr Maria Faraone (Oaa Humanitarian Architect, Oxford Brookes University) Alex Warnock Smith (Founder & Director, Urban Projects Bureau) Gaspard Bos (Founder, New State Of Matter) Dr Natalia Paszkiewicz (Post Doctoral Research Associate, University Of Bath) Anne Kooiman (Lecturer Social Work Education Program, University Applied Sciences Rotterdam) Thami Schweichler (Co-Founder & Director, Makers Unite) Dr Nadia Fayidh Mohammed (Independent Researcher, Specialized In The Mena Region) Charlie Frazer (Director, The Entrepreneurial Refugee Network) Iwanna Swart (Curriculum Manager, Aflatoun International) Andy Kyriakides (Digital Development, International Alert) Karien Vermeulen (Head Of Programme, Waag Society) Julia Smith (Research Fellow, Lse Cities) Aris Papadopoulos (Founder & Director Of Innovation, L A T R A) Felicitas Zu Dohna (Foresight Analyst, Arup Foresight, Research And Innovation)

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CSM x LVMH’s Future LIFE

Tutors Bethany Shepherd Greg Ross David Chambers

Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy (LVMH) is one of the world’s largest fashion and lifestyle conglomerates, responsible for some of the most recognisable contemporary brands, and a substantial supporter of Central Saint Martins. This collaboration, involving students from Spatial Practices alongside students from the school of fashion, marked 25 years of the brand’s LIFE (LVMH Initiatives for the Environment) programme. The project comprised a challenging and high profile opportunity for the installation of an eco-designed art installation, intended to provide the scenographic backdrop for a week-long showcase at the organisation’s headquarters in Paris.

MA Narrative Environments Students Annisa Lazuardini Erica Jensen Maithilee Surawanshi Rhiannon Williams Concetta Reuss Gwen van den Bout Evegenia Boguslavska Norbert Schwab Eve Chokechalermwat Pauline Chiang

The key criteria for the final design of the installation centred on making a positive environmental impact – reflected through the choice of materials, processes involved in the production of the installation and its ability to be recycled after the show. BA Hons Architecture students worked alongside students from Narrative Environments and post graduate architecture courses through a series of competitive charrettes. Working in teams, students had not only to keep the organisation’s core values at the heart of the design elements, but also develop and apply a range of practical and project-management skills at the highest and most professional level.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA Architecture Students Roya Edde Zeena Jamil Sky Moore-Clube Chris Wall-Hayes Amar Sall Dalia Amellal Dahlia Subasi John Moran Tanit Cabau-Wolf Louis Lupien Rafaela Zincone Albieri Jennifer Nibbs

Live Projects – LVMH

Live Projects

The winning design ‘Goutez la solution’ proposed an installation that would allow LVMH visitors and guests to taste, touch, smell, view and learn more about the ongoing LIFE programme.

MA Architecture Sebastian Benson Michael Kennedy Hanelore Dumitrache Lena Iltcheva

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Croydon’s College Square

Project Direction Oscar Brito (Central Saint Martins)

Croydon’s College Square is a one of the outcomes of “Transient Assemblies”, a curricular project developed by Stage 3 during the academic year 2016-17. We have been working in collaboration with Croydon Council’s Spatial Planning team to design and deliver the College Square Meanwhile Space. What began as an academic project for students of Central Saint Martins’ Spatial Practices Programme has been realised as a civic space in the heart of central Croydon.

Anisha Jogani Matthew Rust Akil Scafe-Smith (Croydon Council’s Spatial Planning Team) Design Team Eleanor Johnson Fiona Hartley Mina Fouladi Olivia Sutherhill

Live Projects – CROYDON

Live Projects

Croydon’s College Square is a design proposal for meanwhile interventions in the public space aimed to foster placemaking processes by enabling and promoting social and cultural actions. The design proposal consists of a combination of arched thresholds holding a set of plywood volumes that may be arranged in multiple ways in a public space, working as urban furniture and as props for small spontaneous or organised events. BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

The site for the Croydon’s College Square intervention is at the pedestrianised passage linking George Street and College Road in front of the main entrance to the Croydon College. The site is a recognised as a primary active, public route from George Street into the future cultural quarter in the Fairfield Masterplan – the meanwhile intervention here is crucial in laying the foundations for this as an important and productive space in the masterplan area and encourage changes in the current patterns of behaviour is this near stagnant space. It must also work to create a strong visual link to East Croydon Station in an effort to increase use of the space. Croydon’s College Square has been designed by RIBA Part 1 graduates of BA Architecture at CSM Spatial Practices Programme: Ellie Fox Johnson and Fiona Hartley, Mina Fouladi and Olivia Sutherill, co-ordinated by Stage 3 Leader Oscar Brito.

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CSM + Space10, photo by Rory Gardiner


Public Lectures

Host Spatial Practices, Central Saint Martins

Throughout the year at Central Saint Martins, the intensive programme of academic learning and exciting professional collaborations are supplemented by intellectual and discursive programmes, including a series of programmatic lectures in the first term of the academic year. In 2017-18, the Spatial Practices Programme responded to Head of College Jeremy Till’s Creative Unions ‘Call to Action’.

Find out more at: http://www.arts.ac.uk/ csm/courses/ourprogrammes/spatialpractices-programme/ lecture-series-/

Creative Unions is an initiative of Central Saint Martins and the other Colleges of University of the Arts London, bringing together events, actions, and voices to demonstrate that creativity must continue to know no boundaries in order to play a role in the current political landscape, and that it must operate across borders – geographical, social and disciplinary. As such, the lecture series included a number of international speakers and luminary figures, each pushing to understand and address social, humanitarian and cultural boundaries through their design practice. Markus Bader, cofounder of the Berlin-based work and action collective Raumlabor kicked off the series, as the programme’s Practitioner in Residence for the academic year. A talk from Territorial Agency, a research cell led by John Palmesino and Ann-Sofi Ronnskog, brought territorial and planetary scale to the fore, with their projects on sustainable transformations at a geological level. The Hamburg-based artist Christoph Schafer’s unusual drawings, interventions and initiatives spoke to the idea of collective desires – a notion also addressed in Tom Corden’s presentation of Utopia London, a touching film looking at the idealistic and aspirational social housing projects of yesteryear, particularly relevant in the context of the current housing crisis. Alison Killing of Killing Architects and Grainne Hassett, of Hassett Ducatez, were both invited to discuss their work on migration and refugee predicaments; finally, Venezuelan architect Alejandro Haiek discussed his work on post-catastrophe and other degraded landscapes.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Guest Speakers Markus Bader (raumlabor) John Palmesino & Ann-Sofi Ronnskog (Territorial Agency) Christoph Schafer (Fabric / PlanBude / Park Fiction) Grainne Hassett (Hassett Ducatez Architects) Alison Killing (Killing Architects) Tom Cordell (Director ‘Utopia London’)

Public Lectures

Public Lectures

In this way, the discussions entering, stimulating and animating the school community and especially the students of BA (Hons) Architecture remain radically engaged: immersed in urgent, optimistic and crucial issues facing culture and society at large today, and informed by the very brightest and most exciting practitioners in the expanding field of architectural and spatial practice.

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FUNDAMENTALS

Chaired by Oliver Wainwright

FUNDAMENTALS is a debate and lecture series focussing on the profession – expanded and contested – of architecture. Chaired and developed in collaboration with Oliver Wainwright, architecture critic for The Guardian newspaper, these events are explicitly public and seek to expose multiple viewpoints on major issues affecting the built environment and related activities, and to invigorate discussions within the college with the benefit of broader critical perspectives. Having begun in 2017 by looking outwards, interrogating the larger forces that shape our cities, this 2018 debate series took a long hard look in the mirror to tackle architecture as a discipline, and a profession, taking the following statement as its polemic incentive:

Find out more at: www.fundamentalslondon.uk

The 2018 Fundamentals series, entitled ‘The Way We Work’, comprised of three panel debates on how we learn, work and build, culminating in a symposium on Labour.

The Way We Work: LEARN

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

‘Architectural education is in crisis, staggering on as an over-long, overpriced indulgence with a tenuous grip on reality. Architectural practice only survives by running an exploited labour force of overworked, underpaid, precariously employed staff, fuelling an industry devoid of the power it once had. The best projects go to the worst practices, with risk-averse procurement systems leading to work being awarded to global conglomerates and safe pairs of hands. The architectural profession is broken at every level – how can we fix it?’

Public Lectures

Public Lectures

The Way We Work: WORK

The Way We Work: LEARN From the rise of live projects and collaborative studios that engage with real development sites, to practice-based models of education that do away with the school all together, how can architectural education evolve to remain relevant? Guests:

Mel Dodd – Central Saint Martins Robert Mull – University of Brighton Deborah Saunt – London School of Architecture Rob Sheil – The Bartlett, UCL

The Way We Work: WORK How can labour practices be reformed to avoid the architect’s exploitation and extinction, or will an unregulated market ultimately correct itself?

Guests:

The Way We Work: BUILD

Peter Morris – Allford Hall Monaghan Morris Harriet Harriss – Royal College of Art Patrik Schumacher – Zaha Hadid Architects Lucy Carmichael – Director of Practice RIBA Architectural Workers – campaign group

The Way We Work: BUILD Is procurement too bureaucratic, risk-averse and a barrier to the best design? Guests: 240

Claire Bennie – Municipal Russell Curtis – RCKa / Project Compass Kay Hughes – Khaa Malcolm Reading – Malcolm Reading Consultants 241


Fundamentals Symposium

Find out more at: www.fundamentalslondon.uk

The Fundamentals Symposium critically investigated architecture, education, and the building industry through the lens of ethical work practices. The symposium was an initiative undertaken in partnership with Escola da Cidade, São Paulo, Brazil, as part of their Counter Conducts initiative, exhibition and publication.

Public Lectures

Public Lectures

Architecture and Capital Is procurement too bureaucratic, risk-averse and a barrier to the best design?

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Guests: Ana Carolina Tonetti – Contra Condutas, Escola de Cidade Ligia Nobre – Contra Condutas, Escola de Cidade Adam Kaasa – Royal College of Art Concrete Action Counter-Conducts A Political Pedagogical Action Book Launch and Drinks Alex Warnock Smith – Chair Architecture’s Labour Force How can labour practices be reformed to avoid the architect’s exploitation and extinction, or will an unregulated market ultimately correct itself? Guests: Kadambari Baxi & Laura Diamond Dixit – Precarious Workers Brigade Shumi Bose – CSM Brendan Cormier – Chair Architects as Workers The work that architects do, whether aesthetic, technical, theoretical, social or administrative is a form of labour, yet rarely framed in this way. Guests:

Peggy Deamer – Architecture Lobby, Yale Reiner de Graaf – OMA Jeremy Till – Head of Central Saint Martins Mel Dodd – Chair

Fundamentals Labour Symposium, Programme 242

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Degree Show Sponsor Knight Frank

Sponsors

Sponsor

The Spatial Practices programme at Central Saint Martins is proud to acknowledge Knight Frank as our Programme Sponsor for the Spatial Practices Degree Show.

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Knight Frank is a global property company which operates across 60 countries and is headquartered in London. Their passion for understanding and supporting the human aspect of property and nurturing future talent in the sector has led to our exciting collaboration and we would like to thank them for their continued support for all three courses within the Spatial Practices Programme: MA Narrative Environments, BA Architecture and M ARCH Architecture/MA Architecture. As part of their sponsorship, we host a student award, the ‘Spatial Practices Prize’ supported by Knight Frank. It is awarded to one outstanding student graduating from each course in the Programme, and will be celebrated at a prize giving ceremony held in the Crossing on 21st June. “We are delighted to acknowledge Knight Frank as the Programme Sponsor for our Degree Shows. We share a fascination for the forces that shape the city around us, and in how we can produce engaging and generous spaces and places for people to live in. Our Spatial Practices Prizes, supported by Knight Frank, reward excellence in our graduates, and we look forward to this year’s celebrations, with students, staff, and our sponsors” – Mel Dodd Programme Director, Spatial Practices “This is a very important collaboration for Knight Frank and we have committed to supporting the programme for the second year running. We have seen that it allows the student to showcase their individual flair and this year has produced some fantastic results. The Spatial Practices Prizes are a token of recognition for the work that has gone into the installations and I hope it will be an experience to remember for all that take part.” – Andrew Groocock Regional Partner, Knight Frank

Degree Show 2017, Knight Frank is supporting the Spatial Practices Degree Show for the second year running. 244

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Dean of Academic Programmes Anne Smith Spatial Practices Programme Dr. Melanie Dodd BA Architecture Course Leader Alex Warnock-Smith Stage 3 Leader Oscar Brito

Stage 1 Leaders Amanda Hopkins Ruth Lang Stuart McKenzie Contextual Studies Co-ordinator Shumi Bose Technical Studies Co-ordinator Adrian Robinson Professional Practice Co-ordinator Gregory Ross Media Practice Co-ordinator Andrew Sides Programme Administrator Karina Lee External Liaison Co-ordinator Siobhan Henderson Publication Co-ordinator Lallu Nykopp

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Contextual Studies Stage 1 & 2 Tutors Shumi Bose Francesca Dell’Aglio Konstantinos Kizis Sabrina Puddu Alex Warnock-Smith Francesco Zuddas Dissertation Tutors Allan Atlee Eleni Axioti Shumi Bose Oscar Brito Tom Dyckhoff Sabrina Puddu Alex Warnock-Smith Technical Studies Stage 1 Tutors Ruth Chislett Nick Francis Ciaran Malik Honore van Rijswijk Ajay Shah Oliver Stross Ashley Thomas Stephan Wassermann-Fry Technical Studies Stage 2 & 3 Tutors Jeffrey Blaylock Matthew Duckett Orla Kelly David Knight Lottie McCarthy Michela Mangiarotti Greg Nordberg Grace Richardson Workshop Support Johnny Wilkinson Ricky Brawn Melvyn Friend Billy Dickinson Pete Smithson Mark Laban

Vertical Studios Studio 1 Gregory Ross Ashley Fridd Studio 2 Oscar Brito Clio Capeille Mikel Azkona Uribe Studio 3 Silvana Taher Inigo Minns Studio 4 Mo Woonying Wong Christopher Thorn Studio 5 Adam Nathaniel Furman Julika Gittner Studio 6 David Chambers Kevin Haley Studio 7 Dr. Ursula Dimitrou Dejan Mrdja Studio 8 Anthony Staples Daniel Marmot Stage 1 Design Studios Studio 1 Stuart McKenzie Studio 2 Tom Fox Studio 3 Charlotte Grace Studio 4 Douglas Murphy Studio 5 RubĂŠn Everett Studio 6 Rob Brown Studio 7 Sakiko Kohashi Studio 8 Donald McCrory

Fundamentals Chair Oliver Wainwright

Making Week Co-ordinator Gregory Ross

Fundamentals Guests Mel Dodd Robert Mull Deborah Saunt Rob Sheil Peter Morris Harriet Harriss Patrik Schumacher Lucy Carmichael Architectural Workers Claire Bennie Russell Curtis Kay Hughes Malcom Reading

Guest Makers Andrew Friend Carlotta Novella Jeffery Lambert Juan Montero Benjamin Perrot

Labour Symposium Guests Ana Carolina Tonetti Ligia Nobre Adam Kaasa Alex Warnock-Smith Kadambari Baxi Laura Diamond Dixit Shumi Bose Brendan Cormier Peggy Deamer Reiner de Graaf Jeremy Till Mel Dodd

Guest Tutors from Make Architects David Patterson Kunwook Kang Jason Chang Sam Potter Amanda Sexton Andrew Taylor Paul Simms Suyang Xu Myoungjae Kim

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

Stage 2 Leader Gregory Ross

Staff & Collaborators

Staff & Collaborators

Public Lectures Guests Markus Bader John Palmesino Ann-Sofi Ronnskog Christoph Schafer Grainne Hassett Alison Killing Tom Cordell

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Admissions How To Apply BA (Hons) Architecture ARB/RIBA Part 1

Find out more at www.arts.ac.uk/csm/ courses/undergraduate/ ba-architecture/

Entry to BA (Hons) Architecture is highly competitive. Selection is determined by the quality of the application, indicated primarily in your portfolio of work and written statements. A high proportion of successful applicants complete a Foundation Diploma in Art and Design. Applicants are normally expected to have achieved, or be expected to achieve, the following course entry requirements: • Passes at GCSE level in 5 subjects (grade C or above) including English Language, Mathematics and a double award at science, or a separate science such as Physics or Chemistry, and one other subject (Art & Design or Design Technology are recommended).

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

In addition to the requirement above, 136 UCAS tariff points from one of the following or a combination of the following full level 3 qualifications as follows: • 3 GCE A levels, with two Grade As and a Grade B (AAB); • Foundation Diploma in Art and Design; • BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (three distinction awards) • International Baccalaureate with an overall score of 35 points or above • Equivalent EU or non EU qualifications such as High School Diploma Student Selection Criteria – we do not just look out for a passion for architecture. We are seeking people who are open to new ideas, informed risk–taking and challenges, and who are willing to get involved in the different disciplines and practices of architectural design during their degree. We select degree applicants according to your potential and current ability to: • Work imaginatively and creatively in architecture and design • Engage with experimentation and invention • Show imagination and ambition in proposals for your work • Demonstrate a range of skills and technical abilities • Demonstrate an engagement with 3D and architecture/spatial design • Demonstrate a basic ability to draw and model objects and spaces • Demonstrate a basic ability to discuss ideas verbally and through written work • Demonstrate cultural awareness and/or contextual framework of your work • Articulate and communicate intentions clearly. Portfolio and interview Advice – your work should demonstrate creative development, whether for a college project or in your personal work. By creative development, we mean ideas that have originated in your own experience and research and progressed towards potential visualisation. Ideas, visual research and experimentation are more important than finished design solutions and can be shown in 2D work, or through 3D objects and maquettes. It is important that the creative work you include reflects your thinking, initiative and personal commitment to a particular project, theme or idea. Both through your work and in talking to you at a portfolio review, we are interested in you as an individual. Our focus is on your personal interests, your creativity and your initiative in finding out about your proposed area of study. We would like to know about your favourite designers and artists, where you have gathered more information about the work that interests you. 248

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Staff & Collaborators

BA (Hons) Architecture 2018

BA (Hons)

Architecture 250


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