Page 1

WINTER 2010/2011

Giving Students Broadcast a Voice: Journalism at Sacred Heart

Building Community

R e u ni o n 2 0 1 0


WINTER 2010/2011

Convent of the Sacred Heart 1177 King Street Greenwich, CT 06831 Tel: (203) 531-6500 www.cshgreenwich.org Head of School Pamela Juan Hayes ’64

B o a r d o f T r u stees Paula G. Tennyson, Chair Stephen J. Sweeny, Vice Chair Donald E. Foley, Treasurer Imma De Stefanis, RSCJ, Secretary Bridget Bearss, RSCJ James T. Bretzke, S.J. Joseph J. Ciancaglini

2010–2011 Lenore de Csepel Kathleen Dolan, RSCJ ’56 Lorena Ferrara Wilfred A. Finnegan Kevin J. Grehan Pamela Juan Hayes ’64, Head of School Kimberly J. Huchro Jeanet H. Irwin Kevin A. Knight Robert G. Leary

Patricia E. Molloy Deborah Brown Murdock Mandy Dawson Murphy ’85, Alumnae President Justine Ryan, Parents’ Assn. President Anthony J. Scala Jr. Mary Ellen Vouté Sutherland ’85 Joseph N. Walsh III Patreece Williams-Creegan ’84

E d it o r Kathleen S. Failla C o ntri b u t o rs Victoria Taylor Allen, Michael F. Baber, Janice Calcagni, Jayne Collins, Virginia Downer, Daniel Favata, Kathleen A. Feeney ’98, Lindsey Festa ’09, Ethel Geisinger, Pamela Juan Hayes ’64, Derek Jackson, Erica Jorgensen ’04, John L. Kahl, Marion Kieltyka, Ann Marr, Mimi Melkonian, Mandy Dawson Murphy ’85, Mary Musolino, David Olson, Phyllis J. Pregiato, Len Rubenstein, Judy Ruttkamp, Ellyn Stewart, Paula G. Tennyson, Lori Wilson Desi g ner Good Design, LLC P rintin g Original Impressions Mail letters to the editor: Kathleen S. Failla faillak@cshgreenwich.org Send address changes: Virginia Downer downerg@cshgreenwich.org Send alumnae news: To class representatives or Kathleen A. Feeney ’98 feeneyk@cshgreenwich.org

M issi o n S tatement Convent of the Sacred Heart, Greenwich, founded in 1848, is an independent, Catholic, college preparatory school for young women, from preschool through grade 12. True to its international heritage, the School provides students with experiences of diversity and welcomes students of all races, socioeconomic backgrounds and religious beliefs. Convent of the Sacred Heart, steeped in a solid academic tradition, educates women to have independence of judgment, personal freedom and strength of character so that they can become leaders with broad intellectual and spiritual horizons. Service to others is a compelling commitment of our education, and the entire School community, as a member of the Network of Sacred Heart Schools, is dedicated to the Goals and Criteria.

o n the c o v er Diana White ’11 is in her fourth year of the Broadcast Journalism program. She is preparing for a broadcast career through her work on documentaries and experience as a news anchor. “I think one thing I like the most about Sacred Heart is that this school can provide us with experience for the future,” said Diana. (Image by Len Rubenstein)


F E AT U R E S

4

4 One of Our Greatest Pleasures: Building Community By Michael F. Baber

6 Building Community in Haiti By David Olson and Lori Wilson

10 Giving Students a Voice: Broadcast Journalism By Ellyn Stewart

6

13 Interview with Alumna Margaret Brennan ’98 15 CSH Alumnae Reflections

16 How I Spent My Summer Vacation By Mary Musolino

20 A Pilgrimage to the Holy Land By Phyllis J. Pregiato

24 An Eloquent Lesson in the Building of Community

10

By Mimi Melkonian

26 Friendship: How Gracious and Beautiful By Victoria Taylor Allen and Marion Kieltyka

34 Reunion 2010: Home Is Where the Heart Is

20

38 Outstanding and Honorary Alumnae Awards 41 Tree Dedication in Memory of Barbara Schruth Root ’65

Depa rtments 2 Message from the Chair of the Board of Trustees 3 Letter from the Head of School 25 Faculty Reflection 30 Around Campus

26

32 Message from the Alumnae President 33 Alumnae Highlights 42 Class Notes 49 Annual Report 2009–2010

34


M ess a g e f r o m T he Ch a ir o f the B o a r d o f T r u stees Dear Parents, Alumnae and Friends, On behalf of the Board of Trustees, I would like to thank you for your generous support of the 2009–2010 Annual Fund which raised more than $1.7 million. Your generosity allows us to continue providing our students with an outstanding educational experience rooted in the Goals and Criteria that have become the hallmark of our Sacred Heart education. The record-breaking support we enjoyed could not have happened without the leadership of Paul Huchro, whose enthusiasm and desire to make this the best year possible was infectious. Paul and his wife, Kim, a member of our Board, represent the passion and commitment of our parents, who participated at an incredible rate of 94 percent. Special thanks must go to our class captains for this wonderful response.

Our alumnae, led by Trustee Mandy Dawson Murphy ’85 and the GreenwichMaplehurst Alumnae Association board, increased their participation rate to 26 percent, an 8 percent improvement over last year. What a testament to our School when our graduates continue to give both their financial and volunteer support. They understand and appreciate the lifelong gifts of a Sacred Heart education. The faculty and staff at Convent of the Sacred Heart were again strong supporters of the Annual Fund. We are so fortunate to have such committed people under the leadership of Head of School Pamela Juan Hayes ’64 working with our children every day. Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat, more than 200 years ago, challenged us to help all students achieve academic and personal excellence, and to provide service to those in need of help within our communities.

Paula G. Tennyson

This timeless mission remains strong at Convent of the Sacred Heart, Greenwich, thanks to the continued support of our entire School community. With much gratitude,

Paula G. Tennyson Chair, Board of Trustees

2

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

UPCOMING EVENTS Parents’ Association Luncheon ���������������������������������� December 6 Christmas Vacation..................................December 18–January 2 Christmas Eve Mass ������������������������������������������������ December 24 Classes Resume ������������������������������������������������������������ January 3 Washington, D.C. Alumnae Gathering ������������������������ January 9 Parent Coffees...........................................January 10–February 3 Alumnae Très Bien Reception ������������������������������������� February 3 Boston Alumnae Reception �������������������������������������� February 13 Midwinter Break................................................. February 18–21 Spring Break............................................................March 12–27 Book Fair.................................................................. April 10–12 Alumnae Generations Tea ����������������������������������������������� April 14 NYC Alumnae Gathering at CSH 91st Street ������������������ April 19 Good Friday ������������������������������������������������������������������� April 22 Easter.............................................................................. April 24 Parents’ Association Auction ���������������������������������������������� May 7 Katie Cassidy Higgins ’96 Memorial Lacrosse Tournament ���������������������������������� May 15 Prize Days............................................................ May 31–June 2 Graduation of the Class of 2011 ���������������������������������������� June 3


Dear Members of the Sacred Heart Community: Welcome home to our 162nd year. We are so excited to have you back in our lives, you who are so deeply committed to preserving and advancing the mission of this School. We began the year focusing on the all-school theme, “The Building of Community as a Christian Value,” with an inspiring reflection given to our faculty and staff by Kathleen Hughes, RSCJ, former Provincial of the U.S. Province of the Society of the Sacred Heart. In her talk, Sr. Hughes encouraged us to examine our behavior in relation to how we live with those we have been given, not those we choose. She further enlightened us on the attitudes of St. Madeleine Sophie Barat and the importance she placed on the building of strong relationships to make a community a place where each person looks for the good in the other. It has often been said that values left unarticulated often become inoperative. I have seen in society in general a sense of anxiety, superficiality, lack of trust and isolation creeping into the lives of adults and children alike. Less time is being given to developing real relationships and authentic communication. Citizenship, both in daily life and in our digital world, is often lacking. As a community, I am looking for ways to work together to forge deeper connections with one another. St. Madeleine Sophie Barat knew more than 210 years ago what modern author JoAnn Deak calls in her book, How Girls Thrive, and Rachel Simmons in her book, The Curse of the Good Girl, Raising Authentic Girls with Courage and Confidence, that competence, confidence and connectedness develop high self-esteem. St. Madeleine Sophie, too, called it courage and confidence. However we name it, we need to work on maintaining a connected environment as a priority so that critical foundations and lasting friendships can be made.

C onvent of the S acred H eart

Letter f r o m the he a d o f s c h o o l That is why we are placing such a high priority on “who we are” with one another this year, as the education of our students, as whole persons who spread the love of God into the world, is our commitment and reason for being. The Sacred Heart educational experience is probably more powerful today than it was 20 years ago when everyone respected childhood. Research, conducted by ISM (Independent School Management), involving 9,000 independent school parents, has given us feedback as to why parents chose an independent education for their children. In rank order, these parents were looking for: • Safety—a place of emotional and physical security for their children • A strong student and faculty relationship • A school as a countercultural agency • An environment where the skill of the faculty and the rigor of the program is excellent. A Sacred Heart education stands strong in delivering these values to our students and their families, values that will endure the test of time. And so this year we are united in giving our students, and each other, the best possible experience, and to ensure in fact that this is the place in which they feel safe, the place they will always belong. Thank you for being a part of this remarkable school. Welcome home! With love and gratitude,

3

Goals and Criteria

As a member of the Network of Sacred Heart Schools, the entire School community is dedicated to the following Goals and Criteria:

Goal One A personal and active faith in God

Goal Two Pamela Juan Hayes ’64

A deep respect for intellectual values

Goal Three A social awareness which impels to action

Goal Four The building of community as a Christian value

Goal Five Personal growth in an atmosphere of wise freedom.


4

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

Image by Len Rubenstein

A l l a r e w e lco m e...

“Build a house where love can dwell, and all can safely live...a place where hands will reach beyond the wood and stone to heal and strengthen, serve, and teach.�


By Michael F. Baber, Assistant Head of School

C onvent of the S acred H eart

Building Community

One of our greatest pleasures:

“All are welcome, all are welcome, all are welcome in this place” is a familiar refrain the students have become accustomed to singing at Convent of the Sacred Heart. This popular hymn by Marty Haugen captures the essence of what St. Madeleine Sophie Barat believed about building community. The verses go on to encourage us to “Build a house where love can dwell, and all can safely live...a place where hands will reach beyond the wood and stone to heal and strengthen, serve, and teach….” A hallmark of St. Madeleine Sophie’s success was that she was able, with great challenges, to maintain her original vision of “this little Society,” while experiencing what can only be described as intense growth and quick expansion. Sophie fought hard to build a community of one heart and one mind, blessed with the fast influx of new members and challenging external influences. This was her daily duty. Sophie was a prolific letter writer; in order to maintain her connection to the many Houses she founded, she wrote constantly. It is estimated that she wrote more than 16,000 letters. This allowed her to effectively build community through her preferred mode of governance—relationships. Thankfully, our students are beneficiaries of this inheritance that Sophie has left us. Our students today belong to many communities. Their family first and foremost, their town and the community here at Sacred Heart.

This is what community looks like:

The young girl from Darien comes to school at Sacred Heart in Greenwich. Quickly she comes to know her classmates from Pelham, Rye, Fairfield and Mount Vernon. Dressed in the same uniform they quickly intuit their similarities, as well as their differences. They are soon friends and then, before they know it, sisters forever! The students learn of other sisters in our Sacred Heart School in Uganda. At first, very different, and yet again the similarities emerge, and almost immediately, an affection for the girls in Uganda. To belong to something larger is one of our greatest pleasures. The girls at Greenwich quickly come to understand themselves more intimately because they now belong to a community that includes sisters half a world away. Despite the obvious disparities, they see themselves as united and part of a much bigger community. They no longer see themselves as only from Darien. They are quickly becoming citizens of the world, a bigger and more enriching community.

This is what community sounds like, as a “veteran” second-grader greets a new classmate:

“How long have you been at Sacred Heart?” New second-grader: “This is my first year.” “It is? How do you know where everything is?” New second-grader: “No problem. You can just ask your friends…they are everywhere!” Before one realizes it, this little girl from Fairfield County who looked so cute in her pigtails and tartan jumper will be walking down the front lawn in a brilliant white dress, ready to forge ahead to new horizons. She not only looks different, she is different. She is very well aware of the complexities of the world because she has encountered them throughout her whole life at Sacred Heart. Here is another snapshot: her Facebook page has friends from three continents. How did she come to know them in the first place? She was having dinner at a classmate’s home who was hosting an exchange student from our school in Spain; she had a project to finish with a student in France that involved a video chat. There they were in Rye with a girl from Spain chatting with a sister from France! All in an instant! One of the many gifts that a Sacred Heart graduate leaves with is the insight and wisdom that come from coming to know “the other,” the one who is like her and the one who is not like her, both essential parts of community living at 1177 King Street. With eyes opened wide towards the horizon, our students and alumnae view themselves as citizens of the world. St. Madeleine Sophie must be smiling down upon us because her original vision of communities of her daughters, all around the world, making known the love of God continues to become a reality. “All are welcome, all are welcome, all are welcome in this place”

5


Building Community

in Haiti Story and Photography by David Olson, Middle School head, and Lori Wilson, director of campus ministry and community service

Heartwarming and heartbreaking are the best words to describe our summer Sacred Heart International Service Trip to Haiti. We spent 12 days living and working in the small mountain village of Casale. Our goals were to build community, to experience Haitian culture and to serve the village through various programs.

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

6

On our arrival in Haiti, our eyes were glued to the images passing by during our bus ride from Port-au-Prince to Casale. We saw hordes of people, countless collapsed buildings, tent cities, street markets and travelers crowded onto buses, motorcycles and burros. The most striking image, though, was that of children living in poverty. Our group of 17, consisting of two Religious of the Sacred Heart, college students from Mexico and faculty from Sacred Heart, Greenwich, arrived in Casale and were quickly greeted by the children of the village. Our adventure began with some trepidation, as communication via Creole was a challenge. We soon learned that there are multiple effective nonverbal communication methods. The local public school, with no running water or electricity, was our home base for the first few days and nights. We quickly realized that water is at the heart of Casale. With limited running water in the village, the public tap and the local river are gathering places for collecting water to carry home, or to wash clothes or bodies. The local parish of San Miguel proved to be another community gathering place. Father Anibal Zilli, a Claretian priest, serves as the pastor at San Miguel. Father Anibal is also described as a community developer as he helped Casale’s citizens to pool their limited resources to create “banks” to supply loans to each other. Father Anibal also spearheads various construction projects, works closely with the local schools and provides daily lunch to a significant number of neighborhood children. The church and parish house became our home and helped us reach groups of children and adults who participated in our daily afternoon programs.


C onvent of the S acred H eart

7

“We quickly realized that water is at the heart of Casale.”


Orphan of the earthquake: Six-year-old Joicine

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

8

The Health Center of the Grace of the Good Samaritan is another important community location for the village. One section of the clinic is open three days a week to treat various medical issues. People begin lining up days before the opening in hopes of securing a consultation with a doctor or nurse. The other section of the clinic, where we spent the bulk of our time, is devoted to providing sustenance for malnourished children. The 61 children, infants through six-years-old, live in a windowless communal room. We learned that some of the children had been brought to the clinic by their parents, others were abandoned, and some lost their parents in the earthquake or during childbirth. While the women working in the clinic needed help providing sustenance and a clean environment for the children, we spent much of our time simply providing attention, nurture and human contact. Haiti’s constitution states that all children should attend school through the age of 13. In reality, though, only 15 percent of children receive an education, as the government is unable to provide enough teachers and schools. Casale has one public school and five private schools and boasts a relatively impressive rate of 35 percent school attendance.

We spent a day at St. Michael the Archangel, one of the private elementary schools. While the outdoor classrooms, lack of a bathroom and minimal supplies were a contrast to our experience in Greenwich, we felt at home as both students and teachers were remarkably kind and shared a commitment to education and a passion for learning. Students pay $80 per year to attend the school. At the time of our visit, the school’s director was three months behind in providing the $100 a month teacher salaries, as many families were no longer able to pay their child’s tuition. The director inspired us when she shared her goals for her students: “Every child has different strengths; I want each of them to learn a profession.” Despite considerable poverty and seemingly insurmountable obstacles, we found the people of Haiti to be welcoming, generous and faithful. We returned to Greenwich with a new admiration of Haitian culture and an appreciation of the resources, such as water, health care and education, which we often take for granted. Our next goal is to engage the Sacred Heart community to make a difference in a place that broke our hearts, but won them forever.


C onvent of the S acred H eart

“Every child has different strengths; I want each of them to learn a profession.�

9


Giving Students a Voice:

Broadcast Journalism at Sacred Heart Story by Ellyn Stewart, studio director and Broadcast Journalism teacher

T

he camera operator slowly zooms into the attentive anchor sitting on the Today Show set. The floor director lifts her right hand high into the air to finish the silent countdown as she motions 5, 4, 3, 2, 1… The anchor clearly enunciates each syllable as she reports about educational opportunities for girls in a Ugandan village. This might easily be mistaken for a scene from NBC’s Rockefeller Center Studios. However, the camera operator is an eighthgrader, the floor director is a tenth-grader, and the anchor is a fourth-grader. Welcome to the David J. Bloom Broadcast Suite at Convent of the Sacred Heart, Greenwich. The Broadcast Journalism program has been in existence since 2000, and the capabilities of the program were greatly expanded in 2006 with the creation of the studio space that includes a control room, editing room and recording room. Many Sacred Heart parents and friends of the School work in the media

Image by Len Rubenstein

10

field, and they have been generous in donating their time, talent and gifts to the studio. One of the most exciting gifts was when Mr. Bloom’s colleagues at NBC donated the Today Show set where he had worked, in his memory. Mr. Bloom was a Sacred Heart parent and charismatic reporter for NBC News. In 2003, Mr. Bloom died while reporting on the Iraq war. The studio serves as a lasting testimony to Mr. Bloom’s legacy. More than 920 students have worked in the studio at some point during their time at Sacred Heart. The studio is a resource that provides the youngest to the oldest students in our community an opportunity to share their stories and build confidence. Students learn the latest skills necessary to communicate in an increasingly technology-centered world as well as traditional communication skills, such as writing and public speaking. They experience real-world deadlines and the

pressure of sharing a persuasive message in a limited amount of time. A highlight for the students is being able to watch their work on the television monitors after they perform. This gives them the opportunity to see themselves in a way that they don’t often get to experience in a typical classroom. The students are often most excited about the technology skills they learn, such as operating the teleprompter or using the green screen, but ultimately some of the most lasting benefits of working in the studio are that the students develop self-confidence and poise. As fifth-grader Jillian Larkin who worked as an anchor with her fourthgrade class said, “To see what it is like to be on camera is amazing because some girls weren’t so sure of themselves. It gives the students a chance to see how much they can accomplish and to really believe in themselves.”


©iStockphoto.com/Trifonov_Evgeniy

Global Technology In an increasingly global world, broadcast journalism is a medium that transcends geographical boundaries. Students are taking what they learn in our studio and sharing it with the world through the Internet. In the last year, students worked on video projects based in Nicaragua, Uganda and the Canadian Arctic, taking their technology skills to the most remote parts of our world and returning to share stories of heartbreak and triumph. Students in Ms. Mimi Melkonian’s Arabic class made connections with others from around the world after posting an online version of a news show they created entirely in Arabic. They received feedback from students and educators at universities in Egypt and Lebanon, as well as American institutions such as New York University and Georgetown University. “As a teacher, I think it’s not enough to teach in a classroom. We should be teaching outside of the classroom, and this is a great tool to show how well we can prepare our students for the twenty-first century using technology,” Ms. Melkonian said. One of the favorite technologies the students use is the green screen that allows students to composite an image of their choice behind them. The green screen is most commonly used for weather forecasts, in which the presenter appears to be standing in front of a large map, but our students often use the green screen in more creative ways. A successful Lower School project was “Christmas Around the World”

in which third-graders pretended to be reporting about holiday traditions from cities in Africa, Europe and South America using the green screen.

Studio Space for All The Middle School used the studio to transcend boundaries of time and space when last year’s fifth-grade classes created elaborate scripts, sets, costumes and videos that portrayed them as mythological characters from ancient cultures. Fifth-grade teacher Mrs. Kelly Bridges and Middle School Coordinator

of Educational Technology Mrs. Kiki Carozza helped the students develop the mythological characters and bring their learning to life. They spent time in their classroom planning, scripting and envisioning their performances before they began production in the studio. “I’ve never seen students so eager to get through the first stages of a project so they could get to the studio,” Mrs. Bridges said. One of the most exciting elements of the studio is that it allows for collaborative projects between different grades. A notable collaboration is the production of

11


Broadcast Journalism is an elective in the Upper School.

Giving Back

12

Both Upper and Lower School students benefit from the collaboration and mentoring that occurs in the studio. The Upper School students delight in the opportunity to work with some of the youngest members of our community. The fourth-graders are in awe that the older students take the time to treat them seriously and trust them with important responsibilities on set, and the younger students are especially receptive to learning from other students who are closer to their own age rather than adults. Broadcast students actively share their technology talents by donating their videotaping and editing skills to members of the school and local community. Last summer, six current broadcast students and alumna Lindsey Festa ’09 donated

students in 3 classes, and hundreds

The program started with 7

of student and faculty using the

their time to lead a video program for seventh-grade girls from low-income families. The broadcast students taught the Arts Academy of our Summer Outreach Program how to videotape, storyboard and edit. The extraordinary group of talented students produced three short videos that reflect their dreams, fears and hopes.

Ms. Margaret Brennan ’98; former Today Show and NBC Nightly News producer Mrs. Susan Holey; HBO Sports producer Mr. Rahul Rohatgi; and documentary producer Ms. Abbie Hurewitz. Junior Lucy Adams won the second place Audience Award for her documentary, “No Destination,” about the homeless people of New York City. Lucy said, “Seeing the final product of the film festival up on the big screen with the professionals in the audience was very exciting. I had watched it a million times on a computer screen, but it was a big deal for us to be able to share it with others on the big screen.” Many of our broadcast alumnae are successfully pursuing media studies in college and beyond. Keep your eyes and ears tuned carefully the next time you turn on the television or click onto your favorite online show. If you take a closer look, you just might see a Sacred Heart alumna walking up the aisle to pick up her Emmy award or sitting confidently at the anchor desk of your favorite news show. Sacred Heart students are sharing their voices with the wider world, and they are poised to make their mark in the media. Learn more about the broadcast program by visiting our website at www.broadcast.cshgreenwich.org.

students in 1 class. Now, there

the fourth-grade news show, News from the Heart. Upper School broadcast journalism students teach the fourth-graders how to operate the studio cameras, teleprompter, boom microphone and audio mixer. Fourth-grade teacher Mrs. Candy Sweeney said, “The experience that the girls have, to be able to produce a show in this setting, is one of the things the students have talked about all year, and it’s one of the things they will remember most about being in fourth grade.”

are 52 Broadcast Journalism

Award-Winning The Broadcast Journalism class is an elective offered to students in grades 9–12. Sacred Heart students have been recognized as some of the top student journalists in the nation, most recently winning seven Gold Circle Awards from the Columbia Scholastic Press Association. Students produce public service announcements, documentaries, a monthly news show, short films, music videos and independent projects of their choice. The Broadcast Journalism program continues to expand each year. A notable addition in the 2009–2010 school year was the first ever film festival. The film festival provided a place to showcase student videos to an audience of more than 400 people including many professionals from the media world. A panel of media industry judges watched the work and chose the winners. Judges included Bloomberg television anchor

studio as a resource. 7 alumnae of


the Broadcast Journalism program

58 students have won awards

have gone on to pursue media work

from the Cablevision Educational

for the past 4 years. 19 students

at a professional level through

Awareness Association that

have won national Gold Circle

internships or careers in the field.

recognized our School’s news show

Awards from Columbia University.

as the top show in Fairfield County

INTERVIEW WITH ALUMNA

MARGARET BRENNAN ’98 By Elizabeth Sabia ’11

How is Bloomberg different from your former job at CNBC? I grew up at CNBC and loved working in the NBC family of networks. I spent a number of years both behind and in front of the camera in various roles. By the end of my seven years there, I was the retail and consumer spending reporter at CNBC and contributed to MSNBC and NBC. While I loved that job and its national reach, I was hungry to broaden my reach into international news. Three lessons became abundantly clear during the financial crisis: 1) Wall Street and Main Street are inextricably linked to each other, 2) all stories are business stories or have financial ramifications and 3) there are no borders to the financial markets as they are increasingly global. Now that I put together my own two-hour global broadcast, I get to bring that context to the wide array of political, economic, social and financial stories on the agenda. I’d like to think that the viewer learns something each day and that we take

financial news a step beyond the proverbial “bottom line” of earnings statements. The economy is story number one around the world. Bloomberg is a global network (broadcasting to Asia, Europe, Mideast, Africa and North America) and we’ve got thousands of reporters stationed all around the world and not just in the financial hubs of London, Singapore, Hong Kong and Dubai. We actually have bureaus in Kazakhstan and Lithuania! Having that footprint allows us to continually report from, follow up on and break news on the frontier right alongside that of Washington and New York. Since I launched my own program here at Bloomberg, I’ve broadcasted live from Saudi Arabia, Dubai, London, Dublin and the Gulf Coast. The recession, tight news budgets and fundamental shifts in the media space have made international correspondents an endangered species. So many television networks and news agencies have whittled down their foreign reporting resources to a bare minimum. I think that the financial news space is one of the arenas in which international coverage will have to continue to exist and flourish. After all, the economic growth stories playing out in the emerging markets of China, Brazil and India are likely to continue to power the recovery here in the U.S. market and bring with them political and social change. Who are some of the famous people you have interviewed? One of the best things about my job is that I get to speak to some of the smartest and most interesting people in the world every day. Some of the best-known: Queen Rania of Jordan, former U.K.

Courtesy of bloomberg news

What is your current job, and what are your responsibilities at Bloomberg? I am an anchor and reporter for Bloomberg television (BTV). I have a daily show called “InBusiness with Margaret Brennan” which airs at 10 a.m.–12 noon ET. Along with my production team, I put together a two-hour international broadcast that covers the latest in the United States financial markets, corporate headlines and the political and economic forces that are reshaping global business and impacting trading. The show reaches 240 million viewers around the world and is simulcast on Bloomberg radio.

Prime Minister Tony Blair, George Soros, the prime ministers of Ireland and Hungary, the president of Vietnam, Twitter founder Biz Stone, PepsiCo’s Indra Nooyi and loads of other influential thinkers, economists, strategists. What was your most challenging interview and why? Each day and each interview brings its own challenges. One of the more complex ones for me to prepare for was my recent interview with the CEO of Massey Energy. We spoke about why 29 miners died in an explosion in one of his company’s coal mines last April. It was the worst U.S. coal mine disaster in 40 years and were it not for the BP Gulf of Mexico disaster, a good amount of energy reform would be focused on this portion of the industry. One of the challenging things about the interview for me was attempting to juggle the many narratives within the tragedy while keeping in mind the human cost of the event. The CEO felt that the media were demonizing him for a corporate record of safety violations and said that there wasn’t recognition of how important the coal industry is in this country. He felt the media and the public complained about coal being the “dirtiest” energy source (largest greenhouse gas emitter), but failed to understand that 50 percent of the electricity used in the U.S. comes from

13


I can’t tell you how many times that I’ve thought back to Sr. Cherry’s class and her telling us all to “have the courage of your

conviction or don’t bother to raise your hand!” coal. It is not only a cheap energy source, but it is also abundant. Thousands of jobs are created by the industry in poor areas of the country. It still isn’t clear why 29 people died at the Upper Big Branch Mine in West Virginia.

14

How and why did you get into international reporting? I was a foreign affairs and Middle East studies double major at the University of Virginia. For most of my time at UVa., I thought that I’d work in the foreign service. After interning on the international news desk at CNN during the summer in between my third and fourth years there, I was hooked on working in a newsroom! I saw this as a great way to continue to learn myself, while also sharing firsthand experience in a way that educated the public. Most Americans will never get to leave the 50 states and travel the world. In fact, much of their knowledge of the world will come from a classroom and beyond that they’re likely to experience the world through their TV set or computer screen. That can make those channels a tremendous conduit for education and change. The media has tremendous power in offering a platform for public information and awareness.

What lessons did you learn in your Sacred Heart education that continue to impact your life today? I can’t tell you how many times that I’ve thought back to Sr. Cherry’s class and her telling us all to “have the courage of your conviction or don’t bother to raise your hand!” While she put it in the most memorable terms, this was a sentiment that I heard throughout my years at Sacred Heart. You should be a full participant if you bother to get involved, and, if you do … don’t hedge! I also think about that adage we hear so often at Sacred Heart, “those to whom much is given, much is expected.” That’s a good reminder to stay humble and get involved with the community. I just got involved with a charter school in Stamford. It is called the Waterside School and the hope is that it will scout talented yet less privileged children in an effort to close gaps in their education. Ultimately, we hope this will help increase access to the kind of education that we’re all lucky enough to experience at Sacred Heart. What advice do you have for broadcast journalism students who want to pursue a career in the field? Stay nimble and broaden out your skill set. Communication and information are becoming increasingly democratized. Anyone with a computer can create a blog or a story. That means that your “brand” and integrity are your calling cards. Since consumers have so many choices, they need a reason to choose you. It also means

that you are going to have to engage on many different levels with many different communication channels. You should be able to write for the ear and the eye. Write show copy and be able to write a column for print. You should know what producing a package is like and what line producing a show is like. I learned a tremendous amount as a producer and I do think that any on air person would be well-served by spending some time behind the camera. What are the best and worst parts of being a journalist? The show goes on every day whether or not I feel like waking up at 4:45 a.m. The best part is that I have the excuse to pick up the phone and talk to amazingly talented minds about how the world is changing. Do you ever find it challenging to get people to open up about controversial topics? Yes—it is very hard to get people to talk about topics that make them uncomfortable. However, I firmly believe that if you don’t tell your own story then someone else will tell it for you. It is almost always better to get out front and be proactive than to be on the defensive. Oftentimes the most uncomfortable thing to do is the right thing to do on the communication front. Going forward, what do you hope to accomplish in the world of journalism? What are your goals? Every day I hope that viewers of my show walk away with something new that they learned by the end of the program. Business news is not only front page news during a recession. It is also one of the first places that you can watch the world change. How China’s currency trades will impact the price that you may pay for your jeans at the mall; sweeping financial reforms in Washington will impact what you are charged for that college loan that you’re about to take out; and the devastating floods in Pakistan will not only cost that country half of its economic growth this year, but may also send some victims into the arms of the militant groups, who are providing much-needed aid to those affected by the floods. I hope to connect the dots.


CSH Alumnae reflections LINDSEY FESTA ’09 When I was younger and first started watching the news, I was not tuning in specifically to keep abreast of current events. My interest was born of my fascination with the reporters who covered the stories and delivered them to me with backdrops from around the globe. I was drawn like a moth to the light, fixated on these storytellers, who were consumed with gathering information and, sometimes, even risking their lives in the process. They were the ultimate spin-masters and I was mesmerized. It was chaotic. It was wild. It was fantastic. At the age of twelve, I was unaware that opportunities in broadcast journalism could be a reality, assuming that it was all up to chance and being in the right place at the right time. Fortunately, I grew to realize that such a career was not out of reach. Four years later, I was accepted into the Broadcast Journalism program at Sacred Heart and my life completely changed. I lived and breathed, not only for news, but for film. With the guidance and support of Ms. Ellyn Stewart, I discovered an entirely new world of media. I was not only able to film news pieces like those I had grown up watching, but to write and produce my own stories for people to view and appreciate. I was not constrained to

a two-minute news segment, but I was indulged and extended my story into a five- to six-minute documentary. In one moment, I focused on the satire of the 2008 presidential election in my documentary, “Fried Squirrels for President.” In the next, I exposed the horrors and atrocities of female suicide bombers in my award-winning documentary, “Weapon of Choice.” I found myself making public service announcements about constitutional amendments and global warming. I was hooked. Upon graduation in June 2009, I was concerned that I would be unable to find a place in which I could thrive and excel, as I had under the auspices of the Broadcast Journalism program at Sacred Heart. Any apprehension soon dissipated, as all of my experience paid off and paved a road ahead. During both my first and second semesters at Fordham University, I was selected to co-anchor “Fordham Nightly News,” the nightly live broadcast. This position entailed my researching international, national, local, and school-related stories, writing and then delivering them. I was selected to create my own “girl about campus” segment. In addition, I had the great opportunity to intern at WFUV, Fordham’s National Public Radio affiliate. Now happily entering my sophomore year

at Fordham, I have been appointed assistant producer of “Fordham Nightly News.” I am vice president of the executive board for the TV station. I am proud of these accomplishments so early in my college career. During this past summer, to expand upon my passion, I experienced a completely new field of broadcast, that is, children’s television. Interning at the Manhattan-based production company, Out of the Blue Enterprises (creators of the hit shows “Blues Clues” and “Super Why!”), was wonderful and opened my eyes to new possibilities for the future. Also during the summer, a truly worthwhile experience was volunteering at Sacred Heart’s Summer Academy. As a teacher’s assistant in the Arts Academy, I worked closely with seventh-grade girls as they learned how to videotape, create a storyboard and to edit. Teaching these middle school girls the ins and outs of broadcast journalism was very rewarding. It struck a chord, as I remembered how amazed I was at their age and how the exposure to what they were experiencing for the first time made such a difference in my life. These experiences were pivotal for me, and for this I have Ms. Stewart and the Broadcast Journalism program to thank.

and wonderful memories I made in the Broadcast Journalism class are still near and dear to my heart. Since graduating from CSH, I have used the tools and skills the Broadcast Journalism program empowered me with to challenge myself in college and to pursue a career in television production. At Brown University I doubled-majored in Ethnic Studies and American Civilization and completed a fulllength documentary for my honors thesis entitled, “Shadows of Brown.” The film examined the desegregation of the American school system and the current status of our nation’s public schools. I currently live in Atlanta, Georgia, and work at WSB-TV Channel 2. We are the ABC affiliate here in Atlanta, the number one station in Georgia, and the highest rated affiliate in the nation!

Recently, I won an Emmy Award and Edward R. Murrow Award for a prime-time special I co-produced entitled, “Our Schools, Our Kids, Our Future,” which examined the successes and failures of Georgia’s education system. Tahnee Tangherlini ’04, a Sacred Heart Broadcast Journalism alumna is WSB-TV’s most recent hire. She works as a researcher/producer with one of our investigative reporters. People are always impressed and amazed when I tell them about the opportunities and the unique high-quality education that I received in high school. I am truly grateful for the life-changing experiences that Sacred Heart and Broadcast Journalism afforded me.

ERICA JORGENSEN ’04 Convent of the Sacred Heart provided me with opportunities that few high school students get the chance to take advantage of—the Broadcast Journalism class was one that defined my high school career and future life choices. The Broadcast Journalism program was founded during my freshman year, and I signed up out of an interest in videography, not quite realizing all of the possibilities it would open up to me. While at Sacred Heart I had the opportunity to produce, write and edit several news packages a year and a documentary. The documentary, “Chocolate Chip Cookie,” examined my parents’ interracial relationship and won a student Emmy Award in 2004. Broadcast allowed students to collaborate on projects, flex our creativity and engaged us in a new mode of learning. The close friendships

15


How I Spent My

Summer

“Scientia Pro Bono Humani Generis” is the motto of

the Rockefeller University and it means “Science for the Benefit of Humanity.” This sentiment is pervasive in the many research labs at Rockefeller, and in the unique course they call the Summer Science Outreach Program (SOP). This program has both student and teacher components. I was fortunate to be one of five teachers chosen to participate in the teacher portion of the SOP.

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

16

The seven-week program was a mix of professional development opportunities and biomedical research, and was one of the highlights of my professional career. As a teacher in the course I attended lectures, participated in presentations, and met regularly with the other teachers and high school students in the program. One of my favorite aspects of the program was getting to know the other teachers. We enjoyed getting together weekly to discuss best practices, share knowledge on student opportunities, and have exciting brainstorming sessions. The five teachers were primarily from the New York area, but one teacher was from an all-girls’ school in Singapore. And, of course, there was the research! I worked in the Pfaff Lab for

Neurobiology and Behavior. My project involved determining the feasibility of using a gene excision technique called Cre/loxP to delete estrogen receptors in the ventromedial hypothalamus. This study will ultimately be used to determine the effects of estrogen on social behavior. The research techniques used in the lab included the analysis of brain maps, tissue slicing, immunohistochemistry staining, and digital microscopy. It was a very valuable experience to be a “student” again and to have a wonderful mentor, Dr. Yoav Litvin, guiding me. Over the past 25 years, I have been involved in several research projects. My favorite aspects of the journey have always been protocol troubleshooting and the analysis of results to see if the

hypothesis is correct. The element of discovery is always an exciting part of the process for me. The results of my research were very promising, and my project culminated in a presentation to both the Pfaff Lab and the greater community at an end-of-summer research symposium. My experience will directly benefit the students in Convent of the Sacred Heart’s Science Research Program. Our students will learn related hands-on lab techniques and will be exposed to the many research projects taking place at Rockefeller. I am happy to report that several students are eager to apply for the 2011 Summer Science Outreach Program for students.


C onvent of the S acred H eart

Vacation

1

By Mary Musolino, director of Upper School Science Research Program

17

2

3 1. Mrs. Musolino in the Pfaff Lab for Neurobiology and Behavior at Rockefeller University. 2. Mrs. Musolino (2nd from left) with the other teachers in the Rockefeller Science Outreach Program. 3. Mrs. Musolino explains her research to a high school student at the Rockefeller Science Outreach Symposium.

Background©iStockphoto.com/IngaNielsen

Mary Musolino has spent a lifetime studying and teaching science and she has imparted a love of science to hundreds of Sacred Heart students. She is a former Science Department chair and currently teaches Advanced Placement Chemistry and three grade levels of Science Research. On being awarded the School’s first sabbatical in 1999, Mary spent a semester at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine conducting research into breast cancer. She has continued to pursue her scholarship and teacher training. It is because of Mary’s vision that Sacred Heart has an awardwinning Science Research Program.


Katie Colford ’12 working in the lab.

IN THEIR OWN WORDS

18

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

Science Research Program Inspires Students The Science Research Program is a three-year course that enables students to practice original scientific research. All students enter their research into local, regional, and national scientific competitions. Graduates have gone on to study science at such universities and colleges as Columbia, Dartmouth and Yale. In the program, students identify their topic of research; read scientific literature; create testable hypotheses; perform experiments; record, analyze and discuss results; and state clear conclusions. They communicate and work with scientists within their field of research, and maintain a notebook and portfolio of their work. Students are eligible to gain college credit for their research work. In their own words, here are stories from our juniors and seniors about the significant projects they are working on.

Caroline Antonacci ’12: This summer, I had the privilege of working in Dr. Fong’s laboratory at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center for eight weeks. I worked with a research fellow on a project focusing on oncolytic viruses and colorectal metastases. An oncolytic virus is a special virus that infects and kills cancer cells while leaving the healthy cells alone. I learned many laboratory techniques, including pipetting, cell culture and Western blotting. Next summer, I plan to work on my own project and be more independent. I look forward to my future research work and hope to contribute to the field of oncolytic viral therapy. Katie Colford ’12: This past summer, I conducted research at the Saltzman Lab at Yale University with Dr. Toral Patel. The Saltzman Lab primarily deals with biomedical engineering research and focuses on tissue engineering and drug delivery, particularly the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a type

of terminal brain tumor. My research focused on developing drug-loaded nanoparticles which can be delivered to the brain via convection-enhanced delivery to eliminate remaining tumor cells after surgically removing GBMs. I look forward to my continued research in this area. Caroline Cunningham ’12: I am conducting research on resveratrol, particularly its potential in skin cancer prevention and treatment. I have visited several universities, such as Harvard and New York University (NYU), to speak to professors studying this compound. I am currently in contact with a professor from Columbia University who will help broaden my knowledge on the topic of skin cancer prevention and treatment. I will perform my research this year, and look forward to seeing the results.


n every y, RSCJ Observatory is ope The Mary Aloysia Harde the w Vie r. yea . during the school Thursday, 8 p.m.–10 p.m see to eck Ch a. ronomer Rick Bri night sky with campus ast by er ath we ent lem to clouds or inc if viewing is canceled due (203) 532-3322. phoning the observatory, nal ern Connecticut Invitatio February 5, 2011—South te yno Ke . p.m Fair, 9 a.m.–2 Science and Engineering for ist ent sci ch el, senior resear Speaker: Dr. Heidi Hamm te. The Space Science Institu and Middle Schools March 2, 2011—Lower . Science Symposium, 6 p.m

Krystyna Miles ’12 reading the air temperature at Lee’s Pond, a part of the Saugatuck River in Westport, Conn.

Jenne Ingrassia ’11: For two months this past summer, I was a mentor student at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals in the Ophthalmology Department. I worked very closely with a team of ocular researchers and observed several therapies being tested for efficacy and safety for various eye diseases, such as macular degeneration, chemical injuries in the cornea, and retinal detachment. I specifically conducted experiments that involved targeting marked antibodies in the hopes that this mechanism would inhibit the angiogenesis, or blood vessel growth, in an injured cornea. Gloria Lee ’11: This summer I participated in the NYU Dental School’s Summer Research Program. I was involved in investigating dental practices and dental care utilization in pregnant women, as well as factors influencing dental care while pregnant. I wish to pursue a career in dentistry so this experience was a great opportunity and rewarding learning experience. Krystyna Miles ’12: This past August, I volunteered for the Harbor Watch program at Earthplace, the nature center in Westport, Conn. I collected various water samples from rivers around the Westport/

C onvent of the S acred H eart

pus: Science Events on Cam

annual

m, ence Research Symposiu March 30, 2011—CSH Sci fessor pro , dat Vah da aker: Dr. Lin 6 p.m.–8 p.m. Keynote Spe e. ll Medical Colleg of medicine, Weill Corne

Norwalk area and then ran tests on the samples back in the lab. Testing led to the closing of Pasture Beach in Norwalk due to exceedingly high bacteria levels. While it was satisfying to be part of a project that helped the community, I also realized the seriousness of the issue. Therefore, I feel compelled to continue volunteering throughout the school year, particularly on a project that monitors the Poplar Plains Brook on a biweekly basis. Hopefully, I can help spread the word about water’s essential role in our community. Jessica Morris ’11: My project is about finding bacteria that can break down cellulose to turn it into ethanol for fuel. I am collecting samples of compost and vegetation which may contain organisms that break down cellulose. I will be testing these samples for cellulase, which is an enzyme that catalyzes the fermentation of cellulose into ethanol. Carly Sobecki ’11: I spent the summer working in the Saltzman Lab at Yale University. This lab focuses on developing technology based on the use of biocompatible polymeric materials for the controlled delivery of drugs, proteins, and genes. I worked on researching gene

therapy based treatments for cystic fibrosis using a polymer based controlled release delivery system. I specifically worked on fabricating nanoparticles using different ratios of the proteins poly(beta-amino ester), or PBAE, and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), or PLGA, determining the size of the particles, measuring the control release of DNA from the particles, and testing the cell transfection. Sam Tarde ’12: The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the four most important ligaments and connects the bones in the knee. An ACL injury is one of the most common and severe sports injuries. I am very interested in the new surgical procedures and rehabilitation techniques that are in progress for the reconstruction of the ACL. I am in the process of contacting researchers at Yale University, to seek work in a research lab and find out new advancements in ACL reconstruction.

19


Holy Land Story and Photography by Phyllis J. Pregiato, Theology Department chair, Upper School Theology teacher

Sacred Heart schools strive to encourage an ongoing adventure of the mind and heart for all constituencies. One of the greatest adventures for teachers is the sabbatical offered annually in Greenwich to a teacher whose proposal best meets the criteria. Dreaming about an idea and then creating a written format for it are stimulating for the imagination. Personally experiencing the sabbatical transcended all expectations and became one of the great highlights of my life.

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

20

Since I have been teaching Scripture for many years, Israel placed highly on my “A list” but I had never seen it. Due to the sabbatical, I was able to attend the Tantur Ecumenical Institute, located on the road between Jerusalem and Bethlehem, in Israel, during February and March 2010, for six weeks of classes, travel and prayer. The Institute, now under the auspices of the University of Notre Dame, was established shortly after Vatican II as a direct result of the desire for more ecumenical dialogue. Open to people of all religious beliefs, the Institute promotes and encourages far-reaching discussions. Their six-week program fit my needs perfectly. Travel is always engaging for me but I wanted to do more than just tour the region. This program allowed for greater immersion in the day-to-day life of the people who live there. I had time to visit and revisit the holy sites and to absorb the culture and the sacredness of this Holy Land. Although most of the time was spent in and around Jerusalem, included was a five-day trip to

the Galilee, the region where Jesus walked and taught. Everyone kept asking me if I thought I would be safe. I had not really thought about personal safety as in guns and bombs. What was more daunting to me was arriving in a country where I did not know anyone or speak the language, finding strange ATMs, procuring a shared taxi from the airport to Jerusalem, an hour away, and arriving at an unknown place after dark, alone. Not only do I not usually travel alone, I also did not know anyone who had been accepted into this program. Did I think about safety? Yes, but more in terms of getting to the right place before my nerves dissolved. Tantur is on the outskirts of Jerusalem and there was a shouting match among the taxi drivers and the dispatcher over who was going to take me there from Tel Aviv. It was in Hebrew, but I got the gist. Nobody wanted me…but ultimately I was directed to a cab. When we eventually arrived at the big iron gate, I rang the bell, and rang, and rang, three


C onvent of the S acred H eart

21

The Dome of the Rock dominates the landscape in Jerusalem.

times, while the driver huffed and puffed in Hebrew. Finally, the gate slid open and we rode up the long, winding driveway in the dark. A light shone under an archway, which was too narrow for the taxi, so I alighted with my heavy suitcase and more paraphernalia. I could not help reflecting during this whole experience about Saint Philippine Duchesne coming to the United States in 1818. What thoughts and fears she must have had. Yet, she chose to go anyway. Here I was, worried about a trip that was so much easier, and I really wanted to be there, just like Philippine. Although there seemed to be only one person present when I arrived, he knew that I was expected. My room was freezing. I had been warned about the cold in winter, but this was beyond expectation. I bundled up, settled in, still shivering, and feeling very much alone. However, I had arrived and so, eventually, did sleep. What a difference the daytime makes! The sun was shining; the heat in my room was turned on; a schedule for the next six weeks

appeared along with a list of people who would be sharing my program. This was real. On that first day, we all gathered on the roof overlooking the city of Jerusalem and the city of Bethlehem. In the distance were the mountains of Moab from where Moses viewed the Promised Land. The enormity of that moment cannot be described. Six weeks later, at the end of my sabbatical, I passed close to Mount Nebo, in Jordan, considered the very place where Moses stood as he surveyed what God had promised. I think of these as the bookends of my whole trip. It was as if I had begun my learning experience from a great distance, but now I was finally closing in on the truth. In between there were so many spiritual, emotional, sensory, surprising, even contradictory experiences, and all types of people that I cannot even begin to describe: the holy sites swarming with tourists and pilgrims; the ancient steps to the Temple Mount which probably felt the feet of Jesus; savory spices mounded into pyramidal shapes in the souks; Bedouin women selling their home-grown


asleep under a broom tree, and the reader is sitting under a real broom tree. The Western Wall remains a place of pilgrimage and is often the media focus when Jerusalem is in the news. Visualize walking towards it with so many others, seeing how huge it is and actually touching the ancient stones which have withstood all manner of destruction. Who would not be emotionally overwhelmed? On the other hand, there are the questions that remain. When confronted with multiple locations for Biblical events, where is the reality? How can true believers not appreciate the foundational unity they share in this Holy Land, and still not be able to resolve more of their long-standing theological differences? What happens when the Temple Mount is closed to religious “outsiders” because rock-throwing in protest has again made it unsafe? How can modern-day politicians settle problems that are not just years old, but centuries old, and which resonate throughout the world? Why do people who believe so faithfully in God live peacefully together one day yet erupt with volatility on the next? These are the challenges that I have brought home with me. I know I am forever transformed by this experience. When I show my photos in class or describe the pictures to others, I not only relive the time and place of the photo, but I am reminded of the people who were with me that particular day and of the people who inhabited that place down through the ages. I can see the long human procession throughout time; those who were there at the beginning; those who followed them; those who

Entrance to the tomb of Jesus

Archaeological site of the biblical town of Be’er Shiva

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

22

herbs spread out on a simple cloth at my feet; soldiers with guns everywhere in the Holy Land. It was only later that I thought of the pervasive presence of the Roman soldiers in Jesus’ time. This was still a land where diverse religions and politics sometimes walk hand in hand and sometimes do not. In retrospect, I am not sure what I expected. I do know that the Holy Land offers many answers to faith and an equal number of challenges. Where I expected to be walking in the footsteps of the Old Testament patriarchs and of Jesus himself, I sometimes found no trace of those days. There were often too many people at the sites and busloads of tourists who seemed to be following the same repetitive agenda. Aggressive vendors were selling everything from the sacred to the mundane. Highly questionable “facts” were touted as truth. On the other hand, ruins all over Israel hinted at the glory of ages past, long-held traditions placed certain events at my feet, albeit several layers below, and an atmosphere of unmistakable holiness crept into even the most crowded of venues. There were also moments of sublime connections. Since there were a number of priests participating in the program, Mass was a major element of communal prayer. Imagine being on the shore of Lake Galilee, next to the church which commemorates the time when Jesus said to the Apostle Peter, “Do you love me?” and the priest celebrating Mass is named Peter. Traveling to so many of the geographical references found in the Bible made rereading it fundamental. Think about a day in the dry Judean hills, listening to the story of Elijah


C onvent of the S acred H eart

arrived as conquerors bent on destruction; those who rebuilt again and again, and all those who came on pilgrimage and continue to do so. What I have learned cannot really be quantified. Many of the memories and the learning experiences remain as almost ephemeral impressions. I think of Monet’s multiple paintings of Rouen Cathedral at different times of the day and under different meteorological conditions. The cathedral remains in place, but Monet’s perspective allows it to undergo a certain metamorphosis depending on the moment. This may be what I have to consider from time to time: that my memories are somewhat intact, but there are impressions of my trip that will change as I review them, some expected and some more dramatic. Nonetheless, having had this sabbatical has afforded me the opportunity to see people, places and events across time and across cultures and for that I am very grateful. Using what I have experienced will animate the rest of my life. To contact Mrs. Pregiato, email her at pregiatop@cshgreenwich.org.

Phyllis Pregiato beneath a broom tree

“Imagine being on the shore of Lake Galilee, next to the church which commemorates the time when Jesus said to the Apostle Peter, ‘Do you love me?’ and the priest celebrating Mass is named Peter.…Think about a day in the dry Judean hills, listening to the story of Elijah asleep under a broom tree, and the reader is sitting under a real broom tree.” Mass celebrated on Mount Sinai at dawn

23


in the building of community By Mimi Melkonian, Upper School teacher of Arabic

—St. Madeleine Sophie Barat

©iStockphoto.com/syagci

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

24

Eid al-Fitr is a three-day Muslim holiday that marks the end of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting. Eid is an Arabic word meaning “festivity,” while fitr means “conclusion of the feast.” Thus, the holiday celebrates the conclusion of the 30 days of dawn-to-sunset fasting during the entire month of Ramadan. During the three days of Eid al-Fitr, many Muslims wake up early and pray, either at an outdoor prayer ground, or at a mosque. Muslims dress in their finest clothes and adorn their homes with lights and other decorations. Old wrongs are forgiven and children receive gifts, and all participants enjoy sweet, spicy and other flavorful delicacies. Friends and relatives are invited to share this feast. Gifts and greeting cards are exchanged by all. In addition, many Muslims also donate money to those less fortunate than themselves. It is a time to be generous and hospitable. Common greetings during this holiday are the Arabic greeting ‘Eid Mubārak (“Blessed Eid”) or ‘Eid Sa‘eed (“Happy Eid”). Eid al-Fitr is a joyous occasion, but its underlying purpose is to praise God and to give thanks to Him. It is described as the month of awareness of God: devotion, dedication, discipline and the building of community. This year, the Arabic classes at Convent of the Sacred Heart celebrated Eid al-Fitr throughout the entire school by saying the Lord’s Prayer in Arabic and by distributing date cookies that I Carly Sobecki ’11 and Mimi Melkonian had baked at home with dates from Saudi Arabia. By thanking God for their blessings and by sharing the date cookies, the entire Sacred Heart community celebrated this feast. Carly Sobecki ’11, an Upper School student who studied Arabic this summer in Syria and visited Lebanon and Turkey, shared her Iftar experiences in the Middle East during morning assemblies. By making our School aware of other traditions, we hope that our example “will be an eloquent lesson to the world” in community building.


Contemplatives in Action By Daniel Favata, Upper School AP Art History teacher and Middle School Theology teacher

St. Madeleine Sophie Barat, the foundress of the Society of the Sacred Heart, must have envisioned Convent of the Sacred Heart when she created her order. St. Madeleine Sophie knew something about being busy. She once wrote that to be an effective educator, one had to be at the service of students and parents “from morning to night” and be willing “to sacrifice for them everything except one’s soul.” Our students and their parents know what it means to be busy and work “from morning to night.” Not only do our students have packed class schedules with highly rigorous courses during the school day, but they also have multitiered commitments after school. How, in the midst of all this activity, can our students tend to the raison d’être of this School: fostering a close, personal relationship with God? Our School offers more than one venue for prayer. Theology classes, chapels, liturgies and retreats all offer opportunities for communal and individual prayer. But what about the rest of the time, when students are in the classroom, on the athletic fields, or on Greenwich Avenue, for that matter? How does God fit into all that? St. Madeleine Sophie keenly understood the demands that modern life places on us, and she firmly believed that God could be present even in the daily frenzy that is our lives. She stated that her order was to be “wholly contemplative, wholly apostolic” or, to provide a Middle School translation, “prayerful while doing lots of stuff.” She envisioned the Religious of the Sacred Heart, and all of us who follow in their footsteps, as contemplatives in action. We are decidedly people who are engaged in the world, and we are people who are asked to find God in the midst of this. Madeleine Sophie said that we can be a student, a teacher, a mother or father, an investment banker, a real estate broker, etc., and still live a life that is fully holy. To be holy, we do not need to be incessantly praying in a chapel, but rather simply living the life that God intends for us to live. We fulfill our vocational calling, God’s unique plan for each of us, through our everyday actions. As St. Madeleine Sophie stated, “Your example, even more than your words, will be an eloquent lesson to the world.”

C onvent of the S acred H eart

Building Community as Prayer:

At Sacred Heart, our “eloquent example” is our school community. When we are kind to one another, when we help one another, we are not only building community we are, as Madeleine Sophie reminds us, praying. Our actions, our entire day, become a living prayer to God. One of my favorite Scripture passages is found in the Gospel of Luke, where the Pharisees ask Jesus when the kingdom of God 25

Dan Favata with sixth-grade theology class (Image by Kathleen S. Failla)

would come. Jesus’ reply was: “The coming of the kingdom of God cannot be observed, and no one will announce, ‘Look, here it is,’ or ‘There it is.’ For behold, the kingdom of God is among you.” When we build community, we are engaged in an act of prayer, and we are helping to bring the kingdom of God to earth.


26


By Victoria Taylor Allen, school historian Archive photography courtesy of the School Archives Our “house” (that is, the building now known as “the mansion”) was built in 1906, by Henry Steers, Esq., who developed the property into a working farm and built the red brick house that now houses the office of the head of school, as well as other offices and a few classrooms. He named the place Overlook Farm, for it was on the highest piece of land in Greenwich. In 1926, the farm was bought by Paul Block, one of the leading newspaper publishers in the United States. He wanted a “gracious and beautiful” country home that was close to New York City, but peaceful enough for quiet weekends. He was shown a 186-acre estate called Overlook Farm by his friend Bernard Gimbel, who owned “Chieftains” a huge property a mile down King Street. Mr. Block fell in love with the property on sight, for the red brick house with white trim, columned portico and green shutters had acres of rolling fields and a gorgeous view over Long Island Sound. The land extended for about a mile down King Street, then back through wooded land to the Byram River. The beauty of the place was irresistible. Mr. Block waited for a few years before moving into the house because he began immediately to make improvements to the grounds, as well as to the buildings. Originally, the land was graded on three levels. The house was at the highest level and was surrounded by several gardens. Nearest the house was the formal rose garden; below that, where the front lawn of the campus is today, were other formal gardens with winding paths and benches for visitors and guests. Down where the turf fields are today was the farm, with its small barn, horses, chickens and other animals. Mr. Block put in a tennis court, locating it beside the formal gardens. Just below the tennis court, he supervised the installation of a nine-hole golf course on what is now the long, front lawn that is beside the driveway. Former students, including our head

of school, Pamela Juan Hayes ’64, recall playing in what seemed to be, and in fact were, sand traps, all that remained of the course by the 1960s. He had a swimming pool installed as well. Our present-day pool is located on the exact spot of the original pool. When the Blocks lived here, however, the pool was an outdoor one, surrounded by beautiful terraces filled with potted plants. The tradition of growing vegetables on the property has remained since the house was built in 1906. Mr. Block continued the tradition by putting in a greenhouse and an extensive vegetable garden very near the location of the “farm” we use today. In addition to flowers and vegetables, Mr. Block’s gardeners carefully pruned and developed the woodland around the property, planting various beautiful trees, including the magnificent copper beech trees just in front of the mansion. Apple trees were also a feature of the property. Artesian wells and pumping stations were installed so that the roses, other flowers and vegetables could be watered efficiently. Through the 1920s and 1930s until the end of his life, Mr. Block loved and treasured the property he had named “Friendship.” The huge trees that we see in front of the house, the apple trees, the fields surrounding the buildings are all a tribute to him and to his family. Although the property has changed hands and now belongs to our School, “Friendship” is still flourishing here in Greenwich.

27


By Marion Kieltyka, Lower School science specialist

28

“I grew that!” exclaimed an excited sixth-grader, as she made her way through the lunch line. Grilled eggplant was on the menu that day, as well as zucchini soup, and yes, she had in fact grown it. As a fifth-grade student, her spring semester in science was spent sowing seeds, preparing beds, learning about the value of compost and pollinators, and finally planning and planting a vegetable garden on campus. With the help of science teachers, Marion Kieltyka, Donna Minafra and Heather Palladino, 14 raised beds were planted with a variety of vegetables to be harvested and enjoyed throughout the season. Lettuce, spinach and peas were planted early, before the girls left for the summer, so they could enjoy the fruits of their labor at the annual “Salad Party,” when the entire fifth-grade harvests the greens, slathers them with dressing and enjoys the first crops of the season down in the garden. The goal of our School garden is to help feed our community, foster the relationships between our students, faculty and staff by sharing the fruits of our hard work and to instill in our students an appreciation for the wonder of our natural world, so dramatically apparent in the growing cycle from seed to plant. The garden thrives throughout the summer because of the combined efforts of Benje Medley and other maintenance workers, and the teachers and students from the Summer Outreach Program. The children weeded, watered and harvested the vegetables. They enjoyed their bounty at lunch, while learning that food comes from sources other than the grocery store. Staff members, working diligently throughout the summer, were encouraged to enjoy the long walk down to the garden, next to the Mary Aloysia Hardey, RSCJ Observatory, and to bring home something fresh and delicious for dinner! The excitement and pride the girls take as they return in September as sixth-graders is clearly evident as they watch the

seeds they planted become a nutritious meal shared with our community at lunch, or receive a thank you from faculty and staff, after we share our final harvest at a “Farm Market” in the faculty and staff dining room. Though the vegetable garden is primarily a fifth- and sixth-grade project, students at all levels have projects growing and thriving there throughout the year. Lower School classes can often be found in the garden, be it the fourth grade studying the ecosystem of the garden, the third grade learning about red worms and their value in the compost bin, first-graders planting nectar flowers for butterflies or our kindergarten students exclaiming in delight as they pick giant pumpkins for their classrooms in October. Our second grade helps maintain a milkweed patch as part of their science unit on monarch butterflies. As a result of their efforts, the garden is a recognized “Monarch Way Station,” providing shelter and food for monarch caterpillars that are threatened by habitat loss. In the Upper School, the Science and Society class planted fall crops, and the biology classes collaborated with the second grade on their monarch project. Goal Three, Criteria 5 states, “The school teaches respect for creation and prepares students to be stewards of the earth’s resources.” The Patricia McKean Garden here at Sacred Heart allows our students to fulfill this goal with enthusiasm and a sense of pride, not to mention a healthy dose of vegetables!


29


latest news from Greenwich

Future Problem Solving

Michelle Obama and Queen Elizabeth Exchange Letters with CSH

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

30

The Lower School received letters with unusual postmarks—the White House and Buckingham Palace—in response to the second-grade Wax Museum project. The annual second-grade Wax Museum highlights lessons the girls have learned from studying the biographies of famous people. Each spring, the second grade holds its Wax Museum, and money raised benefits our sister school in Uganda. For the Wax Museum, Bridget Hamlet dressed as First Lady Michelle Obama and Anoushka Howard-Sneyd dressed as Queen Elizabeth. Ann Pereira, preschool teacher, wrote to both Mrs. Obama and Queen Elizabeth describing our “museum” and, in return, received warm replies. “Her majesty was interested to hear about the annual guessing game which your secondgrade students play to raise funds for your school in Uganda,” wrote the Queen’s lady-in-waiting. The Wax Museum is the culminating activity in a study of biographies for the second grade, and last year it raised $2,120 for the Sacred Heart Primary School in Uganda. Photo above: Bridget Hamlet, left, and Anoushka Howard-Sneyd, right, pose before letters from the White House and Buckingham Palace that were sparked by their participation in the second-grade Wax Museum.

Girls in grades four through twelve who have been recommended for Future Problem Solving (FPS), an academic competitive program, have begun their first research topic: Healthy Living. Working in teams, students research and discuss their topic, considering such factors as fast foods, stress, multitasking, sleep deprivation, and the fast-paced lifestyles which affect our health in so many ways. The girls then identify problems, solutions, evaluate their solutions and write a convincing narrative, all of which are then evaluated based on submissions from other teams throughout the state of Connecticut. Other FPS topics during the 2010–11 academic year will include: air transport, genetic testing, water quality, and emergency planning. We wish our students good luck this year!

Future Problem Solving is an academic enrichment program which involves some 300,000 children in grades 4–12 throughout the United States and internationally. Participation often results in students developing divergent, precise, and critical thinking skills, problemsolving and organizational abilities, research abilities and creativity. Each topic is approached seriously and imaginatively. In recent years, some CSH students have been invited to represent our School at the Connecticut State FPS Conference, held at the University of Connecticut (Storrs). And for the last two years, a team has been victorious at the state conference, thereby going on to represent Connecticut at the International FPS Conference, most recently held at the University of Wisconsin, La Crosse.

Three Seniors Are National Merit Semifinalists Three Upper School students have been selected as semifinalists in the National Merit Scholarship program. They are Emily Attubato, Grace Hirshorn and Jenna Nobs. All three are seniors, and they took the preliminary SAT, or PSAT, exam, as juniors in fall 2009 to help them prepare for the SAT. Last year, about 1.5 million juniors in some 22,000 high schools nationwide

entered the 56th annual National Merit Scholarship Program by taking the 2009 PSAT. About 16,000 of those students, now seniors, have been named semifinalists, which allows them to compete for some 8,400 scholarships, worth more than $36 million, to be offered next spring.

The three National Merit semifinalists were recognized at an all-school liturgy. With Head of School Pamela Juan Hayes ’64, they are (left to right) Jenna Nobs, Emily Attubato and Grace Hirshorn.


C onvent of the S acred H eart Image by Kathleen S. Failla

Eucharistic Ministers Commissioned The Mass of the Holy Spirit is a tradition at all Sacred Heart schools. The Most Reverend William E. Lori, Bishop of the Diocese of Bridgeport, celebrated the Mass for 777 students and approximately 200 faculty, staff, trustees and parents. An integral part of this liturgy was the commissioning of our new Eucharistic Ministers. Twenty-nine members of the senior class stepped forward to take on the responsibility of being of service to

our community in this special way. The Eucharistic Ministers will serve at our School through the 2010–2011 school year. “We are proud of these seniors who have made a commitment to live their faith publicly, train for this ministry and give of themselves,” said Lori Wilson, director of campus ministry. The Eucharistic Ministers are: Erin Aoyama, Kate Benjamin, Kerri Brown, Jillian Carter, Megan Cincotta, Lauren

DeGennaro, Clare Finnegan, Lacey Henry, Ally Huchro, Mary Liguori, Bridget Mara, Kelsey Mara, Sam Moor, Ariana Muoio, Lana Papa, Danielle Polemeni-Hegarty, Francesca Recchia, Maria Rincon, Kristen Roche, Elizabeth Sabia, Meagan Snopkowski, Nayara Souza, Michelle Spera, Kathleen Spillane, Molly Trimble, Sarah Tranfo, CeCe Urganczyk, Lauren Webb, and Melissa Whelan.

Vatican Astronomer Speaks on Science and Religion Father George Coyne, S.J., president of the Vatican Observatory Foundation, fascinated faculty and parents alike on September 20, with his topic, “Reaching for the Heavens: God’s Fertile Universe.” The next day, he spoke to an Upper School assembly and captivated them with his exploration of science and our relationship to God. Father Coyne is director emeritus of the Vatican Observatory. He was appointed director by Pope John Paul I in 1978, and in that same year he also became associate director of the University of Arizona Steward Observatory.

As director of the Vatican Observatory, he was a driving force in educational and research initiatives. He retired in August 2006, but remains on staff of the observatory and continues as president of its foundation. He has been active in promoting the dialogue between science and religion. The recipient of many honorary doctorates and awards, he is also a researcher and author. We were privileged to hear this noted scholar, who travels widely speaking to education and religious groups. Speaking with his considerable expertise about the origins of the universe and the

many factors which led to the appearance of our galaxy and planet, Father Coyne posed the question: Did this happen by chance or by necessity?

Vatican astronomer with Nicole Narea ’11

31


catching up with our graduates

M ess a g e f r o m the A l u mn a e presi d ent Dear Fellow Alumnae and All Members of the Extended Sacred Heart Family, With the Christmas season upon us, it is the ideal time to reflect upon the theme for the 2010–2011 academic year at Sacred Heart: the building of community as a Christian value (or as it is also known Goal Four of the Goals and Criteria). Community building is about forging relationships and protecting them. One of the most powerful aspects of Goal Four is that it elevates our day-to-day contact with each other and this community to an expression and a reflection of how we live our principles as Christians and as children of the Sacred Heart. As alumnae, we have a unique relationship with the School because, put simply, it is in our DNA. This gives us a singular and valuable perspective that makes being part of the Sacred Heart family so enjoyable and rewarding. The alumnae association continues to expand and enhance the many ways that each of you can connect with the

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

32

School and one another with a wonderful variety of activities and events. We have an especially terrific calendar this year—please check it out on page 2 for the highlights or head to our website or the Facebook page for all the up-to-date information on what’s upcoming. From large-scale happenings for all alums, like Reunion, to smaller events designed to appeal to groups within the alumnae family, like the very popular Alumnae Family Picnic we introduced last year, to the new Young Alumnae congés this year, we are giving alumnae many opportunities to reinforce their relationship with the School and with each other—community building at work for certain. This special relationship we have with the School and our status as alumnae also means we are in a singular position to build ties with other members of the wider Sacred Heart family. We are the hands and feet of St. Madeleine Sophie—as she always said—and building and protecting the magnificent legacy

she gave us is our special privilege. To foster trust, care and respect in all relationships we make here with the Religious of the Sacred Heart, fellow alumnae, teachers, students, and with parents and staff is to honor what we were taught and will help build a vibrant community that will be a tribute to those alumnae who have come before us and a lasting benefit to all those who will follow. May you all have a very peaceful and joyful Christmas! Warmest regards,

Mandy Dawson Murphy ’85 President, Greenwich-Maplehurst Alumnae Association

2 0 1 0 – 2 0 1 1 Greenwi c h - M a p l eh u rst A l u mn a e Ass o c i ati o n B o a r d President: Mandy Dawson Murphy ’85 Vice President: Patreece Williams-Creegan ’84 Treasurer: Shannon O’Leary Pujadas ’87 Secretary: Magee Finn King ’93

Board Members: Xanthe Alban-Davies ’92 Vanessa Arredondo ’87 Alyssa Keleshian Bonomo ’86 Dreux Dubin Claiden ’77 Lucy Coudert Conrod ’89 Katie Phelan Contino ’95 Kristen Darr ’98 Lisa Burke Fallon ’89 Ellen Feeney ’02 Carli Garcia ’01 Sarah K. Grogan ’97 Hope Houston Hirshorn ’82 Barbara Linsenmeyer Malone ’85 Susan Callagy McCloskey ’84 Colleen Mara McLane ’91

Katie Molloy ’99 Catherine Finnegan Nix ’71 Nicole Seagriff ’03 Laura Treanor ’90 Libby White ’67

Ex Officio Members: Head of School Pamela Juan Hayes ’64 Director of Alumnae Relations Kathleen A. Feeney ’98


C onvent of the S acred H eart

A l u mn a e H i g h l i g hts Patti M c c a rth y ’ 6 0 Life came full circle for Patti McCarthy ’60 last summer on a Malta Youth Pilgrimage to Lourdes. As coordinator of campus ministry at Blessed Trinity Catholic High School in the Atlanta suburb of Roswell, Georgia, Patti met up with students and a chaperon from Convent of the Sacred Heart. For Patti, who celebrated her 50th anniversary as a Sacred Heart graduate this year, the experience was thrilling. “When I met the girls from Greenwich, I said to each and every one of them, ‘that’s where I went to high school.’” “What an incredible trip and indelible memories,” she said. “Indeed, we walked in the footsteps of St. Madeleine Sophie.” When Patti arrived at Lourdes with her three students from Georgia they were teamed up with Greenwich students and their chaperone, Catherine Hennelly, assistant to the Upper School head. The youth group was inspired by daily work with the sick, helping them to the grotto, where the Blessed Virgin appeared to St. Bernadette. “I think that to be reconnected and to be brought back to your roots—my high school years in Greenwich—was amazing. It was more than a coincidence; it was the Lord’s grace,” she said. The other “miracle” that occurred in Patti’s life last summer was meeting an Italian woman who had been cured after her second pilgrimage in 1958. The Church and an international medical committee officially recognized the cure in 1965. “To say you shook hands with a living, walking miracle is something you do not forget,” said Patti. The woman, Elisa Aloi-Varacalli, born in Patti, Italy, in 1931, is the sixty-first miracle at Lourdes. As a child, Patti was influenced by the Sacred Heart values imparted by her mother, Josephine Hauck McCarthy ’30 Noroton. (Her brother later married a

Sacred Heart graduate, Winifred Winx Viguerie ’54 Noroton). So it was no surprise that Patti enrolled at Sacred Heart, first at 91st Street and, then, when the family moved to Greenwich in her sophomore year, at our School. After graduation in 1960, she attended Maryville College in St. Louis, still a Sacred Heart college at the time, where she majored in education. “I was truly immersed in Sacred Heart education,” she said. Following college, she taught for a while and then went into advertising for the fashion industry. Although her work was a departure from education, her classroom experience trained her for agency work. “It is the ability to deal with people, whether it is children, teenagers or adults, some of the same skills come into play—patience, a sense of humor and balance,” she explained. Working for major clients, she traveled the world, promoting products and managing creative services. Eight years ago, she changed career paths again, moving to Atlanta to be near family, “not knowing really what I wanted to do.” The advertising industry had changed. Patti knew it was time to try something different. Returning to education, she worked part-time in adult education. At church one Sunday, she saw an ad for a new Catholic high school—and applied. Today, she is one of three people at the 960-student, co-ed Blessed Trinity who work in campus ministry. She loves it! She coordinates the community service program, organizes retreats and assists with liturgies. “It’s obviously more meaningful because we’re dealing with teenagers to get them to live and love their faith. It’s a tremendous challenge,” she said. With this job, she has taken on her biggest client ever—“The Lord is also trying to increase market share.”

33

“ W h at a n in c re d i b l e trip a n d in d e l i b l e mem o ries . I n d e e d, w e wa l k e d i n t h e f o o t s t e ps o f S t. Ma d e l e i n e S o p h i e .”


Reunion2010 1

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

34

1. (Front row, left to right) Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey, Vicki Simons Ferenbach, Lois Hochschwender O’Brien, Shelly Veysey Curtin, Holly Coman Rylee, Judy MacGuire Reinicke, (Middle row, left to right) Sue Norton, Sue Pollock Kintner, Jan Vosburgh Zak, Katy Little Derezinski, Karan Donahue Whamond, Terry Maguire O’Brien, (Back row, left to right) Chris Kast Bjorner, Ann Waterman Costello, Marola Wittenstein Persico 2. Ann Conroy, RSCJ, Pamela Juan Hayes ’64, Dreux Dubin Claiden ’77 3. Cashie Joyce Egan ’68, Patti Joyce Figge ’58, Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey ’60 and Bonnie Joyce Grace ’63 4. Jenn Einersen ’03 and Nicole Seagriff ’03 5. Katie Horner ’03 and Whitney Young ’03 6. (left to right) Class of 1995 and their husbands, Bill and Sue Carrington, Jack and Jane Steinthal; Bob and Meg Ackerman; Dick and Mary Beth Barth; David and Kacy Morrish; Mike and Penny Carr; John and Sheila Malafronte, and Bill and Ann McKenna

2

3

4

5


Catholic values taught here. The Honorary Alumna Awards were presented to retired Development Director Judith Becker, world languages teacher Ana Maria Neuman and preschool teacher Ann Pereira. These dedicated women were honored for serving the School and promoting its mission for more than 20 years. Another highlight was the recognition of the 50th and 25th reunion classes, the Class of 1960 and of 1985. Great appreciation was offered to the Class of 1960 for their generous gift to the 2010–11 Annual Fund with 100% participation from the class, and to the Class of 1985 for an oil painting, “Unhung Wreath” by artist Lisa Steffens. Classes also recognized in a roll call were 1965, 1970, 1975, 1990, 1995, 2000 and 2005. Before the liturgy closed, a brief business meeting was conducted to vote for the Greenwich-Maplehurst Alumnae Associations Board for 2010–11. All nominees were voted in and the list appears on page 32. Finally, Reunion Day was capped by a reception celebrating the many alumnae who attended this magnificent event. The outpouring of enthusiasm by graduates happy to return “home” was a reminder that Sacred Heart’s mission touches many lives. Reunion is a kickoff to a wonderful year of alumnae events that allows graduates to get together, reconnect and celebrate. Upcoming events will be held in Boston, New York, Washington, D.C., and Greenwich. For dates, check the calendar on page 2 and visit the school website, www.cshgreenwich.org. To ensure invitations reach you, send address and email changes to the Alumnae Relations Office at feeneyk@cshgreenwich.org.

6

C onvent of the S acred H eart

S

unshine and good spirits were in abundance on Saturday, October 2 as alumnae from all generations celebrated Reunion 2010. With more than 250 attendees, it was the biggest reunion ever. It was a memorable and wonderful day that captured the true spirit of Sacred Heart. This year’s theme, “Home Is Where the Heart Is,” was evident in so many ways, from the laughter and smiles of classmates greeting one another, to the joy of being back in the historic mansion, and finally to the expression of faith during the liturgy. The day was full of activities, appealing to graduates of all classes. The 50th Reunion Class of 1960 celebrated a Golden Anniversary Luncheon in the office of Head of School Pamela Juan Hayes ’64. The Class of 1965 met on the front lawn to dedicate a tree in loving memory of a classmate, Barbara Schruth Root ’65. (See article on page 41.) Alumnae and their guests attended the traditional Reunion liturgy in our chapel, celebrated by the Reverend Wilfred Tyrrell, S.A., chaplain of Manhattanville College. It was one of the most beautiful Reunion liturgies in recent memory, and included the participation of alumnae of all years in the readings, prayers and procession. After the liturgy, a ceremony was held to present the Outstanding Alumna Award and the Honorary Alumna Awards. Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey ’60 was nominated by the alumnae association and received the Outstanding Alumna Award. Mary Catherine was recognized for her life accomplishments that reflect her devotion to Convent of the Sacred Heart and the

35


HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

8 9

7

10

12

14 11

36

13

15


16

17

20

22

21

23

C onvent of the S acred H eart

18 19

7. (left to right) Class of 1985: Mary Vouté Sutherland, Megan Cassidy Foley, Kathy Millard Rehm, Erinn Laragh Denson, Cathleen Mendelson Daly, Mandy Dawson Murphy, Barbara Linsenmeyer Malone, Lili Lawry Dimitri, Carolyn O’Gorman Norris, Genevieve Lynch DeBree, Stacey Ann Kuch, Mary Sue Farley, Patricia Aragones 8. Mary Vouté Sutherland ’85, Paula G. Tennyson , chair of the Board of Trustees, and Patricia Aragones ’85 9. Virginia Beach Coudert ’48 and Debbie Busby Kunces ’73 10. François and Katharine Gendron ’81 11. (left to right) Class of 1990: Megan Lahey Sibley, Jane Watson Glassmeyer, Julie DeFilippo, Meg Cassidy and Laura Treanor 12. Kaitlin McGarry Rorick ’00, Margaret Feeney ’00, Katie Molly ’99, Jennifer Bensen, Upper School academic dean, Nicole Seagriff ’03, and Jenn Einersen ’03 13. Libby White ’67 and Lisa Dotson ’70 14. Terry Maguire O’Brien ’60 15. Mandy Dawson Murphy ’85, left, and Pamela Juan Hayes ’64, center right, with honorary alumnae: Ana Maria Neuman, Ann Pereira, Judith Becker 16. Monifa Brown ’00 and Ana Maria Neuman 17. Ann Pereira and her daughter, Catherine ’02 18. Mandy Dawson Murphy ’85 and Kaye Cherry RSCJ ’53 19. Magee Finn King ’93, Hope Houston Hirshorn ’82, and Andy King 20. Priscilla Jennings Pultz ’75, Karan Donahue Whamond ’60 and Josie Kaufmann ’75 21. Pamela Juan Hayes ’64 and Outstanding Alumna Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey ’60 22. Katie Phelan Contino ’95 and Dina Cortese Urso ’95 23. Class of 2005: (front row, left to right) Liz Franco, Ariana Horaitis, Madeleine Sullivan, Hallie Delaney, Meghan McGuinn, Kristina Marantz, Meghan Scopelliti, Lindsay Kennedy, (back row, left to right) Emma Ingrisani, Tierney Tobin, Katie Gojkovich, Kristen Uhmeyer, Kim Kupik, Rachel Kaplan, Ruth McCann, Danielle Gennaro

37


25

24

26

Outstanding and Honorary

Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey ’60

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

38

Outstanding Alumna Award Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey, Class of 1960, is a true “Child of the Sacred Heart,” who has made known the love of God through a lifetime of good works dedicated to serving the sick and the poor and defending the faith. She lovingly gives of herself to many individuals and organizations which vary widely from the regional, such as the St. Elizabeth Guild, which fosters spiritual enrichment, to larger groups with global reach, including the Order of Malta and children of Haiti. Mary Catherine is a member of Malta’s Board of Councillors and Hospitaller of the American Association. She has participated in 13 pilgrimages to Lourdes, sponsored by Malta. Her late husband, Bob, was the Chancellor of the Order. She has been a member since 1985 and as Hospitaller she coordinates all their works of pastoral and social assistance. Mary Catherine is a loyal and devoted alumna, who entered Sacred Heart in 1953 as a sixth-grader. She is one of four Joyce sisters to attend our school—Pat Joyce Figge ’58, Bonnie Joyce Grace ’63 and Cashie Joyce Egan ’68.

As the middle of seven children growing up in New Rochelle, N.Y., she was first inspired by the example of her devout and loving parents. Their devotion to daily Mass is continued by all their children. Mary Catherine is the mother of six— five boys and a girl—and the grandmother of 14. Her daughter, Mary Catherine McCooey Dodman, is a graduate of the Class of 1988. Mary Catherine has served as a board member of the Sisters of Life, Rosalie Hall, The Inner City Scholarship Fund of New York, Iona Preparatory School and the College of Mount St. Vincent. Her strong faith and love of God is deeply rooted in the education she received at Convent of the Sacred Heart. It is with great pleasure that Convent of the Sacred Heart bestows upon Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey the title of Outstanding Alumna.

Ana Maria Neuman

Honorary Alumna Award Ana Maria Neuman has been a Sacred Heart Educator “Extraordinaire.” As a Spanish teacher and a greatly loved faculty member, she has spent 20 years giving of herself totally to the Sacred Heart

community—to everyone, be they her cherished students, her fellow “language aficionados” in the World Language Department, the entire Upper School community or her many friends on the maintenance and kitchen staff. Ana Maria gives of her warmth, exuberance, joy and friendship to everyone! “Hola Signora” is a joyful refrain that one hears as Ana Maria walks down the Upper School corridor and into the student and the faculty dining rooms. Her generosity knows no bounds! Ana Maria has always been there to reach out to the native Spanish speakers in the parent body and on the staff when they need help, advice, or a translator for personal matters. In a year when our theme is “the building of community as a Christian value,” Ana Maria is a beautiful and loving symbol of this goal. She has made it an integral part of who she is for the past 20 years. We are blessed to have Ana Maria as a teacher, a friend and now an honorary alumna!


27

C onvent of the S acred H eart

28

24. Allison Sciarretta ’12 and Caroline Eagan ’12 25. Barbara Linsenmeyer Malone ’85, Lili Lawry Dimitri ’85, Mary Sue Farley ’85, Erinn Laragh Denson ’85, Stacey Ann Kusch ’85, Carolyn O’Gorman Norris ’85 26. Ann Mara and Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey ’60 27. Michelle Perna ’00, Ellen Feeney ’02, Margaret Feeney ’00 and Carli Garcia ’01 28. Kathryn Cooley, Ruth McCann ’05

39

Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey ’60

JUDITH BECKER

Ana Maria Neuman

Honorary Alumna Award Judith Becker has been an invaluable member of the community, one whose loyalty and kindness was combined with an extraordinary talent for helping to make Sacred Heart the successful School that it is today. Judy began her work at Sacred Heart in 1990, when she was named director of development. At that time, the annual fund was raising approximately $200,000 a year and the endowment was $200,000. Over her 20 years, a total of $75 million was raised by all fundraising. The Annual Fund had reached $1.9 million and the endowment grew to $21 million. Judy worked on three capital campaigns that funded the science building, the library and the Middle School, in addition to other major renovations and the endowment. During the academic year of 2006– 2007, Judy became director of planned

Judith Becker

giving and in the four years she served in that role, the number of planned giving expectancies doubled. She served on the Network of Sacred Heart Schools’ Development Committee, and received the CASE District 1 Quarter Century Award. It is more than fitting to make Judy an honorary alumna, for surely she helped to lead us on the road to success.

Ann Pereira

Honorary Alumna Award Ann Pereira, preschool homeroom teacher in the Early Childhood Program, is beloved by generations of Sacred Heart students, who have been influenced by her warmth, compassion and love for the School. During the 2010–11 school year, Ann will celebrate her twentieth year as a Sacred Heart educator at Greenwich. In what has come to be fondly known as the “Pereira

Ann Pereira

experience,” each young girl in preschool is introduced to the Goals and Criteria and to the mission of a Sacred Heart education by a woman of great faith who truly lives our Goals every day. Patient beyond imagination, Ann exemplifies those values we hold deeply: respect for self and community, love and care for the environment, and a relationship with God. How blessed our new families are that their introduction to Sacred Heart begins in the care of such a wise and gentle woman whose highest priorities are the education of our youngest students. Ann is known for the nurturing care she extends to all. It is with great pleasure that we present Ann with the Honorary Alumna Award. As she so often says to her little ones, “Well done!”


29

30

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

40

29. (left to right) Sue Norton ’60, Judy MacGuire Reinecke ’60, Terry Maguire O’Brien ’60 and Holly Coman Rylee ’60 30. Victoria Taylor Allen, Patreece Williams-Creegan ’84, Patrick Creegan, Libby White ’67 31. Class of 1975: Andrea Hawkins Stuart, Priscilla Jennings Pultz, Diane di Scipio Driscoll, Josie Kaufmann, Brenda Stevens Ross, Nancy Oaks, Mary McGowan 32. Anne Schruth ’04 33. Kate Graham Graham ’65, Joyce Garvey Bray ’65 and Liz Betts Leckie 34. Class of 2000: Michelle Perna, Kaitlin McGarry Rorick, Monifa Brown, Erica Carpiniello, Lindsay Smith, Margaret Feeney, Devan Weber 35. Barbara Schruth Root tree 36. Pamela Juan Hayes ’64 blessing the tree 37. Barbara Schruth Root plaque 38. Anne Schruth ’04, Oren Root, Jr., Daphne Root and Kate Schruth 39. Class of 1965: Joyce Garvey Bray, Jane Beattie, Kate Graham Graham, Heather MeGaw Murphy, Patty Powers Woodlock, Stephanie Beaudouin Piper, Liz Betts Leckie, Michele Rees Finn

34

31

32

33


C onvent of the S acred H eart

Tree dedication in memory of

35

Convent of the Sacred Heart dedicated a Kwanzi cherry tree and a plaque in memory of Barbara Schruth Root ’65, a woman who made a difference in the lives of countless people, at a prayer service on Reunion Day. As director of admissions at Sacred Heart 91st Street, Barbara played a significant role in the lives of many students. Her kindness and dedication to Sacred Heart, Greenwich had great impact on her classmates and all who knew her at our School. Members of the Class of 1965 created a fund to purchase the flowering tree, which was dedicated to Barbara at a ceremony on the front lawn. Barbara’s husband, Oren Root Jr., her motherin-law and two nieces attended, in addition to classmates, alumnae board members and school administrators. Stephanie Beaudouin Piper ’65 lead the group in prayer, and classmates offered personal reflections on Barbara’s days at Greenwich. Head of School Pamela Juan Hayes ’64 blessed the tree. Patricia Powers Woodlock ’65 read T.S. Eliot’s poem, Little Gidding, which was also read at Barbara’s memorial and begins: We shall not cease from exploration And the end of all our exploring Will be to arrive where we started And know the place for the first time.

36

41

38 37

39


To submit information, please contact Kathleen A. Feeney ’98, director of alumnae relations, at feeneyk@cshgreenwich.org.

1943

Joan Kirby, RSCJ received the “Interfaith Visionary Lifetime Achievement Award” from the Temple of Understanding (TOU) during the 50th Anniversary Gala and Juliet Hollister Awards Ceremony in New York City. Sr. Kirby has been working at the TOU since 1994 and currently serves as representative to the United Nations. The award was given: “In dedication to Sister Joan Kirby for promoting inter-religious values at the United Nations, her lifelong commitment to addressing human rights and ecological issues, and her passionate devotion to the development of young leaders.”

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

42

1955

Cynthia Crimmins cynthiacrimm@optonline.net The Class of 1955 had a lovely dinner at the home of Cynthia Crimmins attended by nine classmates and their husbands. Jane and Jack Steinthal hosted a barbecue dinner at their home after Reunion.

1959

Dolores Agnew readca47@hotmail.com Dolores Agnew and her family had another fun summer up in Stratton, Vt., playing golf of course. We had two Cox weddings to go to in August—my younger brother, John, and a niece, Laura (Frank’s youngest of seven), at St. Augustine’s in Larchmont, N.Y. Lots of fun family time. Rick and I are back in Palm City, Fla. until December, when we’ll head north again to be with our girls and their families for Christmas. Hope you’ll all continue to stay in touch. Rita Murphey Cleary is going to be a first time grandmother. Daughter, Sharon, and son-in-law, Michael, are expecting a boy on December 26. Sharon and Michael live in Zurich, Switzerland (Michael is Swiss), so Rita will most likely be traveling to Switzerland this Christmas. Rita also had a lovely trip with sons, Mark and Jim, to California including Yosemite. They took a half-day horseback ride into the Sequoias, and said the scenery was breathtaking. Sally Assheton Dodd just returned from an amazing trip to Bhutan, Nepal, and the mystical Himalayas. It was a three-week journey filled with magical

moments. She says the people were warm and friendly, and that she learned so much about their religion, culture, and history. They slept three nights in tents, overlooking the Seti River, which they rafted down, paddling down number II and III rapids, which she said was her favorite part of this glorious adventure. Mary Earle Fox and her husband, Blitz, will be visiting their son, Mark, and his wife, Colette, and their two children in Oahu, Hawaii, just before Christmas. Blitz is still flying his single engine Chinese trainer (still used in China for training), and Mary joins him, only on warm, sunny days, as a passenger in the back seat. They live 20 minutes from the Golden Gate so you can imagine the beautiful scenery they must see on these flights! Mary’s new email address is—tykefox@gmail.com. She sends you this message—“please come visit, I love you all, and miss you.” Patti McCarthy also did some traveling this summer—a family barge trip through Burgundy, France, compliments of her brother and sister-in-law, who celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary and, after returning to Atlanta for three days, she then left for Lourdes on the Malta Youth Pilgrimage. She took three students from her school (Blessed Trinity) and they joined other high school students, including some


1960

Karan Donahue Whamond bamakaran@aol.com Life has a way of bringing us expected joyous memories and that certainly is true of our 50th Reunion the first weekend of October. I am sure there was apprehension amongst many of the 15 members of the Class of 1960 in attendance as we gathered Friday evening at the home of Mary Catherine Joyce McCooey. Would we recognize each other after all the years that have gone by? Would we still have things in common? Would our classmates have the same memories of our years at Sacred Heart? Name tags helped bridge the first obstacle of who was who and as the evening progressed, the spirit and personality of who we were in high school began to shine through—as did our many shared interests whether it was job experiences, marriage, children, grandchildren, the loss of loved ones—we bonded once again. Vicki Simons Ferenbach made us all laugh when she briefly left the room and returned wearing both her green and blue ribbons! When we gathered on Saturday for lunch, we crowded everyone around two tables so the camaraderie could continue. Judy MacGuire Reinicke, Katy Little Derezinski and Susie Pollock Kintner assisted during the Mass and we all proudly were there when Mary McCooey was presented with the Outstanding Alumna Award. An elaborate cocktail reception followed and more wonderful conversations ensued. Kudos to the three brave men who joined us at both events—Don Whamond, Tony Derezinski and Eric Souers (Judy’s friend)—they had a blast as well. Sorely

missed were, Mimi Conway, Nina von Wellsheim Gowen, Mary Lou Franklin Lauve, Joan Marechal Mickley, Cherie Corcoran Wilshire, and Rosemarie VanEyck Winslow. It was agreed that if you make it to the NYC area, we will do a mini-reunion with the nine of us in the area. Just let me know when you will be in town! Now that we have reconnected let’s all make an effort to stay in touch—via email, Facebook, Christmas cards, phone calls—you get the idea and thank you all for the wonderful memories.

Michele Rees Finn’s son, Will, graduates this spring from University of Scranton. Daughter, Kate, and family live in Nashville, where Kate is director of admissions at Father Ryan High School. Michele stays busy with Sacred Heart alumnae activities both nationally and internationally.

1965

Heather Megaw Murphy wrote: “After 30 fun-filled years (and 17 mergers) I’ve retired from banking and find that my life is busier than ever. I really am starting some of those long deferred projects and unread books—and love spending time with my grandson, born last December.”

Stephanie Beaudouin Piper spiper@utk.edu The Class of ’65 gathered for a wonderful 45th reunion weekend in October. Kate Graham Graham hosted a dinner party on Friday evening at her house in Greenwich. On Saturday, we met at School and dedicated a beautiful Kwanzi cherry tree in memory of Barbara Schruth Root. Patty Powers Woodlock read from one of Barbara’s favorite poems and we shared memories of our dear friend. We were honored that Barbara’s husband, Oren Root Jr., his mother, and two of Barbara’s nieces joined us. Special thanks to Pamela Juan Hayes ’64 for orchestrating this perfect tribute. On Saturday evening, Michele Rees Finn held a dinner party at her house in Bronxville, where we continued to reminisce and laugh and comment on how great we all look. Suzanne Scully couldn’t be with us, but sent a package of memorabilia including notes and pictures from Convent days that were great fun. Suzanne and Bill have retired to Watch Hill, R.I., and love the area. Dinner guests included Deirdre Cavanagh Adelman and husband Jon. After a long career in advertising and marketing, Deirdre went back to school to be certified as a high school math teacher. She and Jon live in Montclair, N.J.

Kate Graham Graham and Stewart divide their time between Greenwich and Florida while building a house in Watch Hill, R.I. They are proud grandparents of Abigail Graham, 2.

1967

Mary Francina Golden maryfgolden@aol.com Jackie Machan Callery retired 10 years ago from teaching high school math for 28 years at Sidwell Friends School. “I’ve been playing a lot of tennis, and doing a lot of knitting. I also taught knitting for 30 years and have had some patterns published. My daughter, Megan, has two children, Tommy, three, and Izzy, two. They live less than half an hour away, and I am lucky enough to see them often. My son, Brian, was married a year ago to a girl he met at Edward Jones, where he works as a financial advisor. I get to see them quite a bit, too, as they are staying with us while their new house is being renovated. It’s great that my kids and grandchildren are so close! My husband, Grant, is general counsel of FINRA; he commutes to D.C. from our house in Bethesda, Md. He’s also chair of the board of trustees at the college we both went to, Marietta in Ohio.” In the small world department, Bibi Freyre Hill’s daughter went to high school with my son, Brian. We used to see her husband, Nick, when my father-in-law was living at the Maplewood Retirement Community, as Nick used to work there.

C onvent of the S acred H eart

from Sacred Heart in Greenwich. They worked the baths for five days plus were at the train station for a day escorting the sick to their bus. The schedule included meeting the 61st confirmed miracle at Lourdes, a sweet Italian lady who came to talk to their group with the medical director, who receives all the medical claims for miracles. Patti said, “I shook hands with a living miracle.” She admits it was a rigorous schedule but such a gift to experience Lourdes.

43


Michelle Jones Delmhors said “I could write a tome about my life over the last two years—suffice it to say I’m doing great after beating down breast cancer (diagnosed in Aug ’08—surgery, chemo and radiation—finished in April ’09)—so now two years since diagnosis, and I’m doing great. It was found pretty early, so that’s good. Then I had my left knee replaced in January 2010! That should have been done earlier, but for the breast cancer! But I was able to play a lot of golf this summer, so the recovery has been very good. John and I just finished our roles in the chorus of The Elixir of Love—opera by Donizetti—with the local opera company we have sung in for the past eight years or so. In between all of that, we greatly enjoy seeing our two grandchildren (John’s son, Robb), who are five and almost two.” Maria Julia Harrison writes: “I spent a month in Puerto Rico this summer to visit family and attend my niece’s wedding. In August, went to Japan to spend two months with my eldest son and his family; the little 18-month-old baby girl, our first grandchild, has stolen my heart! Then back to Chicago to repack and leave with my husband for Panama for the winter. If anyone wants to come visit...it’s an interesting country and we have been enjoying it for the last five years from October till May! Now I must start thinking about our 45th and my trip there!”

Bettina McKee writes: “This would be the first time I have submitted any news for Class Notes since graduation. After Manhattanville College and Harvard Business School, I worked for Arthur Young & Co as a CPA for ten years in New York City, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Houston. I left them to go to work for General Foods, which was subsequently acquired by Philip Morris. Under the PM umbrella, I traveled the world on business, and ultimately lived my last seven years with the company in

HO RI ZO N S

Lausanne, Switzerland, where I was vice president strategic planning and business development for the eastern Europe, Middle East & Africa Region. While at PM and later PMI which was eventually spun off, I occasionally came across Mary Francina’s husband, Ken. In between work, I did stints as a trustee at our alma mater, and at Manhattanville.” Melissa Ricci Stewart writes: “My daughter, Elena, married Lt. Patrick Turevon (USMC) on October 2 in Oyster Bay, N.Y. Since being widowed, I am trying to sell my house in Cornwall, Conn. to be closer to people than cows.” Since not all of you have email, or at least emails that are known to the alumnae office, you may not have heard the sad news of Anne Cotter Cole’s death. Anne died in February of this year. If you wish to extend your condolences to her husband, you may reach him at: Kevin A. Coles, 1573 Fairfield Beach Road, Fairfield, CT 06824. I think it would be a good way to honor her memory by donating a gift to the school from our class in her name. Since our 45th reunion is two years away, perhaps we should do that now, and have a formal dedication at the reunion. If any of you have ideas as to what that gift should be, please let me know.

1975

Josie Kaufmann josie.kaufmann@yahoo.com

WINTER 2010/2011

44

Christine Hohl Hubbard writes: “Okay, here it is in a nutshell! I work as the production editor for The Greenwich Workshop which reproduces fine art in canvas and fine art books. This is my twenty-sixth year! I have four children: Rebecca is in her ninth year at Read School in Bridgeport teaching sixth grade and was recently married to Jimmy Hasiotis; Brett is a conservation biologist and works in Sandpoint, Idaho; TJ is a producer for The Golf Channel and was recently married to Lauren nee Ward; Abby is a singer and actress, who, like all theater people, also works in a restaurant. We had one wedding in March (TJ) and the other in July (Rebecca). You would think they would be kind and at least spread it out a bit. My sister, Liz Hohl, is receiving her Ph.D. in women’s history in a few weeks. Very exciting! She attended Greenwich for several years, but graduated from another school.”

Kerry M. Maloney Kmm2@optonline.net

1975 classmates met for 35th Reunion dinner. (left to right, front) Nancy Oaks, Josie Kaufmann, Mike Morgan Clark, Margaret Egan, Lucy Jaffray, Andy Hawkins Stuart. (left to right, back) Diane di Scipio Driscoll, Mary McGowan, Mary Anne Leverty Heine, Rosie Barry, Priscilla Jennings Pultz, Brenda Stevens Ross and Meg O’Toole Gruppo, and Carin Routh

Well 35 years have passed, but 1975 seemed like yesterday on October 2 at Mike Morgan Clark’s house in Fairfield, Conn. Only 16 made it to the dinner— Mike, Mary, Diane, Lucy, Priscilla, Meg, Andy, Nancy, Rosie, Brenda (Peeney), Margaret (Muffin), Carin, Beth, Candy, Mary Anne (Dude) and Josie—we had a blast! Shared lots of laughs, a few tears and nonstop talking. Mike Morgan Clark is a great hostess, thank you Mike!


The children of Megan Cassidy Foley ’85

is on the hunt for a project manager’s job in construction. Margaret Egan is thoroughly enjoying her beautiful daughter and life in Brooklyn; Candy Miele Verrilli lives outside D.C. happily with Mark and has an established career in real estate; Beth Petronelli has two children and lives in Norwalk. Alina Freyre Hoyos is living in Greenwich and working at Brunswick; Claudia Steers and Bruce are in Stamford with two children both of whom attended Harvard and is still teaching; Michelle Seyer is enjoying life in Oregon; Chris Joquera Vickery is a stay-at-home mom for her three kids after many years as an attorney in NYC; Felicia Value sends her love to all; Ellen Weiman Johnson and Greg are still in Ohio and are sending #4 off to Georgetown this year. The Calif. connection—Joan O’Grady-Barada lives in Palo Alto, has four children and one just started at Boston College; Patsy Benziger Wallace and Tim are living in Sonoma, Jack is at Northeastern University; Liz Dolan is in LA. Madelyn (Mary) Barbero Jordan lives in New Rochelle, N.Y., and works at a gallery when not singing; and as for me, Josie Kaufman. I am enjoying life on Cape Cod—landed a job as director of partner operations for a B2B company after being unemployed for 18 months—Life is Good!

1985

Megan Cassidy Foley meganf920@gmail.com Cathleen Mendelson Daly is teaching English part time at the Berlitz Language School in NYC. She and her husband, Kevin, live in Bronxville with their three children Caitlin, Connor and Quinn. Genevieve Lynch DeBree and her husband, Derek, live in Fair Haven, N.J., and have two children, Schuyler and Emmett. She writes this exciting news about her daughter! “Schuyler, a ninth grader at Rumson Fair Haven High School, made the U14 state, regional and national Olympic Development teams in soccer.”

C onvent of the S acred H eart

The Fairfield group is doing well— Mike Morgan Clark has 3 children and enjoying life with Michael; Meg O’Toole Gruppo is a director of human resources at Conde Nast Magazines, has three beautiful boys and living happily with Jim; Dude Leverty Heine works in the fashion industry, is still in touch with Patsy, Katie and Ellen and is now adjusting to being an empty-nester; Diane di Scipio Driscoll is working for Billboard.com, has two handsome boys and living in New Canaan happily with Kevin; Priscilla Jennings Pultz specializes in planting containers at a local nursery, is enjoying Madison, Conn. with Neil—and the girls are enjoying school in Charleston, S.C.; Mary McGowan recently recovered from major back surgery, just started a new job with an organization focused on women and heart issues, and lives in Alexandria, Va.; Andy Hawkins Stuart has survived twins, well I might add—living in N.J. with Stephen and still with BNY Mellon (31 yrs!); Nancy Oaks is living in D.C. and has too been working forever at the FDIC; Rosie Barry is an attorney for the government in NYC and living in Westport; Brenda Stevens-Ross is in administration at Berklee in Boston, lives in Wayland, Mass. and has a beautiful eight-yr-old girl; Lucy Jaffray is living in Blue Hill, Maine, and is recovering from a heart attack—she looks great!; Carin Routh resides in Salem, N.Y., with Steve, and

Megan Cassidy Foley lives in Southport, Conn. with her husband, Larry, and her very active five children...LJ, 12, Liam, 10, Clare, 9, Aidan 6, and Declan, almost a year. 45


1986

Alyssa Keleshian Bonomo Alyssa@kinvestmentsinc.com Nicole Peluso nicolepeluso@gmail.com Alyssa Keleshian Bonomo lives in Greenwich with her two boys—Harry, 5, and Thomas, 2—and her husband, Tom. It is a pleasure and privilege to serve on the alumnae board. Phebe Mickatavage Large and her husband, Michael Large, have four children, and live in Granby, Conn. Phebe works in special education.

1992

Katherine Shafer Coleman Ksc96@alumni.princeton.edu Christine Murtha Coogan Christine.coogan@morganstanley.com

46

Tara Anne Cone is engaged to Penn Miller-Jones. The happy couple plans to marry on May 28, 2011, in Adare, Co. Limerick, Ireland!

Christine Hayes Demetrio shares the happy news that Jack Thomas Demetrio was born on January 13, 2010. The Demetrio family, including big sister Emma, 5, is living in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. Siobhan Hammer Dolce has a daughter Beatrice “Bixie” Dolce who was born on December 30, 2009. Brothers Coakley and George are thrilled to have a little sister!

1993

Margaret Finn King Magee.king@gmail.com Erin O’Keefe Cooney and her husband, Colin, are expecting their third child on December 25. Their newest arrival will join big sister and brother, Brennan and Will.

Pamela Esposito reports: “I am now living in the beautiful town of West Hartford, Conn. which is one of the best kept secrets in America. Especially enjoy seeing other CSH alums around town—including Kathleen Plunkett, who initiated me freshman year. If there are other alums in the area or want to visit, let me know! On other news, we just welcomed a baby boy, Theodore, into our family. Soon after Theodore was born, I took a new job working for a small cancer vaccine company—still living the biotech dream! Hope everyone else is well!”

1995

Catherine Farrell Kaplan gave birth to Willa Farrell Kaplan on May 13, 2010. Willa joins big brothers, Peter, 5, and Hugh, 3. The Kaplan family moved from New York to Washington, D.C., in June and they love their new home!

Katy Grogan Garry is expecting a baby in March 2011, with her husband, Christian.

Dina Cortese Urso dinacortese@hotmail.com Ashling Ahern Besgen is the manager of a barn for competition horses in Brewster, N.Y., called Fly Away Farm. She is also competing in show jumping as an amateur. She has two daughters, Annabelle, 5, and Madeleine, 4. Kelly Fitzpatrick Dattullo is pregnant and due at the end of March.

Martha Harper was married on September 25, 2010, to Kevin Fitzgibbons.

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

Grace Macy is enjoying life in sunny Los Angeles and is a proud and devoted aunt to Nathaniel Everit Macy.

Bouncing “Bixie” Dolce, daughter of Siobhan Hammer Dolce ’92

Big sister, Ellie, with baby Michael, children of Christie Devlin Furman ’97.

John Finnegan Scioli, son of Molly Nix Scioli ’97


Julie Speeckaert Swenson writes: “My husband, Eric and I and our three girls (Caroline, 9, Claire, 6, and Emma, 4) live in Newport, R.I., where he is a student at the Naval War College. He is a major in the Army and so we move frequently. We will move again next summer, but we do not know where to. So far we have lived in Colo., Ky., Kan., Pa., N.Y. and now R.I. I was a French teacher for several years until Emma was born and now I am a part-time photographer and have started my own business.” Sheila Ventre is living in Rome, Italy. She has been there for the last three years. She is a first-grade teacher at Marymount International School.

1996

Rebekah Goodhue rcgoodhue@gmail.com Erin Tiernan Erin.Tiernan@thomson.com After working at Diversified Investment Advisors in Harrison, N.Y. for almost ten

years, Rebekah Goodhue has accepted a job with Wireless Generation, a software development company, specializing in grade-school assessment tests. She resides in Manhattan. Suzanne Dunleavy McDonough, her husband, Matt, and 19-month-old daughter, Cara, welcomed Coleman Patrick, born August 28, 2010. Both Suzanne and Matt are assistant district attorneys and Suzanne is also the co-director of the Dunleavy Shaffer School of Irish Dance. The McDonoughs live in Marshfield, Mass. Alexis Maffei Montemaggiore graduated from UPenn in 2000, and went on to get her MBA from Cornell University’s Johnson School of Management in 2005. From there she accepted an offer at L’Oreal USA in New York City, working in cosmetics and hair color marketing. In 2009 Alexis married Vincent Montemaggiore, and they moved to Mass. where she works as the director of marketing at a beauty start-up company in Cambridge. Alexis and her husband are expecting a baby boy in January and live in Weston, Mass. Christina Grant Pajak and her husband, Andrew, welcomed their first child, Andrew James Jr., born September 13, 2010. Christina and her husband live in Maryland. Alison Carey Ryan and her husband Bill are so happy to announce the arrival of Peter Carey. Pete was born on June 20, 2010 (Father’s Day!), and was welcomed with love by his sister, Kate, and brothers, Marty and Jimmy. Erin Tiernan has been working at Thomson Reuters since graduating from Pace Law School in 2003. She married James Patts Jr. in December 2009 in Newport, R.I. They live in Fairfield County.

1997

Samantha Geary samantha.geary@baml.com Elizabeth Sweeny Block and husband, Jeff Block, celebrated their second wedding anniversary in September. Elizabeth is completing her Ph.D. in Religious Ethics at The University of Chicago and has received a Martin Marty Junior Fellowship for the 2010–2011 academic year. While writing her dissertation, Elizabeth is also teaching undergraduate classes in theology and ethics at Dominican University in River Forest, Ill. Christie Devlin Furman, husband, Michael, and big sister, Ellie, welcomed Michael Cook Furman Jr. on July 27, 2010, in NYC where they live. Megan Heanue and her husband Ravi welcomed their daughter, Mia Praveen Sachdev, on March 15 of this year. Megan continues to work at Juilliard and lives in New York City. Megan attended Amanda Harris’ wedding on October 16 and hopes to see other classmates soon! Molly Nix Scioli and husband, Phil, welcomed John Finnegan Scioli (Finn) to their family on April 1, 2010. Kristina Tobin is happy to share that being married to Max Trainque Rocks!

1999

Kate Heffernan heffkate@gmail.com Katie Molloy Molloy.katie@gmail.com Margot Dolce Sturz margotsturz@gmail.com Margot Dolce Sturz and husband, Christian, welcomed Carolena Dolce Sturz to their family on May 29, 2010.

Carolena Dolce Sturz, daughter of Margot Dolce Sturz ’99

C onvent of the S acred H eart

Jessica Enright Polanish’s daughter, Raela, was born February 10, 2010. She lives in New York City. She took the year off from teaching to stay at home with her daughter and now tutors and consults privately.

47


2000

Margaret Feeney margaretmaryfeeney@gmail.com Lindsay Smith lsmith1211@hotmail.com The Class of 2000 had a great time at this year’s reunion. We had eight people in total from our class—Margaret Feeney, Lindsay Smith, Michelle Perna, Renee King, Monifa Brown, Kaitlin McGarry Rorick, Erica Carpiniello and blast from the past Devan Stevenson Weber—and spent some quality time (perhaps too much time) in the new core center. Although next year will not be an anniversary year for the Class of 2000, We are all looking forward to attending Reunion Day again and hope more classmates will as well.

2001

Kate W. Kretschmann kkretschmann@gmail.com

48

Kate Henry moved to Arlington, Va., in June and is living with her sister, Shannan. She accepted a job offer at Georgetown University Hospital working as a nurse practitioner with the Pediatric Small Bowel Transplant Team. Kate was also recently engaged to Paul Zentko and is planning to get married next July. Cynthia Bouvet Heraty and her husband, Ryan P. Heraty, welcomed their first child, son, Padraig Casey Heraty, on May 31, 2010. He weighed nine pounds six ounces and was 21 inches long. Cynthia is enjoying a year off from teaching fourth grade and K–5 art to stay at home with Paddy! Kate Kretschmann remains in New York City and working at Jacobi Medical Center in the Bronx. She is a social worker on the inpatient trauma surgery service and is studying for her LCSW exam. Alexandra Lewis finished medical school in May, graduating from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. She has relocated to Boston to start her residency in anesthesiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

HO RI ZO N S

WINTER 2010/2011

Melissa Georges is about to begin a new job with the Connecticut Department of Higher Education where she will work as their college scholarship coordinator. Also, she will be attending Rutgers University in January for her master’s in collegiate student affairs and administration.

Sonia Nash Gupta was married this summer to Vinay Gupta. The couple live in New York City. Sonia works in online marketing at Random House Children’s Books. She is looking forward to the ten-year reunion next year and would love to meet any CSH grads in the city!

Annie Mara Whitman ’02 and her husband, Tobin Jennifer Gillis Dreiling ’02 and her husband, Joel

Cristin McGuinn is living in Greenwich, Conn. and is a senior licensing executive at Vineyard Vines. Kristin Brophy Middlebrooks was married in June to Travis Middlebrooks. She now lives in Denver and works at an eye surgery center.

2002

Jennifer G. Raymond Jennifer.raymond@post.harvard.edu Christina Ciardullo recently graduated with a master of architecture from Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP). She received an honor award for Excellence in Design and the Lowenfish Memorial Prize for achievement in her final semester studio. She was also awarded a William Kinne Traveling Grant for research. Jennifer Gillis was married to Joel Dreiling on September 4, 2010, in Kansas City, Mo. Annie Mara married Tobin Whitman on August 6, 2010, at St. Ignatius Loyola church in New York City. Casey Mahoney married Ryan Parrish on September 18, 2010, in Old Saybrook, Conn.


from our

A visit by the Mother General of the Society of the Sacred Heart, Sabine de Vallon, RSCJ, in 1963. She is being welcomed by the headmistress of our School, Reverend Mother Helen Healy, RSCJ. The Mothers General of the Society pay periodic visits to Sacred Heart schools around the world.


1177 King Street • Greenwich, CT 06831

Horizons: Winter, 2010  

Horizons: Winter, 2010

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you