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CONCRETE BURNS


CONCRETE BURNS BA (Hons) Fine Art Degree Show One Central Saint Martins University of the Arts London 2016

concreteburns.com


Cass Art proudly supports Central Saint Martins Degree Show. The Cass Art Prize is awarded to one undergraduate and one postgraduate student selected from the show, each will receive ÂŁ1,000 to spend on art supplies at Cass Art.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We would like to thank BA Fine 2016 graduates for their involvement in the funding and making of this catalogue and Degree Show One. We thank Gustav Metzger for his support as a collaborating artist for CSM’s Remember Nature Event as well as Gabrielle de la Puente and Paul O’Kane for their critical input. This show would not be possible without the hard work of the Degree Show Committee with the generous support of Alex Schady as well as our catalogue design advisor Alexey Kharkov. We thank Grafija Publishing House for their assistance and effective services, as well as our sponsors: Hollyport Capital, CASS Art, Chase Distillery, Proper Corn, Tuplin Fine Art and Vita Coco. Finally, we thank all donators who responded to our Kickstarter campaign:

Sarah Hollamby Rachel Christian Angela Day Jasmine Schofield Takashirou Hata Muted Clothing UK Louiza-Maria Peratikou Tess Rees Joshua Clay-Dennis Sarah Hill Derry McIlwaine Gabrielle Eber Helena Ruth Silja Eystberg Sophia Doe Rosie Cain Georgia Guthrie Jordan Maxwell Christian Wright Charlotte Coombs Anastasia Bizyakina Eliot Allison

CSM Degree Show 15 Emma Hart Neil Buchanan Jo Cartwright Moira Wright David Whitehead Nicole Kat Buchanan Gillian and Rob Saunders Julia Smith Leonie Zeynep Dolanay Margaret Clay Emma Clay Hazel Violet Phil Day Max Hollands William Watters Anna Tirzah Goodman Sean McKenna Silvy Liu


This publication features commissioned photographic series by Joshua Tabti – one of BA Fine Art graduates who responded to an open call, which encouraged students to reflect on our title ‘Concrete Burns’, as well as to the environment of Granary Building at-large. Project Statement Every summer term, first year Fine Art students assist third years with installing their degree show work. I had the chance of working with Angus Frost who decided to hang a monumental red banner from the roof of The Street. Having recently learnt how to shoot 35mm film, I felt it was too ambitious an installation, and too bustling an environment not to photograph. In second year, I returned with a medium format camera. Naturally, documenting my fellow final years’ work in progress using large format photography would nicely finish off the series. On the one hand, spending ten minutes to frame a shot meant there was rarely a ‘decisive moment’. If I was to create grand tableaux of students in their studios, I would have to patiently wait for the next intriguing moment or stage the scene. Fortunately, the actors on stage were willing to stand in freeze frame whilst I prepared the cumbersome rig. The results are a combination of the both, forming simultaneously active and passive scenes. Responding to the infrastructure of Central Saint Martins, my hope is that these photographs provide a glimpse into the exciting relationships of artists and ideas within this concrete landscape.

You can find Joshua’s images on the cover and on pages: 2, 12, 14, 45, 67, 100, 138

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Remember Nature

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Let me see u clap your hands

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THIRD FLOOR

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COLOPHON

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CONCRETE BURNS Paul O’Kane picks a few scabs and exposes the still suppurating wounds of a great modern rip-off.

N.B. To ‘burn’ or ‘get burned’ is, in streetstyle Anglo-American lingo, to be ‘ripped-off’, ‘robbed’, or duped. Once you have any kind of reputation as any kind of writer you can be called upon to write on almost any kind of theme. I tend, however, to say yes, because I like the challenge and because I am afraid of the commissions drying up. Sometimes, inevitably, you doubt whether you have anything to say on the matter at hand, or whether you are in any way qualified to do so. However, in the case of ‘Concrete Burns’ I feel I may be some kind of authority. “10… 9 … 8 … 7 … 6 … 5 … 4 … … Coming! Ready or Not!” I am still convinced that my elder brother impatiently and unfairly cut short the countdown that meant he was allowed to uncover his eyes and start chasing us in that ill-fated game of ‘Hide & Seek’, conducted on what we called ‘the church green’, circa sometime in the mid 1960s. This would explain why, as my brother turned in my direction I was not hidden at all but clearly visible ascending a pile of paving slabs that had been placed by the council pending a programme of repairs. As he turned, I panicked, I giggled, I lurched forward in a mixture of fear and delight, only to slip and smash my head hard on the sharp edge of the next stone in the pile. Shock, fear and copious amounts of blood followed. Then my brother was walking me home, his reddening handkerchief held to my previously pristine 5 year –old brow. Mum screamed and soon I was on the bench seat of a neighbour’s Ford Zephyr, rushing towards hospital, seven stitches and a lifelong scar. What this story also reminds me is that almost my entire environment as a child was made of concrete, gravel, tar and bricks. Even when we went for ‘country’ walks through woods and fields that bordered our sprawling council estate we would come to the gravel pits, cement works and lime quarries from where most of the basic elements of our modern architecture were extracted. These pits made up for a lack of picturesque lakes in our part of the world and the nearest thing we had to sublime mountain peaks was ‘Fossil Hill’. This was actually little

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INTRODUCTION


more than the outcome of excavating minerals from a quarry, thus creating a 100-foot pile of worthless material. We used to trudge heroically up and down it nevertheless, proud that we had conquered something and thereby gained a higher perspective on our environment. The name ‘Fossil Hill’ was not official, nor used beyond immediate family and friends but derived from the fact that my (same) brother found a perfectly calcified sea anemone up there. Its Latin name was verified by the Natural History museum in London but he simply called it ‘Fred’. On hot summer days the flooded gravel pits were expropriated as swimming pools by locals, who needed to find some easy and affordable way of cooling down. We all felt pretty much landlocked, both culturally and geographically, the coast and estuary were far away, and the nearest swimming pool was several miles away in the nearest town and not really our ‘turf’. I suspect we also found a certain romance in the inventive misuse of these unofficial resources, while ignoring warnings about their possible hazards. I have a vague memory that some kids were drowned and/or badly injured in those pits. During a childhood punctuated by persistent scraps and scrapes I started to believe my knees would remain scabbed and grazed forever, and became more concerned when I noticed little flecks of gravel remaining under the skin, even when a wound to leg, arm or hand had healed. The modern, concrete environment was thus ingested, mixed with stomach acids and bloodstream every time I dived into a pit, fell over while running to school or while playing football in a delivery yard. Later in life I began to think more seriously about the way my environment had influenced me, not only culturally, psychologically, mentally, but physically literally getting ‘under my skin’ and effectively transforming my constitution. Now I wonder how all this connects me physically with my roots, in ways perhaps comparable with the use of scarring by certain African tribes. As an adult and an artist I once performed in a gallery window, crawling back and forth over a trail of gravel while partially enclosed in a cardboard box. It was a cathartic project, made at a reflective turning point in my life as I reenacted certain ‘material memories’ sharing in public view something exceptional and intimate, striking and incongruous, yet always rooted in the commonplace. One thing I loved about being old enough to drive, was the ability to escape the ugly, boring estate where I lived out my youth, more or less at will. Given thirty minutes driving I would begin to experience different kinds of dwelling, towns and villages, the city, and various forms of architecture. After all, every terraced house on our estate of 20,000 people was literally identical so even traveling to a nearby town, with some history and perhaps a few Victorian or Georgian shop and hotel fronts offered some relief. Such historical allusions also seemed to offer some kind of hope through their evidence of other possibilities.

PAUL O’KANE

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Once I learned - as a mature student- a little history of art, design and architecture, along with some social and political history, I became aware of the dynamics of history in general and of the particular impositions of modernism; its forms, its economics, its materials, all of which – I now see- increasingly influence our lives and could even be said to contribute to an increasing ‘proletarian-isation’ of our environment. E.g. the very latest ‘bourgeois’ apartment towers seem strangely reminiscent of those often demonized and demolished towers rapidly built as social housing in the decades following WW2 Walter Benjamin has always been a helpful and imaginative guide for me in matters of architecture, technology, design and their possible historical meaning. Benjamin reveled in his very own fascination with the progress of history as discovered and interpreted through particular structures, a prime example being the Paris arcades or passages, those social, psychological, ideational environments nevertheless made possible only by new developments in materials and processes (iron and glass). Elsewhere Benjamin briefly noted the way that primarily pragmatic mass 20th century social housing appeared to be rooted in designs for barracks. The college where I studied as an undergraduate was located within three very different buildings. One was a red brick, ex-school (c. 1900), with floors of varying heights, a grand wooden staircase and a grander lecture hall, complete with a ‘gallery’ of lofty seats for latecomers plus a vaulted wood ceiling and even a little stained glass to enhance the windows. Another building was a product of the ‘Arts & Crafts’ era while the ‘main building’ was classic modernism, built in the early 1970s. One, probably mythical rumour claimed that it that it had been designed for a far hotter, Mexican location but through some mix-up came to be built in South London. More credible is the fact that it was designed and built in what is sometimes called the ‘International Style’, a form of modernism that could and would enthusiastically, evangelistically, and perhaps rather patronizingly ‘fit all’ cultures and climes. The building was a concrete and glass, repetitious and geometric stack of identically shaped floors, with all rooms, bar a ground-floor ‘hall’ and foyer, being of identical height. Such modernist logic was challenged, briefly at least, by a post-modern backlash during the 1980s, which included a tempestuous embrace of ‘complexity’ and ‘vernacular’ styles, as well as an appeal to ‘regionalism’ in terms of both materials and design (ref. Kenneth Frampton, Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown). Such disruptive post-modern values and criteria might promise, not only a return to more varied spaces, complex volumes and changing surfaces but a greater diversity of material cultures influenced and inspired by local materials and traditions. Today however, living and working in rapidly hyper-modernising London, we see a city changing faster than perhaps at any time in its long history and yet might note that only lip-service was ever paid to that brief moment of post-modern alternative and possibility. Ultimately it is capitalist economics that dominates modern and modernist

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INTRODUCTION


design and which therefore dictates our environment. Modernism –we might claimis nothing if not capitalist, and while capitalists are in the driving seat of our society modernism remains the order of the day. To extrude a given floor-plan ten, twenty, or thirty times and to thus produce a tower of identically constructed apartments, each replete with a little, redemptive balcony, is by far the best, tried and tested way to turn a relatively small piece of land, and some more or less valuable empty sky, into an enormous profit. Thus repetitious hypermodernity wins-out over finicky postmodern complexity. The most progressive version of post-modernism did once heralded a new age of anti-hierarchical multiculture, but ‘post-modern’ was always a dirty word for artists, designers, architects and capitalists with any form of investment in modernism. Thus post-modernism was hurriedly and crudely adapted to justify many hideous, again hugely profitable, bog-standard designs during the 1980s and early 90s.Using the cheapest, most cursory and slapped-on interpretation of ‘complexity’, ‘regionalism’ and ‘vernacular’ such buildings were thrown up for a quick buck, thoughtlessly in any available space, and have of course aged and weathered both rapidly and badly, blighting our cities and their suburbs. What is perhaps most interesting however about the current London building boom is what it tells us about modernism and modernity, those two cultural hulks which we are still living with, picking over and trying better to understand. The most noble view we might have of modernism is as a liberating force by means of which the most dynamic of modern people could acclimatize to, and accommodate the inexorable, otherwise disorienting force or ‘spirit’ of modernity. However, given what is occurring in London today we might be more cynical and see the supposedly most noble modern, and modernist artists (professors of the Bauhaus come to mind) as consciously or unconsciously transforming art for the purpose, and in the service of capital by enabling forms of design and architecture that would serve, first and foremost, not the broad, newly democratized public (a public who were in fact often bemused or alienated by modern art) but those capitalists eager to find the cheapest, simplest route to extracting maximum profit from a given amount of materials, space, time and punters, while giving minimum concession to various legal, humanizing checks, balances and regulations. ‘Concrete Burns’ to me cannot therefore help but speak of various kinds of ‘rip-off’, whether I reminisce about my poor childhood skin, repeatedly torn and grazed by falling on gravel, concrete and tarmac, or when gazing up today at scores of tiny, yellowplastic balconies, suspended from apartments, all the way to the 30th floor of a tower overlooking the Elephant & Castle roundabout, each apartment costing upwards of half a million pounds and occupying a space that, a few months ago was occupied only by birds, clouds and some badly polluted air. PAUL O’KANE

PAUL O’KANE

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REMEMBER NATURE GUSTAV METZGER

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he expanding volume taken up by the Remember Nature exhibition at Central Saint Martins came as quite a considerable shock - one hopes that other large scale integrated works can follow this debut. Collaboration is the key to survival. There cannot be enough interaction. This massive demonstration made the point beautifully. Breaking down barriers could be the title for the next event of its kind. By that I mean barriers of all kinds including the 100’s of homeless people sleeping on the streets surrounding Kings Cross and elsewhere. I would make a comment on the lines that I and my fellows have been exceedingly lucky to have lived in our period and from now on everything will become more tough including the question of space and studios for artists. With the increase in cost of studios and accommodation of all kinds we will experience battles for living and working space. All this will be reflected in a toughening life for artists. All this brings us to states of a toughening environment, detrimental to the relative calm and reflectivity that art demands.

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GRO F L O


UND O O R


THE STREET

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ELIOTHENRYALLISON Silvy Liu Sergei Zinchuk SFCH [Sofya Chibisguleva] Erica Corina Robledo Jensen E Zhang Snail Jin Harrison Moore

Subconscious feedback

Distilling conventions

Reactions Aftermath of exploitation

Private vs. public

Boundaries of communication

Choreography of inhibition Reversed dynamics

Systematisation of everyday

Commanding and punctuating behaviours

Class Analysis of knowledge

Fragility of systems

Deconstruct language

Diagramming

Composing mythologies Abbreviations

Cultural values Defying limits

Physical manifestation of perception

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Disrupting architecture Investigating malleability of space Translating intangible structures

Dislocating structures Uncertain spaces

Non literal form of spatial understanding

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ELIOTHENRYALLISON P2 x “I’m Gonna Put Chalks Everywhere” x W2 [Residues and Diagrams], 2015-16 Ongoing

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Left Image: Silvy Liu Pedagogical experiments of unlearning, 2015 - ongoing Branches, graphite, crayon, paint, sponges, paper, cardboard, MDF, children, adults

Right Image: Sergei Zinchuk Function of Myth, 2016 Mixed Media

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Top Image: SFCH Ruin Mythology (I), 2016 Digital Architecture and Analogue Photography 3D Model, BW print on Ilford Multigrade IV Deluxe

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Bottom Image: Erica Corina Robledo Jensen Trivial Pursuits, 2015 Text, cotton tent, knitted materials 3x2x2m

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Top Image: E Zhang “Can you berathe?”, 2014 Art action, cling film, human beings

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Bottom Image: Snail Jin A Stall by Craftise, 2016 Yarn, wood, metal, acrylic, paper Space: 3.6 x 2 x 2m, duration: 2 hours

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Harrison Moore Q&A, 2016 Stills from videos

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THE STREET

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Ted Green Jo McGarry Uznain Majid Katarina Ortiz Pertierra Anusheh Zia Siddiqui

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echnology : time : re-contextualisation : digital : internet : circle : journey : infinity : loop : cyclical : the everyday : media : post-production : political : a-political : black : white : partial : write : read : know : first : print : last : use : mark-making : privacy : public : surveillance : expansion : spatial : light : instant : information : natural : experience : sonic : senses : phenomenology : perception : satellite : transmission : signal : flow : rhythm : order : system : data : automatic : human : basic : process : meditation : repetition : network : location : connection : appropriation : remix : pre-existing : programming : culture : history : communication : change : perspectives : original : author : audience : pattern : sequence

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Ted Green Clockwise, 2016 GIF Animation

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Top Image: Jo McGarry Bloodbath on a Sunny Day, 2013 Computer Game

Bottom Image: Uznain Majid Floods, 2016 Encaustics on wood,128 x 96 cm

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Top Image: Katarina Ortiz Pertierra Soundscape I, 2016 Audio and Video

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Bottom Image: Anusheh Zia Siddiqui salah x infinity, 2015 Digital Photography

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T E M P O R A L T R A N S L AT I O N S

Miho Tanabe Victoria Lane Chloe Herring Joshua Tabti W R Watters Gareth Whiting

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ur aim is to translate or recontexualise historical material from its original sources providing illuminating contexts both visually and conceptually. Resulting work offers something new in its own right, but referencing back to its source, it presents fresh perspectives on the past, suggesting a new relationship to itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s present. Our discourse arose out of a curiosity in revisiting, critiquing and re-presenting aspects of the past such as history, tradition and orthodoxies. Individual membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; personal explorations may take in related ideas such as memory, amnesia, memorials, monuments, ruins and archival material. Translation from the past involves decisions and selection of material, including a return to beginnings in source material or processes or manipulation

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of historical images in tandem with contemporary ones. We are conscious that inevitably, details may be lost, whether deliberately by personal selection or because aspects of the past are irrecoverable. We share interests in rather traditional processes such as painting, print, collage, and analogue photography which by their conscious use are incorporated into or assist our re-examining and re-presenting of the past. For example, we may deliberately use very early photographic processes as an integral part of work. We are also interested in using simple, unpretentious materials and potentially discovering additional meanings through this as well as the technological and physical processes we use.

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Miho Tanabe 160302_Untitled, 2016 Digital Print, 200 x 250 cm

TEMPORAL TRANSLATIONS

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Top Image: Victoria Lane The Animus, 2016 Photocopy of oil painting on concrete

Bottom Image: Chloe Herring Sanctuary, 2016 Watercolour paint, oil paint, emulsion paint, enamel gloss spray paint on canvas 122 x 91 x 4 cm

Right Image: Joshua Tabti Quiberville, 2015 Medium format photograph, 59 x 59 cm

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TEMPORAL TRANSLATIONS

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Left Image: W R Watters I see loose strings, 2016 Digital image

Right Image: Gareth Whiting Syrian mosaic, 2016 Screenprint, acrylic paint and various treated papers framed between layers of acetate sheet 70 x 50 cm

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TEMPORAL TRANSLATIONS

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Jessica Young Joshua Clay-Dennis Derry McIlwaine Molly Eliza Gough Aigli Tsirogianni Rachel Christian

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ix artists operating in the wetzoneâ&#x20AC;Ś. Interested in possessing porous practices, that contaminate the others, working in the format of [Assemblages] The work projects a performativity and fluidity, between the digital negotiations and the transmission of materiality, either through surface or texture. The aim is to create a

[Hyper-saturated] curation of work, using exposure and excess to achieve these aims.

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Jessica Young Stratum, 2016 Digital composite of various installations

FUNGIBLE

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Top Image: Joshua Clay-Dennis accommodating-life, 2016 bean can, pine, clamps, speaker, motor, kitchen tile and grout

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Bottom Image: Derry McIlwaine Hephaestus Cam #3, 2016 Video, 00:00:48 sec

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Molly Eliza Gough Your use of language is phoney, 2016 Text Piece

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Left Image: Aigli Tsirogianni Untitled, 2016 Video still, 10:00 min

Right Image: Rachel Christian GUTTERMESH, 2016 Cotton sheeting, poster paint, PVA glue, sugar, shower gel

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FUNGIBLE

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JeeMin Kim Tirzah Goodman Anna-Maria Guirguis Emese Wu

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his group is concerned with the capability of an artwork to communicate and share personal experiences with the viewer, with the silent exchange that takes place between the viewer and the work. Through the physical embodiment of emotions they aim to allow the work to become universally identifiable and relatable. The intimate and the personal becomes accessible. The artists use the large scale and public nature of the Street to emphasise the contrast between the personal and the universal, a theme that plays an important role in each work.

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JeeMin Kim Dust in Sunlight, 2016 LED, Mixed Media 200 x 200 cm

ENCOUNTERS

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Top Image: Tirzah Goodman The Hand, 2016 Video Clip, 00:01:55 min

Bottom Image: Anna-maria Guirguis 26 February 13:36 , 2016 Unglazed ceramic plate, floor

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Emese Wu Animal Farm, 2016 Human, chain

ENCOUNTERS

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Greg Barratt Martin Fernoit

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ven though both of theses artists have differing tastes and disciplines, both of their respective paths met through their common interest in metal. This inevitably led to the making of monumental sculptural work for both. Both artists didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to divulge any pictures or sketches of their sculptures in order to create a sense of surprise for their audience. Through their respective sculptures they try to convey differing feelings, emotions, and portray their personal preoccupations. To both the space was an important aspect for the final work in order to recreate a path between the two sculptures, where the sense of the audience could be changed, questioned and finally reinvented.

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Greg Barratt Untiled, 2016 Acrilyc paint and ink on canvas 17 5x 135 mm

DEFYING SENSES

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Martin Ferniot Merci Ă Toi, 2015 Watercolour and colour pencils on paper 200 x 300 mm

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Amber Robins Sarah Hill Farah Bellio Sandhya Stearman Seema Mattu Zarina Muhammad Harley White Aylea Skye Matty-Sabat

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lease follow instructions carefully:

Remove all outer packaging. Pierce Plastic Film with fork. For best results heat only once, do not reheat. 800W 8 mins 900W 7½ mins. Heat on full power for 8 minutes (800W) 7 minutes 30 seconds (900W). Stir halfway and before serving. Leave to stand for 1 minute before consuming.

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Farah Bellio Untitled, 2016 Florescent perspex, irridecent organza, plastic film foam, gun metal wire and framed sand paper on wall

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Top Image: Seema Mattu Engagement Photo I, 2016 Photographic and digital image 105.83 x 70.61 mm

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Bottom Image: Alice Naegel The Family, 2016 Moving Image and Installation

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Top Image: Sarah Hill Pulling, 2016 Video Installation 2:18 min looped

Bottom Image: Amber Robins Through the Light, 2016 Mixed-media

STICK A FORK IN US, WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE DONE!

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Left Image: Harley White Tropical Wire Workshop, 2016 2:00:00 hr

STICK A FORK IN US, WEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE DONE!

Right Image: Zarina Muhammad MAJOR KEY [key emoji], 2016 Installation

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Naomi Ellis Rianna Suen Kane Britnell Seungjun Lee Zara Ramsay Philip Wittle Sofia Vannini

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tmosphere been objects your when these context understanding cube presence if between you they hardware images thus in massey work sense is it being then am an as at phone become object bennett viewer other be works artist bodies affect networks matter our smart moment out how into see world modern are too identity by installation have baudrillard where place so a mind art product expression agency within more one i familiar off the such places site able self information to but through data subject screen sites upon experience body good space cloud that act his white me only things from has up us which all image new augĂŠ might this its real less my users both becomes most condition hybrid spaces seems internet since who frame here no some virtual rather ibid affective for their video clouds non around speed we network can not perhaps and today of now capacities physical human just on

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over digital exhibition process or social will was also sculpture encounter behavioural indeed way home with environment what form material infrastructure there online time he forms

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Naomi Ellis Pitcairn, 2016 Digital Image Projection onto clay

PRESENT REFLECTIONS

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Top Image: Rianna Suen Cloudpunk, 2016 HTML, CSS, JavaScript

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Bottom Image: Kane Britnell The Porous Self Logo, 2016 Digital Image

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Seungjun Lee Untitled, 2015 Photograph

PRESENT REFLECTIONS

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Top Image: Zara Ramsay Cappuccino Sweet Cheeks, 2016 3D Printed spiralised courgette piece (reproduced in plaster), enamel paint, MDF

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Bottom Image: Philip Whittle Untitled, 2016 Video, 03:00 min

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Sofia Vannini Minds without Bodies, 2016 Digital Print Installation

PRESENT REFLECTIONS

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Holly Delaney Flora Grosvenor-Stevenson

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n a world where it is increasingly difficult to delineate a border between the sincere and the disingenuous, we seek to find a utopic harmony between the two. Using reoccurring metaphors in the work to suggest both good and bad, the interpretation lies within the viewer’s gaze. We question where we, along with humanity, are situated in the spherical world where everything is connected and everything links.

“ I’m the Cream Of the Great Utopia Dream And you’re the gleam In the depths of your banker’s spleen. ”

Ultimately, we create a world in which perception becomes a reality and reality becomes subject to perception. Who’s place is it to state what is real and what isn’t?

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Top Image: Holly Delaney Self Portrait #1, 2016 Installation, dimensions variable

Bottom Image: Flora Grosvenor-Stevenson Maybe The Rain Isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t to Blame, 2016 Fabric varieties

UTOPIA DREAM

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Mariya Ipatova Gala Finkelbaum Merey Senocak Dani Macovei

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n this collective we explore issues that arise in our realities and their dependency on environment, in terms of context and impact on reliability and comprehension. In truth today we are a lot less connected that we can be made to believe, grown more accustomed to information, and less accustomed to context. Our ability to penetrate and relate to conflicts beyond our immediate environment is challenged by the distant and fast changing nature of digital information and the lack of physcicality in our interaction with it. By creating 4 immersive environments, which become physical manifestations of the issues we are tackling, we are aiming to be give the viewer a chance to face them as solid, real objects rather then subliminal streams of information. The ideas we explore oscillate between socio-political, metaphysical and philosophical.

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Mariya Ipatova Untitled, 2016 Digital Collage

ENVIRON . MENTAL ISSUES

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Top Image: Gala Finkelbaum SUPERPOWER, 2015 Buckwheat, clear acrylic medium on canvas 1512 x 2280 mm

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Bottom Image: Merey Senocak Microscope photography of a humanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hair who wear the hijab

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Dani Macovei YOU!, 2014 Digital photo collage

ENVIRON . MENTAL ISSUES

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e are exploring barriers and borders, physical and systemic, and

how they affect us in our movement, thoughts, desires and perceptions of the world. how they affect us as a human body, the recipient of discrimination, judgement, separation, often through violence. as a human body, the vessel and container of decay and disease under constant surveillance,

Cheryl Kohl sees the human body subjected to outside, often violent forces and the danger of being reduced to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bare lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; - vegetating as decaying matter under increasingly hostile living conditions. At the same time, the human body is a vessel for containing and reverberating sound and music (a possible temporary autonomous zone?) , something she would like to explore further in the future. Tracy Ann Newsome is particularly interested in the concept of disease, and currently investigates the 2014 event of the Ebola outbreak and the mistakes done by health agencies and drug companies. She is critical of the human body placed into institutional mechanisms such as GIS Systems and contact tracing.

how we can affect them through art and dialogue.

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Cheryl Kohl Nordic approach 1, 2016 Found material: bricks, calico coffee bean bags, metal, wool, wood

HUMAN MATTERS

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Tracy Ann Newsome Surveillance of disease, 2016 Projection, petri dish, silicone sealant modelling clay

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xperience something. Closer. Bend down, look under, over… No, wait. Turn around. Get away. Lose the memory. Escape. What’s next? Over there… The screen, how does it flicker when it’s made of paint? Do you bring paint to life? Do you have to squint to see the image shift? Black. White. Pink. Coral. Green. Turquoise. Which layers do your eyes prefer? Go forward. Trip on a branch. Wonder how it got there. Go back. Attempt to relive the moment. Trip once more. An instant that is another. A room whose walls open into space. Objects, time, moments, all connected. We are all connected. Why are those plates dirty? Tired of putting the dishwasher on? Are you late for work? Can we go sit in a cafe for a moment or two? Over there! Look!

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Philip Williams Jean-Pierre Lupdag Fleur Dempsey Felix Higham J B Shaw Paul Gogué Jean Baptiste Lagadec

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Sarah Hollamby Leo A. Lopez Leo Jaybara Pauline Muller-Ullmo Emma Day Hiroaki Onuma Alexandra Gribaudi Paper nailed to the wall. Words across its surface. Burnt metal. Flowers. Wood. Canvas. Scraps. Found objects. Lost something? You might find it here… …where the picture brandishes a knife in vicious red, or by the window, on the floor, on the ceiling. Follow your own route. No right or wrong. End up in a desert where a hand writes the sky. Climb into a painting, cross a landscape and acknowledge the cow. Or maybe you just end up here. You are here. Multiple solutions to your experience of this escape. Are we all just attempting to find our own preferred reality? Answers can only be found when you enjoy the making of the questions.

GROUND FLOOR


Philip Williams Untitled, 2016 Oil on Canvas 120 x 120cm

E&E

69


Jean-Pierre Lupdag Painting, 2016 Oil, canvas, wood 76 x 53 cm

70

GROUND FLOOR


Top Image: Fleur Dempsey Untitled, 2016 Metal structure photograph on fabric

Bottom Image: Felix Higham Women playing chess, 2016 Radiator enamel, ink acrylic paint on board

E&E

71


Top Image: J B Shaw Studio iv, 2016 Oil on linen, 30 x 25.5 cm

Bottom Image: Paul GoguĂŠ Tiger Painting, 2016 Acrylic and oil on canvas 150 x 122 cm

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GROUND FLOOR


Top Image: Jean-Baptiste Lagadec Ariadneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thread #1, 2016 Ink, acrylic and oil paint on wood

Bottom Image: Sarah Hollamby When life gives you dirty dishes, 2016 Installation of Video (5 min) TV monitor PVC Fabric, dirty plates

E&E

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Top Image: Leo A. Lopez Untitled 1 (Fantomatic Painting), 2016 Plant in stretch synthetic fiber on canvas

Bottom Image: Leo Jaybara Cosmic Cow, 2015 Acrylic paint, vinyl paint and spray paint on canvas 220 x 170 cm

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GROUND FLOOR


Pauline Muller-Ullmo FIRST T, 2016 Mixed Media 180 x 110 cm

E&E

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Top Image: Emma Day Water, 2016 Pen

Bottom Image: Hiroaki Onuma Working in progress (Untitled), 2016 Oil on canvas, 220 x 160 cm

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GROUND FLOOR


Alexandra Gribaudi IN TRANSITION, 2016 Steel on hand pallet truck

E&E

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H 010

H P

O O

T

T S

Gabrielle Eber Jennie Owen Alessia Franchi Celia Green What if where we stood we took away the look I want to hear a story about a time when you took the time to give someone the time to hear a story And looked again at what stares at us mouth here mouth there lips open lips close saliva That stuff sharing air mouth here That makes no sense that told you a story to tell me the story of a stranger who is now a friend That has no name performing mouth to mouth That seeks no fame*

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* The theory of the reverse image within the romantic press is found in the reverse image of the everyday life of women, of their aspirations and not only their profound needs in contemporary society but also that of the toil, the illusions and the failures of individual and â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;privateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; everyday life. Henri Lefbvre refers to this within his Critique of Modern Life. Our poem was written in response to these ideas, as each resonates throughout our work.

GROUND FLOOR


Gabrielle Eber Untitled, 2016 Rubber, polymer clay

HOT POTS

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Top Image: Jennie Owen Small Talk, 2016 Interactive Installation

Bottom Image: Alessia Franchi Mouth to mouth, 2016 Performance Clay, straws and tape

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GROUND FLOOR


Celia Green Munton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dunton, 2016 Hand bound, 120 pages of perforated, printed A5 paper Extract of text used within guided walk Walk duration: approx. 40 minutes. Dunton Road, 24 March 2016

HOT POTS

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H 010 + D 001

ART, AGENDA AND P O L I T I C S

Robyn Isobel Brennan James Youell Amber Barlow Divya Mittal

O

ur work explores global issues that are either accidentally overlooked or intentionally dismissed. We aim to explore issues that are taking place around us everyday in a way that people can genuinely connect with. We feel as a group this quote sums up what we/our work stands for. “I don’t mind expressing my opinions and speaking out against injustice. I would be doing this even if I wasn’t a writer. I grew up in a household that believed in social justice. I have always understood myself as having an obligation to stand on the side of the silenced, the oppressed, and the mistreated.” (Tayari Jones)

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GROUND FLOOR


Robyn Isobel Brennan Where Dreams Come True, 2016 Photograph

ART, ANGENDA AND POLITICS

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James Youell The View From The Train, 2015 Digital Photograph

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GROUND FLOOR


Top Image: Amber Barlow Stencils, 2016

Bottom Image: Divya Mittal Untitled, 2015 Photograph (hand painted model) 594 x 841 mm

ART, ANGENDA AND POLITICS

85


H 010

QUASICLUSTERFUCK

Ellie Walker Eugenia Shishkina Tess Rees Ayesha Tan-Jones Angelica Bryant Wolfie Wright Babymorocco [Clayton Pettet]

Q Q Q Q

86

UASI reality UASI duality UASI fetishism UASI syntheticism

P P P P

SEUDO sacred SEUDO naked SEUDO nature SEUDO stranger

GROUND FLOOR


Ellie Walker Blub Specimin, 2016 Digital Collage

QUASI CLUSTER FUCK

87


Top Image: Eugenia Shishkina Film Poster 1, 2016 Digital Collage

Bottom Image: Tess Rees The Laugh of Libertas, 2016 Plaster, modelling clay, mod roc metal wire Dimensions variable

Right Page Top Image: Ayesha Tan Jones Indigo Zoom: The Awakening, 2016 Moving Image ∞ x ∞ , ∞ min: ∞ sec

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Right Page Bottom Image: Angelica Bryant Still#1, 2016 Video

GROUND FLOOR


QUASI CLUSTER FUCK

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Left Image: Wolfie Wright KISS, DATE UNKNOWN 35mm

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Right Image: Babymorocco [Clayton Pettet]

GROUND FLOOR


QUASI CLUSTER FUCK

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H 010

A N T H R O P O M O R P H I C S

P

A

C

E

S

Sarah Gautrey Mareiwa Miller Daniella Reiff Rianne Owen Aukse Jonauskyte Olav Lorentzen

P

ARADOXICALLY SOMETHING AND NOTHING, AN INTIMATE, UNRAVELLING, AMBIGUOUS EXPERIENCE.

RELIANT ON HUMAN BEHAVIOUR BECOMING AND ANTHROPOMORPHIC ANIMATED BUT IF SOMETHING IS NOTHING, DOES THAT MAKE NOTHING SOMETHING? IS NOTHING TRULY JUST LOVE, GOD AND ART?

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GROUND FLOOR


Sarah Gautrey Blurring Borders, 2015 Paper collage

ANTHROPOMORPHIC SPACES

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Top Image: Mareiwa Miller Untitled, 2016 Photographs Dimensions variable

Bottom Image: Daniella Reiff Untitled, 2016 Paper print, metal grating and wood Dimensions variable

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GROUND FLOOR


Top Image: Rianne Owen Detail of Ambiguous Worlds Series (Untitled), 2016 Hessian, wire mesh, black plastic, plaster

Bottom Image: Aukse Jonauskyte Waiting Room, 2016 Video, 07:00 min

ANTHROPOMORPHIC SPACES

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H 010 + K 001

I N D I V I D U A L S

Anne-Dauphine Spacey Grandison

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GROUND FLOOR


Left Image: Anne-Dauphine Borione Kim & North, 2016 Acrylic and glow paint on calico 200 x 180 cm

Right Image: Spacey Grandison Indian brothel, 2015 Digital Photography

INDIVIDUALS

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LET ME SEE U CLAP YOUR HANDS GABRIELLE DE LA PUENTE

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99


T H I F L O H 010

100


I R D O O R 101


B301

G I L D E D L I L Y

Brooke

H

Purvis

|

Maria

Fernandes

ello from the outside/inside.

Welcome to the Gilded Lily = an aesthetic position> grounded in mud + air, or just another spectacle. £££Kerching! we sing, the dolladolla holla. Is fine art pro-per-tay? Can we live in it? Or is it just another tax haven in a corporate hell? Damn, we are so liberated & expressive. Never fear: artists are here! Putting the ass in asset; to do your emotional heavy lifting & critical thinking, & all the other stuff you just don’t have time to do. We hope we match your sofa.

|

Shireen

Liane

|

Vanessa

Crew

vehicle. This is a dark ride. Batteries not included. Your mileage may vary. The systems, the sayings, the institutions; from the conduits in the ceiling to the pipes in the basement – that sound you hear is Capital Creep, the means of control, out of control. We brought the kerosene. We’ve mapped every inch of this place. Anyone got a light?

Of course this is a democracy; of course you are welcome to participate. Please express yourself fully in the time allotted. Please stay in your assigned seat while the seat belt sign is illuminated. Have a drink, shut up, and keep your arms inside the

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THIRD FLOOR


Shireen Liane Untitled, 2016 Shredders, paper cable ties, cable

GILDED LILY

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Top Image: Vanessa Crew Page from Colour inâ&#x20AC;Ś The Toilet Ceilings, 2016 Book

Bottom Image: Brooke Purvis UN-NAMED, 2015 Acrylic spray paint on canvas 152 x 121 cm

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THIRD FLOOR


Maria Fernandes Timber, 2016 1.5 x 1.5 m

GILDED LILY

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B 301

T

B

C

Roxanne Lee Sarah-Elizabeth Taylor Louiza Peratikou Bobby Monteverde Thomas Jon Walker Charlie Nia Dunnery McCracken Sarah Bending

Intimacy Transgression Other Document Perception Body Inbetween Repetition Interaction Passivity

106

THIRD FLOOR


Roxanne Lee DIPTYCH 1, 2016 Analogue Photographs

TBC

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Top Image: Sarah-Elizabeth Taylor Reality is a Daydream, 2016 Moving Image 4 min 25 sec

Bottom Image: Louiza Peratikou (Dis)-(Connected), 2016 Photography

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THIRD FLOOR


Bobby Monteverde Finasteride 5mg, 2016 Gel image transfer and acrylic 94 x 141 cm

TBC

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Thomas Jon Walker Untitled, 2016

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THIRD FLOOR


Top Image: Charlie Nia Dunnery McCracken Simple Life, 2016 58 sec

Bottom Image: Sarah Bending Untitled, 2016 Photograph

TBC

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C 301 + BARRIERS

I N D E T E R M I N A B L E S

P

A

C

E

S

Cara Mills Andrew Wyatt Jordan Mouzouris Blanche Teston

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GROUND + THIRD FLOORS


Cara Mills Untitled, 2016 Shredders, paper cable ties, cable

INDETERMINABLE SPACES

113


Top Image: Andrew Wyatt Documentation of performance Not Working Out, Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Not It, 2016 State Of The Art Berlin Video still

Bottom Image: Jordan Mouzouris Peeping ,2016 01:11

Right Page: Blanche Teston Stiff, 2016 Foil

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GROUND + THIRD FLOORS


INDETERMINABLE SPACES

115


C 301

LINGERING

Jingwen Liu Xiaochun Wang ‘Shan Shui’? ‘ Landscape’?

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THIRD FLOOR


CHUN & WEN Lingering, 2016 Moving Image 16:9

LINGERING

117


C 301

S S

O

L P

I A

T

A C

R E

Y S

Callum Pepper Katherine Poole Lewis Kemmenoe Jacob Mansbridge

S

olitary Spaces gives the individuals in the group the opportunity for their work to exist isolated through differing practices. Whilst collectively being interested in creating environments portraying a sense of independence within the work, the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main concern is creating an immersive experience through their solitary space.

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THIRD FLOOR


Callum Pepper Through Lenses, 2015 HD Video 00:12:10 min

SOLITARY SPACES

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THIRD FLOOR


Top Image: Katherine Poole Untitled, 2015 Oil on wood and Projection

Jacob Mansbridge Circle, 2016 Video

Bottom Image: Lewis Kemmenoe Untitled, 2016 Styrofoam, lighting gel, wire, plasticine wood, paper, electric tape

SOLITARY SPACES

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C 301

C M

A

N

N

O

I V

B

A I

L E

Sam Dauncey Harriet Scott Hauyu Yang Stefano Pelosato Emanuel Tomozei Angelina Jesson & Jaron Hill “They gave me a star for my new movie!” says Gauillard, eyes ablaze with excitement, doubtless unwarranted, as he rolls in. “The one about the Indians!” and holds proudly up the publication. Sure enough a single star shines atop a side article somewhere among the back pages of the periodical. Redskins. Slaughter in the Wild West.  - “Have you ever actually been to Colorado?”  - “Non.” Replies Gauillard.  - “It’s real cold up there, real fucking cold.”  A pause.  “Non.” He says again, the aviator shades sliding on a piste of sweat and sebum down the bridge of his nose, evenly glazing the slushy stuff over follicles. I’d like to press my thumb, hard, dead centre, on his hooter and leave a print there on the shine as it sets in the afternoon sun. Then slap him about a hotel room shouting things like Seriously, what are you doing here!? 

122

- “Why? Should I go?” He’s looking at with me those quizzical eyes.  “Well if you want to make the acquisition of stars in one-cent gazettes your business then you could do a lot worse. Besides, it does a man good to get away from the shit-shovelling and the blarney. I’d a woman installed out there, couple of winters back, little place called Altona. She had nowhere to live so I built her a shack and set her up shop. By the time I came back the poor little thing had to be all but prised out from a snowdrift.”  His eyes light up at this, a vitreous-fuelled firestorm.  “Still there?” He asks, conspicuously neglecting to precede the question with any enquiry as to her welfare.  - “No she’s dead.”  - “Still there?” He asks again.

THIRD FLOOR


Sam Dauncey Rockall, 2016 Video 19:00 min

CANNIBAL MOVIE

123


Top Image: Harriet Scott A New Hope, 2016 Video

124

Bottom Image: Hauyu Yang Social Communication, 2016 Performance, 40:00 min

THIRD FLOOR


Top Image: Stefano Pelosato Untitlted, 2016 Film

Bottom Image: Emanuel Tomozei Ecce Homo, 2016 Digital render

CANNIBAL MOVIE

125


Angelina Jesson & Jaron Hill

126

THIRD FLOOR


CANNIBAL MOVIE

127


C 303

C U L T U R E / /A P P R O P R I AT I O N

Darae Baek Angela Chen Kiss Tesfay Keanoush Zargham Paige Mckiernan â&#x20AC;&#x153;What do you think an artist is?... He is a political being, constantly aware of the heart breaking, passionate or delightful things that happen on the world, shaping himself completely in their image. Painting is not done to decorate apartments. It is an instrument of war.â&#x20AC;? Pablo Picasso

128

THIRD FLOOR


Darae Baek The Memories, 2016 Video Installation video

CULTURE//APPROPRIATION

129


Top Image: Angela Chen

Bottom Image: Kiss Tesfay FORGOTTEN, 2015 Ceramic, glazed

130

THIRD FLOOR


Keanoush Beauty of Allah IV, 2016 Photography

CULTURE//APPROPRIATION

131


F 301

P A L I N O I A

Julia Ironside Joanna SzyĹ&#x201A;o Ricardo Pimentel Sally Burch Shirley-Ann Galbraith Leyla Dincer Anat Smith

P

alinoia â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the obsessive repetition of an act until it is mastered or done perfectly.

The group is unified by the use of repetition in their practice, be it collage, sculpture, drawing or photography. Discussions arise around psychoanalysis, typologies of space and memory.

132

THIRD FLOOR


Julia Ironside Remember Me, 2016 Installation view

PALINOIA

133


134

THIRD FLOOR


Top Image: Leyla Dincer Polished Clean, 2016 Oyster Shells, Nail Polish, Installation view

Joanna SzyĹ&#x201A;o Printed Trees, 2015 Photography, size variable

Bottom Image: Anat Smith Fragments, 2016 Photograph and installation

PALINOIA

135


Shirley-Ann Galbraith Fifty Two + Fifty Two = Two, 2016 Ink and Paper

136

THIRD FLOOR


Top Image: Ricardo Pimentel 2U5IT4NIA (7), 2016 Lightbox 31cm x 35 cm

Bottom Image: Sally Burch, The Art of Losing isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Hard to Master 2016, digital print

PALINOIA

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138


139


F 301

I M

K O

E N

K

A E

Y

Joe Richardson Kat Buchanan Jack McHenry Gabrielle de la Puente Maximilian Hollands Andrew Saunders Isabelle Cole

T

o pin the art collective that is Ikea Monkey down is like trying to catch a sliver of unscented soap with your feet in the bath. But the bath is also filled with olive oil so it’s particularly slippy, and your mum keeps knocking on the door asking where all the olive oil has gone because she wants to make pesto, so you’re distracted and can’t properly focus on catching that soap sliver and so it keeps sliding around the bottom of the bath. Also you’ve been stressed recently so every few minutes you have to close your eyes, take some deep breaths and remember that this is just a chapter in your life book and you’ll feel much better once summer is here. But, alas, it would still be a relief to catch that soap between your toes. It’s lost now, lost like a tiny fashionable monkey all alone in Ikea…

140

Affect Bees CSM David Bowie Emojis Foucault Granary Square Horrid Henry Ikea Monkey Justin Bieber Kanye West Liam Gallagher Marble No Shame Orange (fruit, colour) Pageant speeches Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody Ruscha Simpsons Thundercunt Upstaging Voting Wahaca’s Xeroxing Yearly traditions Zombie flicks

THIRD FLOOR


Joe Richardson Rest, 2016 Acrylic on canvas,150 x 120 cm

IKEA MONKEY

141


Top Image: Kat Buchanan Um, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know, 2016 Image by Sarah Sanderson

142

Top Image: Jack McHenry Dungeon of Vampire Nazis, 2016

THIRD FLOOR


Top Image: Gabrielle de la Puente Fibre Optic Aerobics, 2016 Still from Video

IKEA MONKEY

Top Image: Max Hollands SMILE, 2016 Video, 00:00:54 sec

143


Andrew Saunders The Bicycle Helmet, 2015 Mixed Media

144

THIRD FLOOR


Isabelle Cole Untitled, 2016 Performance

IKEA MONKEY

145


F 304

S D

T

R O

A G

Y S

Abra Attalus Carpus Apollonia Albina Basil Malo Fabiola Primož Klanjšček Pega Nicodemus Nehum Zita Bucephalas

T

o grieve is to turn inside and search by introspection, to persevere and continue on the journey surrounded by the phantoms more often alien than human in form. Here myths are explored by a gradual separation of the invisible from that of the ostensibly visible, exposed by a process of deconstruction at first. Originating on a physical plane of sensations - battling paint, the canvas and the concoction; thus widening the gap between the seer and the reflection - to distinguish subtler domains and their symbols. We take The Raw and the Cooked (1) seriously to expand our experience in a gradual transmutation, while we enjoy eating we also like cooking. We love to embrace: to squeeze one another and

146

muse at something refracted in the eye of a bricoleur, a gift mysteriously melting at the fingertip digit of the engineer. Nostalgic? Ever wondered why, rather than when, rather than if - speech may be dearer to an idea than the written word? How does ‘trace’ comes into being when Jacques claims that it is an act of effacing – does it survive in memory alone (archival)? Understanding, that is what we strive for, what life is worth living for – to understand is to love, to love is to see, to see is to be and to be is a problem, only when fenced by the shadow.

no more

I without it – am

1 – Levi Strauss

THIRD FLOOR


Primož Klanjšček Untitled, 2016 Wood, metal, string, styrofoam

STRAY DOGS

147


F 301

E

L

/

E

V

A

T

E

ELEVATING

Laura Fennelly Olivia Smith Ming Yan Bryan, Ng Lucy Breton Hannah Taylor

Text taken from a single page in Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object from 1966 to 1972 Lucy Lippard, pg 130. An attempt to collectively describe our art practices by using the answers given by another group of artist, Lawrence Weiner, Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler and Joseph Kosuth.

148

THIRD FLOOR


Laura Fennelly Steel and Fabric, 2016

ELEVATE/ELEVATING

149


Top Image: Olivia Smith Box Tracing paper, thread 1188 x 594 mm

150

Bottom Image: Ming Yan Bryan, Ng Untitled, 2015 Installation

THIRD FLOOR


Top Image: Lucy Breton Untitled, 2016 Mixed media

ELEVATE/ELEVATING

Bottom Image: Hannah Taylor Untitled, 2016 Floor, plastacine, image, screen, arrow Video still collage

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F 301

R E L A T I O N S H I P S A

N

D

I N T E R A C T I O N

Sophie Collinson Eva Suzanne Cookney Lillie Hand Charlotte Hamilton

W

e are examining relationships to ourselves, to others and within communities. How do stereotypes and social expectations affect our relationships to ourselves, with others and within communities? What draws us to other people and why do we form particular social groups? What is expected of us as women and what is expected of female bodies? How do we respond to expectations created for us and how do our responses play out in our private and personal lives, as opposed to in our social lives or in public? Do we know what we want? And if we do, what lengths will we go to in order to get it? Is it what we really want? Do we know ourselves as well as we think we do? Or are there subtleties in our interactions that might give away parts of ourselves we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t got to know yet, or parts that we try to hide.

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THIRD FLOOR


Sophie Collinson Wind Art, 2016 Installation

RELATIONSHIPS AND INTERACTION

153


Top Image: Eva Cookney Sage on cam, 2016 Photo in video shoot

154

Bottom Image: Lillie Hand Chelmsford HMP Prison, 2015 Photography

THIRD FLOOR


Charlotte Hamilton How I Lost My Confidence As A Woman, 2016 Poster Series 59.4 x 84.1 cm

RELATIONSHIPS AND INTERACTION

155


F 301

THREE

BOOBS

Mikela Henry-Lowe Caroline Margaret Hilson Vanessa Antunes Pardin

I

llusory Disguise

“My reflection is vague, perception unclear. My mind is like a shattered mirror That devises a veneer fashioned of my fears. I’m seized inside this illusory disguise That’s only feeding me a mouth full of lies. Oh, how I hunger to be recognized… Actuality stays hidden behind the scenes: What my eyes perceive is make believe. Trickeries are fitted in deceiving sleeves. I’m incapable of comprehending the genuine me.” (By Anne Currin)

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THIRD FLOOR


Mikela Henry-Lowe Head Wrap 2, 2016 Acrylic 120 x 120 cm

THREE BOOBS

157


Left Image: Caroline Margaret Hilson

Right Image: Vanessa Antunes Pardin Body of work, 2016 Body cast

158

THIRD FLOOR


THREE BOOBS

159


F 304

ARCHIPELAGO

Ella Bua-In Alice Beswick-Calvert Georgia Guthrie Nicola Christoforou Robert Chappell

O

il paints are combined with resins and layered through unplanned, process based gestural marks and imprints. This flux of painterly movement creates abstract, liminal spaces intended to interact with each viewer individually, offering an escape from day-to-day banality. Exploring continuity between experience and expression. Understanding feminine language; beyond binary opposition and patriarchal structured linearity. Explored through an existential understanding of being, and the relationship between self and world. A subjective tangibility portrayed through materials and gestural marks expresses the fluid, free-floating, non-linear form of the feminine visual language. Taking inspiration directly from the exploration of landscape using memory, form and colour, a sense of displacement and uncertain movement is presented

160

through the works. A visual interpretation of the psychology of space is informed by the study of psychogeography, with the aim not to recreate, but to present a metaphorical and suggestive landscape. Beginning as collages to create logical compositions, the paintings revolve around: line, depth, form and layers. The structured systems play with the idea of balance and space, which are then manipulated through considered colour placement. These elements aim to suggest movement and distortion within a twodimensional surface. A contemporary metropolis, an urban archipelago of enclosures appears as a chaotic agglomeration or urban environments. Architectural plans of these common spaces sitting 2-Dimensionally before they are realised. There is a transition between the real 3D space and the conceptual 2D space, expanding from the 2D print, into physical space.

THIRD FLOOR


Ella Bua-In Nootropic, 2015 Oil on Canvas 135 x 55 cm

ARCHIPELAGO

161


Left Page Top Image: Alice Beswick-Calvert Fragmented Energy, 2016 Charcoal powder on papers 594 x 841 mm

Bottom Image: Georgia Guthrie Displacement, 2016 Digital Image

Right Page Top Image: Nicola Christoforou Parallel Pattern, 2016 Acrylic on Board 120cm x 120 cm

Bottom Image: Robert Chappell Paper Sculpture 1, 2016 Ink on folded cartridge

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THIRD FLOOR


ARCHIPELAGO

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F 304

D D

A N N E V I T

Y O

Julia Karpova James Foster Lucy Loewenberg

D

ripping residue of last nights havoc. Spilling in and out, Stained floor, stained wall. To leave it? What a mess. You won’t see my hands, gloved. Not my crouching body. Object-play. A sticky puzzle, Transcending its original state. The change takes place in various forms, a shift in medium. Every piece in place Or is it?

The wreath of man’s first flower, is Plucked from out Eden’s sacred bower. And by the witness of the Stars fair reason, it is cast into the Midnight pond of the mind. Lo, the Perfumed hand does entreat your entrance into

164

The ancient case of dreams. Fall down Before the God’s strange new masque, for It is writ upon the walls of perception. Fall down, and take witness to your baptism in the fires of their ecstasy. And rejoice. Ye, rejoice. For their song is without End.

Invisible white-gloved hands. Material feed. Heat exerting, Humming. A light appears and then A picture. People-less, a movement of space whiteout disturbance. Architecture sleeps as our eyes Skim over its surface. A touch of the untouchable. Hands glide over the light, Finger tips counting flowers, Each petal seeping through the skin. The image fades to black.

THIRD FLOOR


Julia Karpova Homewrecker, 2016 Wood, paint, plastic, silicone, slime, rubber glove non-slip mat, honey, plinth

DANNY DEVITO

165


Left Image: James Clement Foster The Sunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Solemn Pilgrimage Through the Underworld, 2016 Painting and Digital Media 205 x 275 mm

166

Right Image: Lucy Loewenberg Untitled, 2016 Print from16mm stills & digital glitch

THIRD FLOOR


DANNY DEVITO

167


BRIDGE 3 + BARRIERS

I N F I N I T Y & CHANCE

Adonia Leung Chiali Chang

I

nfinity can be presented by repetitions. It can express by using patterns, drawings, physical actions, time, mental thinking, etc. The works are based on looking into repetitive patterns and actions being involved, which paper and pencils are being used as main materials. The presented work â&#x20AC;&#x153;Linesâ&#x20AC;? is a largescale of pencil drawing on a piece of paper that filled with lines. It based on infinity, repetitions and scales. The lines are drawn repetitively and placed in by the smallest spaces between each line. It relates to human mental and psychological behaviors, such as obsession & compelling notions (obsess-compulsive disorder (OCD)). It shows the anxiousness in the process of the piece. The works were generally around the themes, which were chance, control, and body. I focused on questioning whether there was the existence of pure chance

168

art exist or to what extent by letting go control to create a pure chance piece. I mainly used my body as a medium or sometimes other objects or organic substances by choreographed these mediums into video form, also, by thinking of the idea, at what point, a medium took over and become automatic on their own agency and determine the outcome of the piece. Former was looking at the idea of pure chance, the later which was control, I tried to use my body as a medium to see to what extent I can control my body and let chance happen or how my body was subject to a certain space and also show the characteristic to that space. Later, the piece been made will also be questioning the authorship of the piece, who made the work? Chance, medium or the artist?

GROUND + THIRD FLOORS


Top Image: Adonia Leung Lines, 2016 Pencil on paper 76 cm x 8 m

Bottom Image: Chiali Chang Chance and Control, 2016 Video 07:00 min

INFINITY & CHANCE

169


B 301 + C 301 + F301

I N D I V I D U A L S

Jade Wilford Tobia Silvotti Banna Sifri Chi Ho Ting,Gordon Pooja Patel

170

THIRD FLOOR


Left Image: Jade Wilford A Hard, Typically Green Stone, 2016 Video and writing Continuous dimensions and times

INDIVIDUALS

Right Image: Tobia Silvotti Carry that Weight, 2016 - ongoing Wood (Oak), rope 40 x 18 x 60 cm

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172

THIRD FLOOR


Left Image: Banna Sifri Love They Neighbour, 2016 Installation

INDIVIDUALS

Right Image: Gordon Chi The Gathering of Anxiety, 2016 Oil on canvas

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C

O

L

O

P

H

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CONCRETE BURNS This book was published to accompany the exhibition of works by graduates of BA (Hons) Fine Art at Central Saint Martins Degree Show One, which took place from 25 to 29 May 2016 at 1 Granary Square, N1C 4AA, London www.concreteburns.com BA Fine Art Degree Show Committee E Zhang, Leo A. Lopez, Joshua Tabti, Julia Karpova, Molly Gough, Isabelle Cole Jean-Baptiste Lagadec, Sofya Chibisguleva Printed in Lithuania UAB Grafija SavanoriĹł pr. 219A, Vilnius www.grafija.com Fonts Clear Sans, Overpass Art Direction and Design Sofya Chibisguleva www.sofyachibisguleva.com Editors: Sofya Chibisguleva, Molly Gough, Jean-Baptiste Lagadec Contributors: Gustav Metzger, Gabrielle de la Puente, Paul Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Kane Cover: Joshua Tabti

All right reserved. This book or any portion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the explicit written permission of the publisher.

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2016

BA Fine Art Catalogue 2016  
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